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Researchers identify phenomenon that explains effects of oxidative stress on immune cells

Researchers identify phenomenon that explains effects of oxidative stress on immune cells

You're up in the mountains, the snow is blindingly white, and the sun is blazing down from the sky: ideal skiing conditions - but any skiers carrying the herpes virus might also have to reckon with the onset of cold sores after their day out. [More]
Scientists, agriculture experts explore ways to produce abundant, nutritious with low pollution

Scientists, agriculture experts explore ways to produce abundant, nutritious with low pollution

Nitrogen fertilizers make it possible to feed more people in the world than ever before. However, too much of it can also harm the environment. [More]

Dartmouth-led project aims to address the food-energy-climate nexus

Dartmouth and the University of Maryland have received federal funding to study the environmental and financial benefits of converting methane gas from cow manure into electricity and heat on Vermont and New York dairy farms over the next 60 years. [More]
Benefits of physical activity outweigh harmful effects of air pollution

Benefits of physical activity outweigh harmful effects of air pollution

New research from the University of Copenhagen has found that the beneficial effects of exercise are more important for our health than the negative effects of air pollution, in relation to the risk of premature mortality. In other words, benefits of exercise outweigh the harmful effects of air pollution. [More]
Study compares carbon footprint of Mediterranean diet with UK and US menus

Study compares carbon footprint of Mediterranean diet with UK and US menus

The health benefits of the Mediterranean diet are well-known. As well as being healthier, a recent article concludes that the menu traditionally eaten in Spain leaves less of a carbon footprint than that of the US or the United Kingdom. [More]
AIR Louisville to use digital health technology to improve asthma

AIR Louisville to use digital health technology to improve asthma

Today marks the start of AIR Louisville, the first-of-its-kind data-driven collaboration among public, private and philanthropic organizations to use digital health technology to improve asthma. Kentucky has the fourth highest adult asthma prevalence in the US and Louisville consistently ranks among the top 20 "most challenging" cities to live in with asthma. [More]
American Cancer Society, World Lung Foundation unveil ‘The Tobacco Atlas, Fifth Edition’

American Cancer Society, World Lung Foundation unveil ‘The Tobacco Atlas, Fifth Edition’

The Tobacco Atlas, Fifth Edition ("The Atlas"), and its companion mobile app and website TobaccoAtlas.org, were unveiled today by the American Cancer Society and World Lung Foundation at the 16th World Conference on Tobacco or Health. [More]
NYU Langone Medical Center researchers find that air pollution may pose significant stroke risk

NYU Langone Medical Center researchers find that air pollution may pose significant stroke risk

Air pollution has been linked to a dangerous narrowing of neck arteries that occurs prior to strokes, according to researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
Exposure to diesel exhaust may exacerbate respiratory diseases

Exposure to diesel exhaust may exacerbate respiratory diseases

Researchers in the UK have, for the first time, shown how exhaust pollution from diesel engines is able to affect nerves within the lung. Air pollution is a significant threat to health, they say, and identifying potential mechanisms linking exposure to diesel exhaust and the exacerbation of respiratory diseases may lead to treatments for those affected. [More]
Researchers gain new insights into molecular mechanisms affected by weight gain

Researchers gain new insights into molecular mechanisms affected by weight gain

Until now there have been few molecular epidemiological studies regarding the effects of weight changes on metabolism in the general population. In a recent study conducted and funded within the framework of the Competence Network Obesity, researchers at the Institute of Epidemiology II at Helmholtz Zentrum München evaluated molecular data of the KORA study. [More]
Advanced clinical decision support tools reduce mortality for pneumonia patients

Advanced clinical decision support tools reduce mortality for pneumonia patients

A new study by Intermountain Medical Center researchers in Salt Lake City found that using advanced clinical decision support tools reduces mortality for the 1.1 million patients in the Unites States who are treated for pneumonia each year. [More]
Advanced clinical decision support tools help reduce mortality for pneumonia patients

Advanced clinical decision support tools help reduce mortality for pneumonia patients

A new study by Intermountain Medical Center researchers in Salt Lake City found that using advanced clinical decision support tools reduces mortality for the 1.1 million patients in the Unites States who are treated for pneumonia each year. [More]
bScreen  LB 991: Label-free high-throughput reader

bScreen LB 991: Label-free high-throughput reader

The bScreen combines the performance of µArray formats with the information available from label-free technologies. With a footprint of only 66 x 61 cm2 it substitutes a fluorescence µArray reader and a conventional label-free system (e.g. SPR) in a single instrument. [More]
New article shows how marijuana can act as an allergen

New article shows how marijuana can act as an allergen

Growing up, you may have been given reasons for not smoking marijuana. What you may not have heard is that marijuana, like other pollen-bearing plants, is an allergen which can cause allergic responses. [More]
New poll reveals U.S. public's perceptions of causes of health problems

New poll reveals U.S. public's perceptions of causes of health problems

A new NPR/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health poll finds that more than six in ten people living in the U.S. (62%) are concerned about their future health. Nearly four in ten (39%) said that they had one or more negative childhood experiences that they believe had a harmful impact on their adult health. [More]

Researchers use satellite technology to assess quality of water on Earth

An international team of researchers has demonstrated a way to assess the quality of water on Earth from space by using satellite technology that can visualise pollution levels otherwise invisible to the human eye through 'Superhero vision'. [More]
SK Telecom unveils consumer-centric smart devices at Mobile World Congress 2015

SK Telecom unveils consumer-centric smart devices at Mobile World Congress 2015

SK Telecom has unveiled a variety of consumer-centric smart devices, or 'Lifeware*', at the Mobile World Congress 2015 with the aim to create opportunities in the global market for the Internet of Things (IoT). [More]
Study: African Americans who moved from the South during Great Migration face shorter life expectancy

Study: African Americans who moved from the South during Great Migration face shorter life expectancy

Millions of African Americans moved from the South in the early 20th century to seek better job opportunities and higher wages, but a new study on the historic Great Migration shows that with improved economic conditions came a greater risk of mortality. [More]
Genetic decanalization can lead to complex genetic diseases in humans

Genetic decanalization can lead to complex genetic diseases in humans

The information encoded in the DNA of an organism is not sufficient to determine the expression pattern of genes. This fact has been known even before the discovery of epigenetics, which refers to external modifications to the DNA that turn genes "on" or "off". [More]
Pollution effect: Potentially toxic microbes pose threat to drinking water

Pollution effect: Potentially toxic microbes pose threat to drinking water

Potentially toxic microbes which pose a threat to our drinking water have undergone a dramatic population explosion over the last 200 years as a result of pollution, research involving experts from The University of Nottingham has found. [More]
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