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Maternal exposure to fine particulate air pollution contributes to autism risk

Maternal exposure to fine particulate air pollution contributes to autism risk

Women exposed to high levels of fine particulate matter specifically during pregnancy--particularly during the third trimester--may face up to twice the risk of having a child with autism than mothers living in areas with low particulate matter, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health. [More]
CARLINA, Atlangram partner to develop antibiotics for osteoarticular infectious diseases

CARLINA, Atlangram partner to develop antibiotics for osteoarticular infectious diseases

CARLINA Technologies, a biotechnology company specializing in the development of nanomedicines, today announces the signing of a partnership agreement with Atlangram for the development of innovative pharmaceutical forms of antibiotics for the targeting of osteoarticular infectious diseases. [More]
PNNL to share variety of research at 2014 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting

PNNL to share variety of research at 2014 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting

Scientists from the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will present a variety of research at the 2014 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, which runs Monday, Dec. 15 through Friday, Dec. 19 at the Moscone Convention Center in San Francisco. [More]
Study examines benefits of IS technique in assessing effect of pollution on urban asthmatic children

Study examines benefits of IS technique in assessing effect of pollution on urban asthmatic children

For the firefighters and rescue workers conducting the rescue and cleanup operations at Ground Zero from September 2001 to May 2002, exposure to hazardous airborne particles led to a disturbing "WTC cough" -- obstructed airways and inflammatory bronchial hyperactivity -- and acute inflammation of the lungs. At the time, bronchoscopy, the insertion of a fiber optic bronchoscope into the lung, was the only way to obtain lung samples. But this method is highly invasive and impractical for screening large populations. [More]
Researchers develop new method to track movement of carcinogenic PAHs in the human body

Researchers develop new method to track movement of carcinogenic PAHs in the human body

Researchers for the first time have developed a method to track through the human body the movement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs, as extraordinarily tiny amounts of these potential carcinogens are biologically processed and eliminated. [More]
Experts launch new interdisciplinary scientific collaboration to improve health in urban areas

Experts launch new interdisciplinary scientific collaboration to improve health in urban areas

Aiming to empower planners and policy-makers to achieve better health for billions of people living in fast-growing urban areas, world health, environmental, behavioural and social science experts today launched a major new interdisciplinary scientific collaboration. [More]
Verizon announces winners of 2014 Powerful Answers Award

Verizon announces winners of 2014 Powerful Answers Award

The wait is over. Verizon is proud to announce the winners of Verizon's 2014 Powerful Answers Award, three in each of the following categories: education, health care, sustainability and transportation. [More]
Exposure to chemicals used in UOG operations may affect reproductive and developmental health

Exposure to chemicals used in UOG operations may affect reproductive and developmental health

Unconventional oil and gas (UOG) operations combine directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," to release natural gas from underground rock. Recent discussions have centered on potential air and water pollution from chemicals used in these processes and how it affects the more than 15 million Americans living within one mile of UOG operations. [More]
Researchers develop new tool for global leaders to better control cancer

Researchers develop new tool for global leaders to better control cancer

With the number of global cancer cases expected to increase by more than 50 percent by 2030, researchers around the globe have collaborated to create a new tool for global leaders to determine what actions they must take to better control cancer. [More]
New study reveals how soil helps control air pollution

New study reveals how soil helps control air pollution

Scientists have long known that air pollution caused by cars and trucks, solvent use and even plants, is reduced when broken down by naturally occurring compounds that act like detergents of the atmosphere. What has not been well understood until now are the relative contributions of all the processes producing such compounds. [More]

BIOREM receives patent for innovative biological air purification media

BIOREM Inc.("Biorem" or "the Company") today announced that it has received a patent (US 8,772,015 B2) for its innovative biological air purification media. [More]

Greater income inequality associated with more deaths among African Americans

Greater income inequality is linked to more deaths among African Americans, but the effect is reversed among white Americans, who experienced fewer deaths, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. [More]
New course underlines the importance of early detection of lung cancer

New course underlines the importance of early detection of lung cancer

In Japan, 40 percent of lung cancer cases are detected on early stages and treated with a high probability of remission; in the US 20 percent of cases have that possibility, while in Mexico, in the National Cancer Institute (INCan), only 1.2 percent of patients are diagnosed at an early stage. [More]
Johns Hopkins Medicine names eight new scholars to improve health care in India

Johns Hopkins Medicine names eight new scholars to improve health care in India

The Center for Clinical Global Health Education at Johns Hopkins Medicine, with significant financial support from the Ujala Foundation and the Wyncote Foundation, has named eight new scholars to improve health care in India, with a particular focus on fighting tuberculosis. [More]
Preterm birth becomes world's number one killer of young children

Preterm birth becomes world's number one killer of young children

For the first time in history, the complications of preterm birth outrank all other causes as the world's number one killer of young children. [More]
Exposure to tobacco smoke, roadway air pollution can contribute to obesity

Exposure to tobacco smoke, roadway air pollution can contribute to obesity

New research from Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) bolsters evidence that exposure to tobacco smoke and near-roadway air pollution contributes to the development of obesity. [More]
UPM researchers use probabilistic models to assess health risks of mercury

UPM researchers use probabilistic models to assess health risks of mercury

Researchers from the UPM have characterized the health risks derived from the usage of mercury in artisanal gold mining in Colombia through probabilistic models. [More]
Sulindac drug can protect against oxidative damage due to AMD

Sulindac drug can protect against oxidative damage due to AMD

While oxygen is essential to our planet's life force and the way we function and stay healthy, high concentrations referred to as oxidative stress may very well be the cause of more than 70 widely-spread diseases such as cancer, heart disease, neurodegenerative diseases, and eye diseases including macular degeneration. [More]
Exposure to indoor air pollution affects children's lungs

Exposure to indoor air pollution affects children's lungs

Children with asthma and hay fever often struggle with their breathing. Add secondhand smoke, kerosene and biomass fuel to the mix and allergy and asthma symptoms increase. [More]
Research finds link between autism spectrum disorder and air toxics

Research finds link between autism spectrum disorder and air toxics

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were more likely to have been exposed to higher levels of certain air toxics during their mothers' pregnancies and the first two years of life compared to children without the condition, according to the preliminary findings of a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health investigation of children in southwestern Pennsylvania. [More]