Pharmacogenomics News and Research RSS Feed - Pharmacogenomics News and Research

The terms pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics are often used interchangeably to describe a field of research focused on how genes affect individual responses to medicines. Whether a medicine works well for you—or whether it causes serious side effects—depends, to a certain extent, on your genes.

Just as genes contribute to whether you will be tall or short, black-haired or blond, your genes also determine how you will respond to medicines. Genes are like recipes—they carry instructions for making protein molecules. As medicines travel through your body, they interact with thousands of proteins. Small differences in the composition or quantities of these molecules can affect how medicines do their jobs.

These differences can be due to diet, level of activity, or the medicines a person takes, but they can also be due to differences in genes. By understanding the genetic basis of drug responses, scientists hope to enable doctors to prescribe the drugs and doses best suited for each individual.
Molecular diagnostics of the future: an interview with Elaine Warburton, OBE

Molecular diagnostics of the future: an interview with Elaine Warburton, OBE

Firstly, a sample must be transported from the clinic to the laboratory. Simple tests may be undertaken in a small lab within the hospital or clinic, whilst complex testing such as drug susceptibility testing is often done in a large centralized laboratory many miles from the clinic [More]
Illumina signs initial customer deals for new Global Screening Array

Illumina signs initial customer deals for new Global Screening Array

Illumina, Inc. today announced that it has signed deals with 12 customers for its new Infinium Global Screening Array (GSA). [More]
Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

As individuals and as populations our risks of getting diseases are determined partly genetically and partly from the environment that we live in. An important part of that environment that mediates between the outside world and the inside world of our bodies is the microbiome. [More]
Certain genetic markers linked with depression can also predict who may benefit from exercise

Certain genetic markers linked with depression can also predict who may benefit from exercise

Call it personalized medicine for depression -- but the prescription in this case is exercise, which University of Florida Health researchers have found helps people with certain genetic traits. [More]
Biomarkers may provide novel approaches to monitoring immunosuppressive therapy in organ transplant patients

Biomarkers may provide novel approaches to monitoring immunosuppressive therapy in organ transplant patients

Recently discovered biomarkers may provide valuable new approaches to monitoring immunosuppressive drug therapy in organ transplant recipients--with the potential for individualized therapy to reduce organ rejection and minimize side effects, according to a special article in the April issue of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring, official journal of the International Association of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring and Clinical Toxicology. [More]
Complex biomarker tests for molecularly targeted therapies lack evidentiary standards

Complex biomarker tests for molecularly targeted therapies lack evidentiary standards

Potentially useful biomarker tests for molecularly targeted therapies are not being adopted appropriately into clinical practice because of a lack of common evidentiary standards necessary for regulatory, reimbursement, and treatment decisions. [More]
Vanderbilt to lead Direct Volunteers Pilot Studies under Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort Program

Vanderbilt to lead Direct Volunteers Pilot Studies under Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort Program

Federal officials with the White House and National Institutes of Health announced today that Vanderbilt University Medical Center will lead the Direct Volunteers Pilot Studies under the first grant to be awarded in the federal Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort Program. [More]
Research findings identify potential genetics-guided precision medicine for leukemia patients

Research findings identify potential genetics-guided precision medicine for leukemia patients

An international research team has determined how inherited gene variations lead to severe drug toxicity that may threaten chances for a cure in children with leukemia. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, results of which set the stage to expand the use of a patient's genetic make-up to tailor chemotherapy. [More]
UPMC uses simple gene test to personalize medications for patients undergoing heart catheterization

UPMC uses simple gene test to personalize medications for patients undergoing heart catheterization

Patients who go to UPMC Presbyterian for heart catheterization and who receive a stent to treat clogged arteries are now being screened with a simple blood test to determine if they have a gene variant that makes them less likely to respond to a blood-thinning medication commonly prescribed after the procedure. [More]
Temple team describes use of cadaver DNA to advance genetics learning in medical curriculum

Temple team describes use of cadaver DNA to advance genetics learning in medical curriculum

Cadavers have long been one of the most important resources for anatomy teaching in medical school. Now, they are also at the forefront of cutting-edge genetics teaching, thanks to innovative thinking by professors at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University. [More]
Study findings question validity of some genetic variations linked with cardiac disorders

Study findings question validity of some genetic variations linked with cardiac disorders

A review of medical records of patients with genetic variations linked with cardiac disorders found that patients often did not have any symptoms or signs of the conditions, questioning the validity of some genetic variations thought to be related to serious disorders, according to a study in the January 5 issue of JAMA. [More]
Latitude, summer daylight exposure make difference in results for children treated with growth hormone

Latitude, summer daylight exposure make difference in results for children treated with growth hormone

The rate of growth in children varies with the season while higher latitude and greater summer daylight exposure makes a significant difference in results for children treated with growth hormone, according to new research from The University of Manchester. [More]
Mayo Clinic's Gianrico Farrugia highlights five areas that may impact patient care

Mayo Clinic's Gianrico Farrugia highlights five areas that may impact patient care

How is individualized medicine working? Let us count the ways. That's just what Mayo Clinic Vice President Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., did this morning in his opening keynote at the 4th annual Individualizing Medicine Conference. The core of his talk highlighted five areas in which the knowledge and know-how from the human genome will be most impactful in patient care, not just at Mayo Clinic, but anywhere in the nation and globally. [More]
PharmaMar begins phase II 'Basket' trial to evaluate safety, efficacy of PM1183 in advanced solid tumors

PharmaMar begins phase II 'Basket' trial to evaluate safety, efficacy of PM1183 in advanced solid tumors

PharmaMar announced today the start of a multicenter, international, open-label, exploratory phase II "Basket" trial (NCT02454972) to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the anticancer agent PM1183 (lurbinectedin) in advanced solid tumors. [More]
Genetics and race influence patients' response to anticancer drug treatments

Genetics and race influence patients' response to anticancer drug treatments

A new study published in Pharmacogenomics suggests that a person's response to anticancer drug treatments is strongly related to their genetic ancestry. Pharmacogenomics is published by Future Science Group. [More]
SKA2 gene may play a role in development of PTSD

SKA2 gene may play a role in development of PTSD

A gene linked in previous research, appears to predict more severe post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms as well as a thinner cortex in regions of the brain critical for regulating strong emotions and coping with stressful experiences. This study is believed to be the first to show that the spindle and kinetochore-associated complex subunit 2 (SKA2) gene may play a role in the development of PTSD. [More]
Stanford University launches new professional education course

Stanford University launches new professional education course

Imagine a world where health care is personalized, diseases are treated or even prevented before they become debilitating, and doctor's visits include regular reviews of individual genetic profiles. These are just some of the possibilities at the intersection of healthcare and genomics. [More]
Moffitt researchers analyze participation rate of patients in pharmacogenomic trials

Moffitt researchers analyze participation rate of patients in pharmacogenomic trials

Cancer therapy has evolved from a "one-size-fits-all" type of treatment plan to a personalized approach based on a patient's type of cancer, the protein and genetic markers found in their tumors and their response to therapy. Important aspects of the personalized approach are pharmacogenomic studies that analyze associations between genetic variations and patient drug responses. [More]
Drug addiction expert uncovers molecular mechanisms that contribute to addiction resistance

Drug addiction expert uncovers molecular mechanisms that contribute to addiction resistance

Growing up in West Virginia, Jill Turner saw firsthand the kind of havoc that drug addiction can wreak. "I had a lot of friends who had very promising lives and promising careers ahead of them," the assistant professor in the South Carolina College of Pharmacy says, "but they ended up either overdosing or going to jail for drug-related stuff. It's one of the reasons I went into drug addiction research." [More]
Vanderbilt receives $12.8 million federal grant to develop better ways to predict effects of drugs in patients

Vanderbilt receives $12.8 million federal grant to develop better ways to predict effects of drugs in patients

Vanderbilt University Medical Center has received a five-year, $12.8 million grant from the federal government to develop better ways to predict how patients will respond to the drugs they're given. [More]