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European scientists identify gene linked with certain types of early-onset epilepsy

European scientists identify gene linked with certain types of early-onset epilepsy

Certain types of early-onset epilepsy are caused by previously unknown mutations of a potassium channel gene, KCNA2. The mutations disrupt the electrical balance in the brain in two ways. In some patients, the flow of potassium is greatly reduced; while in others, it is raised enormously. Both states can lead to hard-to-treat epileptic seizures. Mental and motor development can come to a stop, or even to regress. [More]
USF researchers awarded grant to test new drug for age-related hearing loss

USF researchers awarded grant to test new drug for age-related hearing loss

A successful treatment for age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is a step closer to reality, thanks to a group of researchers from the University of South Florida. The research team comprised of faculty and students has been awarded $400,000 by Autifony Therapeutics, Ltd, a company based in the United Kingdom, to test a new drug the company developed for ARHL. [More]
Retigabine drug could reduce debilitating impact of strokes

Retigabine drug could reduce debilitating impact of strokes

New research suggests that an already-approved drug could dramatically reduce the debilitating impact of strokes, which affect nearly a million Americans every year. [More]
Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation names 15 new Damon Runyon Fellows

Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation names 15 new Damon Runyon Fellows

The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, a non-profit organization focused on supporting innovative early career researchers, named 15 new Damon Runyon Fellows at its fall Fellowship Award Committee review. The recipients of this prestigious, four-year award are outstanding postdoctoral scientists conducting basic and translational cancer research in the laboratories of leading senior investigators across the country. [More]
Study identifies new gene for progressive form of epilepsy

Study identifies new gene for progressive form of epilepsy

A study led by researchers at University of Helsinki, Finland and Universities of Melbourne and South Australia has identified a new gene for a progressive form of epilepsy. The findings of this international collaborative effort have been published today, 17 November 2014, in Nature Genetics. [More]
Researchers discover new genetic cause of rare, complex form of epilepsy

Researchers discover new genetic cause of rare, complex form of epilepsy

A research team led by scientists at the Scripps Translational Science Institute has used whole genome sequencing to identify a new genetic cause of a severe, rare and complex form of epilepsy that becomes evident in early childhood and can lead to early death. [More]
Light-activated diabetes drug: an interview with Dr David Hodson

Light-activated diabetes drug: an interview with Dr David Hodson

We've known about chemicals that can be light-activated for about five to ten years now. They’ve mainly all been applied to neurons and, more specifically, the retina. Nobody has ever really looked at any tissues outside of the nervous system. [More]
Cypher researchers identify new genetic cause of severe epileptic encephalopathy

Cypher researchers identify new genetic cause of severe epileptic encephalopathy

Cypher Genomics, Inc., the genome informatics company, announced today the identification of de novo KCNB1 missense mutations as a novel genetic cause of severe epileptic encephalopathy. Cypher’s co-founder and Chief Scientific Officer Ali Torkamani, Ph.D. reviewed the data today at a platform presentation at the ASHG 2014 meeting being held October 18 to 22 in San Diego. [More]
Tannic acid may help ease impact of bacterial lung infections in CF patients

Tannic acid may help ease impact of bacterial lung infections in CF patients

By screening over 2,000 approved drugs and natural products, scientists have shown that tannic acid may help ease the impact of bacterial lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. [More]
Empirical sulphonylurea therapy an option for neonatal diabetes

Empirical sulphonylurea therapy an option for neonatal diabetes

A report of empirical sulphonylurea therapy in neonatal diabetes prior to genetic diagnosis highlights contrasting approaches to the problem. [More]
Mice who have partial deficiency of gene SENP2 are more likely to develop seizures, sudden death

Mice who have partial deficiency of gene SENP2 are more likely to develop seizures, sudden death

A gene crucial for brain and heart development may also be associated with sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), the most common cause of early mortality in epilepsy patients. [More]
Experts examine how molecule in parasitic worms can effectively treat autoimmune diseases

Experts examine how molecule in parasitic worms can effectively treat autoimmune diseases

Experts believe a molecule in parasitic worms could help explain why worm infections can effectively treat a range of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. [More]
Dosing commences in Essentialis’ DCCR clinical study in obese Prader-Willi syndrome patients

Dosing commences in Essentialis’ DCCR clinical study in obese Prader-Willi syndrome patients

Essentialis announced today the dosing of the first patient in clinical study PC025, which is designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of diazoxide choline controlled release tablets (DCCR) in obese Prader-Willi syndrome patients. [More]
Autifony Therapeutics awarded £2.2 million to progress first-in-class drug for tinnitus into Phase IIa study

Autifony Therapeutics awarded £2.2 million to progress first-in-class drug for tinnitus into Phase IIa study

Autifony Therapeutics Limited (“Autifony”), which is pioneering the development of novel pharmaceutical treatments for hearing disorders, today announced that it has been awarded funding of £2.2 million towards a Phase IIa clinical trial in tinnitus patients with its lead compound AUT00063, by the UK’s innovation agency, the Technology Strategy Board. [More]

Researchers discover that anti-seizure drug reduces alcohol consumption

Boston-Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have discovered that the anti-seizure drug ezogabine, reduced alcohol consumption in an experimental model. The findings, reported in the American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, may lead to more effective treatments for alcoholism. [More]
Servier Joins Xention To Develop AF Drug In Up To $163.2M Deal

Servier Joins Xention To Develop AF Drug In Up To $163.2M Deal

... [More]
Research discovery could shed light on unsolved cases of arrhythmia

Research discovery could shed light on unsolved cases of arrhythmia

The heart's regular rhythm is crucial to the delivery of oxygenated blood and nutrients to all the organs of the body. It is regulated by a bundle of cells called "the pacemaker," which use electrical signals to set the pace of the heart. Dysfunction in this mechanism can lead to an irregular heartbeat, known as arrhythmia, and often necessitates the implantation of an artificial pacemaker. [More]
Study reveals that an epilepsy drug shows promise in preventing noise-induced tinnitus

Study reveals that an epilepsy drug shows promise in preventing noise-induced tinnitus

An epilepsy drug shows promise in an animal model at preventing tinnitus from developing after exposure to loud noise, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. [More]
Synthetic compound derived from sea anemone toxin shows potential to treat obesity

Synthetic compound derived from sea anemone toxin shows potential to treat obesity

Scientists at UC Irvine reported this week that a synthetic compound ShK-186, originally derived from a sea anemone toxin, has been found to enhance metabolic activity and shows potential as a treatment for obesity and insulin resistance. [More]
Acorda Therapeutics reports positive data from dalfampridine-ER post-stroke deficits trial

Acorda Therapeutics reports positive data from dalfampridine-ER post-stroke deficits trial

Acorda Therapeutics, Inc. today announced that a proof-of-concept trial found dalfampridine extended release tablets, marketed as AMPYRA (dalfampridine) Extended Release Tablets, 10 mg, improved walking in people with post-stroke deficits. [More]
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