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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
Autoimmune diseases share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer

Autoimmune diseases share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer

Autoimmune disorders may share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer, according to a new report by George Washington University researcher Linda Kusner, Ph.D., published in PLOS ONE on July 22. [More]
Researchers collaborate to tackle rare diseases

Researchers collaborate to tackle rare diseases

Support from a network of leading researchers across Europe specialised in a rare auto-immune disease with unmet medical needs could help test several novel treatments [More]
Iodine supplement can reduce central foveal swelling in RP patients with CME

Iodine supplement can reduce central foveal swelling in RP patients with CME

Cystoid macular edema (CME) is a common complication of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a family of retinal diseases in which patients typically lose night and side vision first and then develop impaired central vision. CME can also decrease central vision. [More]
Scientist uses samples of beating heart tissue to test effect of drugs

Scientist uses samples of beating heart tissue to test effect of drugs

A Coventry University scientist has developed a pioneering new way - using samples of beating heart tissue - to test the effect of drugs on the heart without using human or animal trials. [More]
Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

A team of scientists from around the world led by Baylor College of Medicine and Washington University in St. Louis has completed the genome sequence of the common marmoset - the first sequence of a New World Monkey - providing new information about the marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system, physiology and growth, shedding new light on primate biology and evolution. [More]
Learning role of immune-system cells in digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning role of immune-system cells in digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning the role of immune-system cells in healthy digestive tracts and how they interact with neighboring nerve cells may lead to new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). [More]
Role of immune system cells in healthy digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Role of immune system cells in healthy digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning the role of immune system cells in healthy digestive tracts and how they interact with neighboring nerve cells may lead to new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). [More]
Biochemists find groups of tiny protein loops that help bacteria to establish infection

Biochemists find groups of tiny protein loops that help bacteria to establish infection

When it comes to infecting humans and animals, bacteria need a helping hand. Kansas State University biochemists have found the helping hand: groups of tiny protein loops on the surface of cells. [More]
Health concerns over arsenic in rice-especially for children

Health concerns over arsenic in rice-especially for children

Inorganic arsenic in rice and rice-based foods poses health concerns in infants and young children, and steps should be taken to minimize exposure, according to a commentary in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. [More]
New theory of how cancer works could lead to next generation of treatments of disease

New theory of how cancer works could lead to next generation of treatments of disease

A new theory of how cancer works could lead to the next generation of treatments of the disease. The theory suggests that cancer forms when recently evolved genes are damaged, and cells have to revert to using older, inappropriate genetic pathways. [More]
New way to protect crops from insect plagues in safe and environmentally responsible way

New way to protect crops from insect plagues in safe and environmentally responsible way

Using spider toxins to study the proteins that let nerve cells send out electrical signals, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have stumbled upon a biological tactic that may offer a new way to protect crops from insect plagues in a safe and environmentally responsible way. [More]
Gene therapy can improve regenerative capacity of injured RGCs

Gene therapy can improve regenerative capacity of injured RGCs

Because the adult mammalian central nervous system has only limited intrinsic capacity to regenerate connections after injury, due to factors both intrinsic and extrinsic to the mature neuron, therapies are required to support the survival of injured neurons and to promote the long-distance regrowth of axons back to their original target structures. [More]
New class of anti-arthritic drugs reduce arthritic joint inflammation and periodontitis

New class of anti-arthritic drugs reduce arthritic joint inflammation and periodontitis

Inflammatory diseases can occur simultaneously in distinct sites in the same patient, complicating treatment because a medication effective for one disorder may exacerbate the other. [More]
Acute episodes of low back pain not linked to weather conditions

Acute episodes of low back pain not linked to weather conditions

Australian researchers reveal that sudden, acute episodes of low back pain are not linked to weather conditions such as temperature, humidity, air pressure, wind direction and precipitation. [More]
Rockefeller scientists identify protein that makes breast cancer cells more likely to metastasize

Rockefeller scientists identify protein that makes breast cancer cells more likely to metastasize

Using an innovative tool that captures heretofore hidden ways that cells are regulated, scientists at Rockefeller University have identified a protein that makes breast cancer cells more likely to metastasize. [More]
Study compares level of physical fitness of adolescents in south with centre and north of Europe

Study compares level of physical fitness of adolescents in south with centre and north of Europe

Adolescents in southern Europe are less fit in terms of cardiorespiratory capacity, strength and speed-agility than their central-northern European peers. Moreover, southern adolescents are more obese and present higher levels of total and abdominal fat than those from the centre-north of Europe. [More]
Scientists discover new role for pair of compounds which alter circadian rhythm

Scientists discover new role for pair of compounds which alter circadian rhythm

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered a surprising new role for a pair of compounds—which have the potential to alter circadian rhythm, the complex physiological process that responds to a 24-hour cycle of light and dark and is present in most living things. [More]
High level of adiponectin linked to decreased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease

High level of adiponectin linked to decreased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease

It has been known for its flavorful addition to soups and as a delicacy for dogs but bone marrow fat may also have untapped health benefits, new research finds. [More]
Researchers discover mechanical threshold that regulates angiogenesis

Researchers discover mechanical threshold that regulates angiogenesis

Angiogenesis, the sprouting of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is essential to the body's development. As organs grow, vascular networks must grow with them to feed new cells and remove their waste. [More]
Clear advances in the fight against tuberculosis are within reach, say immunologists

Clear advances in the fight against tuberculosis are within reach, say immunologists

Leading immunologists expect to see some clear advances in the fight against tuberculosis, an infectious disease that is widespread the world over. Professor Stefan Kaufmann, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Berlin, echoed these sentiments at today's launch of the scientific programme for the 64th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting at Lindau, Germany. [More]