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Study shows ancient grain varieties may help reduce risk factors for CVD

Study shows ancient grain varieties may help reduce risk factors for CVD

Eating bread made with ancient grains as part of a healthy diet could help lower cholesterol and blood glucose levels—leading risk factors for heart attack and stroke—according to new research published in the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition. [More]
Researchers discover how mineral ion leaked from dying tumour tissue stops work of immune cells

Researchers discover how mineral ion leaked from dying tumour tissue stops work of immune cells

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute in the USA and the Babraham Institute, UK, have discovered how a mineral ion leaked from tumour tissue as it dies acts to stop the work of anti-tumour immune cells. [More]
Research offers new insights into underlying mechanisms of deadly cystic fibrosis

Research offers new insights into underlying mechanisms of deadly cystic fibrosis

A minor hiccup in the sequence of a human gene can have devastating impacts on health. Such flaws cause cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease affecting the lungs and other vital organs, often leading to death by the age of 30. [More]
Scientists provide new insights into workings of cancer-linked potassium channel

Scientists provide new insights into workings of cancer-linked potassium channel

Most cells in the body carry on their surface tiny pores through which potassium ions travel. In controlling the flow of these positively charged ions, the channel helps the cell maintain its electrical balance. [More]
DRG International to present Aldosterone ELISA Kit at 2016 AACC

DRG International to present Aldosterone ELISA Kit at 2016 AACC

DRG International, a leading international medical diagnostic company, will showcase its DRG Aldosterone ELISA Kit at the 2016 AACC in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on August 02-04. [More]
Fraunhofer scientists show how seaweed has potential to substitute salt

Fraunhofer scientists show how seaweed has potential to substitute salt

Salt (sodium chloride) is an essential nutrient, but one that is often present in surprising quantities in industrially processed foods. [More]
Researchers uncover mechanism of two-in-one sensor protein KdpD

Researchers uncover mechanism of two-in-one sensor protein KdpD

Uptake of potassium by bacteria is regulated by a single protein that senses the concentration of this cation both inside the cell and in the external medium, and controls the expression of the corresponding transport protein accordingly. [More]
Nut consumption may lower risk of overall mortality in prostate cancer patients

Nut consumption may lower risk of overall mortality in prostate cancer patients

In a large prospective study published online in the British Journal of Cancer, researchers looked at the association between nut consumption and prostate cancer risk and mortality among 47,299 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. [More]
Blood pressure medications can lower stroke, heart attack risk in patients with end-stage renal disease

Blood pressure medications can lower stroke, heart attack risk in patients with end-stage renal disease

Two classes of blood pressure medications, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), are associated with a 16% lower risk of strokes, heart attacks and death in patients with end-stage renal disease who are undergoing peritoneal dialysis, a new study in the journal, Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, reports. [More]
Mice implanted with human glia cells exhibit reduced symptoms of Huntington's disease

Mice implanted with human glia cells exhibit reduced symptoms of Huntington's disease

Researchers have successfully reduced the symptoms and slowed the progression of Huntington's disease in mice using healthy human brain cells. The findings, which were published today in the journal Nature Communications, could ultimately point to a new method to treat the disease. [More]
TSRI scientists discover new method for harnessing venoms for therapeutic use

TSRI scientists discover new method for harnessing venoms for therapeutic use

There are lessons to be learned from venoms. Scorpions, snakes, snails, frogs and other creatures are thought to produce tens or even hundreds of millions of distinct venoms. These venoms have been honed to strike specific targets in the body. [More]
First flexible wearable device can monitor biochemical, electric signals in human body

First flexible wearable device can monitor biochemical, electric signals in human body

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the first flexible wearable device capable of monitoring both biochemical and electric signals in the human body. [More]
CSU researchers develop colorful potatoes that are high in antioxidants, rich in nutrients

CSU researchers develop colorful potatoes that are high in antioxidants, rich in nutrients

Purple potatoes might not be the first thing that comes to mind when trying to increase vitamin, mineral and antioxidant intake. However, a group of researchers from Colorado State University have recently developed potato varieties that satisfy these nutritional needs and could act as a preventive measure to several diseases. [More]
ITJ researchers develop new hydrating beverage for athletes

ITJ researchers develop new hydrating beverage for athletes

Jiquiquilpan's Institute of Technology in Mexico developed a hydrating beverage for athletes that is based on agave's fructans, that not only supplies the adequate water levels to the organisms, but also offers other benefits such as dietetic fiber. [More]
Bayer-new phase 3 liver cancer data

Bayer-new phase 3 liver cancer data

Bayer has announced that a Phase III trial evaluating its oncology compound Stivarga® (regorafenib) tablets for the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has met its primary endpoint of a statistically significant improvement in overall survival. The study, called RESORCE, evaluated the efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with HCC whose disease has progressed after treatment with sorafenib. The safety and tolerability were generally consistent with the known profile of regorafenib. Detailed efficacy and safety analyses from this study are expected to be presented at an upcoming scientific congress. [More]
Endocrine Society urges physicians to increase screening for primary aldosteronism

Endocrine Society urges physicians to increase screening for primary aldosteronism

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline calling on physicians to ramp up screening for primary aldosteronism, a common cause of high blood pressure. [More]
Scientists find way to control behaviour of cardiomyocytes using laser radiation

Scientists find way to control behaviour of cardiomyocytes using laser radiation

Scientists from MIPT's Laboratory of the Biophysics of Excitable Systems have discovered how to control the behaviour of heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) using laser radiation; this study will help scientists to better understand the mechanisms of the heart and could ultimately provide a method of treating arrhythmia. The paper has been published in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
Scientists identify key pathway that regulates 'switch' between wakefulness and sleep

Scientists identify key pathway that regulates 'switch' between wakefulness and sleep

Falling asleep and waking up are key transitions in everyone's day. Millions of people have trouble with these transitions - they find it hard to fall asleep or stay asleep at night, and hard to stay awake during the day. Despite decades of research, how these transitions work - the neurobiological mechanics of our circadian rhythm - has remained largely a mystery to brain scientists. [More]
Researchers design more effective version of FDA-approved epilepsy drug with fewer side effects

Researchers design more effective version of FDA-approved epilepsy drug with fewer side effects

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Arts & Sciences have designed a more effective version of an FDA-approved epilepsy drug with the potential for fewer side effects, according to a study published on March 22 in Molecular Pharmacology. The experimental agent also could prove to be a treatment for tinnitus and other disorders caused by volatile neural signaling. [More]
Study confirms involvement of immune system in CASPR2-associated encephalitis

Study confirms involvement of immune system in CASPR2-associated encephalitis

The complement system, which forms part of our immune system, is involved in a special form of epilepsy. This is the conclusion of a recently published single-case study. [More]
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