Psychiatry News and Research RSS Feed - Psychiatry News and Research

Psychiatry is the treatment, study and prevention of mental disorders.
Auditory deficits in people with schizophrenia linked to dysfunctional brain receptors

Auditory deficits in people with schizophrenia linked to dysfunctional brain receptors

The inability to hear subtle changes in pitch, a common and debilitating problem for people with schizophrenia, is due to dysfunctional N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) brain receptors, according to a study by Columbia University Medical Center researchers. [More]
NYU study finds cortisol profile differences among sexual minority men

NYU study finds cortisol profile differences among sexual minority men

Cortisol is a life sustaining adrenal hormone essential to maintaining the natural balance of the body. [More]
Hallucinogenic drug offers relief for people with cancer-related anxiety or depression

Hallucinogenic drug offers relief for people with cancer-related anxiety or depression

In a small double-blind study, Johns Hopkins researchers report that a substantial majority of people suffering cancer-related anxiety or depression found considerable relief for up to six months from a single large dose of psilocybin -- the active compound in hallucinogenic "magic mushrooms." [More]
Overweight adolescents with bipolar disorder show signs of increased illness severity, study finds

Overweight adolescents with bipolar disorder show signs of increased illness severity, study finds

Bipolar disorder is one of the most disabling medical conditions among adolescents worldwide. Similarly, being overweight or obese is common in adolescents and is known to confer risk for cardiovascular disease and other poor health outcomes in adulthood. [More]
Online program for insomnia can improve amount and quality of sleep

Online program for insomnia can improve amount and quality of sleep

An online program designed to help people overcome insomnia significantly improves both the amount and quality of sleep, a new study has found. [More]
Study finds persistent cortical thinning in former collegiate football players

Study finds persistent cortical thinning in former collegiate football players

A growing body of research continues to raise concerns about the effects of head trauma sustained while participating in popular contact sports, particularly football. [More]

Web-based cognitive therapy provides less expensive, scalable treatment option for insomnia

How well did a web-based cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia intervention work in a randomized clinical trial? [More]
Online group therapy can be as effective as face-to-face treatment for bulimia nervosa

Online group therapy can be as effective as face-to-face treatment for bulimia nervosa

Eight years ago, researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill launched a new kind of clinical trial to compare the effectiveness of online therapy - delivered through group chat sessions - to face-to-face group therapy for the treatment of bulimia nervosa, an eating disorder marked by recurrent episodes of binge eating (or eating an unusually large amount of food and feeling out of control) coupled with purging behaviors such as vomiting, laxative abuse, or excessive exercise. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers find evidence of brain injury in young NFL players

Johns Hopkins researchers find evidence of brain injury in young NFL players

In a small study of young or recently retired NFL players, researchers at Johns Hopkins report finding evidence of brain injury and repair that is visible on imaging from the players compared to a control group of men without a history of concussion. [More]
Enzyme research provides new insights into pathophysiology of depression

Enzyme research provides new insights into pathophysiology of depression

Despite the fact that more than four percent of the world's population suffer from depression, and even though approximately 1,500 individuals commit suicide each year in Sweden, the understanding of the pathophysiology of depression remains unclear and only a few new discoveries of mechanisms behind it have been made in recent years. [More]
Individual cognitive processing therapy more efficacious in treating PTSD symptoms

Individual cognitive processing therapy more efficacious in treating PTSD symptoms

Individual sessions of cognitive processing therapy (CPT) - a trauma-focused treatment that teaches patients more balanced thinking about traumatic events - were better at reducing the severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in active-duty military members, although group sessions also were effective, according to an article published online by JAMA Psychiatry. [More]
Social status affects immune regulation and health status in rhesus monkeys

Social status affects immune regulation and health status in rhesus monkeys

The richest and poorest Americans differ in life expectancy by more than a decade. Glaring health inequalities across the socioeconomic spectrum are often attributed to access to medical care and differences in habits such as smoking, exercise and diet. [More]
Stuttering linked to changes in speech and language-based brain circuits

Stuttering linked to changes in speech and language-based brain circuits

Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have conducted the first study of its kind, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to look at brain regions in both adults and children who stutter. [More]
Home-based telemental health provides improved quality of life for depressed elderly veterans

Home-based telemental health provides improved quality of life for depressed elderly veterans

Home-based telemental health for depression is well received by patients and delivers as good a quality of life as in-person visits, according to the results of a clinical trial in 241 depressed elderly veterans reported in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry by investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina and the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center. [More]

Depression commonly occurs in patients with MCI, review suggests

Depression commonly occurs in patients with mild cognitive impairment and a new review of the medical literature suggests an overall pooled prevalence of 32 percent, according to an article published online by JAMA Psychiatry. [More]
Individual cognitive therapy effective in relieving PTSD symptoms in active-duty military members

Individual cognitive therapy effective in relieving PTSD symptoms in active-duty military members

Although both group and individual therapy can ease post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in active-duty military service members, individual therapy relieved PTSD symptoms better and quicker, according to a study led by a Duke University School of Medicine researcher. [More]
Men lack knowledge about risk factors contributing to male infertility, study finds

Men lack knowledge about risk factors contributing to male infertility, study finds

The first large-scale study of its kind has revealed that Canadian men generally lack knowledge about the risk factors contributing to male infertility. [More]
New combinatination therapy shows promise in treating patients with traumatic brain injury

New combinatination therapy shows promise in treating patients with traumatic brain injury

A combination of the stimulant drug methylphenidate with a process known as cognitive-behavioral rehabilitation is a promising option to help people who suffer from persistent cognitive problems following traumatic brain injury, researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine have reported. [More]
Penn study shows breathing-based meditation can help alleviate severe depression

Penn study shows breathing-based meditation can help alleviate severe depression

A breathing-based meditation practice known as Sudarshan Kriya yoga helped alleviate severe depression in people who did not fully respond to antidepressant treatments, reports a new study published today in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Quitting smoking during addiction treatment may improve recovery rates in teens

Quitting smoking during addiction treatment may improve recovery rates in teens

A Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researcher has found that addiction treatment results improved when teens in a residential program stopped smoking. [More]
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