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Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.
Study: 10% of mothers reported chronic depressive symptoms 2 years after Hurricane Katrina

Study: 10% of mothers reported chronic depressive symptoms 2 years after Hurricane Katrina

About 10 percent of mothers experienced chronic, persistent depressive symptoms two years after Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast, killing more than 1,800 people, displacing hundreds of thousands and causing widespread damage estimated at more than $100 billion, according to a Georgia State University study. [More]
Study shows licensed tobacco retailers sell illegal cigarettes throughout NYC

Study shows licensed tobacco retailers sell illegal cigarettes throughout NYC

Licensed tobacco retailers throughout New York City are selling a substantial number of cigarette packs carrying either counterfeit or out-of-state tax stamps, finds an investigation by NYU public health researchers. [More]
NTNU researchers find link between aggression and gene variant in children

NTNU researchers find link between aggression and gene variant in children

Some children react more strongly to negative experiences than others. Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology have found a link between aggression and variants of a particular gene. [More]

Awareness of mortality can be injurious to health, new research reveals

People with low self-esteem use a variety of escape mechanisms to avoid thinking about their own mortality, new research reveals. Researchers led by Dr Arnaud Wisman, of the University of Kent's School of Psychology, found evidence in five studies that people with low self-esteem respond to reminders of their own mortality by directing their focus away from the 'self'. [More]
Study provides insight into how the ability to inhibit an action affects attention and memory

Study provides insight into how the ability to inhibit an action affects attention and memory

You're driving on a busy road and you intend to switch lanes when you suddenly realize that there's a car in your blind spot. You have to put a stop to your lane change -- and quickly. A new study by Duke University researchers suggests that this type of scenario makes a person less likely to remember what halted the action -- for example, the make and model of the car in the blind spot. [More]
Study looks at patterns of emotion regulation in the brains of abused children

Study looks at patterns of emotion regulation in the brains of abused children

Children who have been abused typically experience more intense emotions than their peers who have not been abused. This is often considered a byproduct of living in volatile, dangerous environments. A recent study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP) set to find out what happens when these children are taught how to regulate their emotions. [More]
White sexual-minority men have higher positive racial attitudes, empathy than white heterosexual men

White sexual-minority men have higher positive racial attitudes, empathy than white heterosexual men

White sexual-minority men may be more empathic toward other minority groups compared to their heterosexual white peers. A new study from the University of Houston College of Education compared the attitudes of white heterosexual men to those of white sexual-minority men. [More]

UO survey on sexual victimization issues highlights need to increase awareness of available services

A new survey on sexual victimization issues at the University of Oregon reaffirms previous findings that there is a need to increase awareness about available services, while decreasing negative perceptions of institutional support. [More]
Older people drink unsafe amounts of alcohol, study finds

Older people drink unsafe amounts of alcohol, study finds

One in five older people who drink alcohol are consuming it at unsafe levels - over 21 units of alcohol for men and 14 units for women each week - according to a study by King's College London. The research in inner-city London, published in BMJ Open, found these unsafe older drinkers are more likely to be of higher socioeconomic status. [More]
Poor sleep may impact treatment and recovery in veterans with PTSD, TBI

Poor sleep may impact treatment and recovery in veterans with PTSD, TBI

Poor sleep may impact treatment and recovery in veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). A review of extensive research on sleep in TBI and PTSD has found that sleep-focused interventions can improve treatment outcomes in veterans. [More]
Maltreated children experience more intense emotions than their peers

Maltreated children experience more intense emotions than their peers

Children who have been abused or exposed to other types of trauma typically experience more intense emotions than their peers, a byproduct of living in volatile, dangerous environments. [More]
Hippocampus in the brain's temporal lobe involved in quick, successful conflict resolution

Hippocampus in the brain's temporal lobe involved in quick, successful conflict resolution

The hippocampus in the brain's temporal lobe is responsible for more than just long-term memory. Researchers have for the first time demonstrated that it is also involved in quick and successful conflict resolution. [More]
Temporary postnatal visual deprivation induces permanent auditory responses in the brain's visual area

Temporary postnatal visual deprivation induces permanent auditory responses in the brain's visual area

A brief period of postnatal visual deprivation, when early in life, drives a rewiring of the brain areas involved in visual processing, even if the visual restoration is completed well before the baby reaches one year of age, researchers at the University of Trento, McMaster University, and the University of Montreal revealed today in Current Biology. [More]
Elsevier launches open access journal Reproductive Biomedicine & Society Online

Elsevier launches open access journal Reproductive Biomedicine & Society Online

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, announces the launch of open access journal Reproductive Biomedicine & Society Online. [More]

Simple increases in height and age make men appear more dominant

The study, by scientists at the University of St Andrews, shows that simple increases in a man's height and age automatically makes them appear more dominant. [More]

Study shows alcohol intoxication does not affect accuracy of sexual assault testimonies

People are often concerned about the accuracy of testimony given by victims who were intoxicated during a sexual assault- but a new study by University of Leicester researchers has found that while alcohol intoxicated participants report fewer pieces of information about an assault, the information that they do provide is just as accurate as sober participants. [More]

Intoxicated victims of sexual violence could accurately retain information from events

People are often concerned about the accuracy of testimony given by victims who were intoxicated during a sexual assault- but a new study by University of Leicester researchers has found that while alcohol intoxicated participants report fewer pieces of information about an assault, the information that they do provide is just as accurate as sober participants. [More]
CMU BrainHub scientists use non-invasive brain-imaging tool to detect basal ganglia pathways

CMU BrainHub scientists use non-invasive brain-imaging tool to detect basal ganglia pathways

Certain diseases, like Parkinson's and Huntingdon's disease, are associated with damage to the pathways between the brain's basal ganglia regions. The basal ganglia sits at the base of the brain and is responsible for, among other things, coordinating movement. It is made up of four interconnected, deep brain structures that imaging techniques have previously been unable to visualize. [More]
Scientists identify where the brain records time and place of real-life memories

Scientists identify where the brain records time and place of real-life memories

For the first time, scientists have seen evidence of where the brain records the time and place of real-life memories. Results showed that the similarity of the brain activation patterns when memories were recalled was an indicator of the breadth of space and time between the actual events. [More]

Study uses fMRI scans to examine neural substrates of moral cognition in healthcare decision making

Areas of the brain associated with social and moral disgust are triggered when healthcare funding is split unequally, researchers from the UK and Australia have found. [More]
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