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Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.
Newborns of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have altered stress hormones, DNA

Newborns of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have altered stress hormones, DNA

Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have studied the effects of smoking during pregnancy and its impact on the stress response in newborn babies. Their research indicates that newborns of mothers who smoke cigarettes during pregnancy show lower levels of stress hormones, lowered stress response, and alterations in DNA for a gene that regulates passage of stress hormones from mother to fetus. [More]
Researchers receive NIH grant to study mechanisms of auditory hypersensitivity in fragile X syndrome

Researchers receive NIH grant to study mechanisms of auditory hypersensitivity in fragile X syndrome

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder in humans that causes social impairments and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. [More]

Scandal-hit companies affect job prospects of even lower-ranking employees

There's more bad news for job seekers with a scandal-hit company like Lehman Brothers or Countrywide Mortgage on their résumés. [More]
Cadaver instruction better than computer-simulation instruction when learning human anatomy

Cadaver instruction better than computer-simulation instruction when learning human anatomy

Despite the growing popularity of using computer simulation to help teach college anatomy, students learn much better through the traditional use of human cadavers, according to new research that has implications for health care. [More]
Parental understanding regarding daily experiences may affect adolescent health, well-being

Parental understanding regarding daily experiences may affect adolescent health, well-being

Adolescents whose parents better understand their daily experiences have better psychological adjustment, suggests a study in the October issue of Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. [More]
Medical school applicants anxious about new MCAT

Medical school applicants anxious about new MCAT

One of the biggest hurdles that college students face if they want to go to medical school is the MCAT - the Medical College Admission Test. The one-day standardized multiple-choice exam, which takes more than five hours to complete, is required for admission to nearly all medical schools in the United States. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, more than 85,000 students take the MCAT each year. [More]
ASU hosts 2014 Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience meeting for investigators

ASU hosts 2014 Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience meeting for investigators

Across the country, billions of dollars and millions of hours are spent on studying the inner workings of the brain as scientists search for ways to treat debilitating diseases and injuries such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury. Now, with the tremendous growth in basic knowledge driven by these efforts, researchers see a need to integrate their work across the broad scientific disciplines represented in modern neuroscience. [More]
Carnegie Mellon and Pitt to recognize Mark Roth with 2014 Friend of the CNBC Award

Carnegie Mellon and Pitt to recognize Mark Roth with 2014 Friend of the CNBC Award

Mark Roth, an award-winning senior staff writer at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, will receive the 2014 Friend of the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition Award from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh. [More]

Early childhood neglect associated with changes in brain structure

Under the rule of dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, thousands of Romanian children were placed in overcrowded orphanages with bleak conditions and minimal human contact. Even after the 1989 revolution, the legacy of institutionalization continued. Only recently has research and public concern over early childhood environments caused changes in policies. [More]
NAMS set to launch first-ever menopause mobile app

NAMS set to launch first-ever menopause mobile app

The North American Menopause Society is set to launch a first-ever menopause mobile app designed for use by both clinicians and patients to help manage menopausal symptoms and assess risk factors. [More]
Researchers use light to erase specific memories in mice

Researchers use light to erase specific memories in mice

Just look into the light: not quite, but researchers at the UC Davis Center for Neuroscience and Department of Psychology have used light to erase specific memories in mice, and proved a basic theory of how different parts of the brain work together to retrieve episodic memories. [More]
Exposure to workplace violence can lead to serious consequences for health sector employees

Exposure to workplace violence can lead to serious consequences for health sector employees

Exposure to violence in the workplace can lead to serious consequences for health sector employees say Stéphane Guay and Nathalie Lanctôt of the Institut universitaire de santé mentale and the University of Montreal, who studied this issue in a systematic review of the literature. [More]
Social status can impact health, happiness even among egalitarian forager-farmers

Social status can impact health, happiness even among egalitarian forager-farmers

In western society, where keeping up with the Joneses — or, better yet, surpassing them — is expected and even encouraged, status matters. So important is it that for many people, physical and emotional wellbeing are directly connected to their place in the social hierarchy. [More]
Bad sleep quality may trigger insomnia in older adults

Bad sleep quality may trigger insomnia in older adults

Reports of insomnia are common among the elderly, but a new study finds that sleep problems may stem from the quality of rest and other health concerns more than the overall amount of sleep that patients get. [More]
Weight-normative approach could be harmful to patients, shows study

Weight-normative approach could be harmful to patients, shows study

A new review of the way health care professionals emphasise weight to define health and wellbeing suggests the approach could be harmful to patients. [More]

Hands-free, voice-controlled automobile infotainment systems can distract drivers, show studies

Two new AAA-University of Utah studies show that despite public belief to the contrary, hands-free, voice-controlled automobile infotainment systems can distract drivers, although it is possible to design them to be safer. [More]
Childhood eating disorders could have underlying psychological issues, researchers warn

Childhood eating disorders could have underlying psychological issues, researchers warn

Researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine children's hospital are warning parents that difficult eaters could have underlying psychological issues, as they have found that restrictive behaviours can appear before puberty. [More]
Researchers demonstrate involvement of ClpB protein in eating disorders

Researchers demonstrate involvement of ClpB protein in eating disorders

Eating disorders (ED) such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and binge eating disorder affect approximately 5-10% of the general population, but the biological mechanisms involved are unknown. Researchers at Inserm Unit 1073, "Nutrition, inflammation and dysfunction of the gut-brain axis" (Inserm/University of Rouen) have demonstrated the involvement of a protein produced by some intestinal bacteria that may be the source of these disorders. [More]
Most people agree that exposure to violent media can increase aggression in children

Most people agree that exposure to violent media can increase aggression in children

Majorities of media researchers, parents and pediatricians agree that exposure to violent media can increase aggression in children, according to a new national study. [More]

University of Michigan study identifies different types of early child problems

A toddler who doesn't feel guilty after misbehaving or who is less affectionate or less responsive to affection from others might not raise a red flag to parents, but these behaviors may result in later behavior problems in 1st grade. [More]