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Medicare turns up heat on fraud investigations

Medicare turns up heat on fraud investigations

One U.S. attorney in South Dakota says such cases will be one of the fastest-growing areas of criminal investigations, while some providers are crying foul. [More]
Caffeine intake may aggravate hot flashes and night sweats in postmenopausal women

Caffeine intake may aggravate hot flashes and night sweats in postmenopausal women

A new Mayo Clinic study, published online today by the journal Menopause, found an association between caffeine intake and more bothersome hot flashes and night sweats in postmenopausal women. [More]
Activity level predicts how well patients recover from injuries after treatment

Activity level predicts how well patients recover from injuries after treatment

According to a literature review in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, patients' activity level is a strong predictor for how well they will do with certain treatments and how well they recover from injuries after treatment. Patients are encouraged to ask their orthopaedic surgeon if activity level is an important factor in their treatment decision. [More]
New strategies to help overcome hairstyle-related barriers to physical activity

New strategies to help overcome hairstyle-related barriers to physical activity

According to the Centers for Disease Control, approximately four out of five black women are overweight or obese and 36 percent meet physical activity objectives as determined by the CDC. [More]
Tips for people to choose right physical therapist

Tips for people to choose right physical therapist

After an injury or surgery, rehabilitation is often a critical factor on the road to recovery. Since physical therapy is usually a weekly commitment and may be for an extended period of time, convenience is an important consideration, according to JeMe Cioppa-Mosca, vice president of Rehabilitation at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. [More]
Structural change in periventricular white matter may show correlation with cognitive, sensory motor deficits by aging

Structural change in periventricular white matter may show correlation with cognitive, sensory motor deficits by aging

Ventricular enlargement has been suggested as a structural biomarker for normal aging and progression of some illnesses, such as Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Medicare providers say they lose millions due to excessive audits

Medicare providers say they lose millions due to excessive audits

Health care providers say they're losing millions that are tied up in appeals because of the increasing number of Medicare audits. Meanwhile, the trade group representing family physicians complains about Congress' failure to fix Medicare's outdated physician payment formula. [More]
Limited range of motion may predict future Little League Shoulder injury

Limited range of motion may predict future Little League Shoulder injury

As cases of Little League Shoulder occur more frequently, the need for additional information about the causes and outcomes of the condition has become clear. Researchers presenting at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting today shared new data identifying associated risk factors, common treatment options and return to play. [More]
Pennsylvania releases statewide guidelines on use of prescription opioids for chronic non-cancer pain

Pennsylvania releases statewide guidelines on use of prescription opioids for chronic non-cancer pain

On behalf of Governor Tom Corbett, the Pennsylvania Departments of Drug and Alcohol Programs and Health, in partnership with the Pennsylvania Medical Society, today released statewide guidelines to address the use of prescription opioids to treat chronic non-cancer pain. [More]
First Edition: July 10, 2014

First Edition: July 10, 2014

Today's headlines cover health policy headlines from the marketplace, the campaign trail and regarding the health law's implementation. [More]
Drowning remains leading cause of death in children with autism

Drowning remains leading cause of death in children with autism

Many families beat the summer heat with trips to swimming pools, beaches, and water parks; but water safety concerns are particularly heightened for families of children with autism, said Varleisha Gibbs, OTD, OTR/L, occupational therapy professor at University of the Sciences in Philadelphia. [More]
Orthopedic surgeon offers critical insights on total knee replacement surgery

Orthopedic surgeon offers critical insights on total knee replacement surgery

In 2010, Bonnie Egbert, a veteran of more than 20 marathons, had to quit running due to excruciating pain caused by her right knee joint rubbing bone on bone. [More]
New collaborative fundraising effort focuses on AYA cancer

New collaborative fundraising effort focuses on AYA cancer

Leaders from Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals this evening announced a new collaborative fundraising effort focused on Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) cancer. [More]
Modified classification system finds over one-third of knee replacements as inappropriate

Modified classification system finds over one-third of knee replacements as inappropriate

New research reports that more than one third of total knee replacements in the U.S. were classified as "inappropriate" using a patient classification system developed and validated in Spain. The study, published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), highlights the need for consensus on patient selection criteria among U.S. medical professionals treating those with the potential need of knee replacement surgery. [More]
Research shows colon cancer survivors are more likely to experience pain in back, abdomen

Research shows colon cancer survivors are more likely to experience pain in back, abdomen

Researchers from the University of Granada have discovered that colon cancer survivors are more likely to suffer future lesions related with pain in the back and lower abdomen than healthy individuals of the same gender and age. [More]
FDA approves marketing of first motorized device for patients with spinal cord injuries

FDA approves marketing of first motorized device for patients with spinal cord injuries

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today allowed marketing of the first motorized device intended to act as an exoskeleton for people with lower body paralysis (paraplegia) due to a spinal cord injury. [More]

WebPT receives significant investment from Battery Ventures

WebPT, the leading web-based electronic medical record (EMR) solution for rehabilitation therapists, today announced it has received a significant investment from Battery Ventures. WebPT intends to use the new capital to accelerate growth. [More]
Physician describes ways to combat post-cancer pain

Physician describes ways to combat post-cancer pain

More and more people are surviving their cancer. Unfortunately, sometimes survival can come with pain. Although many people won't feel any pain after their cancer treatment, some may have chronic, bothersome pain. [More]
Researchers explore shiatsu to help people with chronic pain fall asleep

Researchers explore shiatsu to help people with chronic pain fall asleep

There was a time, back in Nancy Cheyne's youth, when she combined the poise and grace of a ballerina with the daring and grit of a barrel racer. When she wasn't pursuing either of those pastimes, she bred sheepdogs, often spending hours on her feet grooming her furry friends at dog shows. [More]
State highlights: New Fla. abortion restrictions; docs move to affluent areas; farmworkers' mental health in Calif.

State highlights: New Fla. abortion restrictions; docs move to affluent areas; farmworkers' mental health in Calif.

A selection of health policy stories from Florida, Wisconsin, California, Michigan, Georgia, North Carolina and Maryland. [More]