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UofL study investigates safety, effectiveness of EBV for treating emphysema symptoms

UofL study investigates safety, effectiveness of EBV for treating emphysema symptoms

The University of Louisville has launched a research trial to study an investigational medical device designed to aid patients with emphysema by shutting off the diseased part of the lung. UofL is the only site in Kentucky among 14 nationwide testing the device. [More]
Deprived, ethnic minority areas in England worst affected by air pollution

Deprived, ethnic minority areas in England worst affected by air pollution

A new study has found big differences in air pollution across communities in England, with deprived and ethnic minority areas the worst affected. [More]
INRS researchers to use new specialized equipment to study environmental equity, male infertility

INRS researchers to use new specialized equipment to study environmental equity, male infertility

With the acquisition of new specialized equipment, INRS researchers Philippe Apparicio, Géraldine Delbès, and Maritza Jaramillo and their teams will be able to advance knowledge and train highly qualified people in the fields of environmental equity, reproductive toxicology, and the treatment of infections. They received a total of over $1 million from the Quebec government and the John R. Evans Leaders Fund of the Canadian Foundation for Innovation. [More]
Income, race and ethnic origin may play more potent roles in asthma risk

Income, race and ethnic origin may play more potent roles in asthma risk

Challenging the long-standing belief that city dwellers suffer disproportionately from asthma, the results of a new Johns Hopkins Children's Center study of more than 23,000 U.S. children reveal that income, race and ethnic origin may play far more potent roles in asthma risk than kids' physical surroundings. [More]
Lung cancer rates are lower in higher-elevation counties, new study finds

Lung cancer rates are lower in higher-elevation counties, new study finds

Here's another potential reason to live up in the mountains. Lung cancer rates in both smokers and non-smokers are lower in higher-elevation counties in the western part of the United States, suggesting that oxygen may promote the incidence of lung cancer, according to a new study co-authored by a student at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Atmospheric oxygen may play role in lung carcinogenesis, new study suggests

Atmospheric oxygen may play role in lung carcinogenesis, new study suggests

The ancient physician/alchemist, Paracelsus, said: "The dose makes the poison." According to a new study published in PeerJ, even oxygen may fall prey to the above adage. While essential to human life, aspects of oxygen metabolism may promote cancer. Capitalizing on the inverse relationship of oxygen concentration with elevation, researchers found lower rates of lung cancer at higher elevations, a trend that did not extend to non-respiratory cancers, suggesting that carcinogen exposure occurs via inhalation. [More]
Exposure to nanoparticles can play major role in development of cardiovascular diseases

Exposure to nanoparticles can play major role in development of cardiovascular diseases

Nanoparticles, extremely tiny particles measured in billionths of a meter, are increasingly everywhere, and especially in biomedical products. Their toxicity has been researched in general terms, but now a team of Israeli scientists has for the first time found that exposure nanoparticles (NPs) of silicon dioxide (SiO2) can play a major role in the development of cardiovascular diseases when the NP cross tissue and cellular barriers and also find their way into the circulatory system. [More]
Maternal exposure to fine particulate air pollution contributes to autism risk

Maternal exposure to fine particulate air pollution contributes to autism risk

Women exposed to high levels of fine particulate matter specifically during pregnancy--particularly during the third trimester--may face up to twice the risk of having a child with autism than mothers living in areas with low particulate matter, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health. [More]
CARLINA, Atlangram partner to develop antibiotics for osteoarticular infectious diseases

CARLINA, Atlangram partner to develop antibiotics for osteoarticular infectious diseases

CARLINA Technologies, a biotechnology company specializing in the development of nanomedicines, today announces the signing of a partnership agreement with Atlangram for the development of innovative pharmaceutical forms of antibiotics for the targeting of osteoarticular infectious diseases. [More]

PNNL to share variety of research at 2014 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting

Scientists from the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will present a variety of research at the 2014 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, which runs Monday, Dec. 15 through Friday, Dec. 19 at the Moscone Convention Center in San Francisco. [More]
Study examines benefits of IS technique in assessing effect of pollution on urban asthmatic children

Study examines benefits of IS technique in assessing effect of pollution on urban asthmatic children

For the firefighters and rescue workers conducting the rescue and cleanup operations at Ground Zero from September 2001 to May 2002, exposure to hazardous airborne particles led to a disturbing "WTC cough" -- obstructed airways and inflammatory bronchial hyperactivity -- and acute inflammation of the lungs. At the time, bronchoscopy, the insertion of a fiber optic bronchoscope into the lung, was the only way to obtain lung samples. But this method is highly invasive and impractical for screening large populations. [More]
Researchers develop new method to track movement of carcinogenic PAHs in the human body

Researchers develop new method to track movement of carcinogenic PAHs in the human body

Researchers for the first time have developed a method to track through the human body the movement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs, as extraordinarily tiny amounts of these potential carcinogens are biologically processed and eliminated. [More]
Experts launch new interdisciplinary scientific collaboration to improve health in urban areas

Experts launch new interdisciplinary scientific collaboration to improve health in urban areas

Aiming to empower planners and policy-makers to achieve better health for billions of people living in fast-growing urban areas, world health, environmental, behavioural and social science experts today launched a major new interdisciplinary scientific collaboration. [More]
Verizon announces winners of 2014 Powerful Answers Award

Verizon announces winners of 2014 Powerful Answers Award

The wait is over. Verizon is proud to announce the winners of Verizon's 2014 Powerful Answers Award, three in each of the following categories: education, health care, sustainability and transportation. [More]
Exposure to chemicals used in UOG operations may affect reproductive and developmental health

Exposure to chemicals used in UOG operations may affect reproductive and developmental health

Unconventional oil and gas (UOG) operations combine directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," to release natural gas from underground rock. Recent discussions have centered on potential air and water pollution from chemicals used in these processes and how it affects the more than 15 million Americans living within one mile of UOG operations. [More]
Researchers develop new tool for global leaders to better control cancer

Researchers develop new tool for global leaders to better control cancer

With the number of global cancer cases expected to increase by more than 50 percent by 2030, researchers around the globe have collaborated to create a new tool for global leaders to determine what actions they must take to better control cancer. [More]
New study reveals how soil helps control air pollution

New study reveals how soil helps control air pollution

Scientists have long known that air pollution caused by cars and trucks, solvent use and even plants, is reduced when broken down by naturally occurring compounds that act like detergents of the atmosphere. What has not been well understood until now are the relative contributions of all the processes producing such compounds. [More]

BIOREM receives patent for innovative biological air purification media

BIOREM Inc.("Biorem" or "the Company") today announced that it has received a patent (US 8,772,015 B2) for its innovative biological air purification media. [More]

Greater income inequality associated with more deaths among African Americans

Greater income inequality is linked to more deaths among African Americans, but the effect is reversed among white Americans, who experienced fewer deaths, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. [More]
New course underlines the importance of early detection of lung cancer

New course underlines the importance of early detection of lung cancer

In Japan, 40 percent of lung cancer cases are detected on early stages and treated with a high probability of remission; in the US 20 percent of cases have that possibility, while in Mexico, in the National Cancer Institute (INCan), only 1.2 percent of patients are diagnosed at an early stage. [More]