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Study explores thoughts among accredited physical therapy schools on pain education

A study published in The Journal of Pain showed that just 2 of 3 accredited physical therapy (PT) schools surveyed believe their students receive adequate education in pain management. [More]
PCORI funds five patient-centered comparative effectiveness research studies

PCORI funds five patient-centered comparative effectiveness research studies

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Board of Governors today approved awards totaling more than $64 million to fund five large patient-centered comparative effectiveness research (CER) studies that will answer critical clinical questions about care for cancer, back pain, and stroke. [More]
Geriatric consultation could improve care for elderly patients admitted for traumatic injuries

Geriatric consultation could improve care for elderly patients admitted for traumatic injuries

Elderly patients who are admitted to the hospital for monitoring and surgical treatment of traumatic injuries could have better geriatric care if medical teams took one extra step—offering geriatric consultation, according to new research findings from surgical and geriatric medicine teams at the Ronald Reagan University of California at Los Angeles Medical Center. [More]
Study: Acute psychosocial stress has deleterious effect on the body's ability to modulate pain

Study: Acute psychosocial stress has deleterious effect on the body's ability to modulate pain

Traffic slows to a crawl, then a stop. You are trapped in a bottleneck nightmare, and late for a meeting. The stress takes a toll on you psychologically - but your body is at risk as well, according to a Tel Aviv University researcher. [More]
Study examines use of yoga therapy to address lymphedema

Study examines use of yoga therapy to address lymphedema

Cancer is bad enough. But cancer patients who receive surgery, radiation and chemotherapy may suffer from side effects that run from irritating to crippling — problems that are postural, musculoskeletal and respiratory, along with lowered self-esteem. Many suffer from lymphedema, swelling caused by retained fluid in a compromised lymphatic system. [More]
Brown University awarded $2.5 million grant to spur physical therapy research

Brown University awarded $2.5 million grant to spur physical therapy research

The Foundation for Physical Therapy has awarded Brown University a $2.5-million, five-year grant for a new center of excellence to spur research in the field. In the Center on Health Services Training and Research, Brown, Boston University, and the University of Pittsburgh will train researchers and seed new studies to build the evidence base for physical therapy care and to improve how care is delivered. [More]
Movement tracking device can effectively help assess progression of Parkinson's disease

Movement tracking device can effectively help assess progression of Parkinson's disease

A device that measures movement and balance can effectively help assess and track the progression of Parkinson's disease, even when medications are used to reduce Parkinson's symptoms, UT Southwestern Medical Center research found. [More]
Simple living requires a lot of patience and a good amount of physical work

Simple living requires a lot of patience and a good amount of physical work

Simple living is not really that simple—but results from a recent unpublished study at University of the Sciences indicate that reducing the clutter and narrowing one's possessions, activities, and thoughts can play a key role in boosting their mental and physical health. [More]
Voices of loved ones telling familiar stories can help awaken unconscious brain, speed coma recovery

Voices of loved ones telling familiar stories can help awaken unconscious brain, speed coma recovery

"Can he hear me?" family members are desperate to know when a loved one with a traumatic brain injury is in a coma. [More]
Controlling acute and chronic pain in women

Controlling acute and chronic pain in women

Despite the variety of effective treatments, and physicians who specialize in treating pain, women often suffer unnecessarily from conditions ranging from backaches to pain after cancer surgery, and also treat their pain with medications that may be ineffective and possibly harmful, according to a review of research related to women and pain by the American Society of Anesthesiologists. [More]
Simple training exercise of catching a medicine ball may help prevent falls in the elderly

Simple training exercise of catching a medicine ball may help prevent falls in the elderly

The simple training exercise of catching a weighted medicine ball can improve balance and may help prevent falls in the elderly, according to research at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
Baylor Scott & White Health to build sports medicine facility at The Star – Home of the Dallas Cowboys

Baylor Scott & White Health to build sports medicine facility at The Star – Home of the Dallas Cowboys

Baylor Scott & White Health is working towards the construction of a 200,000 square-foot center of excellence for sports medicine at The Star – Home of the Dallas Cowboys in Frisco, Texas. [More]
Sustained quality improvement changes in ICU benefits both patients and health care facility

Sustained quality improvement changes in ICU benefits both patients and health care facility

In a pre- and post-evaluation study, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers found that quality improvement changes made in an intensive care unit (ICU) were still in practice five years later — benefiting both patients and the health care facility. Those changes included new protocols for treating critically ill patients by encouraging early physical therapy in the ICU. [More]
Everyday actions could help prevent spread of flu among college students

Everyday actions could help prevent spread of flu among college students

As local college students return to Philadelphia from their long winter breaks over the next several days, it is likely that they'll be bringing who-knows-what germs with them from home, said Stacey A. Gorski, PhD, a biology professor who specializes in immunology at University of the Sciences in Philadelphia. [More]
Wearable technology and data analytics in healthcare: an interview with Mark Taglietti and Bob Zemke

Wearable technology and data analytics in healthcare: an interview with Mark Taglietti and Bob Zemke

Wearables is very much an emerging trend and healthcare is leading this effort. Consumer technology, such as the FitBit, Jawbone, and others, are going to merge with medical devices that are already being used in hospitals today. [More]
Many college students regard hookah smoking safer than smoking cigarettes

Many college students regard hookah smoking safer than smoking cigarettes

Despite emerging evidence otherwise, many college students consider hookah smoking safer than smoking cigarettes, reports a University of South Florida College of Public Health study published this month by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Mylan introduces Methocarbamol Injection USP, 100 mg/mL in the U.S.

Mylan introduces Methocarbamol Injection USP, 100 mg/mL in the U.S.

Mylan Inc. today announced the U.S. launch of its Methocarbamol Injection USP, 100 mg/mL, packaged in 1,000 mg/10 mL single-dose vials. This product is the generic version of Hikma Maple Ltd.'s Robaxin. [More]
Doctors prescribe fewer opioids for pain as prescription drug abuse rises

Doctors prescribe fewer opioids for pain as prescription drug abuse rises

Nine in 10 primary care physicians say that prescription drug abuse is a moderate or big problem in their communities and nearly half say they are less likely to prescribe opioids to treat pain compared to a year ago, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Meniscal surgery may increase risk of osteoarthritis, cartilage loss

Meniscal surgery may increase risk of osteoarthritis, cartilage loss

A popular surgery to repair meniscal tears may increase the risk of osteoarthritis and cartilage loss in some patients, according to research presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. The findings show that the decision for surgery requires careful consideration in order to avoid accelerated disease onset, researchers said. [More]
Salford researchers to support adoption of CAD technologies in footwear manufacturing

Salford researchers to support adoption of CAD technologies in footwear manufacturing

A University of Salford team headed by Dr Anita Williams, Senior Lecturer at the School of Health Sciences, is moving into its second year of delivering sector-leading education content for industries in the UK and European Union, as part of an EU Leonardo da-Vinci funded project - INGA3D. [More]