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Penicillin (sometimes abbreviated PCN or pen) is a group of antibiotics derived from ''Penicillium'' fungi. Penicillin antibiotics are historically significant because they are the first drugs that were effective against many previously serious diseases such as syphilis and Staphylococcus infections.
Researchers use safer method to stimulate ovulation in women undergoing IVF treatment

Researchers use safer method to stimulate ovulation in women undergoing IVF treatment

Researchers have successfully used a new and potentially safer method to stimulate ovulation in women undergoing IVF treatment. [More]
Study shows how psychedelic drug alters brain activity to produce unusual psychological effects

Study shows how psychedelic drug alters brain activity to produce unusual psychological effects

New research shows that our brain displays a similar pattern of activity during dreams as it does during a mind-expanding drug trip. [More]
UK's TSB provides £347,000 for project to optimise gene library assembly technology

UK's TSB provides £347,000 for project to optimise gene library assembly technology

Today, Monday 30th June, 2014, Isogenica, Cambridge UK and Imperial College London secure funding from the Technology Strategy Board (TSB), the UK's innovation agency, for a £347,000 project to optimise a gene library assembly technology for potential use in synthetic biology. [More]
Modified mosquitoes produce sperm that only creates males

Modified mosquitoes produce sperm that only creates males

Scientists have modified mosquitoes to produce sperm that will only create males, pioneering a fresh approach to eradicating malaria. [More]
Study results suggest growing support for patient-centered care management

Study results suggest growing support for patient-centered care management

Primary care doctors practicing in a model of coordinated, team-based care that leverages health information technology are more likely to give patients recommended preventive screening and appropriate tests than physicians working in other settings, according to research published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine. [More]
Growing resistance to antibiotics demands a coordinated global response, say experts

Growing resistance to antibiotics demands a coordinated global response, say experts

Growing resistance to antibiotics and other drugs demands a coordinated global response on the same scale as efforts to address climate change, experts say. [More]
Soil bacteria have strategies for fighting antibiotics

Soil bacteria have strategies for fighting antibiotics

Drug-resistant bacteria annually sicken 2 million Americans and kill at least 23,000. A driving force behind this growing public health threat is the ability of bacteria to share genes that provide antibiotic resistance. [More]
Study investigates whether use of mobile phones affects children's cognitive development

Study investigates whether use of mobile phones affects children's cognitive development

A new study launching today will investigate whether the use of mobile phones and other wireless technologies might affect children's cognitive development. [More]
Manure from dairy cows contains newly identified antibiotic resistance genes

Manure from dairy cows contains newly identified antibiotic resistance genes

Manure from dairy cows, which is commonly used as a farm soil fertilizer, contains a surprising number of newly identified antibiotic resistance genes from the cows' gut bacteria. The findings, reported in mBio- the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, hints that cow manure is a potential source of new types of antibiotic resistance genes that transfer to bacteria in the soils where food is grown. [More]
Researchers devise new approach to treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers devise new approach to treatment of Alzheimer's disease

A team of researchers from Columbia University Medical Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, and Brandeis University has devised a wholly new approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease involving the so-called retromer protein complex. Retromer plays a vital role in neurons, steering amyloid precursor protein (APP) away from a region of the cell where APP is cleaved, creating the potentially toxic byproduct amyloid-beta, which is thought to contribute to the development of Alzheimer's. [More]
Scientists report new approach to restore penicillin's combat effectiveness against bacterial infections

Scientists report new approach to restore penicillin's combat effectiveness against bacterial infections

Penicillin, one of the scientific marvels of the 20th century, is currently losing a lot of battles it once won against bacterial infections. But scientists at the University of South Carolina have just reported a new approach to restoring its combat effectiveness, even against so-called "superbugs." [More]
Scientists discover promising agents to fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Scientists discover promising agents to fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria

In the fight against "superbugs," scientists have discovered a class of agents that can make some of the most notorious strains vulnerable to the same antibiotics that they once handily shrugged off. The report on the promising agents called metallopolymers appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. [More]
Research roundup: Mental health parity; nurses' workload; can restaurants reduce portion size?

Research roundup: Mental health parity; nurses' workload; can restaurants reduce portion size?

Historically, health insurance covered mental health care differently than other medical care. Recent laws have begun bringing them into balance. ... Congress passed the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA) in 2008. ... the MHPAEA applied to large group health plans, both fully and self-insured, and included a cost exemption. [More]
Researchers identify possible mechanism for re-growing damaged nerve fibres in central nervous system

Researchers identify possible mechanism for re-growing damaged nerve fibres in central nervous system

A new discovery suggests it could one day be possible to chemically reprogram and repair damaged nerves after spinal cord injury or brain trauma. [More]
Emergence of community-acquired infections due to ESBL-producing bacteria on the rise

Emergence of community-acquired infections due to ESBL-producing bacteria on the rise

The emergence of community-acquired infections, such as urinary tract infections (UTI), due to strains resistant to common antibiotics are on the rise, according to Rhode Island Hospital researchers. The study is published online in the journal Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control. [More]
XBP1 gene plays pivotal role in the growth and progression of triple negative breast cancer

XBP1 gene plays pivotal role in the growth and progression of triple negative breast cancer

Scientists from Weill Cornell Medical College and Houston Methodist have found that a gene previously unassociated with breast cancer plays a pivotal role in the growth and progression of the triple negative form of the disease, a particularly deadly strain that often has few treatment options. Their research, published in this week's Nature, suggests that targeting the gene may be a new approach to treating the disease. [More]
Climate change could increase death rates in London and southeast England, scientists predict

Climate change could increase death rates in London and southeast England, scientists predict

Warmer summers brought on by climate change will cause more deaths in London and southeast England than the rest of the country, scientists predict. [More]
Trimethoprim is more effective against streptococci than expected, says research

Trimethoprim is more effective against streptococci than expected, says research

The focus of his team was also on samples, in which the bacteria failed to respond to the agent. They discovered two types of resistance. "Spontaneous mutations can occur in the gene for dihydrofolate reductase rendering trimethoprim no longer able to attack the changed enzyme, which means it becomes ineffective," Nitsche-Schmitz explained. [More]
S. pneumoniae thrives in human saliva

S. pneumoniae thrives in human saliva

Streptococcus pneumoniae is able to survive and thrive in human saliva, Dutch researchers have shown. [More]
New drug is effective against superbug MRSA

New drug is effective against superbug MRSA

"I routinely call hospitals and request their yearly antibiotic susceptibility testing data," said Washington University in St. Louis' Timothy Wencewicz. "The log might say, for example, that they've treated hundreds of patients for Acinetobacter baumanni, a bacterium brought into U.S. hospitals by soldiers wounded in the Iraq war, with 30 different antibiotics. [More]