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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
14th APS symposium highlights role of endothelin in many biological functions

14th APS symposium highlights role of endothelin in many biological functions

Endothelin (ET) is a peptide produced by cells in the blood vessels and has powerful vessel-constricting effects. Although endothelin is mainly associated with its role in blood pressure control and cardiovascular diseases, it continues to appear in other physiological functions and diseases. [More]
Endothelin system offers potential therapeutic target for ALS

Endothelin system offers potential therapeutic target for ALS

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disorder in which cells of the nervous system die, leading to muscle weakness that impacts breathing, movement and other physical functions. [More]
Inhalation exposure to PM2.5 pollution triggers liver fibrosis

Inhalation exposure to PM2.5 pollution triggers liver fibrosis

A research team led by Kezhong Zhang, Ph.D., at the Wayne State University School of Medicine's Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, has discovered that exposure to air pollution has a direct adverse health effect on the liver and causes liver fibrosis, an illness associated with metabolic disease and liver cancer. [More]
CPAP treatment restores brain stem function, reverses health changes linked to heart disease

CPAP treatment restores brain stem function, reverses health changes linked to heart disease

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machines are a commonly prescribed treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder in which muscles in the airways collapse during sleep, blocking breathing. [More]
Person with chronic, complete paralysis regains voluntary control to work with robotic device

Person with chronic, complete paralysis regains voluntary control to work with robotic device

A 39-year-old man who had had been completely paralyzed for four years was able to voluntarily control his leg muscles and take thousands of steps in a "robotic exoskeleton" device during five days of training -- and for two weeks afterward -- a team of UCLA scientists reports this week. [More]
A unique perspective on health and exercise

A unique perspective on health and exercise

For over 30 years, Terrie Williams has been studying exercise physiology in wild animals: African lions and wild dogs, dolphins and whales, coyotes and mountain lions, as well as a few human athletes. [More]
New UC Davis Environmental Health Sciences Center launched to protect communities from unhealthy exposures

New UC Davis Environmental Health Sciences Center launched to protect communities from unhealthy exposures

A cross-disciplinary center focused on identifying connections between environmental toxins and disease has been established at UC Davis Health System with the ultimate goal of developing preventions and policies that protect communities from unhealthy exposures. [More]
STEMI study: Absorbable stents perform similarly to metallic stents

STEMI study: Absorbable stents perform similarly to metallic stents

A drug-eluting coronary stent made of absorbable material performed similarly to the gold-standard metal one in a non-inferiority trial among patients with the more serious type of heart attack known as ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), according to results of the ABSORB STEMI TROFI II trial. [More]
Newly discovered prion causes Multiple System Atrophy

Newly discovered prion causes Multiple System Atrophy

Multiple System Atrophy (MSA), a neurodegenerative disorder with similarities to Parkinson's disease, is caused by a newly discovered type of prion, akin to the misfolded proteins involved in incurable progressive brain diseases such Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), according to two new research papers led by scientists at UC San Francisco. [More]
Powerful explosive devices of 21st century warfare prompt urgent calls to re-engineer protective gear

Powerful explosive devices of 21st century warfare prompt urgent calls to re-engineer protective gear

Battle-inflicted head injuries are as old as war itself, evidenced by the copper helmets worn by Bronze Age soldiers to deflect blows from spears and axes. Over the ensuing millennia, as weapons evolved, so did armor. Today, the powerful explosive devices of 21st century warfare have once again raised the stakes, prompting urgent calls to re-engineer protective gear. [More]
UVA researchers reveal how sperm use 'harpoon' to facilitate fertilization

UVA researchers reveal how sperm use 'harpoon' to facilitate fertilization

Could the sperm harpoon the egg to facilitate fertilization? That's the intriguing possibility raised by the University of Virginia School of Medicine's discovery that a protein within the head of the sperm forms spiky filaments, suggesting that these tiny filaments may lash together the sperm and its target. [More]
ieCrowd announces achievement of major milestone in commercial development of Smart Oxygen device

ieCrowd announces achievement of major milestone in commercial development of Smart Oxygen device

ieCrowd today announced the achievement of an important milestone in the commercial development of the company's supplemental oxygen delivery device, Smart Oxygen. The Smart Oxygen device, being developed by ieCrowd's subsidiary Smart Oxygen Solutions, automatically adjusts to a patient's changing demand for oxygen based on level of activity. [More]
Pitt researchers identify molecular mechanisms behind resilience to tinnitus, possible drug therapy

Pitt researchers identify molecular mechanisms behind resilience to tinnitus, possible drug therapy

Researchers have identified in an animal model the molecular mechanisms behind resilience to noise-induced tinnitus and a possible drug therapy that could reduce susceptibility to this chronic and sometimes debilitating condition. The findings by a team from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine were published online in the journal eLife. [More]
Adaptive immune system plays active role in guiding development of mammary glands

Adaptive immune system plays active role in guiding development of mammary glands

In experiments with mouse tissue, UC San Francisco researchers have discovered that the adaptive immune system, generally associated with fighting bacterial and viral infections, plays an active role in guiding the normal development of mammary glands, the only organs--in female humans as well as mice--that develop predominately after birth, beginning at puberty. [More]
New review article reveals Y chromosome’s role in cardiovascular and immune function, cancer

New review article reveals Y chromosome’s role in cardiovascular and immune function, cancer

The role of sex in human disease is a growing area of research. Although estrogen (in females) and androgens (in males) are often seen as possible causes for such differences, sex chromosomes, including the male-specific Y chromosome, may also play a role. However, it has been difficult to understand how the Y chromosome could contribute to disease in men, in part because it is much more difficult to sequence than all other chromosomes. [More]
Researchers uncover important cellular functions that help regulate inflammation

Researchers uncover important cellular functions that help regulate inflammation

Researchers at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech have uncovered key cellular functions that help regulate inflammation -- a discovery that could have important implications for the treatment of allergies, heart disease, and certain forms of cancer. [More]
Melatonin hormone can help prevent cardiovascular disease risk in children born through ART

Melatonin hormone can help prevent cardiovascular disease risk in children born through ART

Studies are revealing that children born through assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The increased risk is due to changes in the expression of the genes important for vascular health. These studies suggest that the composition of the solutions in which embryo fertilization and culturing are done is to blame. [More]
Flu remedies can help treat E. coli bacteria

Flu remedies can help treat E. coli bacteria

If the intestinal bacteria level becomes unbalanced, it can cause diseases. Physiologists from the University of Zurich reveal how a specific carbohydrate in the intestinal mucosa heavily multiplies certain E. coli bacteria and thus causes inflammations. These could be treated with flu remedies, which opens up new therapeutic possibilities. [More]
Researchers reveal new electrical mechanism that can control molecular switches regulating cancer cell growth

Researchers reveal new electrical mechanism that can control molecular switches regulating cancer cell growth

The molecular switches regulating human cell growth do a great job of replacing cells that die during the course of a lifetime. But when they misfire, life-threatening cancers can occur. Research led by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) has revealed a new electrical mechanism that can control these switches. [More]
Researchers establish structure of important tumor-suppressing protein

Researchers establish structure of important tumor-suppressing protein

An international group of researchers led by Carnegie Mellon University physicists Mathias Lösche and Frank Heinrich have established the structure of an important tumor suppressing protein, PTEN. Their findings provide new insights into how the protein regulates cell growth and how mutations in the gene that encodes the protein can lead to cancer. [More]
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