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NSF, NIH, USDA receive more than $12 million in new EEID grants

NSF, NIH, USDA receive more than $12 million in new EEID grants

Ebola, MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome), malaria, antibiotic-resistant infections: Is our interaction with the environment somehow responsible for their increased incidence? [More]
Expert lectures doctors about hidden dangers of wireless radiation from patients' cell phones, Wifi

Expert lectures doctors about hidden dangers of wireless radiation from patients' cell phones, Wifi

An American public health expert will lecture Canadian doctors tomorrow about the hidden dangers of wireless radiation from their patients' cell phones, Wifi and other wireless consumer devices. [More]
Pollution in many cities threatens brain development in children

Pollution in many cities threatens brain development in children

Pollution in many cities threatens the brain development in children. Findings by University of Montana Professor Dr. Lilian Calder-n-Garcidue-as, MA, MD, Ph.D., and her team of researchers reveal that children living in megacities are at increased risk for brain inflammation and neurodegenerative changes, including Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. [More]
First synthetic membranes made without solvents on silicon surfaces

First synthetic membranes made without solvents on silicon surfaces

Artificial membranes mimicking those found in living organisms have many potential applications ranging from detecting bacterial contaminants in food to toxic pollution in the environment to dangerous diseases in people. [More]
Birth weight measurements can be used to predict lung function during late teenage years

Birth weight measurements can be used to predict lung function during late teenage years

A new study has found that factors, such as birth weight, gestational age at birth and lung function, growth and other measures at 8 years, can be used to predict lung function during mid to late teenage years. [More]
Baby has greater risk of asthma if father smoked prior to conception

Baby has greater risk of asthma if father smoked prior to conception

A baby has a greater risk of asthma if his or her father smoked prior to conception. The research, presented at the European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress in Munich today (08 September 2014), is the first study in humans to analyse the link between a father's smoking habits before conception and a child's asthma. [More]
Study identifies link between higher levels of exposure to pollution and lung health in European citizens

Study identifies link between higher levels of exposure to pollution and lung health in European citizens

New data has identified a clear link between higher levels of exposure to air pollution and deteriorating lung health in adult European citizens. [More]
Higher pollution levels linked to deteriorating lung health among adult European citizens

Higher pollution levels linked to deteriorating lung health among adult European citizens

New data has identified a clear link between higher levels of exposure to air pollution and deteriorating lung health in adult European citizens. This study confirms previous findings that children growing up in areas with higher levels of pollution will have lower levels of lung function and a higher risk of developing symptoms such as cough and bronchitis symptoms. [More]
Study establishes significant link between residential greenness, birth outcomes

Study establishes significant link between residential greenness, birth outcomes

Mothers who live in neighborhoods with plenty of grass, trees or other green vegetation are more likely to deliver at full term and their babies are born at higher weights, compared to mothers who live in urban areas that aren't as green, a new study shows. [More]

Study finds considerable gap between economic loss and compensation after Hebei Spirit oil spill

Although nearly eight years have passed since a major oil spill in South Korea, compensation and recovery efforts appear to be far from satisfactory, and the affected communities continue to suffer the effects of the disaster. [More]
Nature of chemicals released into water became problem with air quality

Nature of chemicals released into water became problem with air quality

Andrea Dietrich and Amanda Sain of Virginia Tech's Via Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering estimated that 50 percent of the population taste threshold for manganese II in water, the simplest ionic manganese oxide, to be more than 1000 times the current EPA allowable level. [More]

Scientists explore reason behind major comeback of underwater grasses

The Susquehanna Flats, a large bed of underwater grasses near the mouth of the Susquehanna River, virtually disappeared from the upper Chesapeake Bay after Tropical Storm Agnes more than 40 years ago. [More]
New UCLA study finds that oxidized lipids may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension

New UCLA study finds that oxidized lipids may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension

Oxidized lipids are known to play a key role in inflaming blood vessels and hardening arteries, which causes diseases like atherosclerosis. A new study at UCLA demonstrates that they may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension, a serious lung disease that narrows the small blood vessels in the lungs. [More]
Experts call for action to prevent health risks associated with climate change

Experts call for action to prevent health risks associated with climate change

Previously unrecognized health benefits could be realized from fast action to reduce climate change and its consequences. For example, changes in energy and transport policies could save millions of lives annually from diseases caused by high levels of air pollution. The right energy and transport policies could also reduce the burden of disease associated with physical inactivity and traffic injury. [More]
Unregulated trash burning around the globe pumps more air pollution

Unregulated trash burning around the globe pumps more air pollution

Unregulated trash burning around the globe is pumping far more pollution into the atmosphere than shown by official records. [More]

EVERYAWARE develops AirProbe and Widenoise apps to increase awareness of environment

Air and noise pollution are among the most insidious threats to our health. But what if we could monitor both from our smartphones? The AirProbe and Widenoise apps, developed by an EU-funded research project called EVERYAWARE, have made this possible. [More]
Black carbon may increase risk of cardiovascular disease in women

Black carbon may increase risk of cardiovascular disease in women

Black carbon pollutants from wood smoke are known to trap heat near the earth's surface and warm the climate. A new study led by McGill Professor Jill Baumgartner suggests that black carbon may also increase women's risk of cardiovascular disease. [More]

Greater Toronto Area continues to violate Canada-wide standards for ozone air pollution

A new study shows that while the Greater Toronto Area has significantly reduced some of the toxins that contribute to smog, the city continues to violate the Canada-wide standards for ozone air pollution. [More]
Seafood mislabeling can cause unwanted exposure to harmful pollutants

Seafood mislabeling can cause unwanted exposure to harmful pollutants

New measurements from fish purchased at retail seafood counters in 10 different states show the extent to which mislabeling can expose consumers to unexpectedly high levels of mercury, a harmful pollutant. [More]
Researchers delve into bone and tooth chemistry of King Richard III

Researchers delve into bone and tooth chemistry of King Richard III

A recent study by the British Geological Survey, in association with researchers at the University of Leicester, has delved into the bone and tooth chemistry of King Richard III and uncovered fascinating new details about the life and diet of Britain's last Plantagenet king. [More]