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Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.
Short-term use of opioids implicated in protracted pain, new study finds

Short-term use of opioids implicated in protracted pain, new study finds

Painkillers such as morphine, oxycodone and methadone could actually prolong and increase pain even after only a few days’ use, according to research conducted on rats by scientists at the University of Colorado Boulder in the US. [More]
Brief opioid exposure can cause increase in chronic pain

Brief opioid exposure can cause increase in chronic pain

The dark side of painkillers - their dramatic increase in use and ability to trigger abuse, addiction and thousands of fatal overdoses annually in the United States is in the news virtually every day. [More]
Overcoming barriers in autism research: an interview with Gahan Pandina

Overcoming barriers in autism research: an interview with Gahan Pandina

There are currently no medications which address the core symptoms of ASD, and a significant barrier to their development is that researchers have historically lacked effective methods for measuring clinical outcomes. [More]
Imaging data shows brains may have capacity to reverse schizophrenia effects

Imaging data shows brains may have capacity to reverse schizophrenia effects

A team of scientists from across the globe have shown that the brains of patients with schizophrenia have the capacity to reorganize and fight the illness. This is the first time that imaging data has been used to show that our brains may have the ability to reverse the effects of schizophrenia. [More]
Electronic media use may affect parent-child communication

Electronic media use may affect parent-child communication

It happens in many households. Kids are tapping on their cell phones or are preoccupied by their favorite TV show as their parents ask them a question or want them to do a chore. [More]
Study reveals brain mechanism involved in switching between habitual behavior and decision-making

Study reveals brain mechanism involved in switching between habitual behavior and decision-making

Not all habits are bad. Some are even necessary. It's a good thing, for example, that we can find our way home on "autopilot" or wash our hands without having to ponder every step. But inability to switch from acting habitually to acting in a deliberate way can underlie addiction and obsessive compulsive disorders. [More]
Integrative Body-Mind Training helps reduce smoking

Integrative Body-Mind Training helps reduce smoking

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Tuesday that 15.1 percent of American adults smoked cigarettes in 2015, down almost 2 percent from the year before. This is the lowest recorded smoking rate in the country's history. [More]

Study provides insight into psychological importance of money in romantic relationships

Our romantic choices are not just based on feelings and emotions, but how rich we feel compared to others, a new study published in Frontiers in Psychology has found. [More]
Neuroscientist distinguishes different forms of dementia using MRI scans

Neuroscientist distinguishes different forms of dementia using MRI scans

Neuroscientist Anne Hafkemeijer is able to distinguish two different forms of dementia using advanced imaging techniques. This is the first step towards early recognition of dementia in patients on the basis of brain networks. PhD defence 26 May. [More]
Telehealth can help parents improve social communication of autistic children

Telehealth can help parents improve social communication of autistic children

Parents struggling to find and afford therapy for their child with autism may eventually be able to provide that therapy themselves with the help of telehealth training. [More]
Alcohol exposure during early to mid-adolescence linked to chronic stress vulnerability

Alcohol exposure during early to mid-adolescence linked to chronic stress vulnerability

Drinking during early to mid-adolescence can lead to vulnerability to chronic stress, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. [More]
Gene editing technology helps excise segment of HIV-1 DNA from genomes of living animals

Gene editing technology helps excise segment of HIV-1 DNA from genomes of living animals

Using gene editing technology, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have, for the first time, successfully excised a segment of HIV-1 DNA - the virus responsible for AIDS - from the genomes of living animals. [More]
Study finds greater activation of biological fight or flight mechanism in chronic fatigue syndrome patients

Study finds greater activation of biological fight or flight mechanism in chronic fatigue syndrome patients

Chronic fatigue syndrome patients report they are more anxious and distressed than people who don't have the condition, and they are also more likely to suppress those emotions. [More]
Researchers explore ways to design changes in living environment for older adults with dementia

Researchers explore ways to design changes in living environment for older adults with dementia

As the population ages and demography changes, the UK is facing an unprecedented challenge of how to care for and support its older people. [More]
Better self-care and patient education can improve treatment for chronic pain

Better self-care and patient education can improve treatment for chronic pain

The National Pain Strategy, released this year by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, places strong emphasis on self management and patient education as critical pathways for improving treatment of chronic pain, especially the leading malady, back pain. [More]
Novel ‘Catch It’ smartphone app can help people manage their problems

Novel ‘Catch It’ smartphone app can help people manage their problems

In a joint project between the Universities of Liverpool and Manchester researchers have examined the initial trial of a smartphone application designed to help people manage their problems. [More]
University of Derby introduces new MOOC to provide better knowledge on autism, Asperger’s and ADHD

University of Derby introduces new MOOC to provide better knowledge on autism, Asperger’s and ADHD

A new Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) to educate anyone interested in learning more about autism, Asperger’s and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has been launched by the University of Derby. [More]
Maternal stress, depression during pregnancy may activate protective mechanisms in infants

Maternal stress, depression during pregnancy may activate protective mechanisms in infants

Maternal stress and depression during pregnancy may activate certain protective mechanisms in babies. Psychologists from the University of Basel together with international colleagues report that certain epigenetic adaptations in newborns suggest this conclusion. [More]
Kent researchers perform first clinical trials of bionic legs for patients

Kent researchers perform first clinical trials of bionic legs for patients

Expert clinicians and engineers at the University of Kent are carrying out the first clinical trials of robotic legs for patients [More]

Researchers analyze risk of becoming lonely at different phases of life

Maike Luhmann from the University of Cologne and Louise C. Hawkley from the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago were able to find out in which phases of their lives people are most at risk of becoming lonely. [More]
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