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Research opens door to reveal how platelets sense mechanical forces to initiate blood clotting

Research opens door to reveal how platelets sense mechanical forces to initiate blood clotting

Using a unique single-molecule force measurement tool, a research team has developed a clearer understanding of how platelets sense the mechanical forces they encounter during bleeding to initiate the cascading process that leads to blood clotting. [More]
Male hormones can reverse biological drivers of aging, study shows

Male hormones can reverse biological drivers of aging, study shows

Telomerase, an enzyme naturally found in the human organism, is the closest of all known substances to a "cellular elixir of youth." In a recent study, Brazilian and US researchers show that sex hormones can stimulate production of this enzyme. [More]
Bone marrow transplantation may one day be beneficial to subset of ALS, say researchers

Bone marrow transplantation may one day be beneficial to subset of ALS, say researchers

Harvard Stem Cell Institute researchers at Harvard University and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT have found evidence that bone marrow transplantation may one day be beneficial to a subset of patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. [More]
Study identifies new blood markers to accurately diagnose Gulf War Illness

Study identifies new blood markers to accurately diagnose Gulf War Illness

Based on a study of 85 Gulf War veterans, Veterans Affairs researchers in Minneapolis have developed a tentative panel of blood markers they say can verify a diagnosis of Gulf War Illness with 90 percent accuracy. [More]
Alnylam reports new results from investigational RNAi therapeutic programs

Alnylam reports new results from investigational RNAi therapeutic programs

Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: ALNY), the leading RNAi therapeutics company, announced today preliminary results from its ongoing Phase 2 open-label extension (OLE) studies with patisiran and revusiran, both investigational RNAi therapeutics targeting transthyretin (TTR) for the treatment of hereditary TTR-mediated amyloidosis (hATTR amyloidosis). [More]
WHO urges all countries to establish blood services based on voluntary non-remunerated blood donations

WHO urges all countries to establish blood services based on voluntary non-remunerated blood donations

Voluntary, unpaid blood donations must be increased rapidly in more than half the world’s countries in order to ensure a reliable supply of safe blood for patients whose lives depend on it, the World Health Organization said on World Blood Donor Day. [More]
Discovery on new form ETV6-related thrombocytopenia presented at EHA Annual Congress

Discovery on new form ETV6-related thrombocytopenia presented at EHA Annual Congress

We recently discovered a new form of an inherited deficiency of platelets, which is caused by mutations in the ETV6-gene. [More]
Mice study shows heart medication helps reduce build-up of plaque in brain's blood vessels

Mice study shows heart medication helps reduce build-up of plaque in brain's blood vessels

A new study from örebro University, published in Science Signaling today, shows that heart medication reduces the build-up of plaque in the brain's blood vessels in mice. The question is if this is true also in humans? If the answer is yes, it might bring scientists a step closer to developing a medicine against Alzheimer's disease. [More]
New technique to grow blood vessels could accelerate growth of regenerative medicine

New technique to grow blood vessels could accelerate growth of regenerative medicine

In addition the technique to grow the blood vessels in a 3D scaffold cuts down on the risk of transplant rejection because it uses cells from the patient. It was developed by researchers from the University of Bath's Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, working with colleagues at Bristol Heart Institute. [More]
Increased fitness can normalize platelet function quickly

Increased fitness can normalize platelet function quickly

Women with poor physical fitness display significantly higher platelet activation than women with average to very good fitness. That is the major finding of a study of 62 young women, conducted by the research groups of Ivo Volf and Rochus Pokan and sponsored by the Austrian Heart Foundation. Platelet (thrombocyte) activation can lead to the formation of potentially life-threatening blood clots. [More]
Understanding how individuals respond to aspirin

Understanding how individuals respond to aspirin

Researchers have learned new information about how different people respond to aspirin, a globally prescribed drug in cardioprotection. The research team, led by scientists at Cardiff University in the United Kingdom and including representatives from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of Colorado, identified more than 5,600 lipids — or fats — in blood platelets and gained new insights into how these cells respond to aspirin. [More]
New blood treatment technology could reduce malaria risk following blood transfusions

New blood treatment technology could reduce malaria risk following blood transfusions

Patients, especially children, who undergo blood transfusions in sub-Saharan Africa are at high risk of transfusion-transmitted malaria. A new trial, published in The Lancet today, suggests that treating donated blood with a new technology that combines UV radiation and vitamin B is safe and could minimise the risk of malaria infection following blood transfusions. [More]
Study shows safety of experimental drug guadecitabine in colorectal cancer patients

Study shows safety of experimental drug guadecitabine in colorectal cancer patients

In a small, phase I clinical trial, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers say they show for the first time that the experimental drug guadecitabine (SGI-110) is safe in combination with the chemotherapy drug irinotecan and may overcome resistance to irinotecan in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. [More]
Magnesium could be safe, cost-effective therapeutic intervention for genetic coagulation disorder

Magnesium could be safe, cost-effective therapeutic intervention for genetic coagulation disorder

An international team of scientists was able to demonstrate in mouse and patient studies, how magnesium affects the production of blood platelets and that the TRPM7 channel function plays a key role in this process. Scientists of the Rudolf Virchow Center and the Hospital of the University of Würzburg were primarily involved in this study. Their results were published in the current journal "Nature Communications". [More]
Research suggests ibuprofen does not increase bleeding risk after plastic surgery

Research suggests ibuprofen does not increase bleeding risk after plastic surgery

Patients are often instructed not to take ibuprofen and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs before or after surgery because of increased bleeding risk. But available evidence suggests that ibuprofen does not increase the risk of bleeding after plastic surgery procedures, according to a research review in the April issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
Study shows gut microbes alter platelet function, heightens risk of heart attack and stroke

Study shows gut microbes alter platelet function, heightens risk of heart attack and stroke

In a combination of both clinical studies of over 4,000 patients and animal model studies, Cleveland Clinic researchers have demonstrated -- for the first time -- that gut microbes alter platelet function and risk of blood clot-related illnesses like heart attack and stroke. [More]
RUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules approved for treatment-naïve CLL patients

RUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules approved for treatment-naïve CLL patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules for treatment-naïve patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). [More]
Moderate alcohol consumption can increase risk of heart attack and stroke

Moderate alcohol consumption can increase risk of heart attack and stroke

While the protective connection between moderate alcohol consumption and heart health has been well-studied, new research from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health suggests that the association is more complicated than is widely accepted. [More]
Platelet-rich plasma therapy may help improve tissue healing

Platelet-rich plasma therapy may help improve tissue healing

Tiger Woods, Kobe Bryant and A-Rod have all used it, but does platelet-rich plasma therapy (PRP) really work for the every-day active person? According to a University of Alberta Glen Sather Sports Medicine Clinic pilot study on patients with chronically sore shoulders published in PLOS ONE, preliminary findings say yes. [More]
FDA issues new guidance to reduce risk of Zika blood transmission

FDA issues new guidance to reduce risk of Zika blood transmission

As a safety measure against the emerging Zika virus outbreak, today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a new guidance recommending the deferral of individuals from donating blood if they have been to areas with active Zika virus transmission, potentially have been exposed to the virus, or have had a confirmed Zika virus infection. [More]
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