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Greater Toronto Area continues to violate Canada-wide standards for ozone air pollution

Greater Toronto Area continues to violate Canada-wide standards for ozone air pollution

A new study shows that while the Greater Toronto Area has significantly reduced some of the toxins that contribute to smog, the city continues to violate the Canada-wide standards for ozone air pollution. [More]
Seafood mislabeling can cause unwanted exposure to harmful pollutants

Seafood mislabeling can cause unwanted exposure to harmful pollutants

New measurements from fish purchased at retail seafood counters in 10 different states show the extent to which mislabeling can expose consumers to unexpectedly high levels of mercury, a harmful pollutant. [More]
Researchers delve into bone and tooth chemistry of King Richard III

Researchers delve into bone and tooth chemistry of King Richard III

A recent study by the British Geological Survey, in association with researchers at the University of Leicester, has delved into the bone and tooth chemistry of King Richard III and uncovered fascinating new details about the life and diet of Britain's last Plantagenet king. [More]

Review of fracking fluids raises concerns about several ingredients

As the oil and gas drilling technique called hydraulic fracturing (or "fracking") proliferates, a new study on the contents of the fluids involved in the process raises concerns about several ingredients. [More]
Researchers examine skin creams that contains toxic mercury much faster than before

Researchers examine skin creams that contains toxic mercury much faster than before

As countries try to rid themselves of toxic mercury pollution, some people are slathering and even injecting creams containing the metal onto or under their skin to lighten it, putting themselves and others at risk for serious health problems. [More]
Expert panel issues key suggestions related to unconventional natural gas drilling operations

Expert panel issues key suggestions related to unconventional natural gas drilling operations

Groundwater and air quality testing before, during, and after natural gas drilling - which includes hydraulic fracturing -- should be key components of efforts to ensure the safety of communities near these sites, according to an expert panel convened to weigh in on public health research needs associated with unconventional natural gas drilling operations (UNGDO). [More]
Prominent scientists to deliver scientific presentations at ACS meeting

Prominent scientists to deliver scientific presentations at ACS meeting

The Kavli Foundation Lecture series today features two prominent scientists: one in the booming area of ionic liquids, the other in medical materials. [More]

New market research report on global medical waste management industry

Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: Global Medical Waste Management Industry [More]
Individuals with work related stress are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Individuals with work related stress are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Workplace stress can have a range of adverse effects on health with an increased risk of cardio-vascular diseases in the first line. [More]

Study: Mercury in the global ocean poses dangers to humans and environment

Although the days of odd behavior among hat makers are a thing of the past, the dangers mercury poses to humans and the environment persist today. [More]
Environmental experts gather at EPA forum to discuss sediment removal plan for Passaic River

Environmental experts gather at EPA forum to discuss sediment removal plan for Passaic River

Environmental cleanup experts gathered at NJIT this week for an all-day public forum on a $1.7 billion proposal by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to dredge toxic sediment from an eight-mile stretch of the lower Passaic River. [More]
Unemployment increases risk of death, but recessions decrease it

Unemployment increases risk of death, but recessions decrease it

Being unemployed increases your risk of death, but recessions decrease it. Sound paradoxical? Researchers thought so too. [More]

Researchers develop sensing microbiosensor that detects beneficial bacteria in food

In the food industry is very important to ensure the quality and safety of products consumed by the population to improve their properties and reduce foodborne illness. [More]
Scientists launch project on northern Front Range of Colorado to track harmful pollutant

Scientists launch project on northern Front Range of Colorado to track harmful pollutant

Scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and partner organizations from across the country are launching a major field project on the northern Front Range of Colorado this month to track the origins of summertime ozone, an invisible but harmful pollutant. [More]

Scientists identify superaggregates from wildfire emissions

Every year, wildfires clear millions of hectares of land and emit around 34-percent of global soot mass into the atmosphere. In certain regions, such as Southeast Asia and Russia, these fires can contribute as much as 63-percent of regional soot mass. [More]
Excessive belly fat: A risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Excessive belly fat: A risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Obesity, especially excessive belly fat, is a risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to an article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). [More]
Report shows how negative health effects of noise can be reduced

Report shows how negative health effects of noise can be reduced

Traffic noise is the second biggest environmental problem in the EU, according to WHO. After air pollution, noise is affecting health the most. [More]
Study: Lead in children's' blood linked to increased emotional and behavioral problems

Study: Lead in children's' blood linked to increased emotional and behavioral problems

Emotional and behavioral problems show up even with low exposure to lead, and as blood lead levels increase in children, so do the problems, according to research funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health. The results were published online June 30 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics. [More]
National, state air pollution controls decrease death rates in North Carolina

National, state air pollution controls decrease death rates in North Carolina

National and state air pollution controls that went into effect in the early 1990s coincide with decreasing death rates from emphysema, asthma and pneumonia among people in North Carolina, according to a study led by Duke University researchers. [More]
UCLA study sheds light on the development of lung cancer

UCLA study sheds light on the development of lung cancer

UCLA researchers led by Dr. Brigitte Gomperts have discovered the inner workings of the process thought to be the first stage in the development of lung cancer. Their study explains how factors that regulate the growth of adult stem cells that repair tissue in the lungs can lead to the formation of precancerous lesions. [More]