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Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.
Authors examine potential reasons for the persistence of FC, other autism fads

Authors examine potential reasons for the persistence of FC, other autism fads

The communication struggles of children with autism spectrum disorder can drive parents and educators to try anything to understand their thoughts, needs and wants. Unfortunately, specialists in psychology and communication disorders do not always communicate the latest science so well. [More]
Study finds correlation between tests for hemoglobin A1c using finger stick and oral blood

Study finds correlation between tests for hemoglobin A1c using finger stick and oral blood

It is estimated that 8.1 million of the 29.1 million Americans living with diabetes are undiagnosed and many who have diabetes have poor glycemic control. Given that each year many Americans visit a dental provider but not a primary care provider, dental visits may be an opportune site for diabetes screening and monitoring glucose control for many at-risk patients. [More]
Carnegie Mellon study identifies intermediary neuron system that acts as synaptic cloaking device

Carnegie Mellon study identifies intermediary neuron system that acts as synaptic cloaking device

Neuroscientists believe that the connectome, a map of each and every connection between the millions of neurons in the brain, will provide a blueprint that will allow them to link brain anatomy to brain function. But a new study from Carnegie Mellon University has found that a specific type of neuron might be thwarting their efforts at mapping the connectome by temporarily cloaking the synapses that link a wide field of neurons. [More]
New study shows how anterior cingulate cortex can be stimulated to control pain

New study shows how anterior cingulate cortex can be stimulated to control pain

A new study by a University of Texas at Arlington physics team in collaboration with bioengineering and psychology researchers shows for the first time how a small area of the brain can be optically stimulated to control pain. [More]
'Walking football' could have a multitude of health benefits, say researchers

'Walking football' could have a multitude of health benefits, say researchers

The new sporting craze of 'Walking Football' may enable people to continue playing football into their 60s and 70s while reaping a multitude of health benefits, according to Aston University researchers. [More]
Love hormone has remarkable influence on the intoxicating effect of alcohol

Love hormone has remarkable influence on the intoxicating effect of alcohol

Oxytocin, sometimes referred to as the 'love' or 'cuddle' hormone, has a legendary status in popular culture due to its vital role in social and sexual behaviour and long-term bonding. [More]
Beneficial effects of statin treatment exaggerated, say researchers

Beneficial effects of statin treatment exaggerated, say researchers

Hailed as miracle drugs when they hit the market two decades ago, statins, the cholesterol-lowering drugs prescribed to prevent heart attacks, are not as effective nor as safe as we have been led to believe, say Dr. David M. Diamond, a professor of psychology, molecular pharmacology and physiology at the University of South Florida, and Dr. Uffe Ravnskov, an independent health researcher and an expert in cholesterol and cardiovascular disease. [More]

Altering visual cues can impact chronic neck pain

Using virtual reality to misrepresent how far the neck is turned can actually change pain experiences in individuals who suffer from chronic neck pain, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. [More]
Many women fail to understand risks of unapproved, untested bioidentical hormone therapies

Many women fail to understand risks of unapproved, untested bioidentical hormone therapies

From 28% to 68% of women using hormones at menopause take compounded, so-called "bioidentical" hormones, but women don't understand the risks of these unapproved, untested treatments, shows an analysis of two large surveys, which was published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine professor explores causes, treatments of anorexia

Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine professor explores causes, treatments of anorexia

Eating disorders are serious, debilitating conditions associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and distress. Anorexia nervosa, in particular, is associated with the highest mortality and suicide rates; compared to healthy peers, women with anorexia are up to 12 times more likely to die of any cause, and approximately 57 times more likely to die from suicide, over the same period of time. [More]
Sensor technology has potential to improve teaching of proper CBE techniques

Sensor technology has potential to improve teaching of proper CBE techniques

Sensor technology has the potential to significantly improve the teaching of proper technique for clinical breast exams (CBE), according to a new study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. [More]

New doctorate program to study substance use and related social, health consequences

A new Joint Doctoral Program (JDP) in Interdisciplinary Research on Substance Use has been launched by the Division of Global Public Health in the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and San Diego State University's School of Social Work. The program will emphasize research devoted to studying the use and misuse of alcohol and drugs - and related social and health consequences. [More]
Vanderbilt scientists shed new light on how the brain executes 'mental time travel'

Vanderbilt scientists shed new light on how the brain executes 'mental time travel'

In Proust's novel Recollection of Things Past, the distinctive smell of a lemon madeleine launches the narrator on a long, involved reminiscence of his past that fills seven chapters. [More]
Primary care nurse-led intervention improves physical activity among older adults

Primary care nurse-led intervention improves physical activity among older adults

A primary care nurse-delivered intervention can lead to sustained increases in physical activity (PA) among older adults, according to an article published by Tess Harris of St George's University of London, and colleagues in this week's PLOS Medicine. The trial was funded by the National Institute for Health Research. [More]
Organizational culture may increase use of evidence-based treatments for adolescents with psychiatric disorders

Organizational culture may increase use of evidence-based treatments for adolescents with psychiatric disorders

Many mental health therapists use treatments that have little evidence to support them. A new multi-institution study led by Penn Medicine has found that an organization's culture and climate are better predictors of the use of evidence-based practices than an individual therapist's characteristics in the treatment of children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders. [More]
Psychological safety of NHS staff is critical for patient safety, says new report

Psychological safety of NHS staff is critical for patient safety, says new report

Recognition of the important role psychology has in the Freedom to Speak Up Review is welcomed by the British Psychological Society. [More]
OUP announces launch of new journal that focuses on worker aging and retirement

OUP announces launch of new journal that focuses on worker aging and retirement

Oxford University Press is pleased to announce the launch of a new interdisciplinary journal, Work, Aging and Retirement, which is published in association with Lingnan (University) College of Sun Yat-sen University. [More]
Mindfulness training can influence health via stress reduction pathways

Mindfulness training can influence health via stress reduction pathways

Over the past decade, there have been many encouraging findings suggesting that mindfulness training can improve a broad range of mental and physical health problems. Yet, exactly how mindfulness positively impacts health is not clear. [More]
Background noise in the brain shapes neuron growth

Background noise in the brain shapes neuron growth

A process previously thought to be mere background noise in the brain has been found to shape the growth of neurons as the brain develops, according to research from the MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology (MRC CDN), Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), published in Cell Reports. [More]
Onset of chronic illness makes people lonely, shows study

Onset of chronic illness makes people lonely, shows study

Difficult circumstances often bring people closer together. But a new Concordia study published in Health Psychology has found that the onset of chronic illness often results in sufferers feeling lonelier -- even for those who have had a steady partner for 50 years or more. [More]