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Psychiatry is the treatment, study and prevention of mental disorders.
Older women with gumption score high on compassion

Older women with gumption score high on compassion

​Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that older women, plucky individuals and those who have suffered a recent major loss are more likely to be compassionate toward strangers than other older adults. [More]

Researchers discover that anti-seizure drug reduces alcohol consumption

Boston-Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have discovered that the anti-seizure drug ezogabine, reduced alcohol consumption in an experimental model. The findings, reported in the American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, may lead to more effective treatments for alcoholism. [More]

Autism in adolescents appears to be associated with atypical connectivity in brain, says study

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in adolescents appears to be associated with atypical connectivity in the brain involving the systems that help people infer what others are thinking and understand the meaning of others' actions and emotions. [More]

Vanderbilt and Tennessee partner to bring novel intervention program

Vanderbilt University's Treatment and Research Institute for Autism Spectrum Disorders (TRIAD) and the Tennessee Department of Education are partnering to bring a novel intervention program to families of young children with autism in Middle Tennessee. [More]
Genetically modified neural stem cells offer potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease

Genetically modified neural stem cells offer potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease

UC Irvine neurobiologists have found that genetically modified neural stem cells show positive results when transplanted into the brains of mice with the symptoms and pathology of Alzheimer's disease. The pre-clinical trial is published in the journal Stem Cells Research and Therapy, and the approach has been shown to work in two different mouse models. [More]

Researchers uncover new aspect of autism

A team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the Center for Cancer Systems Biology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has uncovered a new aspect of autism, revealing that proteins involved in autism interact with many more partners than previously known. These interactions had not been detected earlier because they involve alternatively spliced forms of autism genes found in the brain. [More]

ABAM Foundation accredits four new addiction medicine fellowship programs

The American Board of Addiction Medicine Foundation today announced the accreditation of four new addiction medicine fellowship programs, bringing the total number of accredited programs to 23. [More]

Special Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation conference to focus on issues surrounding addiction

The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation's Professionals in Residence program in collaboration with the University of Minnesota Department of Family Medicine and Community Health and the Scaife Family Foundation will host a special conference June 20-21 in Minnesota for primary health care providers to learn more about the issues surrounding addiction. [More]

Older adults in treatment programs experience same challenges as younger participants

Statistics show that the amount of older adults in the criminal justice system has quadrupled in the past 15 years. Many of the adults have histories of mental health problems and are being placed in court-based treatment programs, where government officials and social workers tend to think that they are more likely to experience success compared to their younger counterparts. However, new research by Kelli Canada, assistant professor in the University of Missouri School of Social Work, shows that although mental health court participants older than 50 adhere to treatment programs better than younger adults, they are just as likely to be reincarcerated or relapse into criminal behavior. [More]

Researcher develops novel IBT to help opioid-dependent Vermonters

Opioid dependence - addiction to heroin and prescription painkillers - has reached epidemic levels across the country, with treatment waitlists also at an all-time high. [More]
Studies shed light on propensity for habit formation in obsessive-compulsive disorder

Studies shed light on propensity for habit formation in obsessive-compulsive disorder

Two new studies published this week in Biological Psychiatry shed light on the propensity for habit formation in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). These studies suggest that a tendency to develop habits, i.e., the compulsive component of the disorder, may be a core feature of the disorder rather than a consequence of irrational beliefs. [More]

Researchers win 2014 Joint Team Science Award to improve care for depression in low-income areas

A team of community leaders and researchers from UCLA and RAND has been awarded the 2014 Joint Team Science Award in recognition of a 10-year effort to conduct community engaged, population-based translational science to improve care for depression in low-income areas. [More]
UCLA and RAND researchers receive 2014 Joint Team Science Award

UCLA and RAND researchers receive 2014 Joint Team Science Award

A team of community leaders and researchers from UCLA and RAND has been awarded the 2014 Joint Team Science Award in recognition of a 10-year effort to conduct community engaged, population-based translational science to improve care for depression in low-income areas. [More]

Risk factors for complete, attempted suicide in schizophrenia 'confirmed'

Among individuals with schizophrenia, those earliest in their illness course and those with a history of suicide attempts have the highest suicide-related mortality rates, reveals analysis of the international Ziprasidone Observational Study of Cardiac Outcomes. [More]

High relapse rates in bipolar disorder confirmed

Results from a naturalistic study show that there is a high risk of relapse among bipolar disorder patients, particularly if their medication is changed or stopped. [More]
Intranasal ketamine spray confers rapid antidepressant effect in patients with depressive disorder

Intranasal ketamine spray confers rapid antidepressant effect in patients with depressive disorder

A research team from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai published the first controlled evidence showing that an intranasal ketamine spray conferred an unusually rapid antidepressant effect -within 24 hours-and was well tolerated in patients with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder. [More]
UCSF launches Brain Health Registry to advance neuroscience research

UCSF launches Brain Health Registry to advance neuroscience research

A new online project led by researchers at UC San Francisco promises to dramatically cut the time and cost of conducting clinical trials for brain diseases, while also helping scientists analyze and track the brain functions of thousands of volunteers over time. [More]

Findings confirm importance of brain activity during sleep for memory strength and accuracy

The sense of smell might seem intuitive, almost something you take for granted. But researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center have found that memory of specific odors depends on the ability of the brain to learn, process and recall accurately and effectively during slow-wave sleep — a deep sleep characterized by slow brain waves. [More]
DNA modifications in blood are directly related to changes in brain tissues, say researchers

DNA modifications in blood are directly related to changes in brain tissues, say researchers

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have confirmed suspicions that DNA modifications found in the blood of mice exposed to high levels of stress hormone — and showing signs of anxiety — are directly related to changes found in their brain tissues. [More]
Alkermes announces results from phase 3 clinical trial of aripiprazole lauroxil in patients with schizophrenia

Alkermes announces results from phase 3 clinical trial of aripiprazole lauroxil in patients with schizophrenia

Alkermes plc today announced positive topline results from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 clinical trial of aripiprazole lauroxil in patients with schizophrenia. Patients treated once monthly with either 441 mg or 882 mg of aripiprazole lauroxil demonstrated statistically significant reductions from baseline in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total scores at week 12, compared to placebo (p<0.001 aripiprazole lauroxil 441 mg, p<0.001 aripiprazole lauroxil 882 mg), which was the prespecified primary endpoint in the study. Based on the positive results from this phase 3 study, Alkermes plans to submit a New Drug Application (NDA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the third quarter of 2014. [More]