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Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.
Facial motion capture technology can help identify different speech disorders in children

Facial motion capture technology can help identify different speech disorders in children

Facial motion capture - the same technology used to develop realistic computer graphics in video games and movies - has been used to identify differences between children with childhood apraxia of speech and those with other types of speech disorders, finds a new study by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. [More]
Hormones play dual role in unethical behavior

Hormones play dual role in unethical behavior

Hormones play a two-part role in encouraging and reinforcing cheating and other unethical behavior, according to research from Harvard University and The University of Texas at Austin. [More]
Does dandruff cause psychological distress? An interview with Dr Anjali Mahto

Does dandruff cause psychological distress? An interview with Dr Anjali Mahto

Dandruff is a common chronic scalp disorder that is characterised by flaking of the skin of the scalp. As skin cells die, they are shed from the scalp surface. For some people, however, excessive flaking occurs, resulting in dandruff. [More]
Study suggests potential way to predict autism or psychosis risk in children with genetic abnormality

Study suggests potential way to predict autism or psychosis risk in children with genetic abnormality

Doctors and researchers have long known that children who are missing about 60 genes on a certain chromosome are at a significantly elevated risk for developing either a disorder on the autism spectrum or psychosis — that is, any mental disorder characterized by delusions and hallucinations, including schizophrenia. But there has been no way to predict which child with the abnormality might be at risk for which disorder. [More]
Researchers find blood marker that can help identify women at particular risk for postpartum depression

Researchers find blood marker that can help identify women at particular risk for postpartum depression

Postpartum depression is a debilitating disorder that affects nearly 20 percent of new mothers, putting their infants at increased risk for poor behavioral, cognitive and social development. [More]

New research may aid in treatment of vision problems like lazy eye

If you have two working eyes, you are live streaming two images of the world into your brain. Your brain combines the two to produce a view of the world that appears as though you had a single eye -- like the Cyclops from Greek mythology. [More]
Static synapses that lie between cell body and AIS critical for decreasing neuronal excitability

Static synapses that lie between cell body and AIS critical for decreasing neuronal excitability

In biology, stability is important. From body temperature to blood pressure and sugar levels, our body ensures that these remain within reasonable limits and do not reach potentially damaging extremes. [More]
CU-Boulder study reveals how and when placebo effect works

CU-Boulder study reveals how and when placebo effect works

You don't think you're hungry, then a friend mentions how hungry he is or you smell some freshly baked pizza and whoaaa, you suddenly feel really hungry. Or, you've had surgery and need a bit of morphine for pain. As soon as you hit that button you feel relief even though the medicine hasn't even hit your bloodstream. [More]
Adults born very premature display socially withdrawn personality

Adults born very premature display socially withdrawn personality

New research indicates that adults born very premature are more likely to be socially withdrawn and display signs of autism. [More]
Study finds significant improvements in foods and beverages available in Massachusetts schools

Study finds significant improvements in foods and beverages available in Massachusetts schools

In 2012, Massachusetts adopted comprehensive standards to improve the healthy food options available in middle schools and high schools. One year after implementation, a research team that includes Northeastern associate professor Jessica Hoffman examined compliance with the standards in 74 schools across the commonwealth. [More]
Biases against lesbian and gay people decreasing across all demographic groups

Biases against lesbian and gay people decreasing across all demographic groups

The U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling legalizing marriage between same-sex couples in all 50 states follows on the heels of national polls showing rapid cultural changes in attitudes toward lesbian and gay people. A new University of Virginia study confirms this, showing that not only are Americans' conscious and unconscious biases against lesbian women and gay men decreasing across all demographic groups, but the trend also appears to be accelerating. [More]
Study explores possible pathways that may lead kids toward aggressive behavior later in life

Study explores possible pathways that may lead kids toward aggressive behavior later in life

A University at Buffalo developmental psychologist has received a $550,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to study possible pathways that might lead young children toward different types of aggressive behavior later in life. [More]
MU researcher receives $2.2 million grant to develop system to display clear blood pressure information

MU researcher receives $2.2 million grant to develop system to display clear blood pressure information

Physicians receive lots of information about patients in a short amount of time, and sometimes that information is scattered, disorganized or difficult to comprehend. Now, a researcher at the University of Missouri School of Medicine has received funding to develop a simpler and clearer system to display blood pressure information. [More]
Duke study finds that gut worms can protect babies' brains from chronic inflammation

Duke study finds that gut worms can protect babies' brains from chronic inflammation

A Duke University study in rats finds that gut worms can protect babies' brains from long-term learning and memory problems caused by newborn infections. [More]

Expectations shape babies' brains

Infants can use their expectations about the world to rapidly shape their developing brains, researchers have found. [More]
NDSU assistant professor receives NIH grant to study regulation of transporters in Gram-negative bacteria

NDSU assistant professor receives NIH grant to study regulation of transporters in Gram-negative bacteria

Christopher Colbert, assistant professor of biochemistry at North Dakota State University, Fargo, has received a $348,000 grant award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health to conduct research on structure-function relationships of iron transport and transcriptional regulation in Gram-negative bacteria. [More]
Allergan announces U.S. availability of SAPHRIS 2.5 mg tablets for children with bipolar I disorder

Allergan announces U.S. availability of SAPHRIS 2.5 mg tablets for children with bipolar I disorder

Allergan plc today announced that SAPHRIS (asenapine) 2.5 mg sublingual (placed under the tongue) black-cherry flavored tablets are available in pharmacies throughout the U.S. In March 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved SAPHRIS for the acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder in pediatric patients (ages 10 – 17). [More]
Study finds no meaningful association between birth order and personality or IQ

Study finds no meaningful association between birth order and personality or IQ

For those who believe that birth order influences traits like personality and intelligence, a study of 377,000 high school students offers some good news: Yes, the study found, first-borns do have higher IQs and consistently different personality traits than those born later in the family chronology. However, researchers say, the differences between first-borns and "later-borns" are so small that they have no practical relevance to people's lives. [More]

Cognitive training can help reduce civilian shooting casualties

Although firing a gun seems like one action, it is made up of many smaller decisions and movements that require coordination between multiple brain areas. The sudden decision to not shoot, called 'response inhibition,' is critical when someone innocent comes into the line of fire. That is what soldiers in war experience when they're about to pull the trigger and then realize that their target is a civilian or an ally. Or when a law enforcement officer realizes that a person they thought was armed and dangerous is actually an innocent bystander. [More]
Eating habits linked to faster weight gain in children

Eating habits linked to faster weight gain in children

Some children gain weight faster than others. Eating habits seem to have far more to say than physical activity, research from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology suggests. [More]
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