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Psychiatry is the treatment, study and prevention of mental disorders.
Key modifiable Alzheimer’s risk factors pinpointed

Key modifiable Alzheimer’s risk factors pinpointed

A meta-analysis has identified the key modifiable factors associated with an increased or decreased risk of Alzheimer’s disease. [More]
UiO researchers test new nasal spray device for treating mental illness

UiO researchers test new nasal spray device for treating mental illness

Researchers at the University of Oslo have tested a new device for delivering hormone treatments for mental illness through the nose. This method was found to deliver medicine to the brain with few side effects. [More]
Young adults diagnosed with ADHD in adolescence show differences in brain structure, memory

Young adults diagnosed with ADHD in adolescence show differences in brain structure, memory

Young adults diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adolescence show differences in brain structure and perform poorly in memory tests compared to their peers, according to new research from the University of Cambridge, UK, and the University of Oulu, Finland. [More]
Study shows how difficulty making good decisions can make certain people vulnerable to suicide

Study shows how difficulty making good decisions can make certain people vulnerable to suicide

Not even close to every person who faces challenges or lives with severe depression commits suicide. Some people are more vulnerable than others. [More]
Automated speech analysis program correctly identifies young people at risk for psychosis

Automated speech analysis program correctly identifies young people at risk for psychosis

An automated speech analysis program correctly differentiated between at-risk young people who developed psychosis over a two-and-a-half year period and those who did not. In a proof-of-principle study, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, and the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center found that the computerized analysis provided a more accurate classification than clinical ratings. [More]
New study reveals effect of light exposure at night on the biology of teen sleep

New study reveals effect of light exposure at night on the biology of teen sleep

A new study has an important implication for tweens and young teens as they head back to school: Taking a gadget to bed could really hurt their sleep. [More]

Behavioral Medicine's special issue highlights how contextual factors play role in health outcomes

Behavioral Medicine presents "Health and Context" - a special issue providing important evidence for the myriad ways that contextual factors, such as neighborhoods, schools, family settings, and cultural contexts in which individuals engage, play a role in health outcomes. [More]
Study looks at patterns of emotion regulation in the brains of abused children

Study looks at patterns of emotion regulation in the brains of abused children

Children who have been abused typically experience more intense emotions than their peers who have not been abused. This is often considered a byproduct of living in volatile, dangerous environments. A recent study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP) set to find out what happens when these children are taught how to regulate their emotions. [More]
Older people drink unsafe amounts of alcohol, study finds

Older people drink unsafe amounts of alcohol, study finds

One in five older people who drink alcohol are consuming it at unsafe levels - over 21 units of alcohol for men and 14 units for women each week - according to a study by King's College London. The research in inner-city London, published in BMJ Open, found these unsafe older drinkers are more likely to be of higher socioeconomic status. [More]
New study shows partial genetic basis underlying racial differences in slow-wave sleep

New study shows partial genetic basis underlying racial differences in slow-wave sleep

A new study clearly establishes a partial genetic basis underlying racial differences in slow-wave sleep, suggesting that it may be possible to develop sleep-related therapies that target specific genetic variants. [More]
Poor sleep may impact treatment and recovery in veterans with PTSD, TBI

Poor sleep may impact treatment and recovery in veterans with PTSD, TBI

Poor sleep may impact treatment and recovery in veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). A review of extensive research on sleep in TBI and PTSD has found that sleep-focused interventions can improve treatment outcomes in veterans. [More]
Maltreated children experience more intense emotions than their peers

Maltreated children experience more intense emotions than their peers

Children who have been abused or exposed to other types of trauma typically experience more intense emotions than their peers, a byproduct of living in volatile, dangerous environments. [More]

Study finds link between alcohol use and risky sexual encounters among young women

In-depth interviews conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine of 20 young women attending an urban sexually transmitted disease clinic have documented a variety of unexpected, unintended sexual encounters linked to their alcohol use before sex occurs. [More]
Medicaid could save billions as patents for several blockbuster antipsychotic medications expire

Medicaid could save billions as patents for several blockbuster antipsychotic medications expire

Medicaid is expected to save billions of dollars a year as patents for several blockbuster antipsychotic medications expire and use of generic versions of these drugs increases, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. These savings may provide relief from the high costs of these medications and allow policymakers to lift restrictions on patients' access, the researchers argue. [More]
Loyola doctor provides tips to alleviate back-to-school anxiety in children

Loyola doctor provides tips to alleviate back-to-school anxiety in children

As the number of days of summer vacation decrease, children and adolescent anxiety levels often increase. In addition to getting school supplies, registration completed and vaccinations up to date, it's important for parents to talk to their kids and understand how they feel about heading back to school. [More]
People near the middle of social hierarchies suffer higher rates of depression and anxiety

People near the middle of social hierarchies suffer higher rates of depression and anxiety

Individuals near the middle of the social hierarchy suffer higher rates of depression and anxiety than those at the top or bottom, according to researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
US-based clinical research spending drops 32%, show new data

US-based clinical research spending drops 32%, show new data

Could the Sunshine Act be creating an unintentional downward trend in clinical research? An analysis of the U.S. government's Open Payments database shows that industry spending on U.S-based clinical research has dropped 32 percent in the first year-over-year comparison since Open Payments data started to be collected. [More]
Physicians may now have tools to predict people at greater risk of attempting suicide

Physicians may now have tools to predict people at greater risk of attempting suicide

People being treated for bipolar disorder and other psychiatric illnesses are at greater risk of attempting suicide, but physicians may now have tools to predict which of those individuals will attempt it and intervene early to prevent such tragedies from occurring. [More]
Newly developed technique delivers wireless power for optogenetics

Newly developed technique delivers wireless power for optogenetics

A miniature device that combines optogenetics - using light to control the activity of the brain - with a newly developed technique for wirelessly powering implanted devices is the first fully internal method of delivering optogenetics. [More]
PTSD not associated with increased risk for cancer, find BUSM researchers

PTSD not associated with increased risk for cancer, find BUSM researchers

In the largest study to date that examines Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) as a risk factor for cancer, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine, have shown no evidence of an association. [More]
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