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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
Cigarette smoking may lead to fibrosis in the heart and kidneys, study reveals

Cigarette smoking may lead to fibrosis in the heart and kidneys, study reveals

Smoking may lead to fibrosis in the heart and kidneys and can worsen existing kidney disease, according to a new study. [More]
New three-dimensional map of cystic fibrosis protein offers new insights to treating fatal disease

New three-dimensional map of cystic fibrosis protein offers new insights to treating fatal disease

Rockefeller scientists have created the first three-dimensional map of the protein responsible for cystic fibrosis, an inherited disease for which there is no cure. [More]
Experts explore if DXA-derived measurements could predict fracture risk in diabetic patients

Experts explore if DXA-derived measurements could predict fracture risk in diabetic patients

Increased risk of fracture has been shown to be one of the complications arising from longstanding diabetes. With the worldwide increase in Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), in part due to aging populations, there is also increasing concern about how to identify and manage patients with diabetes who are at high risk of osteoporotic fracture. [More]
New mouse model provides key information for understanding cortical circuit development

New mouse model provides key information for understanding cortical circuit development

A day by day log of cortical electric activity in the mouse visual cortex was published in the Journal of Neuroscience by George Washington University researcher Matthew Colonnese, Ph.D. [More]
Combination treatment may be valuable therapeutic option for HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer

Combination treatment may be valuable therapeutic option for HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer

Finding the ideal combination of targeted, hormonal and chemotherapeutic agents to treat HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer has been challenging researchers for decades. [More]
Sedentary lifestyle linked to poor reading skills in boys

Sedentary lifestyle linked to poor reading skills in boys

A sedentary lifestyle is linked to poorer reading skills in the first three school years in 6-8 year old boys, according to a new study from Finland. [More]
Hunter-gatherers in East Africa live active lifestyle that helps lower risk for heart disease

Hunter-gatherers in East Africa live active lifestyle that helps lower risk for heart disease

In a remote area of north-central Tanzania, men leave their huts on foot, armed with bows and poison-tipped arrows, to hunt for their next meal. [More]
Long-term hormone treatment may negatively affect kidneys in postmenopausal women

Long-term hormone treatment may negatively affect kidneys in postmenopausal women

Long-term estrogen treatment after menopause may increase the risk of new kidney damage and negatively affect women with abnormal kidney function. [More]
HD is myopathy as well as neurodegenerative disease, study suggests

HD is myopathy as well as neurodegenerative disease, study suggests

Researchers have discovered that mice with Huntington's disease (HD) suffer defects in muscle maturation that may explain some symptoms of the disorder. [More]
Scientists create comprehensive computational metabolic models for different gut microbes

Scientists create comprehensive computational metabolic models for different gut microbes

Hundreds of different bacterial species live in the human gut, helping us to digest our food. The metabolic processes of these bacteria are not only tremendously important to our health -- they are also tremendously complex. [More]
Study compares cardiac repair potential of three types of stem cells

Study compares cardiac repair potential of three types of stem cells

New research from New Zealand's University of Otago is providing fresh insights into how a patient's adult stem cells could best be used to regenerate their diseased hearts. [More]
Vestibular thresholds begin to increase above age 40, new study finds

Vestibular thresholds begin to increase above age 40, new study finds

A new study led by researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear found that vestibular thresholds begin to double every 10 years above the age of 40, representing a decline in our ability to receive sensory information about motion, balance and spatial orientation. [More]
TUM scientists explore link between gastrointestinal microbiota and dietary fats

TUM scientists explore link between gastrointestinal microbiota and dietary fats

Gut bacteria play a little-understood role in the body’s energy balance, which is influenced by diet. However, the crucial nutritional components are unknown. A team at the Technical University of Munich was able to demonstrate for the very first time that mice without gastrointestinal microbiota grow obese when fed with dietary fat from plant sources, but not from animal sources. [More]
Study shows essential role of new receptor in protecting against obesity

Study shows essential role of new receptor in protecting against obesity

The team of scientists from King's College London and Imperial College London tested a high-fat diet, containing a fermentable carbohydrate, and a control diet on mice and looked at the effect on food intake of those with and without the FFAR2 receptor. [More]
Dietary supplement extracted from Amaranthus can increase plasma nitrate, study shows

Dietary supplement extracted from Amaranthus can increase plasma nitrate, study shows

A new, clinical study confirms that dietary supplementation of nitrate from a natural extract of Amaranthus species nicknamed "red spinach," results in a significant increase in plasma nitrite that ultimately enhances nitric oxide. [More]
TSRI scientists unravel mystery of ‘food coma’ phenomenon

TSRI scientists unravel mystery of ‘food coma’ phenomenon

Anyone who has drifted into a fuzzy-headed stupor after a large holiday meal is familiar with the condition commonly known as a "food coma." [More]
Study shines new light on genetic makeup of river blindness parasite

Study shines new light on genetic makeup of river blindness parasite

The parasite that causes river blindness infects about 37 million people in parts of Africa and Latin America, causing blindness and other major eye and skin diseases in about 5 million of them. [More]
MGH researchers uncover mechanism revealing why aspartame may not promote weight loss

MGH researchers uncover mechanism revealing why aspartame may not promote weight loss

A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found a possible mechanism explaining why use of the sugar substitute aspartame might not promote weight loss. [More]
Improved surveillance systems and coherent policies needed to combat Rift Valley fever

Improved surveillance systems and coherent policies needed to combat Rift Valley fever

Research on the mosquito-borne Rift Valley fever in east Africa and the Arabian Peninsula shows that current surveillance systems are unable to detect the virus in livestock before it spreads to humans. [More]
New suite of sensors can help monitor patients to prevent heart failure events

New suite of sensors can help monitor patients to prevent heart failure events

A suite of sensors can predict heart failure events by detecting when a patient's condition is worsening, according to Dr. John Boehmer, professor of medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, who presented the findings at the American Heart Association annual meeting in New Orleans. [More]
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