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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
Photodynamic therapy effective in treating porphyrias but can be severely painful, cause inflammation

Photodynamic therapy effective in treating porphyrias but can be severely painful, cause inflammation

Severe paleness and photosensitivity are two symptoms of a rare group of hereditary diseases that affect haem, a substance in the blood. While these metabolic disorders - known as the porphyrias - are extremely rare, a similar effect is often deliberately triggered by dermatologists in localised areas during the treatment of pre-cancerous skin lesions and skin cancers. [More]
The future of simulated teaching methods: an interview with Dr Robert Amyot

The future of simulated teaching methods: an interview with Dr Robert Amyot

In healthcare, we have physicians, nurses and paramedics who know the textbook by heart and know exactly what they need to do, but have never experienced the procedure first-hand, or they have no experience responding to adverse events that may occur. [More]
Simple method may help predict type 2 diabetes risk in women with gestational diabetes

Simple method may help predict type 2 diabetes risk in women with gestational diabetes

An international team of researchers has discovered a simple, accurate new way to predict which women with gestational diabetes will develop type 2 diabetes after delivery. [More]
Long-term suppression of neurotransmitter acetylcholine may lead to dementia-like changes in the brain

Long-term suppression of neurotransmitter acetylcholine may lead to dementia-like changes in the brain

A new study from Western University is helping to explain why the long-term use of common anticholinergic drugs used to treat conditions like allergies and overactive bladder lead to an increased risk of developing dementia later in life. [More]
First CRISPR/Cas9 screen helps identify human proteins required for Zika virus replication

First CRISPR/Cas9 screen helps identify human proteins required for Zika virus replication

Scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School have performed the first CRISPR/Cas9 screen to discover human proteins that Zika virus needs for replication. [More]
Composition of microbiota plays significant role in body's ability to accept transplanted tissue

Composition of microbiota plays significant role in body's ability to accept transplanted tissue

Researchers from the University of Chicago have shown that microbiota—the bacteria, viruses and other microbes living on the skin and in the digestive system—play an important role in the body's ability to accept transplanted skin and other organs. [More]
Researchers identify new myosin kinase that could optimize heart contractions

Researchers identify new myosin kinase that could optimize heart contractions

The heart is the only muscle that contracts and relaxes continuously over a lifetime to pump oxygen-rich blood to the body's organs. Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center now have identified a previously unrecognized enzyme that could optimize contraction and lead to new strategies to treat heart failure. [More]
Long-term opioid therapy may not be effective to manage pain in sickle cell disease patients

Long-term opioid therapy may not be effective to manage pain in sickle cell disease patients

In a small study looking at pain assessments in adults with sickle cell disease, researchers at Johns Hopkins says overall, those treated long-term with opioids often fared worse in measures of pain, fatigue and curtailed daily activities than those not on long-term opioids. [More]
Scientists aim to explore how gestational diabetes can put babies at lifelong risk for cardiovascular disease

Scientists aim to explore how gestational diabetes can put babies at lifelong risk for cardiovascular disease

Gestational diabetes can put babies at a lifelong risk for cardiovascular disease, and scientists want to better understand how. [More]
E-cigarette use modifies gene expression important for upper airway immune defense

E-cigarette use modifies gene expression important for upper airway immune defense

When we smoke cigarettes, dozens of genes important for immune defense are altered in the epithelial cells that line the respiratory tract. Several of these changes likely increase the risk of bacterial infections, viruses, and inflammation. [More]
Decision-making dysfunction may be key contributor to movement disorder symptoms in Parkinson’s patients

Decision-making dysfunction may be key contributor to movement disorder symptoms in Parkinson’s patients

UCLA researchers have discovered that people with Parkinson's disease have a form of impaired decision-making that may be a major contributor to the movement problems that characterize the disease. [More]
New studies provide future treatment strategies for stomach ulcers, IBD and alcoholic liver disease

New studies provide future treatment strategies for stomach ulcers, IBD and alcoholic liver disease

Basic and translational research paves the way for breakthroughs that can ultimately change patient care. [More]
TSRI scientists develop novel technique for finding drug candidates

TSRI scientists develop novel technique for finding drug candidates

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a powerful new method for finding drug candidates that bind to specific proteins. [More]
Researchers explore why women have ubiquitous survival advantage than men

Researchers explore why women have ubiquitous survival advantage than men

Women live longer than men. This simple statement holds a tantalizing riddle that Steven Austad, Ph.D., and Kathleen Fischer, Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham explore in a perspective piece published in Cell Metabolism on June 14. [More]
New and inexpensive technique could help meet global demands for malaria drug

New and inexpensive technique could help meet global demands for malaria drug

A new and inexpensive technique for mass-producing the main ingredient in the most effective treatment for malaria, artemisinin, could help meet global demands for the drug, according to a study to be published in the journal eLife. [More]
15 minutes of daily exercise may lower death risk for older adults

15 minutes of daily exercise may lower death risk for older adults

Fifteen minutes of daily exercise is associated with a 22% lower risk of death and may be a reasonable target for older adults, reveals research presented today at the EuroPRevent 2016 meeting by Dr David Hupin, a physician in the Department of Clinical and Exercise Physiology, University Hospital of Saint-Etienne in Saint-Etienne, France. [More]
Chronic sleep restriction may impair performance in healthy, elite atheletes

Chronic sleep restriction may impair performance in healthy, elite atheletes

A new study found that chronic sleep restriction negatively affects athletic performance. [More]
Postnova reports advances in analysis of plasma proteins using AF4-ICP-MS system

Postnova reports advances in analysis of plasma proteins using AF4-ICP-MS system

Postnova Analytics reports on exciting advances in the analysis of plasma proteins using a hyphenated system that couples asymmetric flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. [More]
Low birth weight, stress during pregnancy can lead to long-term health issues in women

Low birth weight, stress during pregnancy can lead to long-term health issues in women

Low birth weight or stress during pregnancy can lead to long-term health problems in women, according to a study published today in The Journal of Physiology. [More]
Researchers investigate causes of renal failure using mathematical model

Researchers investigate causes of renal failure using mathematical model

No one can deny that open-heart surgery, where the heart is exposed and the blood is made to bypass it, is one of the most invasive of all medical procedures. Nearly a third of all patients undergoing heart surgery experience kidney failure, yet little is known about why kidney injury occurs or how to prevent it. [More]
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