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Poliomyelitis (polio) is a highly infectious disease caused by a virus that invades the nervous system and can cause severe paralysis. The virus enters the body through the mouth and multiplies in the intestine. Initial symptoms are fever, fatigue, headache, vomiting, stiffness in the neck, and pain in the limbs. One in 200 infections leads to irreversible paralysis (usually in the legs). Among those paralyzed, 5-10% die when their breathing muscles become immobilized. Polio mainly affects children under five years of age. Naturally occurring polio was eliminated in the U.S. in 1979 and in the Western Hemisphere by 1991; however, worldwide efforts are continuing towards eradication of this contagious and devastating disease.
High uptake of US infant vaccination in 2013

High uptake of US infant vaccination in 2013

The recently published National Immunization Survey (NIS) conducted by the CDC, shows that the majority of infants in the US were vaccinated against potentially serious diseases in 2013. Fewer than 1% of children were unvaccinated in 2013. [More]
WHO calls for an end to continued attacks on health workers in conflicts, other humanitarian crises

WHO calls for an end to continued attacks on health workers in conflicts, other humanitarian crises

As major emergencies around the globe increase in scale, complexity and frequency, WHO is calling for an end to the targeting of health workers in conflicts and other humanitarian crises, which represent a breach of the fundamental right to health. [More]
Scientists identify gene that regulates sleep and wake rhythms

Scientists identify gene that regulates sleep and wake rhythms

Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have identified a gene that regulates sleep and wake rhythms. [More]
United Spinal partners with Airshells to provide access to safety bags for people living with disabilities

United Spinal partners with Airshells to provide access to safety bags for people living with disabilities

August 6th, United Spinal Association today announced a partnership with Airshells.us to provide people living with disabilities access to safety bags designed to protect foldable and rigid wheelchairs from damage during air travel. [More]
Small molecule may be able to convince damaged nerves to effectively rewire circuits

Small molecule may be able to convince damaged nerves to effectively rewire circuits

Frogs, dogs, whales, snails can all do it, but humans and primates can't. Regrow nerves after an injury, that is—while many animals have this ability, humans don't. [More]
Little-known supportive cells in brain may play major role in cognitive function

Little-known supportive cells in brain may play major role in cognitive function

When you're expecting something-like the meal you've ordered at a restaurant-or when something captures your interest, unique electrical rhythms sweep through your brain. [More]
Doctors remind parents about importance of immunizing children

Doctors remind parents about importance of immunizing children

Doctors at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center want to remind parents about the importance of immunizing their children when preparing to send the children back to school. [More]
Salk scientists identify gene that fights metastasis of common lung cancer

Salk scientists identify gene that fights metastasis of common lung cancer

Scientists at the Salk Institute have identified a gene responsible for stopping the movement of cancer from the lungs to other parts of the body, indicating a new way to fight one of the world's deadliest cancers. [More]
Single injection of protein FGF1 enough to restore blood sugar levels

Single injection of protein FGF1 enough to restore blood sugar levels

In mice with diet-induced diabetes—the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans—a single injection of the protein FGF1 is enough to restore blood sugar levels to a healthy range for more than two days. [More]
Extra dose of polio vaccine boosts immunity in children under 5 years old

Extra dose of polio vaccine boosts immunity in children under 5 years old

Giving children under 5 years old an extra dose of inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) helps to boost their immunity to the poliovirus and should be added to vaccination programmes in polio-endemic countries and those facing a high risk of imported cases, suggests new research published in The Lancet. [More]

New article explores ethical issues and global health impact of counterterrorism

The surge in murders of polio vaccination workers in Pakistan has made headlines this year, but little attention has been devoted to the ethical issues surrounding the global health impact of current counterterrorism policy and practice. An essay in the Hastings Center Report reviews the range of harms to population health traceable to counterterrorism operations. [More]
New genetic 'barcode' for malaria parasites could be used to track and contain spread of disease

New genetic 'barcode' for malaria parasites could be used to track and contain spread of disease

A new genetic 'barcode' for malaria parasites has been found which could be used to track and contain the spread of the disease, according to new research led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. [More]
United Spinal Association, NSCIA to convene at ROCH to address disability issues

United Spinal Association, NSCIA to convene at ROCH to address disability issues

United Spinal Association and advocates from its membership division, National Spinal Cord Injury Association (NSCIA), will gather in Washington, D.C. on June 22-25 for Roll on Capitol Hill to shape policies that impact the health, independence and quality of life of people living with spinal cord injuries and disorders (SCI/D). [More]
Salk Institute receives $25 million for cutting-edge biological research

Salk Institute receives $25 million for cutting-edge biological research

The Salk Institute for Biological Studies has received a $25 million gift from San Diego philanthropist and former Salk trustee Conrad T. Prebys to support cutting-edge biological research on a wide range of diseases. [More]
Chronic bystander viral impairs development of memory T cells

Chronic bystander viral impairs development of memory T cells

Studies of vaccine programs in the developing world have revealed that individuals with chronic infections such as malaria and hepatitis tend to be less likely to develop the fullest possible immunity benefits from vaccines for unrelated illnesses. [More]
Salk scientists explore earliest detectable changes in the brain that lead to schizophrenia

Salk scientists explore earliest detectable changes in the brain that lead to schizophrenia

Using new stem cell technology, scientists at the Salk Institute have shown that neurons generated from the skin cells of people with schizophrenia behave strangely in early developmental stages, providing a hint as to ways to detect and potentially treat the disease early. [More]
Pfizer reports positive results from rLP2086 Phase 2 study for invasive meningococcal disease

Pfizer reports positive results from rLP2086 Phase 2 study for invasive meningococcal disease

Pfizer Inc. announced today the results from two Phase 2 studies of bivalent rLP2086, Pfizer's recombinant vaccine candidate, currently under development for the prevention of invasive meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B in 10 to 25 year olds. [More]
Viewpoints: Evidence for Obamacare saving lives; a continuing role for Minnesotacare

Viewpoints: Evidence for Obamacare saving lives; a continuing role for Minnesotacare

People asking the ultimate question about the Affordable Care Act--will it actually save lives?--now have an answer, and it's yes. [More]
Scientists find 2 key proteins that regulate growth of mammary stem cells and contribute to breast cancer

Scientists find 2 key proteins that regulate growth of mammary stem cells and contribute to breast cancer

By carefully controlling the levels of two proteins, researchers at the Salk Institute have discovered how to keep mammary stem cells-those that can form breast tissue-alive and functioning in the lab. The new ability to propagate mammary stem cells is allowing them to study both breast development and the formation of breast cancers. [More]

Equatorial Guinea launches first phase of campaign to immunize children against polio

The government of Equatorial Guinea launched the first phase of a campaign to immunize the nation's children against polio last week. The government has been working closely with World Health Organization, UNICEF, United Nations, Center for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and others to implement this proactive campaign. [More]