Potassium News and Research RSS Feed - Potassium News and Research

Jianmin Cui receives $1.7 million NIH grant to study heart's inner mechanisms

Jianmin Cui receives $1.7 million NIH grant to study heart's inner mechanisms

Jianmin Cui, PhD, has received a nearly $1.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the molecular bases for the function of potassium channels vital for the heart, brain, inner ear and other tissues. [More]
Researchers develop targeted approach that allows muscle to burn more energy

Researchers develop targeted approach that allows muscle to burn more energy

What started as an evolutionary protection against starvation has become a biological "bad joke" for people who need to lose weight. The human body doesn't distinguish between dieting and possible starvation, so when there is a decrease in calories consumed, human metabolism increases its energy efficiency and weight loss is resisted. [More]
Research: Complex nerve circuits first evolved in common ancestor of humans and cnidarians

Research: Complex nerve circuits first evolved in common ancestor of humans and cnidarians

New research shows that a burst of evolutionary innovation in the genes responsible for electrical communication among nerve cells in our brains occurred over 600 million years ago in a common ancestor of humans and the sea anemone. [More]
USF researchers awarded grant to test new drug for age-related hearing loss

USF researchers awarded grant to test new drug for age-related hearing loss

A successful treatment for age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is a step closer to reality, thanks to a group of researchers from the University of South Florida. The research team comprised of faculty and students has been awarded $400,000 by Autifony Therapeutics, Ltd, a company based in the United Kingdom, to test a new drug the company developed for ARHL. [More]
Retigabine drug shows promise in protecting the brain against effects of ischemic stroke

Retigabine drug shows promise in protecting the brain against effects of ischemic stroke

Retigabine, a drug approved to treat epilepsy, protected the brain against the effects of ischemic stroke in a study conducted at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. [More]
Retigabine drug could reduce debilitating impact of strokes

Retigabine drug could reduce debilitating impact of strokes

New research suggests that an already-approved drug could dramatically reduce the debilitating impact of strokes, which affect nearly a million Americans every year. [More]
IOM report says white potatoes should be allowed under WIC Nutrition Program

IOM report says white potatoes should be allowed under WIC Nutrition Program

The U.S. Department of Agriculture should allow white potatoes as a vegetable eligible for purchase with vouchers issued by the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Woman, Infants, and Children (WIC), says a new report. [More]
Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation names 15 new Damon Runyon Fellows

Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation names 15 new Damon Runyon Fellows

The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, a non-profit organization focused on supporting innovative early career researchers, named 15 new Damon Runyon Fellows at its fall Fellowship Award Committee review. The recipients of this prestigious, four-year award are outstanding postdoctoral scientists conducting basic and translational cancer research in the laboratories of leading senior investigators across the country. [More]
Tree nut consumption linked to better nutrient adequacy, diet quality in adults

Tree nut consumption linked to better nutrient adequacy, diet quality in adults

A new study, published this week in the open access journal Nutrients, compares the nutrient adequacy and diet quality of those who consume tree nuts (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts), and non-tree nut consumers in a nationally representative population. [More]
Potassium salts in plant foods improve bone health

Potassium salts in plant foods improve bone health

Latest research from the University of Surrey has found that the potassium salts (bicarbonate and citrate) plentiful in fruit and vegetables, play an important part in improving bone health. For the first time, the results also showed that these potassium salts reduce bone resorption, the process by which bone is broken down, therefore increasing their strength. [More]
Investigational drug maintains normal potassium levels in patients with chronic kidney disease

Investigational drug maintains normal potassium levels in patients with chronic kidney disease

Research published today found that the investigational drug patiromer decreased high potassium levels and maintained normal potassium levels in patients with chronic kidney disease. The results of a multicenter trial appear in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Majority of kidney dialysis patients not adequately prepared for emergency or natural disaster

Majority of kidney dialysis patients not adequately prepared for emergency or natural disaster

Eighty percent of kidney dialysis patients surveyed were not adequately prepared in the event of an emergency or natural disaster that shut down their dialysis center. [More]
Study identifies new gene for progressive form of epilepsy

Study identifies new gene for progressive form of epilepsy

A study led by researchers at University of Helsinki, Finland and Universities of Melbourne and South Australia has identified a new gene for a progressive form of epilepsy. The findings of this international collaborative effort have been published today, 17 November 2014, in Nature Genetics. [More]
Study evaluates efficacy, safety of zirconium cyclosilicate drug in patients with hyperkalemia

Study evaluates efficacy, safety of zirconium cyclosilicate drug in patients with hyperkalemia

Mikhail Kosiborod, M.D., of Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, and colleagues evaluated the efficacy and safety of the drug zirconium cyclosilicate in patients with hyperkalemia (higher than normal potassium levels). The study appears in JAMA and is being released to coincide with its presentation at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014. [More]
ZS Pharma reports positive ZS-9 Phase 3 clinical trial for treatment of hyperkalemia

ZS Pharma reports positive ZS-9 Phase 3 clinical trial for treatment of hyperkalemia

ZS Pharma, a biopharmaceutical company developing novel treatments for kidney, cardiovascular, liver and metabolic disorders, today presented detailed results from HARMONIZE (ZS004) at the late-breaking Clinical Science Special Reports Session of the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions. [More]
Researchers discover new genetic cause of rare, complex form of epilepsy

Researchers discover new genetic cause of rare, complex form of epilepsy

A research team led by scientists at the Scripps Translational Science Institute has used whole genome sequencing to identify a new genetic cause of a severe, rare and complex form of epilepsy that becomes evident in early childhood and can lead to early death. [More]
D-LIVER project aims to help patients with chronic liver disease

D-LIVER project aims to help patients with chronic liver disease

A European ICT for Health project aims to improve the quality of life of patients with chronic liver disease, by developing a remote support system to monitor their condition at home. [More]
Light-activated diabetes drug: an interview with Dr David Hodson

Light-activated diabetes drug: an interview with Dr David Hodson

We've known about chemicals that can be light-activated for about five to ten years now. They’ve mainly all been applied to neurons and, more specifically, the retina. Nobody has ever really looked at any tissues outside of the nervous system. [More]
Researchers discover link between seizures and migraines

Researchers discover link between seizures and migraines

Seizures and migraines have always been considered separate physiological events in the brain, but now a team of engineers and neuroscientists looking at the brain from a physics viewpoint discovered a link between these and related phenomena. [More]
Digoxin drug may be adaptable for ALS treatment, study suggests

Digoxin drug may be adaptable for ALS treatment, study suggests

Digoxin, a medication used in the treatment of heart failure, may be adaptable for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive, paralyzing disease, suggests new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]