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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
3D respiratory tissue model shown to be effective for measuring impact of chemicals

3D respiratory tissue model shown to be effective for measuring impact of chemicals

A 3-dimensional model of human respiratory tissue has been shown to be an effective platform for measuring the impact of chemicals, like those found in cigarette smoke, or other aerosols on the lung. [More]
Updated guidelines for diagnosis, treatment of medullary thyroid carcinoma released

Updated guidelines for diagnosis, treatment of medullary thyroid carcinoma released

A Task Force convened by the American Thyroid Association released updated guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The current document is the first revision of the original guidelines published in 2009. [More]
USF scientists identify potential compounds to improve cardiovascular system, small vessel disease

USF scientists identify potential compounds to improve cardiovascular system, small vessel disease

University of South Florida scientists have identified a group of compounds with the potential for beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system and small vessel disease while researching grape seed extracts discovered at USF. [More]
UVA researchers develop compound that could lead to improved leukemia treatments

UVA researchers develop compound that could lead to improved leukemia treatments

Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have developed a compound that delays leukemia in mice and effectively kills leukemia cells in human tissue samples, raising hopes that the drug could lead to improved treatments in people. The researchers call it an exciting "new paradigm" for treating leukemia. [More]
Researchers discover new way to attract, kill pregnant malaria-transmitting mosquitoes

Researchers discover new way to attract, kill pregnant malaria-transmitting mosquitoes

The battle against malaria is also a battle against its natural host, the mosquito, which means disrupting the insect's lifecycle is every bit as important as putting nets over beds. Now, an international research team has discovered what attracts mosquitos to lay their eggs in specific places. [More]
Broad Institute of MIT researcher honored for groundbreaking research using new gene editing tool

Broad Institute of MIT researcher honored for groundbreaking research using new gene editing tool

The newest gene editing tool - called CRISPR-Cas9 - is leading to new research possibilities in cell biology and neuroscience. This includes the ability to make transgenic animal models more quickly, which helps researchers better study diseases that affect thousands of people each year. [More]
EMA approves Baylor's hollow fiber system for development of TB drugs

EMA approves Baylor's hollow fiber system for development of TB drugs

The European Medicines Agency (EMA), the equivalent of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, has approved the use of the hollow fiber system for the development of drugs to treat and prevent tuberculosis (TB). [More]
Mast plans to develop vepoloxamer for chronic heart failure treatment

Mast plans to develop vepoloxamer for chronic heart failure treatment

Mast Therapeutics, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company leveraging its molecular adhesion and sealant technology (MAST) platform to develop novel therapies for sickle cell disease, arterial disease and heart failure, today announced its plans to develop vepoloxamer (MST-188) for the treatment of patients with chronic heart failure. [More]
Scientists use optical radiation to treat cancer at the cellular level

Scientists use optical radiation to treat cancer at the cellular level

Wanting to achieve early cancer detection, a group of scientists from the Center for Research in Optics (CIO) of Guadalajara, in Mexico, seeks to address the problem from the cell with optical radiation. [More]
New study pinpoints major increase in subdural hematoma surgery by 2030

New study pinpoints major increase in subdural hematoma surgery by 2030

By 2030, chronic subdural hemorrhage (SDH) will be the most common adult brain condition requiring neurosurgical intervention in the U.S., according to a new study conducted by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
UConn Health cancer epidemiologist reveals effect of artificial light on health

UConn Health cancer epidemiologist reveals effect of artificial light on health

Modern life, with its preponderance of inadequate exposure to natural light during the day and overexposure to artificial light at night, is not conducive to the body's natural sleep/wake cycle. [More]
Vitamin D plays major role in preventing diabetes and atherosclerosis

Vitamin D plays major role in preventing diabetes and atherosclerosis

In recent years, a deficiency of vitamin D has been linked to type 2 diabetes and heart disease, two illnesses that commonly occur together and are the most common cause of illness and death in Western countries. Both disorders are rooted in chronic inflammation, which leads to insulin resistance and the buildup of artery-clogging plaque. [More]
Researchers study how maternal intake of excessive vitamins impacts offspring's behaviour

Researchers study how maternal intake of excessive vitamins impacts offspring's behaviour

A research group at the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine has been using a rat model to see how maternal intake of above-requirement vitamins (A, D, E, and K) impact offspring's brain development and behaviour. [More]
New research lays groundwork for developing treatments for asthma, COPD

New research lays groundwork for developing treatments for asthma, COPD

In diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the body produces too much mucus, making breathing difficult. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis provides clues to potentially counteract inappropriate mucus production. [More]
Kansas State doctoral student selected to attend prestigious Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

Kansas State doctoral student selected to attend prestigious Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

A Kansas State University doctoral student will spend part of her summer interacting with Nobel laureates in physics, physiology, medicine and chemistry. [More]
PVNF gifts $1,250,000 to support Alzheimer's research at UT Southwestern

PVNF gifts $1,250,000 to support Alzheimer's research at UT Southwestern

Presbyterian Village North Foundation has made two gifts totaling $1,250,000 to support Alzheimer's research at UT Southwestern Medical Center. [More]
GW, Children's National researchers awarded $6.2 million grant to solve pediatric dysphagia

GW, Children's National researchers awarded $6.2 million grant to solve pediatric dysphagia

An interdisciplinary group of researchers from the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences and Children's National Health System has been awarded a program project grant (PPG) for $6.2 million from The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to solve pediatric dysphagia -- a chronic difficulty with feeding and swallowing in children. [More]
Active ingredient dextromethorphan may help people with Type 2 diabetes

Active ingredient dextromethorphan may help people with Type 2 diabetes

The active ingredient dextromethorphan, which is contained in many over-the-counter cough remedies, has been shown to improve blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes (diabetes mellitus). That was the finding of a recent international study, in which the Center for Physiology and Pharmacology of MedUni Vienna played a significant part and which has now been published in the leading medical journal "Nature Medicine". [More]
Researchers find that exercise may slow tumor growth, improve chemotherapy

Researchers find that exercise may slow tumor growth, improve chemotherapy

One way many cancers grow resistant to treatment is by generating a web of blood vessels that are so jumbled they fail to provide adequate oxygen to the tumor. With oxygen starvation, the tumor gains a sort of cloaking device that protects it from the toxic effects of chemotherapy drugs and radiation, which are designed to seek out well-oxygenated tissue. [More]
Researchers team up to study stomach flu

Researchers team up to study stomach flu

Rice University bioengineers are teaming with colleagues from Baylor College of Medicine and MD Anderson Cancer Center to apply the latest techniques in tissue engineering toward the study of one of the most common and deadly human illnesses -- the stomach flu. [More]
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