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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
HemoShear announces research collaboration with Medivir

HemoShear announces research collaboration with Medivir

HemoShear, LLC, the human disease biology company, today announced research collaboration with Medivir AB of Stockholm, Sweden, an emerging research-based pharmaceutical company focused on infectious diseases. [More]

Investigators use computer-assisted approach to identify and rank new clock genes

Over the last few decades researchers have characterized a set of clock genes that drive daily rhythms of physiology and behavior in all types of species, from flies to humans. [More]

Studies identify 2 genes highly associated with IBD

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), a group of chronic inflammatory disorders of the intestine that result in painful and debilitating complications, affects over 1.4 million people in the U.S., and while there are treatments to reduce inflammation for patients, there is no cure. [More]

Drug used to treat hypertension prevents post-traumatic epilepsy in rodent model

Between 10 and 20 percent of all cases of epilepsy result from severe head injury, but a new drug promises to prevent post-traumatic seizures and may forestall further brain damage caused by seizures in those who already have epilepsy. [More]

Cedars-Sinai researchers to receive $8M grant to fund Phase II clinical trial of experimental drug for stroke

​Cedars-Sinai stroke intervention researchers have been informed that the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes of Health, will award an $8 million grant to fund a multicenter Phase II clinical trial of an experimental drug for stroke. [More]

Three Johns Hopkins researchers awarded grants for work on potential treatments for diabetes

Three Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine researchers have been awarded two-year grants for their work on potential treatments for diabetes, Novo Nordisk announced this month. Of the 110 initial submissions to the new Novo Nordisk Diabetes and Obesity Biologics Science Forum Program, only four projects were funded, three of which are led by Johns Hopkins researchers. They are Jonathan Powell, M.D., Ph.D.; G. William Wong, Ph.D.; and Elias Zambidis, M.D., Ph.D. [More]

Engineering cell-based, biological devices may selectively kill cancer cells without disrupting healthy cells

​A Northwestern University synthetic biology team has created a new technology for modifying human cells to create programmable therapeutics that could travel the body and selectively target cancer and other sites of disease. [More]

Study shows sprifermin reduces cartilage thickness loss in patients with knee osteoarthritis

In a new study in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, at 12 months, total femorotibial cartilage thickness loss was reduced in sprifermin (recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 18)-treated knees compared to placebo-treated knees, with effects being significant in the lateral femorotibial compartment but not in the central femorotibial compartment. [More]

Study shows massage therapy improves blood flow, alleviates muscle soreness after exercise

Massage therapy improves general blood flow and alleviates muscle soreness after exercise, according to a study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

​Researchers at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts and Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM) have uncovered a mechanism that may help explain the severe forms of schistosomiasis, or snail fever, which is caused by schistosome worms and is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. The study in mice, published online in The Journal of Immunology, may also offer targets for intervention and amelioration of the disease. [More]

Massage therapy alleviates muscle soreness and improves general blood flow

Massage therapy improves general blood flow and alleviates muscle soreness after exercise, according to a study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]

AAA announces 2014 award winners in the field of anatomy

The American Association of Anatomists is honored to announce its 2014 award winners. All awards will be presented during the Closing Awards Ceremony being held at the San Diego Marriott Hotel on Tuesday, April 29th at 7:30 p.m. during AAA's 2014 Annual Meeting at Experimental Biology. [More]
Researchers show development of new cell models that track, report clock gene function

Researchers show development of new cell models that track, report clock gene function

The consequences of modern life -- shift work, cell phone addiction, and travel across time zones -- all disturb internal clocks. These are found in the brain where they regulate sleep and throughout the body where they regulate physiology and metabolism. [More]
New book is an essential resource for academic scientists working in biomedicine

New book is an essential resource for academic scientists working in biomedicine

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press is pleased to announce the publication of Connecting with Companies: A Guide to Consulting Agreements for Biomedical Scientists by Edward Klees, J.D. and H. Robert Horvitz, Ph.D. The book is an essential resource for academic scientists and physicians considering consulting work in biomedicine. [More]
Researchers reveal how cells respond to mechanical manipulation

Researchers reveal how cells respond to mechanical manipulation

The push and pull of physical force can cause profound changes in the behavior of a cell. Two studies from researchers working at the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center reveal how cells respond to mechanical manipulation [More]

Research finding sheds more light on cancer development and metastasis

The push and pull of physical force can cause profound changes in the behavior of a cell. Two studies from researchers working at the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center reveal how cells respond to mechanical manipulation, a key factor in addressing the underlying causes of cancer and other diseases. [More]
Natural compound from green tomatoes protects against muscle atrophy

Natural compound from green tomatoes protects against muscle atrophy

Using a screening method that previously identified a compound in apple peel as a muscle-boosting agent, a team of University of Iowa scientists has now discovered that tomatidine, a compound from green tomatoes, is even more potent for building muscle and protecting against muscle atrophy. [More]

New drug for treating Rett syndrome is on the horizon

A powerful new drug which could relieve the symptoms of devastating childhood disease Rett syndrome is on the horizon thanks to a funding injection of -180,000. [More]
Penn Medicine to host symposium on regenerative medicine

Penn Medicine to host symposium on regenerative medicine

The University of Pennsylvania's Institute for Regenerative Medicine will host a symposium on Friday, April 11, 2014 to detail the progress researchers are making toward reprogramming human cells to treat a variety of diseases. [More]
New lab at the Nencki Institute conducts research on neurodegenerative diseases

New lab at the Nencki Institute conducts research on neurodegenerative diseases

The Laboratory of Preclinical Studies of Higher Standard, the newest lab of the Neurobiology Center at the Nencki Institute in Warsaw, Poland, will conduct basic research aimed to explain molecular mechanisms responsible for neurodegenerative diseases. [More]