Psychiatry News and Research RSS Feed - Psychiatry News and Research

Psychiatry is the treatment, study and prevention of mental disorders.
Researchers use sensitive technique to reveal high levels of genetic heterogeneity in schizophrenia

Researchers use sensitive technique to reveal high levels of genetic heterogeneity in schizophrenia

International researchers centered at Nagoya University use a highly sensitive technique to identify significantly more DNA sequence repeats in patients with schizophrenia than in control individuals, and outline a possible link between genome instability and disease. [More]
Stony Brook researcher receives grant to evaluate daily activity levels, heart rate patterns of CFS patients

Stony Brook researcher receives grant to evaluate daily activity levels, heart rate patterns of CFS patients

By better understanding daily activity levels and heart rate patterns of those who suffer from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), scientists hope to discover more about this complex illness condition. [More]
Neurotherapeutic video game may help improve cognitive abilities in children with genetic disorders

Neurotherapeutic video game may help improve cognitive abilities in children with genetic disorders

A UC Davis researcher has created a video game for children who experience cognitive impairments from genetic disorders with the hope that that it will improve their ability to mentally process information about space and time. [More]
Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Nonmedical use of prescription opioids more than doubled among adults in the United States from 2001-2002 to 2012-2013, based on a study from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, part of the National Institutes of Health. Nearly 10 million Americans, or 4.1 percent of the adult population, used opioid medications in 2012-2013 a class of drugs that includes OxyContin and Vicodin, without a prescription or not as prescribed (in greater amounts, more often, or longer than prescribed) in the past year. [More]
Study to examine new ways to transfer autistic child's improving communication skills into education setting

Study to examine new ways to transfer autistic child's improving communication skills into education setting

A University of Manchester-led study is testing whether an intervention with parents and teachers can help children with autism transfer newly acquired social communication skills from home into school. [More]
Impulsive children may drink less alcohol when raised in less coercive environment

Impulsive children may drink less alcohol when raised in less coercive environment

Years of research have shown that impulsivity in childhood is among the individual vulnerabilities leading to substance abuse, delinquency, as well as aggressive and antisocial behavior in adolescence and adulthood. [More]
Scientists detect new genetic candidate for testing treatments that could influence fear learning in PTSD patients

Scientists detect new genetic candidate for testing treatments that could influence fear learning in PTSD patients

Researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have identified a new genetic candidate for testing therapies that might affect fear learning in people with PTSD or other conditions. Results of the study have been published in the Journal of Neuroscience. [More]
Researchers play crucial role in crafting diagnostic criteria for functional GI disorders

Researchers play crucial role in crafting diagnostic criteria for functional GI disorders

With no laboratory test available to diagnose functional gastrointestinal disorders, proper diagnostic criteria are critical for clinicians to make an accurate determination of what ails their patients. [More]
Mayo Clinic highlights potential merits of individualizing treatment for patients taking antidepressants

Mayo Clinic highlights potential merits of individualizing treatment for patients taking antidepressants

Mayo Clinic is highlighting the potential merits of using precision medicine in prescribing antidepressants. Details appear in the current issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. [More]
Maternal hypothyroxinemia may contribute to increased risk of schizophrenia in infants

Maternal hypothyroxinemia may contribute to increased risk of schizophrenia in infants

A study published in Biological Psychiatry reveals a new link between low levels of the thyroid hormone thyroxine during pregnancy and risk of schizophrenia in the offspring. [More]
Long-term opioid therapy may not be effective to manage pain in sickle cell disease patients

Long-term opioid therapy may not be effective to manage pain in sickle cell disease patients

In a small study looking at pain assessments in adults with sickle cell disease, researchers at Johns Hopkins says overall, those treated long-term with opioids often fared worse in measures of pain, fatigue and curtailed daily activities than those not on long-term opioids. [More]
Prenatal cannabis exposure could have important effects on brain development in infants

Prenatal cannabis exposure could have important effects on brain development in infants

Compared with unexposed children, those who were prenatally exposed to cannabis had a thicker prefrontal cortex, a region of the brain involved in complex cognition, decision-making, and working memory. [More]
TUM scientists identify four new risk genes altered in MS patients

TUM scientists identify four new risk genes altered in MS patients

Scientists of the Technical University of Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry have identified four new risk genes that are altered in German patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Illumina signs initial customer deals for new Global Screening Array

Illumina signs initial customer deals for new Global Screening Array

Illumina, Inc. today announced that it has signed deals with 12 customers for its new Infinium Global Screening Array (GSA). [More]
Zeiger’s cognitive behavioral therapy program helps school-aged children deal with anxiety issues

Zeiger’s cognitive behavioral therapy program helps school-aged children deal with anxiety issues

Change can be hard for many people. For kids - who often thrive on routine and predictability - the transition from school year to summer and into a new academic year can bring uncertainty that can trigger anxiety and behavioral problems. [More]
Study evaluates rate of depression in mothers based on different onset times

Study evaluates rate of depression in mothers based on different onset times

Postpartum depression--a household term since actress Brooke Shields went public in 2005 about her struggle with it--is indeed serious. But depression that begins before or during pregnancy is often more severe because it lasts longer and usually goes undetected until the doctor screens for it after the birth of the baby, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Brain's reward system in obese people operates differently in response to food and dopamine

Brain's reward system in obese people operates differently in response to food and dopamine

As young people reach adulthood, their preferences for sweet foods typically decline. But for people with obesity, new research suggests that the drop-off may not be as steep and that the brain's reward system operates differently in obese people than in thinner people, which may play a role in this phenomenon. [More]
Maternal SRI treatment may cause microscopic changes in fetal brain structure

Maternal SRI treatment may cause microscopic changes in fetal brain structure

A new Finnish study shows that fetal exposure to commonly used SRI drugs may affect brain activity in newborns. The researchers suggest that the effects of drugs on fetal brain function should be assessed more carefully. [More]
Individuals diagnosed with ADHD, obesity have reduced ability to delay gratification

Individuals diagnosed with ADHD, obesity have reduced ability to delay gratification

Two new studies led by researchers at McMaster University and St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton have found that individuals diagnosed with ADHD or obesity are more likely to choose smaller immediate rewards over larger future rewards. [More]
Child adversities linked to high rates of adult insomnia

Child adversities linked to high rates of adult insomnia

According to a new study, child adversities, which are known to play an important role in mental and physical health, are also associated with poor sleep. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement