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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
New camera technology paired with electron microscope allows biologists to see tiny cellular components

New camera technology paired with electron microscope allows biologists to see tiny cellular components

Using a new, lightning-fast camera paired with an electron microscope, Columbia University Medical Center scientists have captured images of one of the smallest proteins in our cells to be "seen" with a microscope. [More]
Research opens way towards making promising advances in retinal prostheses

Research opens way towards making promising advances in retinal prostheses

A major therapeutic challenge, the retinal prostheses that have been under development during the past ten years can enable some blind subjects to perceive light signals, but the image thus restored is still far from being clear. [More]
Atomic level analysis reveals how two classes of calcium channel blockers produce different effects

Atomic level analysis reveals how two classes of calcium channel blockers produce different effects

An atomic level analysis has revealed how two classes of calcium channel blockers, widely prescribed for heart disease patients, produce separate therapeutic effects through their actions at different sites on the calcium channel molecule. [More]
Novel innovation could help scientists study new treatments for mitochondrial diseases

Novel innovation could help scientists study new treatments for mitochondrial diseases

A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences from the University of Missouri has succeeded in creating embryos with "heteroplasmy," or the presence of both maternal and paternal mitochondrial DNA. [More]
Researcher aims to shed new light on inner workings of the retina

Researcher aims to shed new light on inner workings of the retina

One of the more studied parts of the human anatomy, the retina -- the neural layer at the back of the eye that senses light -- still has secrets to reveal. [More]
Study challenges widely-held assumption that larger athletes need more protein

Study challenges widely-held assumption that larger athletes need more protein

Sports nutrition recommendations may undergo a significant shift after research from the University of Stirling has found individuals with more muscle mass do not need more protein after resistance exercise. [More]
Research shows ketone esters increase exercise endurance, cognitive function in rats

Research shows ketone esters increase exercise endurance, cognitive function in rats

New research published online in The FASEB Journal shows that in rats, a substance called a ketone ester significantly increase exercise endurance, cognitive function and energy levels in the heart at high workloads. [More]
New ATA recommendations offer guidance for managing all forms of thyrotoxicosis

New ATA recommendations offer guidance for managing all forms of thyrotoxicosis

New evidence-based recommendations from the American Thyroid Association provide guidance to clinicians in the management of patients with all forms of thyrotoxicosis (excessively high thyroid hormone activity), including hyperthyroidism. [More]
Migraine patients differ from healthy people by increased vascular reactivity

Migraine patients differ from healthy people by increased vascular reactivity

A group of scientists from several Russian universities and medical centers made progress in explaining the nature of one of the most ancient neurologic diseases – migraine. The study was conducted within a larger project to develop a device capable of remotely and effectively diagnosing this disease. [More]
Scientists examine how neural responses change over time in patients with Parkinson's disease

Scientists examine how neural responses change over time in patients with Parkinson's disease

Neuroscientists peered into the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease and two similar conditions to see how their neural responses changed over time. [More]
Newfound role for PARP proteins could lead to therapeutic opportunities for cancer

Newfound role for PARP proteins could lead to therapeutic opportunities for cancer

Using technology they developed, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a previously unknown role of a certain class of proteins: as regulators of gene activity and RNA processing. [More]
New, non-invasive way to monitor progression of Parkinson's disease may help improve treatment

New, non-invasive way to monitor progression of Parkinson's disease may help improve treatment

A new, non-invasive way to track the progression of Parkinson's disease could help evaluate experimental treatments to slow or stop the disease's progression. [More]
Scientists find new functions of ANG protein that plays key role in regulation of blood cell formation

Scientists find new functions of ANG protein that plays key role in regulation of blood cell formation

Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University scientists have found exciting, new functions of the protein angiogenin that play a significant role in the regulation of blood cell formation, important in bone marrow transplantation and recovery from radiation-induced bone marrow failure. [More]
USC researchers discover two Zika proteins potentially responsible for microcephaly

USC researchers discover two Zika proteins potentially responsible for microcephaly

USC researchers have tracked down two Zika proteins potentially responsible for thousands of microcephaly cases in Brazil and elsewhere — taking one small step toward preventing Zika-infected mothers from birthing babies with abnormally small heads. [More]
Pancreatic cancer cells find alternative source of nutrition to avoid starvation

Pancreatic cancer cells find alternative source of nutrition to avoid starvation

Pancreatic cancer cells avert starvation in dense tumors by ordering nearby support cells to supply them with an alternative source of nutrition. [More]
New disease gene linked to shortened telomeres appears to raise risk of pulmonary fibrosis-emphysema

New disease gene linked to shortened telomeres appears to raise risk of pulmonary fibrosis-emphysema

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have identified a new disease gene that, when mutated, appears to increase the risk in a small number of people of developing emphysema and a lung-scarring condition known as pulmonary fibrosis. [More]
Penn study sheds light on role of essential compound in maintaining optimal muscle function

Penn study sheds light on role of essential compound in maintaining optimal muscle function

Maintaining proper levels of an essential helper molecule is crucial for optimal muscle function, according to a study led by Joseph Baur, PhD, an assistant professor of Physiology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Philips collaborates with Mayo Clinic to climb Mount Kilimanjaro on research expedition

Philips collaborates with Mayo Clinic to climb Mount Kilimanjaro on research expedition

Royal Philips today announced it will be among the leading organizations collaborating with the Mayo Clinic to climb Mount Kilimanjaro on a research expedition to understand how the body reacts to the rigors of high altitude and how those learnings can be applied to improving human health. [More]
Study finds reduced activity of ACMSD enzyme in people with suicidal behavior

Study finds reduced activity of ACMSD enzyme in people with suicidal behavior

It is known that people who have attempted suicide have ongoing inflammation in their blood and spinal fluid. Now, a collaborative study from research teams in the U.S., Sweden and Australia published in Translational Psychiatry shows that suicidal patients have a reduced activity of an enzyme that regulates inflammation and its byproducts. [More]
New odour-baited traps offer effective and safe solution to fight against malaria mosquito

New odour-baited traps offer effective and safe solution to fight against malaria mosquito

The use of a newly-developed mosquito trap incorporating human odour has resulted in a 70% decline in the population of the most significant malaria mosquito on the Kenyan island of Rusinga. [More]
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