Proteome News and Research RSS Feed - Proteome News and Research

The proteome is the entire complement of proteins expressed by a genome, cell, tissue or organism. More specifically, it is the expressed proteins at a given time point under defined conditions. The term is a blend of proteins and genome.
First large-scale proteogenomic study helps pinpoint genes that drive breast cancer

First large-scale proteogenomic study helps pinpoint genes that drive breast cancer

Building on data from The Cancer Genome Atlas project, a multi-institutional team of scientists has completed the first large-scale "proteogenomic" study of breast cancer, linking DNA mutations to protein signaling and helping pinpoint the genes that drive cancer. [More]
Study examines effects of ultra-low doses of glyphosate on gene expression profiles

Study examines effects of ultra-low doses of glyphosate on gene expression profiles

Glyphosate, often sold under the brand name of Roundup, is the world's most widely used weed-killer. While Glyphosate has approval from regulatory bodies worldwide, there are growing concerns about its possible adverse health effects. [More]
Unlocking the dark proteome: an interview with Dr Kriwacki

Unlocking the dark proteome: an interview with Dr Kriwacki

The term dark proteome refers to proteins whose structural features and thus functions are not well understood. Many proteins within the dark proteome do not fold into stable three-dimensional structures. These proteins are called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and feature highly flexible, disordered confirmations. [More]
Saliva fingerprints could be useful in searching for signs of disease

Saliva fingerprints could be useful in searching for signs of disease

Testing for health conditions usually involves needles, X-rays and other invasive or uncomfortable measures. To make diagnostics less burdensome for patients, scientists are developing alternatives, looking for disease markers in urine -- and even spit. [More]
New sensitive detection method could help measure subfractions of HDL

New sensitive detection method could help measure subfractions of HDL

High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is often referred to as good cholesterol: high levels of HDL are associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease. But many clinical outcome trials for drugs that raise HDL levels have failed to show significant benefits for trial participants. [More]
New SPOR Network launched to transform health outcomes of diabetes patients

New SPOR Network launched to transform health outcomes of diabetes patients

A new national research network was launched today to transform the health outcomes of individuals with diabetes and its related complications. It will be led by two of Canada's top researchers in the field and includes researchers conducting leading-edge health and biomedical research at nine institutions across the country. [More]
Scientists identify two enzymes that appear to play role in metabolism, inflammation

Scientists identify two enzymes that appear to play role in metabolism, inflammation

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies has discovered two enzymes that appear to play a role in metabolism and inflammation—and might someday be targeted with drugs to treat type 2 diabetes and inflammatory disorders. [More]
UCI researchers get $8 million to help develop new vaccine for Q fever

UCI researchers get $8 million to help develop new vaccine for Q fever

A University of California, Irvine scientific team led by infectious diseases researchers Philip Felgner and Aaron Esser-Kahn has received $8 million from the U.S. Department of Defense's Defense Threat Reduction Agency to help develop a new vaccine for Q fever. [More]
Molecular basis for tongue cancer progression: an interview with Dr Simona Principe

Molecular basis for tongue cancer progression: an interview with Dr Simona Principe

Head and neck cancers (HNC) are the sixth most common cancers worldwide, with approximately 600,000 new cases diagnosed every year. [More]
Scientists find surprising link between iPS cell reprogramming, blood cell formation and cancer

Scientists find surprising link between iPS cell reprogramming, blood cell formation and cancer

The ability to reprogram cells has revolutionized stem cell research with major implications for almost all fields of modern biology. A decade ago Shinya Yamanaka described a procedure that revolutionized stem cell biology. Using a genetic trick that introduces a cocktail of four genes into cultured cells from human biopsies, he was able to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) from mature skin or blood cells [More]
Unlocking intrinsically disordered proteins: an interview with Peter Wright

Unlocking intrinsically disordered proteins: an interview with Peter Wright

I'm a professor in the Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology at The Scripps Research Institute. I have been performing NMR research on proteins for nearly 40 years. [More]
Eliminating the 'bad seeds' of liver cancer

Eliminating the 'bad seeds' of liver cancer

Researchers have found the 'bad seeds' of liver cancer and believe they could one day reprogram them to remain responsive to cancer treatment, a new study has found. [More]
Researchers develop novel computational approach to accelerate search for hepatitis C vaccine

Researchers develop novel computational approach to accelerate search for hepatitis C vaccine

Borrowing from several statistical science models, an interdisciplinary team of researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has developed a novel computational approach for massively accelerating the search for a hepatitis C vaccine. [More]
IQWiG: Benefit of proteome analysis for detection of diabetic nephropathy remains unclear

IQWiG: Benefit of proteome analysis for detection of diabetic nephropathy remains unclear

The German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care examined the benefit of a diagnostic-therapeutic strategy using urinary proteome analysis for detection of diabetic nephropathy (DN) versus a conventional diagnostic strategy in patients with diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension. After publication of the preliminary report in June 2015, interested persons and parties had the opportunity to comment on the preliminary results. [More]
Study provides insight into the structure of dark proteome

Study provides insight into the structure of dark proteome

Proteins are often referred to as the building blocks of life, and make up about 15 per cent of the mass of the average person, performing a wide variety of essential functions in the body. [More]
St. Jude and Scripps Research Institute scientists help launch Human Dark Proteome Initiative

St. Jude and Scripps Research Institute scientists help launch Human Dark Proteome Initiative

Scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and other institutions today announced the launch of the Human Dark Proteome Initiative (HDPI). The initiative aims to accelerate research into biology’s “invisible mass” to provide novel insights into cell function and a new frontier in drug discovery. [More]
Better understanding of hibernation could help researchers develop treatments for cardiac disease

Better understanding of hibernation could help researchers develop treatments for cardiac disease

Wintry weather means hats and scarves for some mammals, and hibernation for others. Hibernation dramatically lowers body temperatures, heart rates and oxygen consumption -- things that would be fatal to other animals. A team reports in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research a study of the proteins and genes that allow squirrels' hearts to stay healthy during the winter. [More]
Understanding molecular mechanisms underlying human aging

Understanding molecular mechanisms underlying human aging

Researchers have found differences between normal and pathologic peptidomic changes that may lead to an improved understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying aging. Proteome analysis in combination with therapy may influence pathologic aging. [More]
Researchers now have a way to study special proteins linked to different diseases, cancer

Researchers now have a way to study special proteins linked to different diseases, cancer

Researchers from Northwestern University and Yale University have developed a user-friendly technology to help scientists understand how proteins work and fix them when they are broken. Such knowledge could pave the way for new drugs for a myriad of diseases, including cancer. [More]
Researchers provide new insights into biology of aging, age-related diseases

Researchers provide new insights into biology of aging, age-related diseases

The scientific team of a new biotech company Gero in collaboration with one of the leading academics in the field of aging Prof. Robert J. Shmookler Reis (current world record holder in life extension for model animals - 10 fold for nematodes) has recently brought new insights into biology of aging and age-related diseases, primarily, around the stability and stress resistance of certain gene regulatory networks. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement