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Poliomyelitis (polio) is a highly infectious disease caused by a virus that invades the nervous system and can cause severe paralysis. The virus enters the body through the mouth and multiplies in the intestine. Initial symptoms are fever, fatigue, headache, vomiting, stiffness in the neck, and pain in the limbs. One in 200 infections leads to irreversible paralysis (usually in the legs). Among those paralyzed, 5-10% die when their breathing muscles become immobilized. Polio mainly affects children under five years of age. Naturally occurring polio was eliminated in the U.S. in 1979 and in the Western Hemisphere by 1991; however, worldwide efforts are continuing towards eradication of this contagious and devastating disease.
UAE calls for strengthening global campaign to eradicate polio

UAE calls for strengthening global campaign to eradicate polio

At an event hosted by the UAE Ministry of International Cooperation and Development, speaking on behalf of the Minister MICAD, HE Sheikha Lubna Bint Khaled Al Qasimi, HE Dr. Anwar Gargash, Minister of State for Foreign Affairs and Minister of State for Federal National Council Affairs, called for an intensification of the global campaign to eradicate polio. [More]
Sustained international efforts can help reduce premature deaths by 40% over next 20 years

Sustained international efforts can help reduce premature deaths by 40% over next 20 years

New research published today [Friday 19 September] in The Lancet suggests that, with sustained international efforts, the number of premature deaths could be reduced by 40% over the next two decades (2010-2030), halving under–50 mortality and preventing a third of the deaths at ages 50–69 years. [More]
High impact health interventions reduce maternal and child mortality in poor countries

High impact health interventions reduce maternal and child mortality in poor countries

New studies have uncovered the specific interventions and advances that have led to the success with these at-risk populations in the poorest countries. [More]
Getting flu shot every autumn can lead to better health

Getting flu shot every autumn can lead to better health

Everyone knows that the best way to avoid the flu is by getting an annual flu shot. But a trip to your physician every autumn for the vaccination can help you avoid much more than the dreaded flu bug. "At the doctor's office, the focus is on you and what is going on with your health. This is your time to talk about concerns to improve your well-being beyond the flu season," says Jorge Parada, MD, MPH, the medical director of the Infection Prevention and Control Program at Loyola University Health System. [More]
Gates Foundation pledges $50 million to support emergency efforts to control Ebola epidemic

Gates Foundation pledges $50 million to support emergency efforts to control Ebola epidemic

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation today announced that it will commit $50 million to support the scale up of emergency efforts to contain the Ebola outbreak in West Africa and interrupt transmission of the virus. [More]
Scientists identify how immune cells use two critical receptors to clear dead cells from the body

Scientists identify how immune cells use two critical receptors to clear dead cells from the body

In most of the tissues of the body, specialized immune cells are entrusted with the task of engulfing the billions of dead cells that are generated every day. [More]
Viewpoints: End-of-life discussions; seniors missing their vaccinations; health law's new political calculations

Viewpoints: End-of-life discussions; seniors missing their vaccinations; health law's new political calculations

There is reason to hope that a degree of sanity may be returning to the touchy issue of advance planning for medical care at the end of life. [More]
High uptake of US infant vaccination in 2013

High uptake of US infant vaccination in 2013

The recently published National Immunization Survey (NIS) conducted by the CDC, shows that the majority of infants in the US were vaccinated against potentially serious diseases in 2013. Fewer than 1% of children were unvaccinated in 2013. [More]

WHO calls for an end to continued attacks on health workers in conflicts, other humanitarian crises

As major emergencies around the globe increase in scale, complexity and frequency, WHO is calling for an end to the targeting of health workers in conflicts and other humanitarian crises, which represent a breach of the fundamental right to health. [More]
Scientists identify gene that regulates sleep and wake rhythms

Scientists identify gene that regulates sleep and wake rhythms

Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have identified a gene that regulates sleep and wake rhythms. [More]
United Spinal partners with Airshells to provide access to safety bags for people living with disabilities

United Spinal partners with Airshells to provide access to safety bags for people living with disabilities

August 6th, United Spinal Association today announced a partnership with Airshells.us to provide people living with disabilities access to safety bags designed to protect foldable and rigid wheelchairs from damage during air travel. [More]
Small molecule may be able to convince damaged nerves to effectively rewire circuits

Small molecule may be able to convince damaged nerves to effectively rewire circuits

Frogs, dogs, whales, snails can all do it, but humans and primates can't. Regrow nerves after an injury, that is—while many animals have this ability, humans don't. [More]
Little-known supportive cells in brain may play major role in cognitive function

Little-known supportive cells in brain may play major role in cognitive function

When you're expecting something-like the meal you've ordered at a restaurant-or when something captures your interest, unique electrical rhythms sweep through your brain. [More]
Doctors remind parents about importance of immunizing children

Doctors remind parents about importance of immunizing children

Doctors at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center want to remind parents about the importance of immunizing their children when preparing to send the children back to school. [More]
Salk scientists identify gene that fights metastasis of common lung cancer

Salk scientists identify gene that fights metastasis of common lung cancer

Scientists at the Salk Institute have identified a gene responsible for stopping the movement of cancer from the lungs to other parts of the body, indicating a new way to fight one of the world's deadliest cancers. [More]
Single injection of protein FGF1 enough to restore blood sugar levels

Single injection of protein FGF1 enough to restore blood sugar levels

In mice with diet-induced diabetes—the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans—a single injection of the protein FGF1 is enough to restore blood sugar levels to a healthy range for more than two days. [More]
Extra dose of polio vaccine boosts immunity in children under 5 years old

Extra dose of polio vaccine boosts immunity in children under 5 years old

Giving children under 5 years old an extra dose of inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) helps to boost their immunity to the poliovirus and should be added to vaccination programmes in polio-endemic countries and those facing a high risk of imported cases, suggests new research published in The Lancet. [More]

New article explores ethical issues and global health impact of counterterrorism

The surge in murders of polio vaccination workers in Pakistan has made headlines this year, but little attention has been devoted to the ethical issues surrounding the global health impact of current counterterrorism policy and practice. An essay in the Hastings Center Report reviews the range of harms to population health traceable to counterterrorism operations. [More]
New genetic 'barcode' for malaria parasites could be used to track and contain spread of disease

New genetic 'barcode' for malaria parasites could be used to track and contain spread of disease

A new genetic 'barcode' for malaria parasites has been found which could be used to track and contain the spread of the disease, according to new research led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. [More]
United Spinal Association, NSCIA to convene at ROCH to address disability issues

United Spinal Association, NSCIA to convene at ROCH to address disability issues

United Spinal Association and advocates from its membership division, National Spinal Cord Injury Association (NSCIA), will gather in Washington, D.C. on June 22-25 for Roll on Capitol Hill to shape policies that impact the health, independence and quality of life of people living with spinal cord injuries and disorders (SCI/D). [More]