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Brief exercise program can minimize effects of hospitalization, improve functionality of COPD patients

Brief exercise program can minimize effects of hospitalization, improve functionality of COPD patients

The treatment, designed by scientists at the University of Granada and Virgen de las Nieves Hospital in Granada, allows for cost savings to the health system as it reduces the need for patients to stay in hospital. [More]
Study to test effectiveness of worksite exercise regimen to reduce low back injury risk in firefighters

Study to test effectiveness of worksite exercise regimen to reduce low back injury risk in firefighters

The University of South Florida and Tampa Fire Rescue have launched a randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a worksite exercise regimen targeted to reduce the risk of low back injury and disability in firefighters -- a physically demanding occupation particularly prone to back problems that can lead to chronic pain and early retirement. [More]
Toddlers with mobility disabilities less likely to engage in physical activity

Toddlers with mobility disabilities less likely to engage in physical activity

Typical toddlers simultaneously spend about three hours a day in physical activity, play and engagement with objects such as toys, while their peers with mobility disabilities are less likely to engage in all of those behaviors at the same time, new research from Oregon State University shows. [More]
ACB could lead to quicker, safer recovery after total knee arthroplasty

ACB could lead to quicker, safer recovery after total knee arthroplasty

Two commonly used nerve blocks during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are the adductor canal block (ACB) and femoral nerve block (FNB). ACB appears to preserve quadriceps strength superior to FNB while maintaining adequate postoperative pain control. Improving early functional outcome could lead to a quicker and safer recovery with earlier hospital discharges. [More]
St. Luke’s surgeon first in world to implant Medtronic’s new, MRI-compatible neurostimulator system

St. Luke’s surgeon first in world to implant Medtronic’s new, MRI-compatible neurostimulator system

Steven Falowski, MD, Chief of Functional Neurosurgery at St. Luke’s University Health Network in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania today was the first surgeon in the world to implant Medtronic’s brand new, full-body, MRI-compatible paddle electrode leads for the Restore neurostimulator system. [More]
Tai chi exercise improves outcomes in older fallers

Tai chi exercise improves outcomes in older fallers

Recently, researchers compared the effects of tai chi to leg strengthening exercises (a physical therapy called "lower extremity training," or LET) in reducing falls. Falls are a leading cause of serious injuries in older adults and can lead to hospitalization, nursing home admission, and even death. [More]
New study shows that structural changes within the spine alter vibration response

New study shows that structural changes within the spine alter vibration response

Magnetic resonance image isn't everything. A new University of Alberta study shows that vibrating the spine may reveal more when it comes to treating back pain. Teaming with the University of South Denmark to study the lumbar spine of twins, Greg Kawchuk and his team demonstrate that structural changes within the spine alter its vibration response significantly. [More]
Practicing movements at different speeds enhances certain nerve functions after stroke or spine injury

Practicing movements at different speeds enhances certain nerve functions after stroke or spine injury

Changes in one circuit of nerves, but not another, in the spinal cord depend on how quickly muscles must move to complete a task, according to results from the Human Motor Control Laboratory of Professor Kozo Funase, PhD, at Hiroshima University. The results could influence physical therapy routines for patients struggling to control their bodies after a stroke or spine injury. [More]
New study finds dramatic increase in young athletes undergoing Tommy John surgery

New study finds dramatic increase in young athletes undergoing Tommy John surgery

A new study found a dramatic increase in the number of adolescents undergoing "Tommy John" surgery to repair a pitching-related elbow injury in recent years, outstripping growth among major league pitchers. [More]
Preseason prevention programs beneficial to young baseball players

Preseason prevention programs beneficial to young baseball players

Preseason prevention programs are beneficial to young baseball pitchers, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Specialty Day. [More]
Platelet-rich plasma therapy may help improve tissue healing

Platelet-rich plasma therapy may help improve tissue healing

Tiger Woods, Kobe Bryant and A-Rod have all used it, but does platelet-rich plasma therapy (PRP) really work for the every-day active person? According to a University of Alberta Glen Sather Sports Medicine Clinic pilot study on patients with chronically sore shoulders published in PLOS ONE, preliminary findings say yes. [More]
Adapted yoga feasible, beneficial for adults with stroke or traumatic brain injury

Adapted yoga feasible, beneficial for adults with stroke or traumatic brain injury

A research team, led by an IU School of Health and Rehabilitation faculty member at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, has determined that adapted yoga is both feasible and beneficial for adults with stroke or traumatic brain injury. [More]
Patients benefit from one-on-one counseling session prior to knee or hip replacement surgery

Patients benefit from one-on-one counseling session prior to knee or hip replacement surgery

A study at Hospital for Special Surgery finds that patients benefit from a one-on-one education session provided by a physical therapist and access to a custom web portal prior to knee or hip replacement surgery. [More]
Select Medical Holdings, Kindred Healthcare agree to exchange five long term acute care hospitals

Select Medical Holdings, Kindred Healthcare agree to exchange five long term acute care hospitals

Select Medical Holdings Corporation today announced that it has signed a definitive agreement to exchange five of its long term acute care hospitals for four long term acute care hospitals currently operated by Kindred Healthcare, Inc. and $800,000 in cash consideration. [More]
Physical therapy reduces urinary problems in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

Physical therapy reduces urinary problems in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

After menopause, women with osteoporosis struggle more with urinary incontinence than women with healthy bones do. But physical therapy that includes pelvic floor muscle training can produce dramatic improvements, shows a study published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
New pain management strategies key to maximizing patient outcomes after TKR procedures

New pain management strategies key to maximizing patient outcomes after TKR procedures

According to a new literature review in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, a team-based care approach (consisting of the patient, family members, the orthopaedic surgeon and other medical practitioners) on total knee replacement (TKR) procedures, in conjunction with newer pain management strategies, is key to maximizing patient outcomes. [More]
Opioid medication does not improve physical function in patients with neuropathic pain

Opioid medication does not improve physical function in patients with neuropathic pain

Opioids such as morphine, codeine and Tylenol 3 can be effective for treating pain, however, a new University of Alberta study finds that patients with neuropathic pain taking opioids report no improvements in physical functioning compared to those who were not prescribed opioids. [More]
Physiotherapy ‘should be targeted’ in Parkinson’s disease

Physiotherapy ‘should be targeted’ in Parkinson’s disease

Physical and occupational therapy does not deliver quality of life benefits for patients with mild to moderate Parkinson’s disease, a randomised trial shows. [More]
Study finds possibility of targeting Orai3 as novel treatment for obesity-related inflammation

Study finds possibility of targeting Orai3 as novel treatment for obesity-related inflammation

A new study by a team of Rosalind Franklin University researchers headed by Carl White, PhD, assistant professor of physiology and biophysics, has discovered that the degree of chronic inflammation caused by obesity is highly dependent on levels of the signaling molecule, hydrogen sulfide, which alters the activity of a calcium channel, Orai3. [More]
Aerobic exercise training may slow progression of Parkinson's disease

Aerobic exercise training may slow progression of Parkinson's disease

You've likely heard this before: Exercise is good for you. It helps your heart, bones, back and more. But here's one thing you might not have heard: Ongoing aerobic exercise may slow the progression of Parkinson's disease, a progressive disorder of the nervous system. [More]
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