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Psychiatry is the treatment, study and prevention of mental disorders.

People who use anabolic steroids to improve sporting performance experience memory issues

People using anabolic steroids to improve muscle growth and sporting performance are far more likely to experience issues with their memory, according to new research from Northumbria University. [More]
UChicago Medicine, Little Company of Mary partner to boost community access to specialty care for children

UChicago Medicine, Little Company of Mary partner to boost community access to specialty care for children

The University of Chicago Medicine and Little Company of Mary Hospital and Health Care Centers are partnering to expand care for infants and children by developing a subspecialty center on the community hospital's Evergreen Park campus that will provide enhanced neonatology and pediatric services. [More]
Study sheds new light on how the brain forms memories

Study sheds new light on how the brain forms memories

In the first study of its kind, UCLA and United Kingdom researchers found that neurons in a specific brain region play a key role in rapidly forming memories about every day events, a finding that may result in a better understanding of memory loss and new methods to fight it in Alzheimer's and other neurological diseases. [More]
Study identifies trends in use of antipsychotic medications in young people in the U.S.

Study identifies trends in use of antipsychotic medications in young people in the U.S.

Despite concerns that use of antipsychotic medications in treating young people has increased, use actually declined between 2006 and 2010 for children ages 12 and under, and increased for adolescents and young adults. [More]
UCSD researchers report that statins make women aggressive, but men calmer

UCSD researchers report that statins make women aggressive, but men calmer

Statins are a hugely popular drug class used to manage blood cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of heart disease. Previous studies had raised questions about adverse behavioral changes with statins, such as irritability or violence, but findings with statins have been inconsistent. In the first randomized trial to look at statin effects on behavior, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that aggressive behavior typically declined among men placed on statins (compared to placebo), but typically increased among women placed on statins. [More]
Use of antipsychotic drugs more common in boys than girls, research shows

Use of antipsychotic drugs more common in boys than girls, research shows

Boys are more likely than girls to receive a prescription for antipsychotic medication regardless of age, researchers have found. [More]
Brain-imaging studies may help predict promiscuity, problem drinking in young adults

Brain-imaging studies may help predict promiscuity, problem drinking in young adults

A pair of brain-imaging studies suggest researchers may be able to predict how likely young adults are to develop problem drinking or engage in risky sexual behavior in response to stress. [More]
Comorbid anxiety ‘a crucial target’ for treatment in bipolar disorder

Comorbid anxiety ‘a crucial target’ for treatment in bipolar disorder

Almost half of patients with bipolar disorder will have comorbid anxiety disorder in their lifetime, show the findings of a systematic review and meta-analysis. [More]
Virtual human helps veterans with PTSD, people with mental illness build job interview skills

Virtual human helps veterans with PTSD, people with mental illness build job interview skills

Finding a job is difficult for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and individuals with severe mental illness, who have high unemployment rates even though many want to work. [More]
Loyola offers holistic approach to help couples manage their sexual health

Loyola offers holistic approach to help couples manage their sexual health

Cancer and cancer therapies are frequently associated with sexual dysfunction, yet this condition often goes untreated, according to specialists at Loyola Medicine's Sexual Wellness Clinic. [More]
Hospital-wide clinical improvement initiative for patients at risk for DASH reduces readmission rates

Hospital-wide clinical improvement initiative for patients at risk for DASH reduces readmission rates

Brigham and Women's Hospital finds that developing and implementing an interdisciplinary care improvement initiative improves outcomes. [More]
Poor sleep linked to negative mood in women with bipolar disorder

Poor sleep linked to negative mood in women with bipolar disorder

Poor sleep is associated with negative mood in women with bipolar disorder, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine and University of Michigan Medical School. [More]
People with recurrent depression have significantly smaller hippocampus than healthy individuals

People with recurrent depression have significantly smaller hippocampus than healthy individuals

The brains of people with recurrent depression have a significantly smaller hippocampus - the part of the brain most associated with forming new memories - than healthy individuals, a new global study of nearly 9,000 people reveals. [More]
Amphetamine-based drug Evekeo effective in treating ADHD symptoms in children

Amphetamine-based drug Evekeo effective in treating ADHD symptoms in children

The amphetamine-based drug Evekeo, given once or twice daily to children 6-12 years of age, is effective in treating attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and improving performance in a laboratory classroom setting, according to the results of a new study published in the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Artemisinin and the fight against malaria: an interview with Dr. Robert Sebbag, Sanofi

Artemisinin and the fight against malaria: an interview with Dr. Robert Sebbag, Sanofi

Since 2014, more than 16 million anti-malarial treatments derived from the Sanofi patented process for semi-synthetic artemisinin have been supplied to endemic countries in Africa. [More]
Different neurobiological pathways lead to expression of Alzheimer's disease

Different neurobiological pathways lead to expression of Alzheimer's disease

The amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) posits that sticky aggregations or plaques of amyloid-beta peptides accumulate over time in the brain, triggering a series of events that ultimately result in the full-blown neurodegenerative disorder. The hypothesis has been a major driver of AD research for more than 20 years. [More]
New UCLA study may lead to more precise treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder

New UCLA study may lead to more precise treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder

Tens of millions of Americans -- an estimated 1 to 2 percent of the population -- will suffer at some point in their lifetimes from obsessive-compulsive disorder, a disorder characterized by recurrent, intrusive, and disturbing thoughts (obsessions), and/or stereotyped recurrent behaviors (compulsions). [More]
Chronic disease, mental health issues affect low-income African-Americans, Latinos and Hispanics

Chronic disease, mental health issues affect low-income African-Americans, Latinos and Hispanics

Chronic disease and mental health issues disproportionately affect low-income African-Americans, Latinos and Hispanics, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Two new studies by the UCLA Center for Culture, Trauma and Mental Health Disparities shed light on the causes and impacts of this disparity. [More]
Light may just be the answer for solving sleep problems among lung cancer patients

Light may just be the answer for solving sleep problems among lung cancer patients

When you're having trouble sleeping, light is the last thing you assume you need. But according to a pilot study attempting to solve insomnia among lung cancer patients led by University at Buffalo sleep researcher Grace Dean, light may just be the answer. [More]

Long-acting injectable antipsychotic medication benefits people with schizophrenia

Schizophrenia, which affects 2 million to 3 million people in the U.S., causes hallucinations, delusions and disorganization. Left untreated, the disease can cause a significant loss in quality of life, including unemployment and estrangement from loved ones. But many people with schizophrenia can control the disorder and live without symptoms for several years if they consistently take prescribed antipsychotic medication, typically a daily pill. [More]
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