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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
WPI receives patent for novel method of reprogramming human skin cells

WPI receives patent for novel method of reprogramming human skin cells

Cell therapies for a range of serious conditions, including heart attacks, diabetes, and traumatic injuries, will be accelerated by research at Worcester Polytechnic Institute that yielded a newly patented method of converting human skin cells into engines of wound healing and tissue regeneration. [More]
Obese individuals who consume aspartame may have worse glucose management

Obese individuals who consume aspartame may have worse glucose management

Artificial sweeteners help individuals with obesity to cut calories and lose weight but may have negative health effects, according to researchers at York University's Faculty of Health. [More]
Georgia Tech engineers developing device to listen to and measure sounds inside the joint

Georgia Tech engineers developing device to listen to and measure sounds inside the joint

You've injured your knee. A doctor straps a listening device to it, and the noises you hear coming out of it are cringe-worthy. "Crackle! Krglkrglkrgl! Snap!" [More]
JBCPP journal publishes new evidence for clinical efficacy of cannabis therapy

JBCPP journal publishes new evidence for clinical efficacy of cannabis therapy

New evidence for the clinical efficacy of cannabis therapy is presented in the latest issue of the Journal of Basic and Clinical Physiology and Pharmacology, a De Gruyter publication. [More]
Researchers identify trigger for immune cells' inflammatory response

Researchers identify trigger for immune cells' inflammatory response

Scientists at the University of Bristol have identified the trigger for immune cells' inflammatory response - a discovery that may pave the way for new treatments for many human diseases. [More]
Scientists create computational network model to understand human physiology and disease

Scientists create computational network model to understand human physiology and disease

Scientists at UMass Medical School have created a computational network model that will enable the unraveling of the mechanisms by which different macro- and micronutrients contribute to the physiology of the nematode C. elegans, which is a primary model for understanding human physiology and disease. [More]
DECT trial shows combination of epirubicin and trastuzumab improves outcomes in breast cancer patients

DECT trial shows combination of epirubicin and trastuzumab improves outcomes in breast cancer patients

The study entitled "A phase II neoadjuvant sequential regimen of docetaxel followed by high-dose epirubicin in combination with cyclophosphamide administered concurrently with trastuzumab. [More]
Neuropeptide plays role in driving rhythms of detoxification gene activity, study shows

Neuropeptide plays role in driving rhythms of detoxification gene activity, study shows

A 24-hour rhythm of cellular detoxification in flies and mammals is coordinated by a neuropeptide that also drives feeding in both organisms, found a team led by Amita Sehgal, PhD, a professor of Neuroscience and director of the Chronobiology Program, in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
New research defies earlier belief that calcium channels function independently

New research defies earlier belief that calcium channels function independently

Voltage-gated calcium channels open in unison, rather than independently, to allow calcium ions into and activate excitable cells such as neurons and muscle cells, researchers with UC Davis Health System and the University of Washington have found. [More]
Flavopiridol drug could be effective strategy to impair brain cancer growth

Flavopiridol drug could be effective strategy to impair brain cancer growth

Glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer is a deadly disease for which at present there is no cure. Now, researchers have published research results that show how repurposing the old drug flavopiridol could be an effective strategy to cut short sugar availability and impair cancer growth. [More]
Hydroxyurea treatment improves pulmonary function decline in children with sickle cell disease

Hydroxyurea treatment improves pulmonary function decline in children with sickle cell disease

For the first time, researchers were able to demonstrate that children diagnosed with sickle cell disease showed improvement in lung function after treatment with hydroxyurea, a treatment that is underused despite its demonstrated benefits. [More]
Closely related molecule can mimic effect of PKMzeta in mice

Closely related molecule can mimic effect of PKMzeta in mice

New research led by SUNY Downstate Medical Center shows that mice devoid of PKMzeta, a molecule previously identified by SUNY Downstate scientists as essential to memory formation and storage, recruit a closely related molecule, PKCiota/lambda, to make up for the missing PKMzeta. [More]
High levels of secretin hormone may play vital role in management of chronic liver diseases

High levels of secretin hormone may play vital role in management of chronic liver diseases

High levels of a digestive hormone called secretin may play an important role in the management of certain chronic liver diseases, according to new research published in the journal Hepatology. These findings could result in new ways to treat cholestatic liver diseases, a condition that impairs the movement of bile, the fluid produced by the liver to digest fats. [More]
Overnight extubations in ICU patients linked to higher mortality

Overnight extubations in ICU patients linked to higher mortality

Adult patients who were admitted to U.S. intensive care units had higher mortality if they were extubated overnight. The results reported at the ATS 2016 International Conference may discourage hospital administrators from expanding the practice of overnight extubations in ICUs, which the lead author noted are rapidly being transformed to provide continuity of care. [More]
Research shows close similarities of canine models of human rare disorders

Research shows close similarities of canine models of human rare disorders

Professor Hannes Lohi's research group at the University of Helsinki has discovered three novel canine genes for Caffey, Raine and van den Ende-Gupta syndromes. Research reveals close similarities of the canine models of human rare disorders and highlights the potential of comparative research approach for the development of rare disease diagnostics and treatments. [More]
First-ever clinical trial of bioabsorbable cardiovascular device in children shows promise

First-ever clinical trial of bioabsorbable cardiovascular device in children shows promise

Current cardiovascular valve or blood vessel implants are generally associated with a number of complications, have limited efficacy over time, and may necessitate repeated interventions over a patient's lifetime, especially when implanted in a young child. [More]
Researchers identify risk factors for unplanned readmissions following esophageal resection

Researchers identify risk factors for unplanned readmissions following esophageal resection

Esophagectomy is a major surgical procedure associated with significant complications with up to 1 in 5 patients readmitted following hospital discharge. These unplanned readmissions are an important problem as they negatively impact patient care and, in the future, may have implications for reimbursement through the Hospital Readmissions Reduction program. [More]
Exercise may help reduce toxicity caused by glutamate build-up in the brain

Exercise may help reduce toxicity caused by glutamate build-up in the brain

In a new study published today in Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, scientists from the University of Guelph have found that exercise has the potential to decrease toxic build-up in the brain, reducing the severity of brain disorders such as Huntington's disease. [More]
RDAVR system improves survival of patients with severe aortic stenosis

RDAVR system improves survival of patients with severe aortic stenosis

When replacing a defective aortic valve with a new one, restoring function is the first priority. However, variables such as durability, length of surgery, duration of heart stoppage, size of the surgical incision, postoperative pain, and complications are other important considerations. [More]
Exercise plays significant role in combating obesity

Exercise plays significant role in combating obesity

Two factors—metabolism and gut microbes - have been credited by researchers as key players in the fight against obesity. [More]
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