Pesticide News and Research RSS Feed - Pesticide News and Research

U-M receives $1.6 million federal grant to study potential social and environmental links to autism

U-M receives $1.6 million federal grant to study potential social and environmental links to autism

University of Michigan researchers will use a new $1.6 million federal grant to probe potential social and environmental links to autism, collecting location-specific information from tens of thousands of affected individuals and their families nationwide. [More]
Suicide prevention: an interview with Dr Shekhar Saxena, World Health Organization

Suicide prevention: an interview with Dr Shekhar Saxena, World Health Organization

Suicide is a serious public health problem. More than 800,000 people die from suicide every year – that’s one person every 40 seconds. [More]
People with food allergies have to watch what their fruits and vegetables eat

People with food allergies have to watch what their fruits and vegetables eat

People with food allergies always have to watch what they eat. Now, they may have to watch what their fruits and vegetables eat, as it seems it's possible to have an allergic reaction to antibiotic residues in food. [More]
Exposure to certain phenols during pregnancy may disrupt growth of boys

Exposure to certain phenols during pregnancy may disrupt growth of boys

A research consortium bringing together teams from Inserm, the Nancy and Poitiers University Hospitals, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, Atlanta, USA), and coordinated by the Inserm and University of Grenoble Environmental Epidemiology team (Unit 823), has just published an epidemiological study indicating that exposure to certain phenols during pregnancy, especially parabens and triclosan, may disrupt growth of boys during foetal growth and the first years of life. [More]
Researchers advance stability of protein that may prevent brain damage from toxins

Researchers advance stability of protein that may prevent brain damage from toxins

Research at New York University is paving the way for a breakthrough that may prevent brain damage in civilians and military troops exposed to poisonous chemicals-particularly those in pesticides and chemical weapons. [More]
Study finds nutritional and safety benefits from consumption of organic food

Study finds nutritional and safety benefits from consumption of organic food

The largest study of its kind has found that organic foods and crops have a suite of advantages over their conventional counterparts, including more antioxidants and fewer, less frequent pesticide residues. [More]
Agricultural pesticides raise risk of autism in unborn children

Agricultural pesticides raise risk of autism in unborn children

Pregnant women who lived in close proximity to fields and farms where chemical pesticides were applied experienced a two-thirds increased risk of having a child with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental delay, a study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found. The associations were stronger when the exposures occurred during the second and third trimesters of the women's pregnancies. [More]
Studies show relation between spice and different types of psychosis

Studies show relation between spice and different types of psychosis

Professors of Medicine Degree at the CEU Cardenal Herrera University and the Provincial Hospital of Castellón, in collaboration with doctors of the Addictive Behaviors Unit of Valencia, have described the first case of catatonic psychosis caused by a synthetic derivate of Cannabis: the spice. [More]
India's shocking rates of suicide are highest in areas with most debt-ridden farmers

India's shocking rates of suicide are highest in areas with most debt-ridden farmers

A new study has found that India's shocking rates of suicide are highest in areas with the most debt-ridden farmers who are clinging to tiny smallholdings - less than one hectare - and trying to grow 'cash crops', such as cotton and coffee, that are highly susceptible to global price fluctuations. [More]
Researchers identify eight new active molecules against Alzheimer

Researchers identify eight new active molecules against Alzheimer

Researchers of the Unit of Medicine Design and Molecular Topology (Department of Physics Chemistry) of the University of Valencia have discovered eight new active molecules against Alzheimer by a novel mechanism of action, different to the currently used medicines. The work has just been published in the "Plos One" magazine. [More]
New mechanism uses light to activate drug-delivery inside body

New mechanism uses light to activate drug-delivery inside body

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, in collaboration with materials scientists, engineers and neurobiologists, have discovered a new mechanism for using light to activate drug-delivering nanoparticles and other targeted therapeutic substances inside the body. [More]
Mechanism for pesticide effect on PD risk uncovered

Mechanism for pesticide effect on PD risk uncovered

Some pesticides may contribute to Parkinson’s disease risk by inhibiting neuronal aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, a study suggests. [More]
Study shows how pesticides may contribute to development of Parkinson's disease

Study shows how pesticides may contribute to development of Parkinson's disease

New research shows how pesticides may increase the risk of Parkinson's disease and that people with certain gene variants may be more susceptible to the disease. The research is published in the February 4, 2014, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Exposure to DDT may increase likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease later in life

Exposure to DDT may increase likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease later in life

Exposure to DDT may increase the likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease later in life, a study with researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center suggests. While previous studies have linked chronic diseases such as cancer and diabetes to DDT, this is the first clinical study to link the U.S.-banned pesticide to Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Exposure to pesticide may increase risk of Alzheimer's disease, say researchers

Exposure to pesticide may increase risk of Alzheimer's disease, say researchers

Scientists have known for more than 40 years that the synthetic pesticide DDT is harmful to bird habitats and a threat to the environment. [More]

Researchers discover devastating pest in India for saving up to $309 million

Virginia Tech researchers who first discovered a devastating pest in India and devised a natural way to combat it have now put an economic value on their counterattack: up to $309 million the first year and more than $1 billion over five years. [More]
Biosimulation and epilepsy treatments: an interview with Dr. Serge Bischoff, CEO of Rhenovia and RHENEPI program director

Biosimulation and epilepsy treatments: an interview with Dr. Serge Bischoff, CEO of Rhenovia and RHENEPI program director

The need for biosimulation is primarily to do with the very high attrition rate in drug development and especially in the development of drugs for the central nervous system. [More]
Mutation in alpha-synuclein gene causes increased vulnerability to pesticides, leading to Parkinson's

Mutation in alpha-synuclein gene causes increased vulnerability to pesticides, leading to Parkinson's

​A team of researchers has brought new clarity to the picture of how gene-environmental interactions can kill nerve cells that make dopamine. Dopamine is the neurotransmitter that sends messages to the part of the brain that controls movement and coordination. [More]
Common birth defect in male infants weakly linked to commercial pesticides

Common birth defect in male infants weakly linked to commercial pesticides

A study of several hundred chemicals used in commercial pesticides has found only weak evidence that any of them are associated with a common birth defect in male infants. [More]

Use of intensive pesticide in banana plantations leads to contamination

Shoppers spend over -10 billion on bananas annually and now this demand is being linked to the contamination of Central America's crocodilians. New research, published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, analyses blood samples from spectacled caiman in Costa Rica and finds that intensive pesticide use in plantations leads to contaminated species in protected conservation areas. [More]