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Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.
Teens with slower cognitive processing speed experience depression, anxiety symptoms as adults

Teens with slower cognitive processing speed experience depression, anxiety symptoms as adults

Teens with slower performance on a test of "cognitive processing speed" are more likely to have depression and anxiety symptoms as adults, reports a paper in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. [More]
HIV infections continue to rise among YMSM despite prevention efforts

HIV infections continue to rise among YMSM despite prevention efforts

HIV infections continue to rise in a new generation of young, gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (YMSM) despite three decades of HIV prevention as well as recent availability of biomedical technologies to prevent infection. [More]
Omega-3 fatty acids improve cognitive flexibility in older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease

Omega-3 fatty acids improve cognitive flexibility in older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease

A study of older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease found that those who consumed more omega-3 fatty acids did better than their peers on tests of cognitive flexibility -- the ability to efficiently switch between tasks -- and had a bigger anterior cingulate cortex, a brain region known to contribute to cognitive flexibility. [More]
New UCLA study finds Naltrexone drug as promising treatment for methamphetamine addiction

New UCLA study finds Naltrexone drug as promising treatment for methamphetamine addiction

A new study by UCLA researchers has found that Naltrexone, a drug used to treat alcoholism, may also be a promising treatment for addiction to methamphetamine. [More]
Duke and MIT scientists discover brain area sensitive to the timing of speech

Duke and MIT scientists discover brain area sensitive to the timing of speech

Duke and MIT scientists have discovered an area of the brain that is sensitive to the timing of speech, a crucial element of spoken language. [More]
UK's leading experts to discuss new ideas and controversies in obesity at Plymouth symposium

UK's leading experts to discuss new ideas and controversies in obesity at Plymouth symposium

No one health issue has the most impact on human health, or engenders more debate about how to tackle it, than obesity. [More]
APS honors recipients of Clinical Centers of Excellence in Pain Management Awards

APS honors recipients of Clinical Centers of Excellence in Pain Management Awards

The American Pain Society today honored the recipients of its annual Clinical Centers of Excellence in Pain Management Awards recognizing the nation's outstanding pain care centers. Five multidisciplinary pain programs were recognized. [More]
Rises in unemployment linked to significant increases in prostate cancer mortality

Rises in unemployment linked to significant increases in prostate cancer mortality

The knock-on effects of the economic downturn have been explored in economy and psychology. Now researchers are examining the effects of unemployment on an even darker subject - cancer mortality. [More]
APS announces recipients of prestigious achievement awards during annual scientific meeting

APS announces recipients of prestigious achievement awards during annual scientific meeting

The American Pain Society (APS), www.americanpainsociety.org, today announced the recipients of its prestigious achievement awards during the organization's annual scientific meeting. [More]

Rejection by attractive suitor makes women to distance themselves from unattractive man

It's portrayed in movies again and again - a character gets rejected by someone attractive and then falls willingly into the arms of someone perhaps less attractive. [More]

Playing games can shift players' attitudes toward public health issues

A Dartmouth research laboratory is working to quantify the effects of playing games. In a study published online last month by the Games for Health Journal, Professor Mary Flanagan and her team found that attitudes toward public health issues shift to be more accepting and understanding after playing a game they developed called RePlay Health. [More]
Serotonin and TGF-beta pathways link diet to health and ageing

Serotonin and TGF-beta pathways link diet to health and ageing

Diet exerts a major impact on health and ageing. The nervous system plays an important role in this process but, thus far, how food signals are interpreted by the nervous system has been a mystery. [More]

Offenders enrolled in alcohol treatment programmes less likely to be reconvicted

Offenders enrolled in alcohol treatment programmes as part of their sentence are significantly less likely to be charged or reconvicted in the 12 months following their programme, a study led by Plymouth University has shown. [More]
Transgender people at greater risk for eating disorders

Transgender people at greater risk for eating disorders

Transgender and non-transgender lesbian, gay and bisexual students are at greater risk for eating disorders, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Study finds extremely high levels of cardiovascular risk factors in people with psychosis

Study finds extremely high levels of cardiovascular risk factors in people with psychosis

Extremely high levels of cardiovascular risk factors have been found in people with established psychosis, with central obesity evident in over 80 per cent of participants, in a study by researchers from the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London. [More]
Study highlights potential new targets for development of novel cancer therapy

Study highlights potential new targets for development of novel cancer therapy

An international consortium of scientists led by a group from the University of Leicester has announced a new advance in understanding the mechanisms of cancer and how to target it more effectively with new treatments. [More]
Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Individuals with this altered gene have hereditary hypertension (high blood pressure) and at the same time a skeletal malformation called brachydactyly type E, which is characterized by unusually short fingers and toes. The effect on blood pressure is so serious that -- if left untreated -- it most often leads to death before age fifty. [More]
New scanning methods could help predict people vulnerable to schizophrenia

New scanning methods could help predict people vulnerable to schizophrenia

New scanning methods which map the wiring of the brain could provide a valuable new tool to predict people at risk of schizophrenia, according to a new study. [More]
WSU researchers study how sleep loss affects critical aspects of decision making in real-world situations

WSU researchers study how sleep loss affects critical aspects of decision making in real-world situations

The difference between life and death in the operating room, on the battlefield or during a police shootout often comes down to the ability to adapt to the unexpected. Sleep deprivation may make it difficult to do so, according to a Washington State University study published this month in the journal Sleep. [More]
Regular bedtime routine associated with better sleep outcomes in young children

Regular bedtime routine associated with better sleep outcomes in young children

A multinational study suggests that having a regular bedtime routine is associated with better sleep in young children up to 6 years of age, and the positive impact on sleep increases with the consistency of the nightly routine. [More]
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