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Early physical activity following concussion linked to lower risk of PPCS

Early physical activity following concussion linked to lower risk of PPCS

Among children and adolescents who experienced a concussion, physical activity within 7 days of injury compared with no physical activity was associated with reduced risk of persistent postconcussive symptoms at 28 days, according to a study appearing in the December 20 issue of JAMA. [More]
Red meat consumption does not affect short-term cardiovascular disease risk factors, review suggests

Red meat consumption does not affect short-term cardiovascular disease risk factors, review suggests

Consuming red meat in amounts above what is typically recommended does not affect short-term cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as blood pressure and blood cholesterol, according to a new review of clinical trials from Purdue University. [More]
New review explores approaches for prevention of hip fracture in very high risk patients

New review explores approaches for prevention of hip fracture in very high risk patients

Hip fractures are of great concern as they are the most severe type of fracture in osteoporotic patients, associated with premature death, and commonly leading to long-term physical disability, impaired capacity to perform daily activities and live independently, and reduced quality of life. [More]
Young girls with poorer fundamental movement skills more likely to be obese than boys

Young girls with poorer fundamental movement skills more likely to be obese than boys

Young girls who exhibit a poor mastery of fundamental movement skills (FMS) are more likely to be obese than boys who have similarly low skills, according to research led by Coventry University. [More]
Researchers receive NIH grant to map molecular changes linked to physical movement

Researchers receive NIH grant to map molecular changes linked to physical movement

A research team led by Robert Gerszten, MD, Chief of Cardiovascular Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and a Senior Associate Member of the Broad Institute, has received an award of more than $11 million as part of the Molecular Transducers of Physical Activity in Humans consortium, a large-scale initiative of the National Institutes of Health to investigate and map the molecular changes that occur in our bodies during and after exercise. [More]
U-M awarded NIH grant to investigate molecular changes that occur during and after physical activity

U-M awarded NIH grant to investigate molecular changes that occur during and after physical activity

The University of Michigan was recently awarded $8.2 million from the National Institutes of Health to investigate the molecular changes that occur during and after physical activity. [More]
BodyCap’s health-monitoring wearables used by ESA astronauts aboard the ISS

BodyCap’s health-monitoring wearables used by ESA astronauts aboard the ISS

BodyCap, a company specialized in miniaturized wireless monitoring devices, today announces that two of its wearable health monitoring devices are currently being used by European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet aboard the International Space Station, as part of ESA’s EveryWear program, an ambulatory data collection system. [More]
Endurance runners' brains have greater functional connectivity, research shows

Endurance runners' brains have greater functional connectivity, research shows

If you're thinking about taking up running as your New Year's resolution and still need some convincing, consider this: MRI scans reveal that endurance runners' brains have greater functional connectivity than the brains of more sedentary individuals. [More]
New review shows how automated telephone systems could play vital role in delivery of health care

New review shows how automated telephone systems could play vital role in delivery of health care

A new Cochrane Review, summarizing data from 132 trials of automated telephone systems in preventing and managing long-term health conditions, concludes that they probably have the potential to play an important role in the delivery of health care. [More]
Initial rheumatoid arthritis symptoms often invisible to others, survey reveals

Initial rheumatoid arthritis symptoms often invisible to others, survey reveals

Rheumatoid Arthritis is a chronic disease characterized by joint swelling, pain, and stiffness that affects approximately 1.3 million individuals in the U.S. Unlike the more common osteoarthritis, RA is an autoimmune condition in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue. [More]
Innovation in stroke aftercare across Europe: an interview with Professor Urs Fischer

Innovation in stroke aftercare across Europe: an interview with Professor Urs Fischer

Stroke is the epidemic disease of the twenty-first century and the second most frequent cause of death in 2011, accounting for 11% of all deaths worldwide. Stroke is also the second most important cause of permanent disability and... [More]
Many U.S. children do not receive evidence-based care for obesity despite USPSTF recommendations

Many U.S. children do not receive evidence-based care for obesity despite USPSTF recommendations

Six years following the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation that clinicians screen and treat (or refer) children age six and older for obesity, most U.S. children still do not receive evidence-based care for obesity. [More]
Researchers find strong link between angiotensin receptor autoantibodies and increased risk of frailty

Researchers find strong link between angiotensin receptor autoantibodies and increased risk of frailty

Results of a new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers offer new evidence for a strong link between angiotensin receptor autoantibodies and increased risk of frailty. [More]
Hemophilia B patients produce near-normal levels of clotting factor IX after gene therapy, study shows

Hemophilia B patients produce near-normal levels of clotting factor IX after gene therapy, study shows

Researchers are reporting the highest and most sustained levels to date of the essential blood-clotting factor IX in patients with the inherited bleeding disorder hemophilia B. [More]
Replacing screen time with other sedentary behavior can improve obesity risk in children

Replacing screen time with other sedentary behavior can improve obesity risk in children

High amounts of screen-based activity, such as TV viewing, is known to be associated with higher risk of being obese in youth. [More]
Research shows link between psychological well-being and physical activity in older adults

Research shows link between psychological well-being and physical activity in older adults

In a paper just published by researchers at Chapman University, findings showed associations between psychological well-being and physical activity in adults ages 50 and older. [More]
Four weeks of prehabilitation may help cancer patients to get in shape for surgery, study suggests

Four weeks of prehabilitation may help cancer patients to get in shape for surgery, study suggests

Just four weeks of prehabilitation may be enough to help some cancer patients get in shape for surgery. [More]
Menopausal women may experience accelerated decline in lung function, research shows

Menopausal women may experience accelerated decline in lung function, research shows

Menopausal women appear to experience an accelerated decline in lung function, according to new research published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Simple exercise program improves walking performance and quality of life in dialysis patients

Simple exercise program improves walking performance and quality of life in dialysis patients

In a recent study, a simple exercise program carried out at home improved dialysis patients' walking performance and quality of life. The findings appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
NASPGHAN clinical practice guidelines recommend screening test for NAFLD in obese children

NASPGHAN clinical practice guidelines recommend screening test for NAFLD in obese children

A screening test for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)--a serious condition that may have lifelong health consequences--is recommended for all obese children aged nine to eleven years, according to clinical practice guidelines developed by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and published in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. [More]
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