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Penicillin (sometimes abbreviated PCN or pen) is a group of antibiotics derived from ''Penicillium'' fungi. Penicillin antibiotics are historically significant because they are the first drugs that were effective against many previously serious diseases such as syphilis and Staphylococcus infections.
NanoPass signs license agreement for supply of MicronJet600 device to Circassia

NanoPass signs license agreement for supply of MicronJet600 device to Circassia

NanoPass Technologies Ltd., a pioneer in intradermal delivery solutions for vaccines, announced today that it has entered into a license agreement for the supply of MicronJet600, its microneedle delivery device, to Circassia Pharmaceuticals plc. (Oxford, UK), a specialty biopharmaceutical company focused on the allergy market. [More]
New study finds high levels of HCV infection among HIV-infected people across Africa

New study finds high levels of HCV infection among HIV-infected people across Africa

A new study has found high levels of infection with hepatitis C (HCV) across Africa, particularly in people infected with HIV. [More]
Study opens door for new therapeutic approaches to treating patients with melanoma

Study opens door for new therapeutic approaches to treating patients with melanoma

Weill Cornell Medical College researchers have shown for the first time that a gene previously implicated in blood vessel formation during embryonic development and tumor growth also induces immune suppression during tumor development. [More]
Rising shortages of key antibiotics raise serious concerns about effects on patient care

Rising shortages of key antibiotics raise serious concerns about effects on patient care

Shortages of key antibiotics, including gold-standard therapies and drugs used to treat highly resistant infections, are on the rise, according to a new study of shortages from 2001 to 2013 published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and available online. The trends raise serious concerns about the effects on patient care, particularly for infections without effective alternative treatment options. [More]
Global changes in cancer cells' epigenome may determine disease progression

Global changes in cancer cells' epigenome may determine disease progression

Genomic studies have illuminated the ways in which malfunctioning genes can drive cancer growth while stunting the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy and other treatments. But new findings from Weill Cornell Medical College investigators indicate that these genes are only partly to blame for why treatment that was at one point effective ultimately fails for about 40 percent of patients diagnosed with the most common form of non-Hodgkin Lymphoma. [More]
Researchers reveal obstacles that prevent Ugandans with RHD from getting life-saving penicillin

Researchers reveal obstacles that prevent Ugandans with RHD from getting life-saving penicillin

Penicillin has nearly eradicated rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in the United States. But 15 million people still suffer with the disease worldwide, and 1.4 million die each year, according to World Heart Federation. [More]
Synthetic Biologics begins SYN-004 Phase 2a clinical trial to prevent C. difficile infection

Synthetic Biologics begins SYN-004 Phase 2a clinical trial to prevent C. difficile infection

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a developer of pathogen-specific therapies for serious infections and diseases, with a focus on protecting the microbiome, today announced the initiation of a Phase 2a clinical trial to evaluate the gastrointestinal (GI) antibiotic-degrading effects and the safety of SYN-004, the Company's investigational oral beta-lactamase enzyme designed to protect the microbiome and prevent C. difficile infection (CDI). [More]
Researchers use genetic information to track the fatal spread of multidrug-resistant TB

Researchers use genetic information to track the fatal spread of multidrug-resistant TB

Scientists have for the first time used DNA sequencing to trace the fatal spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis between patients in the UK. [More]
Study shows that households can serve as reservoir for transmitting MRSA

Study shows that households can serve as reservoir for transmitting MRSA

Households can serve as a reservoir for transmitting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), according to a study published this week in mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. Once the bacteria enters a home, it can linger for years, spreading from person to person and evolving genetically to become unique to that household. [More]
New study could lead to better remedies for insomnia, more effective anaesthetic drugs

New study could lead to better remedies for insomnia, more effective anaesthetic drugs

Scientists have discovered that switching on one area of the brain chemically can trigger a deep sleep. [More]
Study findings could lead to new potential drug targets for allergic diseases

Study findings could lead to new potential drug targets for allergic diseases

Scientists have discovered over 30 new genes that predispose people to allergies and asthma, some of which could be targets for new drugs. [More]
Weill Cornell receives NIH grant to study TB-causing bacteria

Weill Cornell receives NIH grant to study TB-causing bacteria

In an effort to stop tuberculosis (TB) from becoming progressively less treatable worldwide, the National Institutes of Health has awarded Weill Cornell Medical College more than $6.2 million in first-year funding to support a research collaboration among six institutions in close alliance with voluntary pharmaceutical partners. [More]
Fusobacterium necrophorum often causes severe sore throats in young adults

Fusobacterium necrophorum often causes severe sore throats in young adults

New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham suggests that Fusobacterium necrophorum more often causes severe sore throats in young adults than streptococcus — the cause of the much better known strep throat. [More]
Synthetic Biologics reports positive results from SYN-004 Phase 1b trial to prevent C. difficile infection

Synthetic Biologics reports positive results from SYN-004 Phase 1b trial to prevent C. difficile infection

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a developer of pathogen-specific therapies for serious infections and diseases, with a focus on protecting the microbiome, today announced positive topline safety and tolerability results from a Phase 1b clinical trial of SYN-004, the Company's investigational oral beta-lactamase enzyme designed to protect the microbiome and prevent Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection, antibiotic-associated diarrhea and secondary antibiotic-resistant infections in patients receiving intravenous (IV) beta-lactam antibiotic therapy. [More]
Investigators develop microbiome map of New York City subway system

Investigators develop microbiome map of New York City subway system

The microbes that call the New York City subway system home are mostly harmless, but include samples of disease-causing bacteria that are resistant to drugs -- and even DNA fragments associated with anthrax and Bubonic plague -- according to a citywide microbiome map published today by Weill Cornell Medical College investigators. [More]
Study uses 'systems genetics' approach to identify potential target for epilepsy

Study uses 'systems genetics' approach to identify potential target for epilepsy

A single gene that coordinates a network of about 400 genes involved in epilepsy could be a target for new treatments, according to research. [More]
Secrets of success for pioneering research revealed

Secrets of success for pioneering research revealed

The British Pharmacological Society has announced the secrets of success for pioneering research along with the outcome of its annual 'Putting UK Pharmacology on the Map' vote. The vote selects sites of special scientific interest linked to achievements in pharmacology based on a ballot of MPs, peers and senior members of the scientific community. [More]
Scientists discover how certain gut bacteria can protect themselves, others from antibiotics

Scientists discover how certain gut bacteria can protect themselves, others from antibiotics

Scientists from the Institute of Food Research and the University of East Anglia have discovered how certain gut bacteria can protect themselves and others in the gut from antibiotics. [More]
Pharmacology 2014 to showcase latest research on NHS care

Pharmacology 2014 to showcase latest research on NHS care

The British Pharmacological Society has announced that its annual meeting, Pharmacology 2014, will showcase the latest research on the NHS care received by children and the elderly in the UK. New findings in these 'Cinderella' areas (so-called because they are often neglected or over-looked) represent just a small sample of the cutting-edge research being presented next week. [More]
Brunel scientists find way to target hard-to-reach cancers using 'Trojan horse' nanoparticles

Brunel scientists find way to target hard-to-reach cancers using 'Trojan horse' nanoparticles

Scientists at Brunel University London have found a way of targeting hard-to-reach cancers and degenerative diseases using nanoparticles, but without causing the damaging side effects the treatment normally brings. [More]
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