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Group of tiny algae could be key to measure nutrient pollution in fresh water

Group of tiny algae could be key to measure nutrient pollution in fresh water

The key to effectively measuring damagingly high levels of nutrients in freshwater streams lies in the microscopic organisms living in them, according to a group of Drexel University scientists. [More]
Air pollution becomes leading risk factor for stroke worldwide

Air pollution becomes leading risk factor for stroke worldwide

Air pollution – including environmental and household air pollution - has emerged as a leading risk factor for stroke worldwide, associated with about a third of the global burden of stroke in 2013, according to a new study published in The Lancet Neurology journal. [More]
Air pollution exposure may have direct role in triggering lupus among children and adolescents

Air pollution exposure may have direct role in triggering lupus among children and adolescents

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress show for the first time that an individual's exposure to air pollution may have a direct role in triggering disease activity as well as airway inflammation in children and adolescents with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). [More]
David Gandy becomes new ambassador for Vitabiotics Wellman

David Gandy becomes new ambassador for Vitabiotics Wellman

Known for his passion for fitness and for the championing of top British brands, David Gandy is the new ambassador for Vitabiotics Wellman. [More]
Exposure to air pollution affects psychiatric health of children and adolescents

Exposure to air pollution affects psychiatric health of children and adolescents

New research from Umeå University in Sweden indicates that dispensed medication for psychiatric diagnosis can be related to air pollution concentrations. The study covers a large part of the Swedish population and has been published in the journal BMJ Open. [More]
Correcting defective p73 gene function may be promising therapeutic strategy for chronic lung diseases

Correcting defective p73 gene function may be promising therapeutic strategy for chronic lung diseases

Rising global air pollution and increasing smoking prevalence in many developing nations will likely lead to a growing incidence of lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which currently affects more than 330 million people worldwide, is the third-leading cause of death and carries an estimated healthcare cost of $2.1 trillion. [More]
Noise in ICUs exceeds recommended levels, disturbs patients and care givers

Noise in ICUs exceeds recommended levels, disturbs patients and care givers

A study presented at Euroanaesthesia 2016 shows that noise levels in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) can go well above recommended levels, disturbing both patients and the medical teams that care for them. [More]
European cardiovascular prevention guidelines emphasise population approaches

European cardiovascular prevention guidelines emphasise population approaches

The European Society of Cardiology has updated its cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines to include, for the first time, population approaches to be implemented by legislators, schools and workplaces. [More]
Updates on sixty-ninth World Health Assembly

Updates on sixty-ninth World Health Assembly

Delegates at the World Health Assembly have agreed resolutions and decisions on air pollution, chemicals, the health workforce, childhood obesity, violence, noncommunicable diseases, and the election of the next Director-General. [More]
Technical advances in neuroimaging offer new promise to clinicians

Technical advances in neuroimaging offer new promise to clinicians

The current special issue of Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors, Volume 18, Number 1 (all open access), is devoted to the evolution of neuroimaging technology, with seven articles chronicling the latest advances in this critical area. [More]
Global life expectancy on the rise, but major health inequalities persist

Global life expectancy on the rise, but major health inequalities persist

Dramatic gains in life expectancy have been made globally since 2000, but major inequalities persist within and among countries, according to this year’s “World Health Statistics: Monitoring Health for the SDGs”. [More]
Tackling Zika: are insect repellents the answer? An interview with Bruno Jactel

Tackling Zika: are insect repellents the answer? An interview with Bruno Jactel

The repellents that are used today are mostly based on what we call chemical pesticides. These products are used to repel mosquitoes as well as ticks. They are very broadly used, but there are different issues surrounding their use. [More]
WHO: Air pollution levels increase in low- and middle income cities

WHO: Air pollution levels increase in low- and middle income cities

More than 80% of people living in urban areas that monitor air pollution are exposed to air quality levels that exceed the World Health Organization limits. While all regions of the world are affected, populations in low-income cities are the most impacted. [More]
Exposure to fine particulate matter in air can increase risk of cancer-specific mortality

Exposure to fine particulate matter in air can increase risk of cancer-specific mortality

In 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) published a series of monographs on the evaluation of various carcinogenic risks. In a monograph on air pollution, the organization pointed out the difficulty of assessing the effects of pollution on multiple types of cancers, given their different etiologies, risk factors and variability in the composition of air pollutants in space and time. However, the IARC identified certain key components of air pollution, including particulates. [More]
Residential radon exposure may lead to hematologic cancer risk in women

Residential radon exposure may lead to hematologic cancer risk in women

A new report finds a statistically-significant, positive association between high levels of residential radon and the risk of hematologic cancer (lymphoma, myeloma, and leukemia) in women. The study is the first prospective, population-based study of residential radon exposure and hematologic cancer risk, leading the authors to caution that it requires replication to better understand the association and whether it truly differs by sex. It appears early online in Environmental Research. [More]
Maternal exposure to air pollution increases risk of long-term health problems in children

Maternal exposure to air pollution increases risk of long-term health problems in children

Even small amounts of air pollution appear to raise the risk of a condition in pregnant women linked to premature births and lifelong neurological and respiratory disorders in their children, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Children living closer to major roadways have increased risk of lower lung function, study finds

Children living closer to major roadways have increased risk of lower lung function, study finds

According to new research led by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center pulmonologist and critical care physician Mary B. Rice, MD, MPH, improved air quality in U.S. cities since the 1990s may not be enough to ensure normal lung function in children. The findings were recently published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care, a journal of the American Thoracic Society. [More]
Higher levels of neighborhood greenness linked to lower chronic disease risk

Higher levels of neighborhood greenness linked to lower chronic disease risk

A new study of a quarter-million Miami-Dade County Medicare beneficiaries showed that higher levels of neighborhood greenness, including trees, grass and other vegetation, were linked to a significant reduction in the rate of chronic illnesses, particularly in low-to-middle income neighborhoods. [More]
Experts focus on scientific complexities of individual and population health at iCOMOS 2016

Experts focus on scientific complexities of individual and population health at iCOMOS 2016

How do we balance the needs for individualized health care with the public health programs serving communities - especially in the context of environmental pollution and climate change? Given a fixed set of resources, maximizing the potential of both is challenging, indeed. [More]
Green vegetation near homes plays important role in reducing mortality

Green vegetation near homes plays important role in reducing mortality

Women live longer in areas with more green vegetation, according to new research funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health. Women with the highest levels of vegetation, or greenness, near their homes had a 12 percent lower death rate compared to women with the lowest levels of vegetation near their homes. The results were published Apr. 14, 2016 in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. [More]
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