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Telerehabilitation may help alleviate side effects linked to breast cancer

Telerehabilitation may help alleviate side effects linked to breast cancer

Researchers from the University of Granada (UGR) and from hospitals Virgen de las Nieves and San Cecilio (Granada) have proved that telerehabilitation (rehabilitation with the help of the Internet, using the application Skype as a control platform) may help to alleviate the side effects associated with breast cancer and its treatment, like pain, fatigue, strength loss, deterioration of the quality of life, etc.. [More]
SLU expert suggests viewing exercise as daily contribution that offers cumulative health benefits

SLU expert suggests viewing exercise as daily contribution that offers cumulative health benefits

Have you already faltered on your New Year's resolution to exercise regularly in 2017? Joined a gym, but only worked out two days so far? New workout gear still neatly folded with tags attached? Don't give up your admirable ambition just yet. Instead, consider a new attitude to refocus your approach toward your exercise goal. [More]
Yoga during active treatment can provide QOL benefits for pediatric cancer patients and parents

Yoga during active treatment can provide QOL benefits for pediatric cancer patients and parents

A yoga program for children with cancer can be carried out even during cancer treatment, and has quality of life (QOL) benefits for the children as well as their parents, suggests a study in Rehabilitation Oncology, official journal of the Oncology Section of the American Physical Therapy Association. [More]
Early stimulation can boost brain development of babies

Early stimulation can boost brain development of babies

Many new parents still think that babies should develop at their own pace, and that they shouldn't be challenged to do things that they're not yet ready for. [More]
Study reports volume and cost of in-home care for children with special medical conditions

Study reports volume and cost of in-home care for children with special medical conditions

U.S. families provide nearly $36 billion annually in uncompensated medical care at home to children who have special health care needs, such as muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis, according to a large national study. [More]
Study tracks parents' unpaid time assisting children with special health care needs

Study tracks parents' unpaid time assisting children with special health care needs

About half of U.S. children with special health care needs -- 5.6 million children -- receive medical care from uncompensated family members worth billions of dollars, finds a large national study led by Boston Children's Hospital and the University of Southern California (USC). [More]
Common bacterium that causes gum infections may trigger rheumatoid arthritis

Common bacterium that causes gum infections may trigger rheumatoid arthritis

Investigators at Johns Hopkins report they have new evidence that a bacterium known to cause chronic inflammatory gum infections also triggers the inflammatory "autoimmune" response characteristic of chronic, joint-destroying rheumatoid arthritis (RA). [More]
Virtual reality intervention shows promise to repair mobility and motor skills in impaired limb

Virtual reality intervention shows promise to repair mobility and motor skills in impaired limb

A combination of traditional physical therapy and technology may improve the motor skills and mobility of an impaired hand by having its partner, more mobile hand lead by example through virtual reality training, new Tel Aviv University research suggests. [More]
Starvation may shorten lifespans of children and male descendants, study suggests

Starvation may shorten lifespans of children and male descendants, study suggests

New Tel Aviv University research suggests that periods of fasting or starvation may significantly shorten the lifespans of both children and their male descendants. [More]
Vestibular thresholds begin to increase above age 40, new study finds

Vestibular thresholds begin to increase above age 40, new study finds

A new study led by researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear found that vestibular thresholds begin to double every 10 years above the age of 40, representing a decline in our ability to receive sensory information about motion, balance and spatial orientation. [More]
Private practitioners urge patients to choose physical therapy over opioids to manage pain

Private practitioners urge patients to choose physical therapy over opioids to manage pain

Prescription opioid headlines are staggering: 40 Americans die each day from overdoses involving prescription opioids; they cost the United States economy $78.5 billion a year; and 227 million opioid prescriptions were handed out in the U.S. in 2015. [More]
Active older population, better technology may be cause for more hip and knee replacement surgeries

Active older population, better technology may be cause for more hip and knee replacement surgeries

An active aging population is a good thing for society. It also keeps John Shields, M.D., very busy. [More]
Study investigates long-term outcomes in trauma patients discharged to IRFs

Study investigates long-term outcomes in trauma patients discharged to IRFs

As more trauma patients survive their initial hospital stays, new study results show that acute inpatient rehabilitation facilities are the best places for some of these patients to go once they leave the hospital. [More]
Second annual conference at UofL focuses on improving access to quality health care for adults with IDD

Second annual conference at UofL focuses on improving access to quality health care for adults with IDD

Thanks to advances in medical science and a highly developed network of specialized pediatric health care services, people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are much more likely to live into adulthood than they were several decades ago. [More]
Professor shares health tips for preventing stroke

Professor shares health tips for preventing stroke

Having a stroke can be a debilitating and life changing event for an individual and their family. Regardless of one's age or family history, 90 percent of strokes are preventable. [More]
Many back pain patients taking opioids get limited relief and worry about side effects, study finds

Many back pain patients taking opioids get limited relief and worry about side effects, study finds

Millions of people take opioids for chronic back pain, but many of them get limited relief while experiencing side effects and worrying about the stigma associated with taking them, suggests research presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2016 annual meeting. [More]
Simple treatment can help relieve majority of back pain

Simple treatment can help relieve majority of back pain

During their lifetime, as many as eight out of ten people experience back pain that lasts more than three days. However, for a vast majority of these people, the pain goes away with simple treatment. [More]
PathMaker Neurosystems receives 2016 Universal Biotech Innovation Prize

PathMaker Neurosystems receives 2016 Universal Biotech Innovation Prize

PathMaker Neurosystems, a clinical-stage neurotechnology company developing non-invasive neurotherapy systems to treat neuromotor disorders, has been named as the Recipient of the Universal Biotech Innovation Prize 2016 in the global competition that offers "a glimpse of the future of life sciences." [More]
UAB investigators receive BRAIN Initiative award to study new DBS technology for Parkinson's disease

UAB investigators receive BRAIN Initiative award to study new DBS technology for Parkinson's disease

The University of Alabama at Birmingham has received a BRAIN Initiative grant of $7.3 million over five years from the National Institutes of Health to study new technology that could improve outcomes from deep brain stimulation, an increasingly important treatment for Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders. [More]
Technology motivates older people in nursing homes to exercise

Technology motivates older people in nursing homes to exercise

Virtual Reality can get the elderly in nursing homes to be happier about exercising. A new research project from Aalborg University shows that the technology motivates older people in nursing homes to get moving. [More]
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