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Psychiatry is the treatment, study and prevention of mental disorders.
New Norwegian study finds strong relationship between sleep problems and self-harm in adolescents

New Norwegian study finds strong relationship between sleep problems and self-harm in adolescents

There is a strong relationship between sleep problems such as insomnia, and self-harm, according to findings in a new Norwegian study. [More]
Sham-controlled trial of deep brain stimulation treatment for depression fails to show efficacy

Sham-controlled trial of deep brain stimulation treatment for depression fails to show efficacy

Depression is a leading cause of disability worldwide, and treatment-resistant symptoms of depression have a terrible personal and societal cost. They can devastate lives, careers, and families. Some severely ill patients may be unable to attend to even the basic elements of self-care, while others attempt or complete suicide. [More]
Study demonstrates that stress hormone cortisol can reduce heroin cravings

Study demonstrates that stress hormone cortisol can reduce heroin cravings

Every addiction is characterized by a strong desire for a certain addictive substance, be it nicotine, alcohol or other drug. Researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland recently conducted a study on heroin addiction and demonstrated that the stress hormone cortisol can reduce addictive cravings. [More]
Study suggests potential way to predict autism or psychosis risk in children with genetic abnormality

Study suggests potential way to predict autism or psychosis risk in children with genetic abnormality

Doctors and researchers have long known that children who are missing about 60 genes on a certain chromosome are at a significantly elevated risk for developing either a disorder on the autism spectrum or psychosis — that is, any mental disorder characterized by delusions and hallucinations, including schizophrenia. But there has been no way to predict which child with the abnormality might be at risk for which disorder. [More]
Static synapses that lie between cell body and AIS critical for decreasing neuronal excitability

Static synapses that lie between cell body and AIS critical for decreasing neuronal excitability

In biology, stability is important. From body temperature to blood pressure and sugar levels, our body ensures that these remain within reasonable limits and do not reach potentially damaging extremes. [More]
UCLA, UTHealth develop new PCBD Checklist for Youth

UCLA, UTHealth develop new PCBD Checklist for Youth

The first test ever constructed to assess Persistent Complex Bereavement Disorder—a problematic syndrome of grief—has been jointly published by researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and The University of California, Los Angeles. [More]
Diagnosing psychiatric disorder may not be as important as prescribing effective treatment

Diagnosing psychiatric disorder may not be as important as prescribing effective treatment

Nailing the diagnosis of a psychiatric disorder may not be important in prescribing effective treatment, according to Mark Zimmerman, M.D., a clinical researcher at Rhode Island Hospital. His opinion editorial was published online today in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. [More]
Computerized attention-control training program significantly reduces PTSD symptoms among combat veterans

Computerized attention-control training program significantly reduces PTSD symptoms among combat veterans

A computerized attention-control training program significantly reduced combat veterans' preoccupation with - or avoidance of -- threat and attendant PTSD symptoms. By contrast, another type of computerized training, called attention bias modification - which has proven helpful in treating anxiety disorders - did not reduce PTSD symptoms. NIMH and Israeli researchers conducted parallel trials in which the two treatments were tested in US and Israeli combat veterans. [More]
Body fat can send stress signals, say University of Florida Health researchers

Body fat can send stress signals, say University of Florida Health researchers

The brain's effect on other parts of the body has been well established. Now, a group that includes two University of Florida Health researchers has found that it's a two-way street: Body fat can send a signal that affects the way the brain deals with stress and metabolism. [More]
Researchers examine brain networks involved in PTSD and TBI

Researchers examine brain networks involved in PTSD and TBI

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have devastating consequences. Both are associated with high rates of disability and suicide, and although they are separate conditions, they commonly co-occur. For example, a soldier who has developed PTSD as a result of a traumatic experience may have also sustained a brain injury during that experience. [More]

Mission statements of medical schools influence outcomes among graduate students

Medical schools whose mission statements underscore societal good and a desire to train students for service to at-risk populations are more likely to produce physicians who will enter careers in primary care (such as family medicine) and work in medically underserved areas, according to a study by Upstate Medical University researchers published in the June issue of the journal Family Medicine. [More]
Smokers who switch to low-nicotine cigarettes find difficult to curb smoking habits in the long term

Smokers who switch to low-nicotine cigarettes find difficult to curb smoking habits in the long term

Smokers who successfully lowered their nicotine intake when they were switched to low-nicotine cigarettes were unable to curb their smoking habits in the long term, according to a study by researchers at UCSF and San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center. [More]
New assessment tool helps identify children and adolescents with bereavement disorder

New assessment tool helps identify children and adolescents with bereavement disorder

Everybody grieves the death of a loved one, and the process helps most mourners adjust to their loss. "Charlie Brown was right," said Christopher Layne, a psychologist and researcher at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA. "There is good grief." But for some people, bereavement becomes a problem in itself, prolonging suffering and impairing functioning. For grieving children and adolescents persistent complex bereavement disorder can derail social and academic development at a time when children and adolescents need to master skills and form aspirations to succeed later in life. [More]
UCLA Health's hospitals named among nation's best in U.S. News and World Report

UCLA Health's hospitals named among nation's best in U.S. News and World Report

UCLA Health's hospitals in Westwood and Santa Monica have been named to U.S. News and World Report's 2015-2016 Best Hospitals Honor Roll. UCLA, which previously ranked No. 5 in the country, tied for No. 3 this year. [More]
Study identifies new culprit in Alzheimer's disease development

Study identifies new culprit in Alzheimer's disease development

A recent study conducted at Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research and NYU Langone Medical Center implicates a new culprit in Alzheimer's disease development. The research reveals that ßCTF -- the precursor of the amyloid beta (Aß) peptide -- acts at the earliest stage of Alzheimer's to initiate a range of abnormalities leading to the loss of groups of neurons critical for memory formation. [More]
Study reveals potential new therapeutic target for depression treatment

Study reveals potential new therapeutic target for depression treatment

Increasing the levels of a signaling molecule found in the brain can positively alter response to stress, revealing a potential new therapeutic target for treatment of depression, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers said. [More]
Poverty has detrimental effects on child's brain development

Poverty has detrimental effects on child's brain development

An alarming 22 percent of U.S. children live in poverty, which can have long-lasting negative consequences on brain development, emotional health and academic achievement. A new study, published July 20 in JAMA Pediatrics, provides even more compelling evidence that growing up in poverty has detrimental effects on the brain. [More]
New monoclonal antibodies may provide blueprint for effective Alzheimer's disease treatments

New monoclonal antibodies may provide blueprint for effective Alzheimer's disease treatments

Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center's Center for Cognitive Neurology have evidence that monoclonal antibodies they developed may provide the blueprint for effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease. [More]
New findings point toward potential blood test to detect schizophrenia

New findings point toward potential blood test to detect schizophrenia

High blood levels of a growth factor known to enable new blood vessel development and brain cell protection correlate with a smaller size of brain areas key to complex thought, emotion and behavior in patients with schizophrenia, researchers report in the journal Molecular Psychiatry. [More]
UAB Department of Psychiatry to open new clinic to serve mental health needs of LGBTQ community

UAB Department of Psychiatry to open new clinic to serve mental health needs of LGBTQ community

The University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Psychiatry will open a mental health and wellness clinic specifically for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning individuals. The clinic will see patients beginning Monday, July 20. [More]
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