Pharmacogenomics News and Research RSS Feed - Pharmacogenomics News and Research

The terms pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics are often used interchangeably to describe a field of research focused on how genes affect individual responses to medicines. Whether a medicine works well for you—or whether it causes serious side effects—depends, to a certain extent, on your genes.

Just as genes contribute to whether you will be tall or short, black-haired or blond, your genes also determine how you will respond to medicines. Genes are like recipes—they carry instructions for making protein molecules. As medicines travel through your body, they interact with thousands of proteins. Small differences in the composition or quantities of these molecules can affect how medicines do their jobs.

These differences can be due to diet, level of activity, or the medicines a person takes, but they can also be due to differences in genes. By understanding the genetic basis of drug responses, scientists hope to enable doctors to prescribe the drugs and doses best suited for each individual.
Study quantifies different mutational profiles of tumour cell clusters in patients with bowel cancer

Study quantifies different mutational profiles of tumour cell clusters in patients with bowel cancer

Bowel cancer is often driven by mutations in one of several different genes, and a patient can have a cancer with a different genetic make-up to another patient's cancer. Identifying the molecular alterations involved in each patient's cancer enables doctors to choose drugs that best target specific alterations. [More]
Agena Bioscience releases LungFUSION Panel to identify gene fusions in NSCLC tumors

Agena Bioscience releases LungFUSION Panel to identify gene fusions in NSCLC tumors

Agena Bioscience today released the LungFUSION Panel for rapid and sensitive identification of oncogenic ALK, RET, and ROS1 gene fusions in non-small cell lung cancer tumors. [More]
UF pharmacy dean to be honored with 2015 SURA Distinguished Scientist Award

UF pharmacy dean to be honored with 2015 SURA Distinguished Scientist Award

SURA today announced that Julie A. Johnson, Dean and Distinguished Professor at the University of Florida's College of Pharmacy, will receive its 2015 SURA Distinguished Scientist Award. [More]
GeneSight test better predicts antidepressant outcomes for patients with depression

GeneSight test better predicts antidepressant outcomes for patients with depression

The combinatorial, multi-gene GeneSight test has been found to better predict antidepressant treatment outcomes for patients with depression, and their use of health care resources, than any of the individual genes that comprise the test, according to a peer-reviewed analysis by investigators from the Mayo Clinic and Assurex Health, and published online by The Pharmacogenomics Journal. [More]
Researchers identify first genetic variation linked to increased risk of peripheral neuropathy

Researchers identify first genetic variation linked to increased risk of peripheral neuropathy

Researchers have identified the first genetic variation that is associated with increased risk and severity of peripheral neuropathy following treatment with a widely used anti-cancer drug. Investigators also found evidence of how it may be possible to protect young leukemia patients without jeopardizing cures. [More]
Agena releases MassARRAY 24-Well System for mass spectrometry-based genetic testing

Agena releases MassARRAY 24-Well System for mass spectrometry-based genetic testing

Agena Bioscience today released the MassARRAY 24-Well System for mass spectrometry-based genetic analysis, adding to its existing MassARRAY portfolio. The new 24-well format is tailored to smaller clinical testing laboratories requiring modest sample throughput, reduced initial hardware costs, and reduced time to result. [More]
Personalized prevention, treatments of cancer now accessible through Stanford University's new genetics course

Personalized prevention, treatments of cancer now accessible through Stanford University's new genetics course

Instrumental research that aims to enhance how we predict, diagnose and design personalized prevention and treatments of cancer is now accessible through Stanford University's latest professional education course, Understanding Cancer at the Genetic Level. [More]
Two genetic mutations can interact to reduce risk for heart attack

Two genetic mutations can interact to reduce risk for heart attack

Researchers have determined that two mutations on a single gene can interact in a way that lowers the carrier's risk for a heart attack. [More]
New initiative aims at reducing adverse effects of medications in individuals with mental illnesses

New initiative aims at reducing adverse effects of medications in individuals with mental illnesses

Geneticists at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health will provide their scientific expertise to a new initiative aimed at preventing and reducing the adverse effects of medications in people with mental illnesses. [More]
Patient's gene profile influences effects of statins

Patient's gene profile influences effects of statins

The Montreal Heart Institute Research Centre is once again pushing the limits of knowledge in personalized medicine. A meta-analysis combining the results of several pharmacogenomic studies and involving over 40,000 research subjects now makes it possible to demonstrate a different response to statins according to the patient's gene profile. [More]
Genome Canada awards $6M grant to CAMH and Assurex Health

Genome Canada awards $6M grant to CAMH and Assurex Health

Assurex Health and Canada's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) today announced they have received a $6 million grant from Genome Canada, an agency of the Canadian government, to study the benefits of genetic testing to guide medication decisions for patients with depression or schizophrenia. [More]
Case Western Reserve researcher lands Director's New Innovator Awards from NIH

Case Western Reserve researcher lands Director's New Innovator Awards from NIH

For the second consecutive year, a Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researcher has landed one of the year's much-coveted Director's New Innovator Awards from the National Institutes of Health. Principal investigator Rong Xu, PhD, assistant professor of medical informatics, will receive $2,377,000 for five years, starting immediately, to initiate computational analysis of thousands of drugs and their effects. [More]
Gaucher disease: an interview with Dr Clement Olivier, Shire

Gaucher disease: an interview with Dr Clement Olivier, Shire

Gaucher disease is the most common condition within a family of rare diseases known as the lysosomal storage diseases. The disease causes lipids to accumulate in cells, which is why it is referred to as a storage disorder. The accumulation occurs mainly in the spleen, liver, and bones, but may also occur in the lungs, heart, and central nervous system. [More]

Three Scottish universities to offer a new course in stratified medicine

Stratified medicine, which uses the genetic make-up of patients and their differing responses to drugs to create more personalised and effective forms of treatment, has been hailed as one of the most important concepts to emerge in 21st century clinical science. [More]
New avenues for treatment of Alzheimer's disease

New avenues for treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Judes Poirier, PhD, C.Q., from the Douglas Mental Health Institute and McGill University in Montr-al (Canada) and his team have discovered that a relatively frequent genetic variant actually conveys significant protection against the common form of Alzheimer's disease and can delay the onset of the disease by as much as 4 years. [More]
Agena Bioscience expands ultrasensitive somatic mutation detection technology

Agena Bioscience expands ultrasensitive somatic mutation detection technology

Agena Bioscience, Inc., which recently acquired the Bioscience business of Sequenom, Inc., today announced expansion of the UltraSEEK™ technology, the first ultrasensitive somatic mutation detection technology for high-throughput and definitive interrogation of rare mutations that occur at less than 1% abundance in matched tissue, circulating plasma, and tumor samples. [More]
Agena Bioscience acquires Sequenom’s Bioscience business

Agena Bioscience acquires Sequenom’s Bioscience business

Agena Bioscience, Inc., a portfolio company of Telegraph Hill Partners (THP), today acquired the Bioscience business of Sequenom, Inc., which sells the MassARRAY® System for mass spectrometry-based detection of nucleic acids in research and clinical laboratories. [More]
GEN Publishing introduces semi-monthly digital publication focusing on OMICs technologies

GEN Publishing introduces semi-monthly digital publication focusing on OMICs technologies

GEN Publishing recently introduced Clinical OMICs a semi-monthly digital publication focusing on the application of OMICs technologies in clinical settings. These advanced techniques, such as next-gen sequencing, are beginning to transform medical care just as they revolutionized basic life science research over the past decade-and-a-half. [More]
Personalis receives CAP accreditation

Personalis receives CAP accreditation

Personalis, Inc., a leading provider of genome-based diagnostics, announced today that its onsite clinical laboratory has received accreditation from the College of American Pathologists (CAP), meeting the highest standard of excellence in clinical laboratory practices. [More]
Personalis and Inova team up to advance genomic medicine

Personalis and Inova team up to advance genomic medicine

Inova Translational Medicine Institute and Personalis, Inc. today announced a partnership to advance genomic medicine for Inova's patient population. [More]
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