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Higher-fit kids have significantly thinner gray matter, better mathematics achievement than their low-fit peers

Higher-fit kids have significantly thinner gray matter, better mathematics achievement than their low-fit peers

A new study reveals that 9- and 10-year-old children who are aerobically fit tend to have significantly thinner gray matter than their "low-fit" peers. Thinning of the outermost layer of brain cells in the cerebrum is associated with better mathematics performance, researchers report in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
Five sun-blocking superheroes teach preschoolers about sun safety

Five sun-blocking superheroes teach preschoolers about sun safety

Five globe-trotting, sun-blocking superheroes teach preschoolers about lifelong sun safety in a new curriculum available this summer based on research at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Regular exercise benefits children with multiple sclerosis

Regular exercise benefits children with multiple sclerosis

A new study suggests children with multiple sclerosis (MS) who exercise regularly may have a less active disease. The research is published in the August 12, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Sexting, Internet safety climb higher on list of major health concerns for children

Sexting, Internet safety climb higher on list of major health concerns for children

With more kids online and using cell phones at increasingly younger ages, two issues have quickly climbed higher on the public's list of major health concerns for children across the U.S: sexting and Internet safety. [More]
Doctors suggest tips to ensure children's safety during school sports

Doctors suggest tips to ensure children's safety during school sports

Many children return to sports such as soccer, football, cross-country and volleyball when they return to school. Physicians in the Division of Sports Medicine at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center say preparation before the first day of practice is critical in helping to reduce the risk of injury. [More]

Study: Out-of-home activities increase level of physical activity among older people

It is beneficial to stimulate older people to leave home to increase their level of physical activity, suggests the study of postdoctoral researcher Erja Portegijs. The study, conducted at the Gerontology Research Center of the University of Jyväskylä, showed that older people were more physically active on the days when they left home and went further away. [More]
Eating spicy food regularly may help us live longer

Eating spicy food regularly may help us live longer

People who consume spicy foods regularly throughout the week have a 14% lower risk of death than people who eat them less than once a week, suggests a study of Chinese individuals. [More]
Hospital physicians rarely identify or address overweight/obesity in children

Hospital physicians rarely identify or address overweight/obesity in children

Physicians and physician trainees fail to identify or address overweight/obesity in over 90 percent of hospitalized children, according to new research from a Saint Louis University pediatric hospitalist. [More]
Adoption of Health Codes of Conduct in workplaces effectively engages employees in wellness initiatives

Adoption of Health Codes of Conduct in workplaces effectively engages employees in wellness initiatives

Workplace wellness can be a positive source of health and empowerment for employees. While many employers have found that wellness programs are ineffective at engaging employees, a new strategy proposed by Cornell University researchers may be just the solution! [More]
Academic stress increases injury risk among college football players

Academic stress increases injury risk among college football players

Coaches and trainers strive to keep their players healthy so they can perform at their maximum potentials. Injury restrictions, or limits on athletes' physical activity due to illnesses or injuries, can keep athletes on the bench for a game or even an entire season. Now, University of Missouri researchers have found college football players are more likely to experience injuries during test weeks than during training camp. [More]
Simple lifestyle intervention can help prevent gestational diabetes in high-risk women

Simple lifestyle intervention can help prevent gestational diabetes in high-risk women

Gestational diabetes can be prevented by a simple, easily applicable individualized lifestyle intervention in high-risk women, finds a study led by Helsinki University Hospital and South Karelia Central Hospital, Finland. The results of the study are promising, and in line with previous published T2D prevention studies. The findings may have major health consequences for both the mother and the child. [More]
Dog sledding can benefit paediatric cancer patients

Dog sledding can benefit paediatric cancer patients

A team of sled dogs racing through the snowy forests of northern Canada conjures up the timeless spirit of exploration. But the intrepid youths on the sleds may not be exactly what you're picturing - they're young girls and boys with cancer. [More]
Parents with low health literacy less likely to select recommended weight-control strategies for children

Parents with low health literacy less likely to select recommended weight-control strategies for children

Parents who have low health literacy are less likely to choose government-recommended weight-loss strategies, such as increasing physical activity or serving more fruits and vegetables, to help their children control their weight than parents who are better able to understand basic health-related information, a new study suggests. [More]
Weight loss through lifestyle modifications, bariatric surgery can reduce features of NASH

Weight loss through lifestyle modifications, bariatric surgery can reduce features of NASH

Weight loss through both lifestyle modification and bariatric surgery can significantly reduce features of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a disease characterized by fat in the liver, according to two new studies published in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Resistance training can help reduce liver fat levels in patients suffering from fatty liver disease

Resistance training can help reduce liver fat levels in patients suffering from fatty liver disease

Resistance training in the gym leads to a fall in liver fat levels. This is the finding of a new study held at the University of Haifa in cooperation with Tel Aviv Medical Center and Tel Aviv University. [More]
UTHealth researchers provide insights into current understanding of childhood obesity epidemic

UTHealth researchers provide insights into current understanding of childhood obesity epidemic

Encouraging more social interaction for children rather than just limiting TV time and enforcing strong nutritional policies in schools are two of the ways to decrease child obesity rates, according to researchers from the Michael & Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health Austin Regional Campus. [More]
Regular exercise, healthy diet may help reduce knee pain for overweight adults with diabetes

Regular exercise, healthy diet may help reduce knee pain for overweight adults with diabetes

Knee pain in older adults, often caused by osteoarthritis, usually means more visits to the doctor and also can be a harbinger of disability. [More]
Mediterranean lifestyle contributes to positive effects on cardiovascular health

Mediterranean lifestyle contributes to positive effects on cardiovascular health

Cardiovascular disease remains the No. 1 cause of death in the U.S. Evidence suggests that elevated levels of triglycerides (fats) in the blood after meals, known as postprandial lipemia (PPL), is associated with an increased risk for hardening of the arteries—a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. [More]
Late- and post-menopausal women have more fat around hearts compared to pre-menopausal counterparts

Late- and post-menopausal women have more fat around hearts compared to pre-menopausal counterparts

Late- and post-menopausal women have significantly greater volumes of fat around their hearts - a risk factor for heart disease - than their pre-menopausal counterparts, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health study has shown for the first time. [More]
New research suggests updates to current dietary protein recommendations

New research suggests updates to current dietary protein recommendations

New research based on modern techniques suggests that recommendations for protein intake in healthy populations may be incorrect. In a paper just published in Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, an NRC Research Press journal (a division of Canadian Science Publishing), researchers put the focus on protein as an essential component of a healthy diet. [More]
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