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Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.
Study provides window into the brain changes that link mindfulness meditation with health-related benefits

Study provides window into the brain changes that link mindfulness meditation with health-related benefits

Over the past decade, mindfulness meditation has been shown to improve a broad range of health and disease outcomes, such as slowing HIV progression and improving healthy aging. Yet, little is known about the brain changes that produce these beneficial health effects. [More]
Strong link found between incarceration of family members during childhood and heart attacks in men

Strong link found between incarceration of family members during childhood and heart attacks in men

A parent's incarceration has immediate, devastating effects on a family. Now, Virginia Tech and University of Toronto researchers say there may be a longer term risk: Men who as children experienced a family member's incarceration are approximately twice as likely to have a heart attack in later adulthood in comparison with men who were not exposed to such a childhood trauma. [More]
Using BMI to measure health incorrectly labels over 54 million Americans as 'unhealthy', study finds

Using BMI to measure health incorrectly labels over 54 million Americans as 'unhealthy', study finds

Over the past few years, body mass index, a ratio of a person's height and weight, has effectively become a proxy for whether a person is considered healthy. Many U.S. companies use their employees' BMIs as a factor in determining workers' health care costs. And people with higher BMIs could soon have to pay higher health insurance premiums, if a rule proposed in April by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is adopted. [More]
CMU joins $12 million research project to reverse-engineer the brain's secret algorithms

CMU joins $12 million research project to reverse-engineer the brain's secret algorithms

Carnegie Mellon University is embarking on a five-year, $12 million research effort to reverse-engineer the brain, seeking to unlock the secrets of neural circuitry and the brain's learning methods. Researchers will use these insights to make computers think more like humans. [More]
Prenatal stress affects babies' health in war-torn areas

Prenatal stress affects babies' health in war-torn areas

Children from war-torn areas of the globe are affected by trauma even before they are born, according to a new University of Florida study. [More]
New analysis method may help categorise stroke patients with language problem

New analysis method may help categorise stroke patients with language problem

Brain researcher Karsten Specht has found a new method of analysis to distinguish between stroke patients with language problem. The result may be individualised treatment for each patient. [More]
Researchers publish work on how news articles shape perceptions of obesity

Researchers publish work on how news articles shape perceptions of obesity

Researchers at Chapman University, UCLA, and Stanford have just published work on how news media coverage shapes perceptions of obesity. They examined how perspectives on obesity portrayed in news articles affect people's support for different obesity-related public policies and their prejudice towards fat men and women. [More]
New UEA-led research initiative aims to improve understanding of deictic communication in humans

New UEA-led research initiative aims to improve understanding of deictic communication in humans

A major new €3.5 million research initiative led by the University of East Anglia will aim to improve understanding of a fundamental part of communication in humans. [More]
Men with ASD have differences in brain connections

Men with ASD have differences in brain connections

Research at King's College London has revealed subtle brain differences in adult males with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which may go some way towards explaining why symptoms persist into adulthood in some people with the disorder. [More]

UMass Amherst cognitive neuroscientist receives NSF CAREER award to study brain functions

Cognitive neuroscientist Rosie Cowell at the University of Massachusetts Amherst recently received a five-year, $599,619 CAREER award from the National Science Foundation to develop and test a theory of how memory interacts with fine-grained visual perception and how both brain functions depend on the medial temporal lobe (MTL), which once was thought to be critical for memory but not for visual perception. [More]
Anticholinergic medications may not be best option for dementia patients in rehab facility

Anticholinergic medications may not be best option for dementia patients in rehab facility

During rehabilitation following an acute hospital stay, medications that block neurotransmitters may be overprescribed to older patients suffering from delirium superimposed on dementia, according to health researchers. [More]
Involving family members in care may reduce hospital readmissions

Involving family members in care may reduce hospital readmissions

A new study finds that educating and involving family members in the care of a loved one who has memory loss may significantly reduce hospital readmissions. [More]

Four factors help predict later cognitive function, motor performance for children with low birth weight

Four factors - medical complications at birth, maternal education, early motor assessments, and early cognitive assessments - help predict later cognitive function and motor performance for children born early and at a very low birth weight, finds a new study by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. [More]
Study shows prevalence of clinically relevant depressive symptoms among Division I college athletes

Study shows prevalence of clinically relevant depressive symptoms among Division I college athletes

Nearly a quarter of Division I college athletes reported depressive symptoms while enrolled at a liberal arts university on the East Coast, says a new study published in the February issue of the British Journal of Sports Medicine. Women were almost two times more likely to experience symptoms than their male peers. [More]
University of Leicester researchers publish structural details of protein linked to many types of cancer

University of Leicester researchers publish structural details of protein linked to many types of cancer

A team from the University of Leicester has for the first time published a detailed description of a protein linked to many types of cancer. [More]
New interprofessional program aims to provide primary care and dental services to older adults

New interprofessional program aims to provide primary care and dental services to older adults

Primary care within a dental practice? It's an interdisciplinary idea that has teeth: Your mouth, noted the U.S. surgeon general in the Oral Health in America report, provides a window into your overall health. Now, a research team led by Maria Dolce, an associate professor in the School of Nursing at Northeastern, will make that idea a reality. [More]
IDEAL study holds new hope for children exposed to methamphetamine in the womb

IDEAL study holds new hope for children exposed to methamphetamine in the womb

Despite continuing reports that methamphetamine abuse during pregnancy can lead to behavioral and emotional problems in children, pregnant women continue to abuse the illicit drug. Nearly one-fourth of pregnant women seeking treatment at federal facilities were methamphetamine users. [More]
Weekend junk food binges bad for your gut health

Weekend junk food binges bad for your gut health

Yo-yoing between eating well during the week and bingeing on junk food over the weekend is likely to be just as bad for your gut health as a consistent diet of junk, new UNSW research suggests. [More]

Survey provides no evidence that depressive symptoms vary from season to season

A large-scale survey of U.S. adults provides no evidence that levels of depressive symptoms vary from season to season, according to new research published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings are inconsistent with the notion of seasonal depression as a commonly occurring disorder. [More]
Anxiety can make people to walk in a leftward trajectory

Anxiety can make people to walk in a leftward trajectory

People experiencing anxiety and inhibition have more activity in the right side of the brain, causing them to walk in a leftward trajectory. [More]
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