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Research finds association between fine particulate air pollution and childhood autism risk

Research finds association between fine particulate air pollution and childhood autism risk

Exposure to fine particulate air pollution during pregnancy through the first two years of a child's life may be associated with an increased risk of the child developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a condition that affects one in 68 children, according to a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health investigation of children in southwestern Pennsylvania. [More]

International study reveals that cold weather kills far more people than hot weather

The study analysed over 74 million (74225200) deaths between 1985 and 2012 in 13 countries with a wide range of climates, from cold to subtropical... [More]
Heavy metallic elements influence AMD progression

Heavy metallic elements influence AMD progression

Researchers report associations between age-related macular degeneration and five heavy metallic elements, in findings that highlight the detrimental effects of pollution but the possible benefits of essential elements supplementation. [More]
Study: Air pollution, impaired lung function independently affect cognition

Study: Air pollution, impaired lung function independently affect cognition

Studies have shown that both air pollution and impaired lung function can cause cognitive deficits, but it was unclear whether air pollution diminishes cognition by reducing breathing ability first or whether air pollution represents an independent risk factor for cognitive deficit. [More]
Historic mining pollution in south west England reduces genetic diversity of brown trout

Historic mining pollution in south west England reduces genetic diversity of brown trout

Pollution from historic mining activities in south west England has led to a reduction in genetic diversity of brown trout according to new research from the University of Exeter. [More]
LSTM scientists one step closer to understanding why HAP increases risk of pneumonia

LSTM scientists one step closer to understanding why HAP increases risk of pneumonia

Scientists at LSTM have come a step closer to understanding why people exposed to household air pollution (HAP) are at higher risk of lung infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis. [More]
Exposure to traffic-related air pollution during infancy increases risk of developing allergies

Exposure to traffic-related air pollution during infancy increases risk of developing allergies

New research from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) study shows that exposure to outdoor air pollution during the first year of life increases the risk of developing allergies to food, mould, pets and pests. [More]
Air pollution, poverty significantly lower IQ in children

Air pollution, poverty significantly lower IQ in children

Children born to mothers experiencing economic hardship, who were also exposed during pregnancy to high levels of PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), scored significantly lower on IQ tests at age 5 compared with children born to mothers with greater economic security and less exposure to the pollutants. [More]
Adult survivors of preterm births at higher risk of developing COPD

Adult survivors of preterm births at higher risk of developing COPD

Adult survivors of preterm births may have a lung capacity that resembles the healthy elderly or casual smokers by the time they reach their early 20s, according to a University of Oregon study. [More]
Papers on antibiotic resistance, neglected diseases and future of the ocean to be discussed during G7 summit

Papers on antibiotic resistance, neglected diseases and future of the ocean to be discussed during G7 summit

Today the national science academies of the G7 countries handed three statements to their respective heads of government for discussion during the G7 summit at Schloss Elmau in early June 2015. The papers on antibiotic resistance, neglected and poverty-related diseases, and the future of the ocean were drawn up by the seven national academies under the aegis of the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. [More]
Study: Long-term exposure to air pollution can damage brain structures, impair cognitive function

Study: Long-term exposure to air pollution can damage brain structures, impair cognitive function

Air pollution, even at moderate levels, has long been recognized as a factor in raising the risk of stroke. A new study led by scientists from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine suggests that long-term exposure can cause damage to brain structures and impair cognitive function in middle-aged and older adults. [More]
Children riding school buses with cleaner fuels and technologies experience better lung development

Children riding school buses with cleaner fuels and technologies experience better lung development

Use of clean fuels and updated pollution control measures in the school buses 25 million children ride every day could result in 14 million fewer absences from school a year, based on a study by the University of Michigan and the University of Washington. [More]
Children exposed to adverse childhood experience more likely to develop asthma

Children exposed to adverse childhood experience more likely to develop asthma

Robyn Wing, M.D., an emergency medicine physician at Hasbro Children's Hospital, recently led a study that found children who were exposed to an adverse childhood experience (ACE) were 28 percent more likely to develop asthma. [More]
U of T studies find harmful vehicle emissions spreading farther than thought across Canadian cities

U of T studies find harmful vehicle emissions spreading farther than thought across Canadian cities

A trio of recently published studies from a team of University of Toronto engineers has found that air pollution could be spreading up to three times farther than thought--contributing to varying levels of air quality across cities. [More]
Researchers identify phenomenon that explains effects of oxidative stress on immune cells

Researchers identify phenomenon that explains effects of oxidative stress on immune cells

You're up in the mountains, the snow is blindingly white, and the sun is blazing down from the sky: ideal skiing conditions - but any skiers carrying the herpes virus might also have to reckon with the onset of cold sores after their day out. [More]

Scientists, agriculture experts explore ways to produce abundant, nutritious with low pollution

Nitrogen fertilizers make it possible to feed more people in the world than ever before. However, too much of it can also harm the environment. [More]

Dartmouth-led project aims to address the food-energy-climate nexus

Dartmouth and the University of Maryland have received federal funding to study the environmental and financial benefits of converting methane gas from cow manure into electricity and heat on Vermont and New York dairy farms over the next 60 years. [More]
Benefits of physical activity outweigh harmful effects of air pollution

Benefits of physical activity outweigh harmful effects of air pollution

New research from the University of Copenhagen has found that the beneficial effects of exercise are more important for our health than the negative effects of air pollution, in relation to the risk of premature mortality. In other words, benefits of exercise outweigh the harmful effects of air pollution. [More]
Study compares carbon footprint of Mediterranean diet with UK and US menus

Study compares carbon footprint of Mediterranean diet with UK and US menus

The health benefits of the Mediterranean diet are well-known. As well as being healthier, a recent article concludes that the menu traditionally eaten in Spain leaves less of a carbon footprint than that of the US or the United Kingdom. [More]
AIR Louisville to use digital health technology to improve asthma

AIR Louisville to use digital health technology to improve asthma

Today marks the start of AIR Louisville, the first-of-its-kind data-driven collaboration among public, private and philanthropic organizations to use digital health technology to improve asthma. Kentucky has the fourth highest adult asthma prevalence in the US and Louisville consistently ranks among the top 20 "most challenging" cities to live in with asthma. [More]
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