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Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.
Mindfulness practices ease depression among pregnant women

Mindfulness practices ease depression among pregnant women

Pregnant women with histories of major depression are about 40 percent less likely to relapse into depression if they practice mindfulness techniques--such as meditation, breathing exercises and yoga--along with cognitive therapy, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder. [More]
UH professor receives NIH grant for breast cancer research

UH professor receives NIH grant for breast cancer research

After earning her medical degree in China, Qian Lu, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Houston, felt she could help patients more by treating the mind as well as the body. She then decided to pursue a doctorate in psychology in the U.S. [More]
Electronic cigarettes reduce smoking habits

Electronic cigarettes reduce smoking habits

Electronic cigarettes offer smokers a realistic way to kick their tobacco smoking addiction. In a new study published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, scientists at KU Leuven report that e-cigarettes successfully reduced cravings for tobacco cigarettes, with only minimal side effects. [More]
One third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight, shows study

One third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight, shows study

Almost one third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight. This can influence their eating habits and, consequently, their health, according to a study led by the UAB and conducted with 600 teenage boys from Barcelona and surrounding areas. [More]
Physical pain and social pain use distinct neural circuits, new study reveals

Physical pain and social pain use distinct neural circuits, new study reveals

Over the last decade, neuroscientists have largely come to believe that physical pain and social pain are processed by the brain in the same way. But a new study led by the University of Colorado shows that the two kinds of pain actually use distinct neural circuits, a finding that could lead to more targeted treatments and a better understanding of how the two kinds of pain interact. [More]
E-cigarettes reduce cravings for tobacco cigarettes

E-cigarettes reduce cravings for tobacco cigarettes

Electronic cigarettes offer smokers a realistic way to kick their tobacco smoking addiction. In a new study published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, scientists at KU Leuven report that e-cigarettes successfully reduced cravings for tobacco cigarettes, with only minimal side effects. [More]
Hispanics hospitalized less than other ethnic groups, study finds

Hispanics hospitalized less than other ethnic groups, study finds

For nearly three decades, researchers have pondered the Hispanic Mortality Paradox -- why Hispanics in the U.S. tend to outlive non-Hispanic whites by several years, despite having, in general, lower income and educational attainment levels that are associated with shorter lives. [More]
Smart drug Modafinil can impair cognitive performance in healthy students

Smart drug Modafinil can impair cognitive performance in healthy students

It is claimed one in five students have taken the 'smart' drug Modafinil to boost their ability to study and improve their chances of exam success. [More]
New NIH-funded study aims to find novel way to treat iron deficiency anemia in children

New NIH-funded study aims to find novel way to treat iron deficiency anemia in children

Penn State College of Medicine and University of Wisconsin have been awarded a five-year, $2.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to fund the study of a novel way to treat iron deficiency anemia in children. Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency and the leading cause of anemia in the United States. [More]
UM researchers develop novel, family-focused, culturally-informed treatment for schizophrenia

UM researchers develop novel, family-focused, culturally-informed treatment for schizophrenia

Researchers at the University of Miami have developed a family-focused, culturally-informed treatment for schizophrenia (CIT-S). The program is one of the first to incorporate elements of the patient's cultural background as part of therapy. [More]
Research reveals that majority of people unable to correctly identify obesity

Research reveals that majority of people unable to correctly identify obesity

The majority of people - including healthcare professionals - are unable to visually identify whether a person is a healthy weight, overweight or obese according to research by psychologists at the University of Liverpool. [More]
New research shows hospital workers wash hands less often as workday progresses

New research shows hospital workers wash hands less often as workday progresses

Hospital workers who deal directly with patients wash their hands less frequently as their workday progresses, probably because the demands of the job deplete the mental reserves they need to follow rules, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. [More]
U-M study reveals that mothers' education can predict children's academic success

U-M study reveals that mothers' education can predict children's academic success

A mother knows best--and the amount of education she attains can predict her children's success in reading and math. In fact, that success is greater if she had her child later in life, according to a new University of Michigan study. [More]
Study provides answers regarding scientific controversies about brain anatomy in autism research

Study provides answers regarding scientific controversies about brain anatomy in autism research

In the largest MRI study to date, researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and Carnegie Mellon University have shown that the brain anatomy in MRI scans of people with autism above age six is mostly indistinguishable from that of typically developing individuals and, therefore, of little clinical or scientific value. [More]
New study finds link between conflict and reinforcement learning

New study finds link between conflict and reinforcement learning

We celebrate our triumphs over adversity, but let's face it: We'd rather not experience difficulty at all. A new study ties that behavioral inclination to learning: When researchers added a bit of conflict to make a learning task more difficult, that additional conflict biased learning by reducing the influence of reward and increasing the influence of aversion to punishment. [More]

UW researchers successfully replicate direct brain-to-brain connection between people

University of Washington researchers have successfully replicated a direct brain-to-brain connection between pairs of people as part of a scientific study following the team's initial demonstration a year ago. In the newly published study, which involved six people, researchers were able to transmit the signals from one person's brain over the Internet and use these signals to control the hand motions of another person within a split second of sending that signal. [More]
Study measures effects of high-fat maternal diet on the cognitive functioning of offspring

Study measures effects of high-fat maternal diet on the cognitive functioning of offspring

New research suggests that a high-fat maternal diet during pregnancy and while breastfeeding could have significant and lasting detrimental effects on the brain function and behavior of children. [More]

New technology could revolutionise the way medical staff treat people with degenerative condition

A pioneering piece of technology will allow users to experience the world through the eyes of a person with Young-Onset Parkinson's disease- which could revolutionise the way carers and medical staff treat people with the degenerative condition. [More]
Dietary patterns of children vary according to socioeconomic backgrounds of mothers

Dietary patterns of children vary according to socioeconomic backgrounds of mothers

You have to be at least 2 years old to be covered by U.S. dietary guidelines. For younger babies, no official U.S. guidance exists other than the general recommendation by national and international organizations that mothers exclusively breastfeed for at least the first six months. [More]
Family-focused intervention program leads to fewer drop-out rates among Mexican American children

Family-focused intervention program leads to fewer drop-out rates among Mexican American children

New research findings from a team of prevention scientists at Arizona State University demonstrates that a family-focused intervention program for middle-school Mexican American children leads to fewer drop-out rates and lower rates of alcohol and illegal drug use. [More]