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The proteome is the entire complement of proteins expressed by a genome, cell, tissue or organism. More specifically, it is the expressed proteins at a given time point under defined conditions. The term is a blend of proteins and genome.
MIT researchers develop novel method for multiscale imaging of the brain tissue

MIT researchers develop novel method for multiscale imaging of the brain tissue

MIT researchers have developed a new technique for imaging brain tissue at multiple scales, allowing them to peer at molecules within cells or take a wider view of the long-range connections between neurons. [More]
New bioinformatics tool can analyse 40,000 proteins per minute

New bioinformatics tool can analyse 40,000 proteins per minute

Biology and computing have joined forces to create a piece of software that analyses mutations in proteins; these mutations are potential inducers of diseases, such as cancer. [More]
Using NMR to investigate intrinsically disordered proteins: an interview with Dr Isabella Felli

Using NMR to investigate intrinsically disordered proteins: an interview with Dr Isabella Felli

“IDPs” is now a widely used acronym that stands for “intrinsically disordered proteins.” It is the term generally used by the scientific community to refer to a wide variety of proteins that do not have a stable 3D structure and are instead characterized by a high extent of local mobility, disorder and many conformers that are accessible at room temperature. [More]
Study focuses on critical proteins involved in ovarian cancer biology

Study focuses on critical proteins involved in ovarian cancer biology

In what is believed to be the largest study of its kind, scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University and their collaborators from institutions across the nation have examined the collections of proteins in the tumors of 169 ovarian cancer patients to identify critical proteins present in their tumors. [More]
Scientists reveal metabolic reasons why low calorie diets may lead to longer life

Scientists reveal metabolic reasons why low calorie diets may lead to longer life

Overeating can lead to health issues that can shorten one's life, such as obesity, diabetes and heart disease. [More]
New protein risk score may help predict cardiovascular risk in patients with CHD

New protein risk score may help predict cardiovascular risk in patients with CHD

In a study appearing in the June 21 issue of JAMA, Peter Ganz, M.D., of the University of California-San Francisco, and colleagues conducted a study to develop and validate a score to predict risk of cardiovascular outcomes among patients with coronary heart disease using analysis of circulating proteins. [More]
New blood test could help predict severity of pulmonary arterial hypertension

New blood test could help predict severity of pulmonary arterial hypertension

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that rising blood levels of a protein called hematoma derived growth factor (HDGF) are linked to the increasing severity of pulmonary arterial hypertension, a form of damaging high blood pressure in the lungs. [More]
Simple blood test could help diagnose endometriosis

Simple blood test could help diagnose endometriosis

Endometriosis is a chronic, often painful disease affecting up to 10 percent of women of reproductive age in the U.S. How it develops is not well understood, and detecting it with certainty requires surgery. [More]
TSRI scientists develop novel technique for finding drug candidates

TSRI scientists develop novel technique for finding drug candidates

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a powerful new method for finding drug candidates that bind to specific proteins. [More]
Scientists develop new tool to overcome major hurdle for personalized medicine

Scientists develop new tool to overcome major hurdle for personalized medicine

Scientists from EPFL and ETHZ have developed a powerful tool for exploring and determining the inherent biological differences between individuals, which overcomes a major hurdle for personalized medicine. [More]
Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

As individuals and as populations our risks of getting diseases are determined partly genetically and partly from the environment that we live in. An important part of that environment that mediates between the outside world and the inside world of our bodies is the microbiome. [More]
Scientists discover unexpected functions of snoRNAs that explains cause of some diseases

Scientists discover unexpected functions of snoRNAs that explains cause of some diseases

Scientists have discovered unexpected functions of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) that explain the cause of some diseases. [More]
First large-scale proteogenomic study helps pinpoint genes that drive breast cancer

First large-scale proteogenomic study helps pinpoint genes that drive breast cancer

Building on data from The Cancer Genome Atlas project, a multi-institutional team of scientists has completed the first large-scale "proteogenomic" study of breast cancer, linking DNA mutations to protein signaling and helping pinpoint the genes that drive cancer. [More]
Study examines effects of ultra-low doses of glyphosate on gene expression profiles

Study examines effects of ultra-low doses of glyphosate on gene expression profiles

Glyphosate, often sold under the brand name of Roundup, is the world's most widely used weed-killer. While Glyphosate has approval from regulatory bodies worldwide, there are growing concerns about its possible adverse health effects. [More]
Unlocking the dark proteome: an interview with Dr Kriwacki

Unlocking the dark proteome: an interview with Dr Kriwacki

The term dark proteome refers to proteins whose structural features and thus functions are not well understood. Many proteins within the dark proteome do not fold into stable three-dimensional structures. These proteins are called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and feature highly flexible, disordered confirmations. [More]
Saliva fingerprints could be useful in searching for signs of disease

Saliva fingerprints could be useful in searching for signs of disease

Testing for health conditions usually involves needles, X-rays and other invasive or uncomfortable measures. To make diagnostics less burdensome for patients, scientists are developing alternatives, looking for disease markers in urine -- and even spit. [More]
New sensitive detection method could help measure subfractions of HDL

New sensitive detection method could help measure subfractions of HDL

High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is often referred to as good cholesterol: high levels of HDL are associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease. But many clinical outcome trials for drugs that raise HDL levels have failed to show significant benefits for trial participants. [More]
New SPOR Network launched to transform health outcomes of diabetes patients

New SPOR Network launched to transform health outcomes of diabetes patients

A new national research network was launched today to transform the health outcomes of individuals with diabetes and its related complications. It will be led by two of Canada's top researchers in the field and includes researchers conducting leading-edge health and biomedical research at nine institutions across the country. [More]
Scientists identify two enzymes that appear to play role in metabolism, inflammation

Scientists identify two enzymes that appear to play role in metabolism, inflammation

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies has discovered two enzymes that appear to play a role in metabolism and inflammation—and might someday be targeted with drugs to treat type 2 diabetes and inflammatory disorders. [More]
UCI researchers get $8 million to help develop new vaccine for Q fever

UCI researchers get $8 million to help develop new vaccine for Q fever

A University of California, Irvine scientific team led by infectious diseases researchers Philip Felgner and Aaron Esser-Kahn has received $8 million from the U.S. Department of Defense's Defense Threat Reduction Agency to help develop a new vaccine for Q fever. [More]
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