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Poliomyelitis (polio) is a highly infectious disease caused by a virus that invades the nervous system and can cause severe paralysis. The virus enters the body through the mouth and multiplies in the intestine. Initial symptoms are fever, fatigue, headache, vomiting, stiffness in the neck, and pain in the limbs. One in 200 infections leads to irreversible paralysis (usually in the legs). Among those paralyzed, 5-10% die when their breathing muscles become immobilized. Polio mainly affects children under five years of age. Naturally occurring polio was eliminated in the U.S. in 1979 and in the Western Hemisphere by 1991; however, worldwide efforts are continuing towards eradication of this contagious and devastating disease.
Cincinnati Children's doctors remind parents about the importance of immunizing kids before sending them to school

Cincinnati Children's doctors remind parents about the importance of immunizing kids before sending them to school

Doctors at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center want to remind parents about the importance of immunizing their children when preparing to send their children back to school. [More]
Aggressive vaccination effort reduces transmission of measles among North American Amish communities

Aggressive vaccination effort reduces transmission of measles among North American Amish communities

An aggressive vaccination effort in response to the 2014 measles outbreak among North American Amish communities in Ohio significantly reduced the transmission of measles and the expected number of cases, according to a new study, even though under-vaccination among the North American Amish and in other communities around the United States led to the highest national annual number of reported cases in 2014 in the last 20 years. [More]
Salk researchers move one step closer to making cures for genetic diseases a reality

Salk researchers move one step closer to making cures for genetic diseases a reality

Healthy brain, muscle, eye and heart cells would improve the lives of tens of thousands of people around the world with debilitating mitochondrial diseases. Now, researchers at the Salk Institute have gotten one step closer to making such cures a reality: they've turned cells from patients into healthy, mutation-free stem cells that can then become any cell type. [More]
Salk professor receives Allen Distinguished Investigator award to uncover biology of Alzheimer's disease

Salk professor receives Allen Distinguished Investigator award to uncover biology of Alzheimer's disease

The Salk Institute today announced that Rusty Gage, Salk professor in the Laboratory of Genetics, has been selected as one of five recipients of the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation's Allen Distinguished Investigator (ADI) program and will be awarded $1.5 million to conduct his research. These researchers have projects aimed at uncovering the elusive biological foundations of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
University of Georgia's Lynn Bailey leads international paper on folate biomarkers

University of Georgia's Lynn Bailey leads international paper on folate biomarkers

A University of Georgia researcher is lead author on an international paper on folate biomarkers as part of an initiative to provide evidence-based guidance for the global nutrition and public health community. [More]
Dietary fat intake could potentially ease mitochondrial disease, shows research

Dietary fat intake could potentially ease mitochondrial disease, shows research

Mice that have a genetic version of mitochondrial disease can easily be mistaken for much older animals by the time they are nine months old: they have thinning grey hair, osteoporosis, poor hearing, infertility, heart problems and have lost weight. Despite having this disease at birth, these mice have a "secret weapon" in their youth that staves off signs of aging for a time. [More]
Scientists develop small molecule drug that prevents autophagy from starting in cancer cells

Scientists develop small molecule drug that prevents autophagy from starting in cancer cells

As a tumor grows, its cancerous cells ramp up an energy-harvesting process to support its hasty development. This process, called autophagy, is normally used by a cell to recycle damaged organelles and proteins, but is also co-opted by cancer cells to meet their increased energy and metabolic demands. [More]
Nucleoporin proteins play significant role in maintaining embryonic stem cells

Nucleoporin proteins play significant role in maintaining embryonic stem cells

What if you found out that pieces of your front door were occasionally flying off the door frame to carry out chores around the house? That's the kind of surprise scientists at the Salk Institute experienced with their recent discovery that nucleoporins -- proteins that act as cellular 'doorways' to help manage what goes in and out of a cell's nucleus -- are actually much bigger players in expressing genes than previously thought. [More]
New research shows that low glycemic index diets reduce autism symptoms in mice

New research shows that low glycemic index diets reduce autism symptoms in mice

Bread, cereal and other sugary processed foods cause rapid spikes and subsequent crashes in blood sugar. In contrast, diets made up of vegetables, fruits and whole grains are healthier, in part because they take longer to digest and keep us more even-keeled. [More]
Nanopatch Jet Coating drug delivery platform wins 2015 Good Design Award

Nanopatch Jet Coating drug delivery platform wins 2015 Good Design Award

Invetech, a leader in instrument development, custom automation, and contract manufacturing, and Vaxxas, a biotechnology start-up and developer of the Nanopatch™ needle-free drug delivery technology, have been named winners of the 2015 Good Design Award for development of the Nanopatch Jet Coating Instrument, an advanced technology platform to support needle-free dermal drug delivery research and product development. The award was announced last evening at the Good Design Awards Gala Night held in Sydney, Australia. [More]
Chancellor Angela Merkel calls for new plan to tackle Ebola outbreak at 68th World Health Assembly

Chancellor Angela Merkel calls for new plan to tackle Ebola outbreak at 68th World Health Assembly

Angela Merkel, Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany addressed delegates on the first morning of the Sixty-eighth World Health Assembly. "The WHO is the only international organization that has universal political legitimacy on global health issues,” she said. [More]
CMO Council announces the launch of global innovation ecosystem to advance UNICEF’s work

CMO Council announces the launch of global innovation ecosystem to advance UNICEF’s work

The Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) Council today announced the launch of a global CauseTech.net community and portal site, which is part of a new private sector initiative to crowdsource breakthrough ideas, inventions, products, and emerging technologies that can advance the work done by the UNICEF Global Innovation Center worldwide. [More]
Malfunction of brain architecture can prompt neuron to make 'early-career' switch

Malfunction of brain architecture can prompt neuron to make 'early-career' switch

Scientists at the Salk Institute have discovered that the role of neurons -- which are responsible for specific tasks in the brain -- is much more flexible than previously believed. [More]

Liberia conducts first polio, measles immunizations since Ebola outbreak.

A week-long campaign to vaccinate more than 600,000 children against polio and measles kicks off today in Liberia... [More]
Salk discovery may offer new avenues for generating novel therapies

Salk discovery may offer new avenues for generating novel therapies

Scientists at the Salk Institute have discovered a novel type of pluripotent stem cell--cells capable of developing into any type of tissue--whose identity is tied to their location in a developing embryo. This contrasts with stem cells traditionally used in scientific study, which are characterized by their time-related stage of development. [More]
Rudolf Jaenisch honored with 2015 March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology

Rudolf Jaenisch honored with 2015 March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology

Rudolf Jaenisch, MD, who laid the groundwork for the development and use of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells - stem cells derived directly from adult tissue -- to potentially treat and cure a variety of human diseases, has received the 20th anniversary March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology. [More]
New microneedle patch simplifies measles vaccination

New microneedle patch simplifies measles vaccination

A new microneedle patch being developed by the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) could make it easier to vaccinate people against measles and other vaccine-preventable diseases. [More]
National Immunization Awareness Week launched by the Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health

National Immunization Awareness Week launched by the Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health

Today, the Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health, and Dr. Gregory Taylor, Canada's Chief Public Health Officer, launched National Immunization Awareness Week, which runs from April 25 to May 2. They encouraged Canadians to stay healthy by making sure their vaccinations are up to date. [More]
New text message alert system helps parents remember child's vaccination appointments

New text message alert system helps parents remember child's vaccination appointments

Nearly a third of all children nationwide and in Kentucky aren't up-to-date with the vaccination schedule recommended by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), but not because their parents are refusing vaccines. Evidence suggests parents tend to forget appointments when children are scheduled to receive immunizations. [More]
Polio immunization campaign targets 5.8 million children in Iraq

Polio immunization campaign targets 5.8 million children in Iraq

A 5-day nationwide polio immunization campaign targeting 5.8 million children under 5 years of age will begin in Iraq on Sunday 12 April. The campaign will be marked by launch events on 12 April in Baghdad, organized by the Ministry of Health, and on 13 April in Erbil organized by the Kurdistan regional Ministry of Health. [More]
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