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Babies exposed to air pollution in womb at increased risk of developing asthma

Babies exposed to air pollution in womb at increased risk of developing asthma

Babies born to mothers exposed to air pollution from traffic during pregnancy have an increased risk of developing asthma before the age of six, according to new UBC research. [More]
Study shows association between traffic-related air pollution and dark spots on the skin

Study shows association between traffic-related air pollution and dark spots on the skin

A largescale study that included women from Germany and China has demonstrated a link between levels of traffic-related air pollution and air pollution-associated gases with the formation of dark spots on the skin, known as lentigenes. The most pronounced changes were observed on the cheeks of Asian women over the age of 50. [More]
Indoor air quality in hospitality venues that allow smoking is worse than outdoor, study finds

Indoor air quality in hospitality venues that allow smoking is worse than outdoor, study finds

Research carried out in six cities with dangerous levels of air pollution indicates that air quality inside venues that allow smoking is even worse than outdoors. [More]
Vital Strategies launched to improve global health

Vital Strategies launched to improve global health

A new name in global health - Vital Strategies was launched today, with a mission of reducing disease and premature death and helping to deliver a world where every person has the protection of a strong public health system. [More]
Air pollution exposure increases preterm birth risk

Air pollution exposure increases preterm birth risk

Exposure to high levels of small particle air pollution is associated with an increased risk of preterm birth - before 37 weeks of pregnancy, according to a new study published online in the journal Environmental Health. [More]
Adults with long-term exposure to ozone face increased risk of respiratory and cardiovascular deaths

Adults with long-term exposure to ozone face increased risk of respiratory and cardiovascular deaths

Adults with long-term exposure to ozone (O3) face an increased risk of dying from respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, according to the study "Long-Term Ozone Exposure and Mortality in a Large Prospective Study" published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
New diagnostic method shows COPD risk higher for women

New diagnostic method shows COPD risk higher for women

Researchers from Lund University Sweden have through a new diagnostic method been able to show that the risk of developing Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease could be twice as high for women as it is for men. [More]
Malaysian scientists join forces with Harvard experts to help revolutionize lung disease treatment

Malaysian scientists join forces with Harvard experts to help revolutionize lung disease treatment

Malaysian scientists are joining forces with Harvard University experts to help revolutionize the treatment of lung diseases -- the delivery of nanomedicine deep into places otherwise impossible to reach. [More]
Global action on reducing mercury emissions should lead to billions in economic benefits for U.S.

Global action on reducing mercury emissions should lead to billions in economic benefits for U.S.

Mercury pollution is a global problem with local consequences: Emissions from coal-fired power plants and other sources travel around the world through the atmosphere, eventually settling in oceans and waterways, where the pollutant gradually accumulates in fish. Consumption of mercury-contaminated seafood leads to increased risk for cardiovascular disease and cognitive impairments. [More]

Emissions controls making a difference in reducing exposure to mercury

Emissions controls on coal-fired power plants are making a difference in reducing exposure of mercury to people, especially in the western Maryland community. A study of air quality from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science found that levels of mercury in the air from power plant emissions dropped more than half over a 10-year period, coinciding with stricter pollution controls. [More]
WHO launches new comprehensive analysis of global health trends

WHO launches new comprehensive analysis of global health trends

The World Health Organization (WHO) today launched a new comprehensive analysis of global health trends since 2000 and an assessment of the challenges for the next 15 years. [More]
Adverse environmental changes present potential health hazards to eyes

Adverse environmental changes present potential health hazards to eyes

Another reason to worry about climate change: Expanding areas of arid land, air pollution, and greater exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation all present potential health hazards to your eyes, according to Sheila West, Ph.D., vice chair for research at the Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University. [More]
Air pollution accounts for over 430 000 premature deaths in Europe, shows new report

Air pollution accounts for over 430 000 premature deaths in Europe, shows new report

Air pollution is the single largest environmental health risk in Europe. It shortens people’s lifespan and contributes to serious illnesses such as heart disease, respiratory problems and cancer. [More]

Leading University of Leicester experts to discuss climate issues at Framing the Climate Crisis event

Leading experts from the University of Leicester will be discussing prominent environmental issues - including how air pollution will become the world's top environmental cause of premature death in the coming decades - at an event on Wednesday 25 November. [More]
Hazardous nanoparticles from sea traffic can penetrate deeper into the lungs

Hazardous nanoparticles from sea traffic can penetrate deeper into the lungs

New data presented by researchers at Lund University and others in the journal Oceanologia show that the air along the coasts is full of hazardous nanoparticles from sea traffic. Almost half of the measured particles stem from sea traffic emissions, while the rest is deemed to be mainly from cars but also biomass combustion, industries and natural particles from the sea. [More]
Higher levels of air pollution in major urban areas linked to heart attack risks in people 65 and older

Higher levels of air pollution in major urban areas linked to heart attack risks in people 65 and older

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have found a link between higher levels of a specific kind of air pollution in major urban areas and an increase in cardiovascular-related hospitalizations such as for heart attacks in people 65 and older. [More]
WHO: Strong actions needed to address climate change to protect people's health

WHO: Strong actions needed to address climate change to protect people's health

According to WHO estimates, climate change is already causing tens of thousands of deaths every year - from shifting patterns of disease, from extreme weather events, such as heat-waves and floods, and from the degradation of air quality, food and water supplies, and sanitation. [More]
Lead exposure in early childhood increases risk for sleep problems in later childhood

Lead exposure in early childhood increases risk for sleep problems in later childhood

A new research study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing shows that lead exposure in early childhood are associated with increased risk for sleep problems and excessive daytime sleepiness in later childhood. [More]

Experts develop low-cost method to combat deadly form of air pollution

People could soon be using their smartphones to combat a deadly form of air pollution, thanks to a potentially life-saving breakthrough by RMIT University researchers in Melbourne, Australia. [More]
Environmental factors may lead to development of some childhood cancers

Environmental factors may lead to development of some childhood cancers

Environmental factors may be a contributory cause in the development of some childhood cancers, leading scientists have revealed. [More]
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