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New York Blue Light Symposium highlights three measures to counter consequences of artificial illumination

New York Blue Light Symposium highlights three measures to counter consequences of artificial illumination

The New York Blue Light Symposium convened in New York from June 26-27, 2015. The event was sponsored by the International Blue Light Society (Senior Representative: Kazuo Tsubota), which was founded to research and release findings on the effects of blue light on the human body. [More]
Present-day efforts to cut mercury emissions may reduce pollution more quickly than current models

Present-day efforts to cut mercury emissions may reduce pollution more quickly than current models

A Dartmouth-led study using a 600-year-old ice core shows that global mercury pollution increased dramatically during the 20th century, but that mercury concentrations in the atmosphere decreased faster than previously thought beginning in the late 1970s when emissions started to decline. [More]
New research reveals that polluted Toronto neighbourhoods have high rates of childhood asthma

New research reveals that polluted Toronto neighbourhoods have high rates of childhood asthma

Children who develop asthma in Toronto are more likely to have been born in a neighbourhood that has a high level of traffic-related air pollution, new research suggests. [More]
Noisy road traffic may reduce life expectancy, increase stroke risk

Noisy road traffic may reduce life expectancy, increase stroke risk

Living in an area with noisy road traffic may reduce life expectancy, according to new research published in the European Heart Journal. [More]
Climate change poses medical emergency, threatens 50 years of gains in global health

Climate change poses medical emergency, threatens 50 years of gains in global health

Climate change is a “medical emergency” says Commission author, but tackling it could be the greatest global health opportunity of the 21st century [More]

Scientists forecast an average 'dead zone' in Gulf of Mexico this year

Scientists are expecting that this year's Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone, also called the "dead zone," will be approximately 5,483 square miles or about the size of Connecticut-the same as it has averaged over the last several years. [More]

Unsafe prescribing increases risk of life threatening asthma attacks

Last year’s National Review of Asthma Deaths highlighted prescribing errors in nearly half of asthma deaths in primary care (47%). Now new analysis from Asthma UK, based on data from over 500 UK GP practices, reveals evidence that over 22,000 people with asthma in the UK, including 2,000 children, have been prescribed medicines (long-acting reliever inhalers) in a way that is so unsafe they have a ‘black box warning’ in the USA due to the risk they pose to the lives of people with asthma. [More]
Improving air quality could prevent pollution-related deaths worldwide

Improving air quality could prevent pollution-related deaths worldwide

Improving air quality -- in clean and dirty places -- could reduce pollution-related deaths worldwide by millions of people each year. That finding comes from a team of environmental engineering and public health researchers who developed a global model of how changes in outdoor air pollution could lead to changes in the rates of health problems such as heart attack, stroke and lung cancer. [More]
A third of people avoid social situations due to uncontrolled dandruff, reveals anonymous survey

A third of people avoid social situations due to uncontrolled dandruff, reveals anonymous survey

A third of people admitted to avoiding social situations as a result of emotional distress caused by their dandruff, according to new survey results released today by the British Skin Foundation(BSF) in conjunction with the world’s no. 1 anti-dandruff shampoo, Head & Shoulders (H&S). [More]

New method identifies harmful bacteria levels on recreational beaches

An international team, led by researchers at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, has developed a new, timelier method to identify harmful bacteria levels on recreational beaches. The new model provides beach managers with a better prediction tool to identify when closures are required to protect beachgoers from harmful contaminates in the water. [More]
UK scientists explore the impact of antibiotic resistant bacteria on surfers

UK scientists explore the impact of antibiotic resistant bacteria on surfers

UK Scientists are about to begin an innovative study that will shed light on how surfers exposed to human sewage and diffuse pollution in seawater might be affected by antibiotic resistant bacteria. [More]
Death rates are higher in zip codes with more fine particulate air pollution

Death rates are higher in zip codes with more fine particulate air pollution

A new study by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that death rates among people over 65 are higher in zip codes with more fine particulate air pollution (PM2.5) than in those with lower levels of PM2.5. [More]
Contaminant particles emitted by vehicles have negative repercussions in children with respiratory illnesses

Contaminant particles emitted by vehicles have negative repercussions in children with respiratory illnesses

Particles of less than 2.5 microns emitted by vehicles have negative repercussions for bronchiolitis, pneumonia, asthma and bronchitis in children. [More]

Charged particles more common beside busy roads, reveals QUT study

Despite community concerns about living under high-voltage power lines, a world-first QUT study reveals that there are far more charged particles beside busy roads. [More]

IU research finds that air pollution regulations have uncertain health effects

Air pollution regulations issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are estimated to save thousands of lives annually. A new study by researchers at Indiana University says these estimates are more uncertain than commonly believed. [More]
Traffic noise could increase risk of mid-riff bulge

Traffic noise could increase risk of mid-riff bulge

Road traffic noise is linked to a heightened risk of developing a mid-riff bulge, indicates research published online in Occupational & Environmental Medicine. [More]
Research finds association between fine particulate air pollution and childhood autism risk

Research finds association between fine particulate air pollution and childhood autism risk

Exposure to fine particulate air pollution during pregnancy through the first two years of a child's life may be associated with an increased risk of the child developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a condition that affects one in 68 children, according to a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health investigation of children in southwestern Pennsylvania. [More]

International study reveals that cold weather kills far more people than hot weather

The study analysed over 74 million (74225200) deaths between 1985 and 2012 in 13 countries with a wide range of climates, from cold to subtropical... [More]
Heavy metallic elements influence AMD progression

Heavy metallic elements influence AMD progression

Researchers report associations between age-related macular degeneration and five heavy metallic elements, in findings that highlight the detrimental effects of pollution but the possible benefits of essential elements supplementation. [More]
Study: Air pollution, impaired lung function independently affect cognition

Study: Air pollution, impaired lung function independently affect cognition

Studies have shown that both air pollution and impaired lung function can cause cognitive deficits, but it was unclear whether air pollution diminishes cognition by reducing breathing ability first or whether air pollution represents an independent risk factor for cognitive deficit. [More]
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