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Psychiatry is the treatment, study and prevention of mental disorders.
Meta-analysis links signalling pathways to bipolar disorder

Meta-analysis links signalling pathways to bipolar disorder

A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies has identified six biological pathways that may be involved in the genetic predisposition to develop bipolar disorder. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify potential new treatment for depression

UT Southwestern researchers identify potential new treatment for depression

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center are making breakthroughs that could benefit people suffering from depression. [More]
Researchers develop effective behavioral economic approach that offers women financial incentives to quit smoking

Researchers develop effective behavioral economic approach that offers women financial incentives to quit smoking

Smoking during pregnancy - particularly among economically-disadvantaged women - leads to a host of poor pregnancy outcomes, including miscarriage, preterm birth, SIDS, and additional adverse effects later in life. Without a formal treatment intervention, women in this population continue to smoke, and their babies suffer. [More]
Study shows mechanistic link between sleep loss in early life and adult behavior in animal model

Study shows mechanistic link between sleep loss in early life and adult behavior in animal model

Mom always said you need your sleep, and it turns out, she was right. According to a new study published in Science this week from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, lack of sleep in young fruit flies profoundly diminishes their ability to do one thing they do really, really well - make more flies. [More]
New approach to handle people with dementia may help reduce use of antipsychotics drugs

New approach to handle people with dementia may help reduce use of antipsychotics drugs

A new approach to handling agitation, aggression and other unwanted behaviors by people with dementia may help reduce the use of antipsychotics and other psychiatric drugs in this population, and make life easier for them and their caregivers, a team of experts says. [More]
New approach may help reduce use of antipsychotics and other psychiatric drugs in dementia patients

New approach may help reduce use of antipsychotics and other psychiatric drugs in dementia patients

A new approach to handling agitation, aggression and other unwanted behaviors by people with dementia may help reduce the use of antipsychotics and other psychiatric drugs in this population, and make life easier for them and their caregivers, a team of experts says. [More]
New hypothesis about emergence of Parkinson's disease

New hypothesis about emergence of Parkinson's disease

The cause of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is still unknown, but a new study proposes that neurons may be mistaken for foreign invaders and killed by the person's own immune system, similar to the way autoimmune diseases like type I diabetes, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis attack the body's cells. [More]
Scientists find new information in study on depression in Parkinson's disease

Scientists find new information in study on depression in Parkinson's disease

A group of scientists from the University of Kentucky College of Medicine and the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging has found interesting new information in a study on depression and neuropsychological function in Parkinson's disease (PD). [More]

Cedars-Sinai nurses screening hospitalized patients for signs of depression

In an effort to identify and treat patients with undiagnosed depression, Cedars-Sinai nurses are screening each hospitalized patient for signs of the illness and for risk factors that could make recoveries harder and longer. [More]

IV-administered ketamine effective in patients with chronic PTSD

For the first time, evidence that a single dose of IV-administered ketamine was associated with the rapid reduction of symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder in patients with chronic PTSD was demonstrated in a proof-of-concept, randomized, double blind crossover study, undertaken by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. These findings, according to Mount Sinai researchers, could be the first step toward developing new interventions for PTSD. [More]
Dopamine replacement therapy liked with decline in depressed Parkinson patients' cognitive function

Dopamine replacement therapy liked with decline in depressed Parkinson patients' cognitive function

A group of scientists from the University of Kentucky College of Medicine and the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging has found interesting new information in a study on depression and neuropsychological function in Parkinson's disease (PD). [More]
Older women with gumption score high on compassion

Older women with gumption score high on compassion

​Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that older women, plucky individuals and those who have suffered a recent major loss are more likely to be compassionate toward strangers than other older adults. [More]

Researchers discover that anti-seizure drug reduces alcohol consumption

Boston-Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have discovered that the anti-seizure drug ezogabine, reduced alcohol consumption in an experimental model. The findings, reported in the American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, may lead to more effective treatments for alcoholism. [More]

Autism in adolescents appears to be associated with atypical connectivity in brain, says study

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in adolescents appears to be associated with atypical connectivity in the brain involving the systems that help people infer what others are thinking and understand the meaning of others' actions and emotions. [More]
Vanderbilt and Tennessee partner to bring novel intervention program

Vanderbilt and Tennessee partner to bring novel intervention program

Vanderbilt University's Treatment and Research Institute for Autism Spectrum Disorders (TRIAD) and the Tennessee Department of Education are partnering to bring a novel intervention program to families of young children with autism in Middle Tennessee. [More]
Genetically modified neural stem cells offer potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease

Genetically modified neural stem cells offer potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease

UC Irvine neurobiologists have found that genetically modified neural stem cells show positive results when transplanted into the brains of mice with the symptoms and pathology of Alzheimer's disease. The pre-clinical trial is published in the journal Stem Cells Research and Therapy, and the approach has been shown to work in two different mouse models. [More]

Researchers uncover new aspect of autism

A team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the Center for Cancer Systems Biology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has uncovered a new aspect of autism, revealing that proteins involved in autism interact with many more partners than previously known. These interactions had not been detected earlier because they involve alternatively spliced forms of autism genes found in the brain. [More]

ABAM Foundation accredits four new addiction medicine fellowship programs

The American Board of Addiction Medicine Foundation today announced the accreditation of four new addiction medicine fellowship programs, bringing the total number of accredited programs to 23. [More]

Special Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation conference to focus on issues surrounding addiction

The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation's Professionals in Residence program in collaboration with the University of Minnesota Department of Family Medicine and Community Health and the Scaife Family Foundation will host a special conference June 20-21 in Minnesota for primary health care providers to learn more about the issues surrounding addiction. [More]

Older adults in treatment programs experience same challenges as younger participants

Statistics show that the amount of older adults in the criminal justice system has quadrupled in the past 15 years. Many of the adults have histories of mental health problems and are being placed in court-based treatment programs, where government officials and social workers tend to think that they are more likely to experience success compared to their younger counterparts. However, new research by Kelli Canada, assistant professor in the University of Missouri School of Social Work, shows that although mental health court participants older than 50 adhere to treatment programs better than younger adults, they are just as likely to be reincarcerated or relapse into criminal behavior. [More]