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Agienic issued three key U.S. patents for novel copper-based antimicrobial materials

Agienic issued three key U.S. patents for novel copper-based antimicrobial materials

Agienic Inc., an Arizona-based innovator in antimicrobial technology, announced today the issuance of three key U.S. patents on their novel copper-based antimicrobial materials. [More]
Antivirulence antibiotics could evade resistance longer than traditional antibiotics

Antivirulence antibiotics could evade resistance longer than traditional antibiotics

We've all seen the headlines. "Man found to be shedding virulent strain of polio"; "Virulent flu strain in Europe hits the economy"; "Most virulent strain of E. coli ever seen contains DNA sequences from plague bacteria." [More]
Millercare offers tips to prevent onset of deep vein thrombosis

Millercare offers tips to prevent onset of deep vein thrombosis

We’re set to have one of the coldest Januarys in years. As winds batter the UK, it can be tempting to stay indoors and hide from the chill, particularly for the elderly. [More]
SUNY Downstate study maps areas of high probability of plague across the western US

SUNY Downstate study maps areas of high probability of plague across the western US

Researchers at SUNY Downstate Medical Center have identified and mapped areas of high probability of plague bacteria in the western United States. [More]
TGen receives 2015 Regents' Award for Outstanding Service to Higher Education

TGen receives 2015 Regents' Award for Outstanding Service to Higher Education

The Arizona Board of Regents presented the Translational Genomics Research Institute with its 2015 Regents' Award for Outstanding Service to Higher Education, recognizing the extensive research TGen has conducted in association with Northern Arizona University. [More]
Barefoot activities can improve balance and posture, prevent common injuries

Barefoot activities can improve balance and posture, prevent common injuries

As your cold-weather footwear makes the seasonal migration from the back of your closet to replace summer's flip flops and bare feet, don't underestimate the benefits of padding around naked from the ankles down. [More]
Plague endemic in man since early Bronze Age, but has not always been flea-borne

Plague endemic in man since early Bronze Age, but has not always been flea-borne

A recent analysis of ancient DNA has revealed that the plaque had been endemic in humans for at least 3000 years before the first global outbreak on record (the Plague of Justinian in 541 AD). Furthermore, the disease was not always transmitted by fleas, with mutation to the bubonic form only occurring around the start of the 1st millennium BC. [More]
Cancer-causing parasitic worm may help patients recover from wounds, say JCU scientists

Cancer-causing parasitic worm may help patients recover from wounds, say JCU scientists

It's short, ugly and deadly. But James Cook University scientists have found a cancer-causing, parasitic worm could help patients recover from their wounds. [More]
RE.WORK showcases future technology and innovations in deep learning software

RE.WORK showcases future technology and innovations in deep learning software

The future of technological innovation is a broad topic with endless opportunities in every scientific field. RE.WORK’s two most recent concurrent conferences ‘RE.WORK: Future Technology’ and ‘RE.WORK: Deep Learning’, in part focussed on putting healthcare in the context of the wider technological revolution. [More]
Highly diluted acetic acid in vinegar can kill bacteria, prevent infection in burn wounds

Highly diluted acetic acid in vinegar can kill bacteria, prevent infection in burn wounds

Highly diluted acetic acid, an active ingredient of household vinegar, has been shown to be an effective alternative agent to prevent infection and kill bacteria found in burn wounds. [More]
Online course offered in October on zoonotic disease

Online course offered in October on zoonotic disease

Recent outbreaks of plague, tularemia and increasing incidents of rabies exposure highlight the importance of zoonotic disease education for physicians and public health professionals. [More]
Johns Hopkins study advances scientific understanding of how DNA segments move among bacteria

Johns Hopkins study advances scientific understanding of how DNA segments move among bacteria

Scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have deciphered the structure and unusual shape of a bacterial protein that prepares segments of DNA for the insertion of so-called jumping genes. [More]
Researchers decode molecular mechanism of fish toxin that has potential to treat cancer

Researchers decode molecular mechanism of fish toxin that has potential to treat cancer

Pathogenic bacteria develop killer machines that work very specifically and highly efficiently. Scientists from the University of Freiburg have solved the molecular mechanism of a fish toxin that could be used in the future as a medication to treat cancer. The scientists have now published their research in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
Regulatory T cells critical for the immune system's ability to fight off future pathogen attacks

Regulatory T cells critical for the immune system's ability to fight off future pathogen attacks

Just as militaries need to have trained, experienced soldiers ready for future wars, making sure that the immune system has enough battle-ready T cells on hand is important for fast-acting, more effective vaccines, according to Penn State researchers. [More]
Researchers receive $10 million grant for citrus greening research project

Researchers receive $10 million grant for citrus greening research project

To help develop a therapeutic treatment for citrus greening disease, a bacterial infection that threatens the future of the U.S. citrus industry, the United States Department of Agriculture Specialty Crop Research Initiative has awarded a diverse group of researchers a $10 million grant. [More]
Pneumonic plague transmission from dog to man

Pneumonic plague transmission from dog to man

Pneumonic plague is a rare but life-threatening condition caused by the bacteria Yersinia pestis. Y pestis is usually carried by rodents and can be transmitted to humans through a bite from an infected rodent or rodent flea or inhalation of infectious droplets... [More]
Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute sets new national standard for most adult heart transplants

Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute sets new national standard for most adult heart transplants

The Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute completed 120 adult heart transplants and two adult heart-lung transplants in 2014, setting a new national standard for the most adult heart transplants performed in a single year. [More]
Scientists sequence genome of hookworm

Scientists sequence genome of hookworm

In an advance that may potentially lead to new treatments for parasitic hookworms, scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and Cornell University have sequenced the genome of the hookworm, Ancylostoma ceylanicum. [More]
Discovery offers much needed information about how virulent insect-borne diseases cause infection

Discovery offers much needed information about how virulent insect-borne diseases cause infection

For decades, scientists have thought the bacteria that cause the bubonic plague hijack host cells at the site of a fleabite and are then taken to the lymph nodes, where the bacteria multiply and trigger severe disease. But UNC School of Medicine researchers discovered that this accepted theory is off base. The bacteria do not use host cells; they traffic to lymph nodes on their own and not in great numbers. [More]
TUSM researchers awarded $7.4 million to study brain impairment in patients infected with HIV

TUSM researchers awarded $7.4 million to study brain impairment in patients infected with HIV

Researchers at Temple University School of Medicine have been awarded a $7.4 million, five-year grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to determine how cocaine and HIV-1 interact to cause brain impairment in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. [More]
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