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New pain management strategies key to maximizing patient outcomes after TKR procedures

New pain management strategies key to maximizing patient outcomes after TKR procedures

According to a new literature review in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, a team-based care approach (consisting of the patient, family members, the orthopaedic surgeon and other medical practitioners) on total knee replacement (TKR) procedures, in conjunction with newer pain management strategies, is key to maximizing patient outcomes. [More]
Opioid medication does not improve physical function in patients with neuropathic pain

Opioid medication does not improve physical function in patients with neuropathic pain

Opioids such as morphine, codeine and Tylenol 3 can be effective for treating pain, however, a new University of Alberta study finds that patients with neuropathic pain taking opioids report no improvements in physical functioning compared to those who were not prescribed opioids. [More]
Physiotherapy ‘should be targeted’ in Parkinson’s disease

Physiotherapy ‘should be targeted’ in Parkinson’s disease

Physical and occupational therapy does not deliver quality of life benefits for patients with mild to moderate Parkinson’s disease, a randomised trial shows. [More]
Study finds possibility of targeting Orai3 as novel treatment for obesity-related inflammation

Study finds possibility of targeting Orai3 as novel treatment for obesity-related inflammation

A new study by a team of Rosalind Franklin University researchers headed by Carl White, PhD, assistant professor of physiology and biophysics, has discovered that the degree of chronic inflammation caused by obesity is highly dependent on levels of the signaling molecule, hydrogen sulfide, which alters the activity of a calcium channel, Orai3. [More]
Aerobic exercise training may slow progression of Parkinson's disease

Aerobic exercise training may slow progression of Parkinson's disease

You've likely heard this before: Exercise is good for you. It helps your heart, bones, back and more. But here's one thing you might not have heard: Ongoing aerobic exercise may slow the progression of Parkinson's disease, a progressive disorder of the nervous system. [More]
Study illuminates ways to better treat knee meniscus tears, other injuries

Study illuminates ways to better treat knee meniscus tears, other injuries

Fibrocartilage tissue in the knee is comprised of a more varied molecular structure than researchers previously appreciated, according to a new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Delaware. [More]
Back pain becoming more common in children and adolescents

Back pain becoming more common in children and adolescents

According to a new literature review in the January issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, it's becoming more common for children and adolescents to seek medical care for back pain. Even with expensive, advanced tests like MRI scans, doctors may not be able to find the exact cause for the pain. [More]

UIC's orthopaedic residency program earns accreditation from American Physical Therapy Association

Physical therapists who want to advance their skills and opportunities can apply to a 13-month orthopaedic residency program at the University of Illinois at Chicago that emphasizes training along with patient care. [More]
Physiotherapy equipment market in India expected to grow at CAGR of over 12% during 2015 - 2020

Physiotherapy equipment market in India expected to grow at CAGR of over 12% during 2015 - 2020

According to recently published Pharmaion report, "India Physiotherapy Equipment Market Opportunities, 2010 - 2020", the physiotherapy equipment market in India is projected to grow at a CAGR of over 12% during 2015 - 2020, on account of increasing prevalence of cardiovascular and neurological diseases, expanding elderly population and escalating demand for at-home physiotherapy. [More]
VNS technology could help improve lives of people recovering from stroke

VNS technology could help improve lives of people recovering from stroke

A new study involving UT Dallas researchers shows that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) technology could help improve the lives of hundreds of thousands of people who suffer weakness and paralysis caused by strokes. [More]
Surgery and manual physical therapies similarly effective in improving pain for CTS patients

Surgery and manual physical therapies similarly effective in improving pain for CTS patients

Results of a randomized clinical trial, published in The Journal of Pain, showed that surgery and manual physical therapies were similarly effective in improving pain and function for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). [More]
Reduced bone mass puts critically ill patients at greater risk for fractures

Reduced bone mass puts critically ill patients at greater risk for fractures

One year after being hospitalized in intensive care, patients have reduced bone mass that puts them at greater risk for fractures, according to a new study published online ahead of print in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
New study compares outcomes from two postoperative pain control methods in knee replacement patients

New study compares outcomes from two postoperative pain control methods in knee replacement patients

A new study published today in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association compared outcomes from two types of postoperative pain control methods in a group of patients who had both of their knees replaced. [More]
AfBPM's second National Summit aims to improve pain management, patient safety

AfBPM's second National Summit aims to improve pain management, patient safety

The Alliance for Balanced Pain Management, a diverse collective of 24 health care advocacy groups, patient organizations, industry representatives and other stakeholders, held its second National Summit on Nov. 12 and 13, 2015, to identify continued ways to support appropriate access to integrated pain management and responsible use of prescription pain medicines with an aim to improve patient safety and reduce abuse. [More]
Duchenne muscular dystrophy could directly affect muscle stem cells

Duchenne muscular dystrophy could directly affect muscle stem cells

A new study from The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa is poised to completely change our understanding of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and pave the way for far more effective treatments. [More]
Matthew Teeter recognized with 2015 John Charles Polanyi Prize for research in joint replacement

Matthew Teeter recognized with 2015 John Charles Polanyi Prize for research in joint replacement

Matthew Teeter, PhD, an assistant professor at Western University's Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry and researcher at Lawson Health Research Institute, is a winner of the 2015 John Charles Polanyi Prize. The $20,000 award recognizes the excellence of Teeter's research in joint replacement. [More]
DePuy offers ambulatory surgery outpatient solutions for joint replacement patients

DePuy offers ambulatory surgery outpatient solutions for joint replacement patients

DePuy Synthes Companies announces the national launch of the DEPUY SYNTHES ADVANTAGE™ Outpatient Solutions Program to facilitate best practices and protocols for joint replacement in ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs) and outpatient hospitals throughout the United States. [More]
PT Solutions announces opening of new facility in Atlanta's Morningside neighborhood

PT Solutions announces opening of new facility in Atlanta's Morningside neighborhood

PT Solutions, a physical therapy practice that offers a comprehensive suite of therapeutic services, has announced the opening of PT Solutions of Morningside in the city of Atlanta (549 Amsterdam Avenue). [More]
Researchers demonstrate new screening model to identify drug targets for the most lethal strain of malaria

Researchers demonstrate new screening model to identify drug targets for the most lethal strain of malaria

A University of South Florida Center for Global Health & Infectious Diseases Research team has demonstrated a new screening model to classify antimalarial drugs and to identify drug targets for the most lethal strain of malaria, Plasmodium falciparum. [More]
Conventional methods may underestimate cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength in people with MS

Conventional methods may underestimate cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength in people with MS

Conventional methods of assessing cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular strength among people with multiple sclerosis may underestimate participants' capabilities, prompting clinicians to prescribe exercise therapies that are less effective than they could be, according to new research by scientists at the University of Illinois. [More]
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