Psychiatry News and Research RSS Feed - Psychiatry News and Research

Psychiatry is the treatment, study and prevention of mental disorders.
New non-drug approach may help manage pain in individuals receiving addiction treatment

New non-drug approach may help manage pain in individuals receiving addiction treatment

It's a Catch-22 with potentially deadly consequences: People trying to overcome addiction can't get treatment for their pain, because the most powerful pain medicines also carry an addiction risk. [More]
Researchers study link between health insurance, tobacco and alcohol use among reproductive age women

Researchers study link between health insurance, tobacco and alcohol use among reproductive age women

Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health studied the relationship between health insurance coverage and tobacco and alcohol use among reproductive age women in the United States, and whether there were differences according to pregnancy status. [More]
Researchers discover three new risk genes for ALS

Researchers discover three new risk genes for ALS

Published today in Nature Genetics, the study reveals three new risk genes for ALS and one of these - C21orf2 - increases an individual's risk of developing the dis-ease by 65 per cent. [More]
Odor identification test may help detect early-stage Alzheimer's disease

Odor identification test may help detect early-stage Alzheimer's disease

Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, and NewYork-Presbyterian reported that an odor identification test may prove useful in predicting cognitive decline and detecting early-stage Alzheimer's disease. [More]
People with bipolar disorder not diagnosed until six years after onset of symptoms, study finds

People with bipolar disorder not diagnosed until six years after onset of symptoms, study finds

Crucial opportunities to manage bipolar disorder early are being lost because individuals are waiting an average of almost six years after the onset of the condition before diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Menopause and insomnia could make women age faster

Menopause and insomnia could make women age faster

Two UCLA studies reveal that menopause--and the insomnia that often accompanies it -- make women age faster. [More]
Brain activity and response to food cues in severely obese women differ from lean counterparts

Brain activity and response to food cues in severely obese women differ from lean counterparts

The brain's reward centers in severely obese women continue to respond to food cues even after they've eaten and are no longer hungry, in contrast to their lean counterparts, according to a recent study by a multidisciplinary team at UT Southwestern Medical Center. [More]
Study reveals evidence of categorical and dimensional models of ASD in the brain

Study reveals evidence of categorical and dimensional models of ASD in the brain

A study in Biological Psychiatry provides a new understanding of brain alterations in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) that may help researchers and clinicians better define the disorder. [More]
New technology allows researchers to temporarily shut down brain area to better understand function

New technology allows researchers to temporarily shut down brain area to better understand function

Capitalizing on experimental genetic techniques, researchers at the California National Primate Research Center, or CNPRC, at the University of California, Davis, have demonstrated that temporarily turning off an area of the brain changes patterns of activity across much of the remaining brain. [More]
Scientists receive grant to examine brain mechanisms underlying social stress in males and females

Scientists receive grant to examine brain mechanisms underlying social stress in males and females

The Center for Behavioral Neuroscience at Georgia State University has received a five-year, $3.2 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to investigate the neurochemical mechanisms underlying social stress in males and females. [More]
Adults with pain could be at higher risk of developing prescription opioid use disorders

Adults with pain could be at higher risk of developing prescription opioid use disorders

What do we really know about the relationship between the experience of pain and risk of developing opioid use disorder? Results from a recent study - the first to directly address this question -- show that people with moderate or more severe pain had a 41 percent higher risk of developing prescription opioid use disorders than those without, independent of other demographic and clinical factors. [More]
New CBIT therapy can help lessen frequency of tics

New CBIT therapy can help lessen frequency of tics

When Dr. Laura Duda goes into an elementary school classroom, she can usually spot one or two children who have a tic - a rapid, involuntary movement or sound such as sniffing, blinking their eyes or scrunching their faces. [More]
Study highlights effectiveness of atypical antipsychotic drug in treating children with TD

Study highlights effectiveness of atypical antipsychotic drug in treating children with TD

A meta-analysis of clinical trials evaluating the effectiveness of aripiprazole for the treatment of Tourette's disorder (TD) in children and adolescents showed a significantly greater overall improvement in total tics and tic severity from pretreatment to post-treatment for the aripiprazole compared to the placebo group. [More]
Researchers identify stress mechanism in the brain that appears to act as social switch

Researchers identify stress mechanism in the brain that appears to act as social switch

Meeting new people can be both stressful and rewarding. Research at the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, reported today in Nature Neuroscience, suggests that a molecule involved in regulating stress in the brain may also help determine how willing we are to leave the safety of our social group and strike up new relationships. [More]
NYU Langone launches Alzheimer's and Related Dementias Family Support Program for caregivers

NYU Langone launches Alzheimer's and Related Dementias Family Support Program for caregivers

Two new grants from the New York State Department of Health will enable New Yorkers with Alzheimer's diseaseand dementia, and their families, to get the most comprehensive care and support services available in the New York City area. [More]
Researchers study impact of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in adolescents with anxiety disorders

Researchers study impact of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in adolescents with anxiety disorders

Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric conditions affecting children and adolescents. While antidepressants are frequently used to treat youth with anxiety disorders, sometimes, antidepressants may be poorly tolerated in children who are at high risk of developing bipolar disorder. [More]
Noninvasive brain stimulation may curb cravings for appetitive foods

Noninvasive brain stimulation may curb cravings for appetitive foods

Available research suggests that noninvasive stimulation of a specific brain area can reduce food cravings—particularly for high-calorie, "appetitive" foods, according to a review in the Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Researchers identify how sensory nerve receptors work together to transmit itch signals

Researchers identify how sensory nerve receptors work together to transmit itch signals

Researchers have found how sensory nerve cells work together to transmit itch signals from the skin to the spinal cord, where neurons then carry those signals to the brain. Their discovery may help scientists find more effective ways to make itching stop. [More]
Buprenorphine implants could be effective option to treat adults with opioid dependence

Buprenorphine implants could be effective option to treat adults with opioid dependence

While buprenorphine has long been used to treat adults with opioid dependence, its efficacy can be hindered by lack of adherence to daily, sublingual (beneath the tongue) doses of the medication. [More]
Risk of suicide among OCD patients much higher than previously thought

Risk of suicide among OCD patients much higher than previously thought

Patients with OCD are 10 times more likely to commit suicide, contrary to what was previously thought. In a new study from Karolinska Institutet published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, is also shown that the main predictor of suicide in OCD patients is a previous suicide attempt, which offers opportunities for prevention. [More]
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