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Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.
Children who experience inadequate sleep more likely to develop depression, anxiety later in life

Children who experience inadequate sleep more likely to develop depression, anxiety later in life

When asked how lack of sleep affects emotions, common responses are usually grumpy, foggy and short-tempered. [More]
Neuroimaging study identifies four mental stages during math problem solving

Neuroimaging study identifies four mental stages during math problem solving

A new Carnegie Mellon University neuroimaging study reveals the mental stages people go through as they are solving challenging math problems. [More]
Experts call to make parenting a national priority

Experts call to make parenting a national priority

Ask any mom or dad and they will tell you: parenting is hard work. For those parents and caregivers who struggle with the nature or the demands of child rearing, sometimes help is hard to find. [More]
Pitt researchers shed more light on neurobiology of reading

Pitt researchers shed more light on neurobiology of reading

Reading is a relatively modern and uniquely human skill. For this reason, visual word recognition has been a puzzle for neuroscientists because the neural systems responsible for reading could not have evolved for this purpose. [More]
Patient characteristics, outcomes differ for indoor and outdoor fallers, study shows

Patient characteristics, outcomes differ for indoor and outdoor fallers, study shows

Falling can have serious consequences for older adults, including a loss of function and increased risk of institutionalization. [More]
Researchers explore effectiveness of neurorehabilitation for individuals with brain injury or stroke

Researchers explore effectiveness of neurorehabilitation for individuals with brain injury or stroke

In the current issue of NeuroRehabilitation leading researchers explore the effectiveness of several neurorehabilitation treatments for individuals with brain injury or stroke. A number of published articles have covered the issue of efficacy of neurorehabilitation, but only a few have discussed the issue of effectiveness. [More]
Noninvasive brain stimulation may curb cravings for appetitive foods

Noninvasive brain stimulation may curb cravings for appetitive foods

Available research suggests that noninvasive stimulation of a specific brain area can reduce food cravings—particularly for high-calorie, "appetitive" foods, according to a review in the Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Study shows ordering food immediately before eating leads to overall increase in calorie content

Study shows ordering food immediately before eating leads to overall increase in calorie content

Want to cut calories and make healthier meal choices? Try avoiding unhealthy impulse purchases by ordering meals at least an hour before eating. [More]
Researchers aim to reduce decision-making errors due to sleep loss

Researchers aim to reduce decision-making errors due to sleep loss

Researchers from Washington State University's Sleep and Performance Research Center received a $1.7 million grant to develop and test cognitive flexibility training to combat the effects of sleep loss on decision-making under rapidly changing circumstances. [More]
In-hospital formula introduction and family history may help explain racial, ethnic breastfeeding disparities

In-hospital formula introduction and family history may help explain racial, ethnic breastfeeding disparities

A national research collaboration funded by the National Institutes of Health has found significant racial and ethnic disparities in breastfeeding outcomes, according to a study published online this week in Pediatrics. [More]
All brain training protocols do not return equal benefits, study reveals

All brain training protocols do not return equal benefits, study reveals

Cognitive brain training improves executive function whereas aerobic activity improves memory, according to new Center for BrainHealth research at The University of Texas at Dallas. [More]
JAD announces recipient of 2016 Alzheimer Award

JAD announces recipient of 2016 Alzheimer Award

The Journal of Alzheimer's Disease is pleased to announce that Mark W. Bondi, PhD, ABPP/CN, Professor of Psychiatry at UC San Diego and Director of the Neuropsychological Assessment Unit at the VA San Diego Healthcare System, has been chosen as the recipient of the 2016 Alzheimer Award presented by the journal in recognition of his outstanding work on the development of a novel and promising method of staging preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on number of abnormal biomarkers that is predictive of progression to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD. [More]
New study shows patient’s self-rated health can be better predictor of illness and death

New study shows patient’s self-rated health can be better predictor of illness and death

Patients' self-rated health is a better long-term predictor of illness and death than standard blood tests, blood pressure measurements or other symptomatic evidence a doctor might gather, according to a new study from Rice University. [More]
New study shows team training of health care staff can reduce patient mortality by 15%

New study shows team training of health care staff can reduce patient mortality by 15%

Team training of health care employees can reduce patient mortality by 15 percent, according to a new study from Rice University, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, the University of Central Florida, the U.S. Department of Defense and the Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center. [More]
Research shows how breastfeeding rates differ among white, black and Hispanic mothers

Research shows how breastfeeding rates differ among white, black and Hispanic mothers

Chapman University has published research on how breastfeeding rates differ among white, black and Hispanic mothers. [More]
VMS during menopause transition linked to sociodemographic, psychosocial factors

VMS during menopause transition linked to sociodemographic, psychosocial factors

More data analysis about hot flashes from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation has been published today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Researcher receives $1.9 million grant to study development of memory networks in children

Researcher receives $1.9 million grant to study development of memory networks in children

Noa Ofen, Ph.D., a Wayne State University researcher in lifespan cognitive neuroscience, received a five-year, $1.9 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health to study the development of memory networks in children. [More]
Hungry parents may serve large portions of food for their young children, study shows

Hungry parents may serve large portions of food for their young children, study shows

The hungrier parents are at mealtimes, a new study shows, the more they may feed their young children, which could have implications for childhood obesity. [More]
New research explains why many diet plans do not work

New research explains why many diet plans do not work

Many diet plans are doomed from the start. The reason? Dieters tend to adopt the wrong strategies, often planning to ditch their favorite foods and replace them with less-desirable options, according to new research from Baylor University's Hankamer School of Business. [More]
Machine learning can improve autism screening and diagnostics

Machine learning can improve autism screening and diagnostics

Approximately one in 68 people are on the autism spectrum. Experts are unanimous on this: early intervention is critical for improving communication skills and addressing behavioral issues. [More]
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