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Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.
Genom Austria project to explore impact of genome sequencing on science and society

Genom Austria project to explore impact of genome sequencing on science and society

In many countries, genome sequencing technology is now starting to become available in the clinic, where it helps to diagnose rare Mendelian diseases and contributes to personalized cancer therapy. The analysis of personal genomes also creates unprecedented opportunities for predictive health counseling, ancestry research, and many more applications that are just starting to emerge. [More]

Researchers explore effectiveness of inpatient psychotherapy in Germany

Sarah Liebherz (Department of Medical Psychology, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf) and Sven Rabung (Institute of Psychology, Alpen-Adria-Universit├Ąt Klagenfurt) have examined 59 studies conducted between 1977 and 2009, to determine the effectiveness of inpatient psychotherapy - which is widely available in Germany - with regard to the reduction of the psychiatric symptoms and impairments in the interpersonal sphere. [More]
Research findings highlight power of expectations to drive brain activity in Parkinson's patients

Research findings highlight power of expectations to drive brain activity in Parkinson's patients

Learning-related brain activity in Parkinson's patients improves as much in response to a placebo treatment as to real medication, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder and Columbia University. [More]
Adults diagnosed with retinoblastoma as infants perform better on tasks, study finds

Adults diagnosed with retinoblastoma as infants perform better on tasks, study finds

Most long-term survivors of retinoblastoma, particularly those who had been diagnosed with tumors by their first birthdays, have normal cognitive function as adults, according to a St. Jude Children's Research Hospital study. The research, which appears in the current issue of the journal Cancer, found that the vast majority of survivors work full time, live independently and fulfill other milestones of adult life. [More]
Study shows that abuse of anti-anxiety, sleep drugs becomes a growing issue among teens

Study shows that abuse of anti-anxiety, sleep drugs becomes a growing issue among teens

The medical community may be inadvertently creating a new generation of illegal, recreational drug users by prescribing anti-anxiety or sleep medications to teenagers, say University of Michigan researchers. [More]
Phone counseling can help hazardous-drinking smokers quit smoking

Phone counseling can help hazardous-drinking smokers quit smoking

Smokers who drink heavily have a tougher time quitting cigarettes than smokers who drink moderately or not at all. However, a multi-center study led by researchers in Yale Cancer Center and Yale School of Medicine found that modifying tobacco-oriented telephone counseling to help hazardous drinkers can help them quit smoking. [More]
First issue of GSA's new publication series explores pain as public health problem

First issue of GSA's new publication series explores pain as public health problem

The first issue of a new publication series from The Gerontological Society of America called From Policy to Practice explores pain as a public health problem and takes a look at how various policies impact the care provided to patients in a range of practice settings. [More]
Mindfulness practices ease depression among pregnant women

Mindfulness practices ease depression among pregnant women

Pregnant women with histories of major depression are about 40 percent less likely to relapse into depression if they practice mindfulness techniques--such as meditation, breathing exercises and yoga--along with cognitive therapy, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder. [More]
UH professor receives NIH grant for breast cancer research

UH professor receives NIH grant for breast cancer research

After earning her medical degree in China, Qian Lu, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Houston, felt she could help patients more by treating the mind as well as the body. She then decided to pursue a doctorate in psychology in the U.S. [More]
Electronic cigarettes reduce smoking habits

Electronic cigarettes reduce smoking habits

Electronic cigarettes offer smokers a realistic way to kick their tobacco smoking addiction. In a new study published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, scientists at KU Leuven report that e-cigarettes successfully reduced cravings for tobacco cigarettes, with only minimal side effects. [More]
One third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight, shows study

One third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight, shows study

Almost one third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight. This can influence their eating habits and, consequently, their health, according to a study led by the UAB and conducted with 600 teenage boys from Barcelona and surrounding areas. [More]
Physical pain and social pain use distinct neural circuits, new study reveals

Physical pain and social pain use distinct neural circuits, new study reveals

Over the last decade, neuroscientists have largely come to believe that physical pain and social pain are processed by the brain in the same way. But a new study led by the University of Colorado shows that the two kinds of pain actually use distinct neural circuits, a finding that could lead to more targeted treatments and a better understanding of how the two kinds of pain interact. [More]
E-cigarettes reduce cravings for tobacco cigarettes

E-cigarettes reduce cravings for tobacco cigarettes

Electronic cigarettes offer smokers a realistic way to kick their tobacco smoking addiction. In a new study published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, scientists at KU Leuven report that e-cigarettes successfully reduced cravings for tobacco cigarettes, with only minimal side effects. [More]
Hispanics hospitalized less than other ethnic groups, study finds

Hispanics hospitalized less than other ethnic groups, study finds

For nearly three decades, researchers have pondered the Hispanic Mortality Paradox -- why Hispanics in the U.S. tend to outlive non-Hispanic whites by several years, despite having, in general, lower income and educational attainment levels that are associated with shorter lives. [More]
Smart drug Modafinil can impair cognitive performance in healthy students

Smart drug Modafinil can impair cognitive performance in healthy students

It is claimed one in five students have taken the 'smart' drug Modafinil to boost their ability to study and improve their chances of exam success. [More]
New NIH-funded study aims to find novel way to treat iron deficiency anemia in children

New NIH-funded study aims to find novel way to treat iron deficiency anemia in children

Penn State College of Medicine and University of Wisconsin have been awarded a five-year, $2.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to fund the study of a novel way to treat iron deficiency anemia in children. Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency and the leading cause of anemia in the United States. [More]
UM researchers develop novel, family-focused, culturally-informed treatment for schizophrenia

UM researchers develop novel, family-focused, culturally-informed treatment for schizophrenia

Researchers at the University of Miami have developed a family-focused, culturally-informed treatment for schizophrenia (CIT-S). The program is one of the first to incorporate elements of the patient's cultural background as part of therapy. [More]
Research reveals that majority of people unable to correctly identify obesity

Research reveals that majority of people unable to correctly identify obesity

The majority of people - including healthcare professionals - are unable to visually identify whether a person is a healthy weight, overweight or obese according to research by psychologists at the University of Liverpool. [More]
New research shows hospital workers wash hands less often as workday progresses

New research shows hospital workers wash hands less often as workday progresses

Hospital workers who deal directly with patients wash their hands less frequently as their workday progresses, probably because the demands of the job deplete the mental reserves they need to follow rules, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. [More]
U-M study reveals that mothers' education can predict children's academic success

U-M study reveals that mothers' education can predict children's academic success

A mother knows best--and the amount of education she attains can predict her children's success in reading and math. In fact, that success is greater if she had her child later in life, according to a new University of Michigan study. [More]