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Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.
More accurate tests could be created to diagnose memory problems

More accurate tests could be created to diagnose memory problems

UEA research finds hope for more accurate diagnosis of memory problems. More accurate tests could be created to diagnose diseases such as Alzheimer's or memory problems stemming from head injuries, leading to earlier intervention, according to new findings from the University of East Anglia (UEA). [More]
Do we take liquid calories into account when planning meals?

Do we take liquid calories into account when planning meals?

New research by academics in the University of Bristol's Nutrition and Behaviour Unit (NBU) has looked into whether we take liquid calories into account when planning meals. [More]
Diet rich in soy may help feminine hearts, but timing matters

Diet rich in soy may help feminine hearts, but timing matters

A diet rich in soy may help feminine hearts, but timing matters, finds a new study published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Brains of autistic kids are relatively inflexible at switching from rest to task performance

Brains of autistic kids are relatively inflexible at switching from rest to task performance

The brains of children with autism are relatively inflexible at switching from rest to task performance, according to a new brain-imaging study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Researcher examines how motivated older adults maintain focus on cognitive tasks

Researcher examines how motivated older adults maintain focus on cognitive tasks

A psychology researcher at North Carolina State University is proposing a new theory to explain why older adults show declining cognitive ability with age, but don't necessarily show declines in the workplace or daily life. [More]
Parallel brain circuits associated with opposing emotional reactions

Parallel brain circuits associated with opposing emotional reactions

People choosing between two or more equally positive outcomes experience paradoxical feelings of pleasure and anxiety, feelings associated with activity in different regions of the brain, according to research led by Amitai Shenhav, an associate research scholar at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute at Princeton University. [More]

Researchers examine why men prefer responsive, attractive and feminine partner

People's emotional reactions and desires in initial romantic encounters determine the fate of a potential relationship. Responsiveness may be one of those initial "sparks" necessary to fuel sexual desire and land a second date. [More]
GW researcher awarded SFARI grant for autism research

GW researcher awarded SFARI grant for autism research

The link between autism and disrupted brain development is an essential part of the puzzle of the disease, and is largely unknown. However, thanks to funding from the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative, George Washington University researcher Anthony-Samuel LaMantia, Ph.D. may be able to offer truly integrative and in-depth answers to these key questions in the field of autism research. [More]

People who think of relationships as perfect unity between soulmates have worse relationships

Aristotle said, "Love is composed of a single soul inhabiting two bodies." Poetic as it is, thinking that you and your partner were made in heaven for each other can hurt your relationship, says a new study. [More]
Early life experiences influence risk of cognitive impairment in later life

Early life experiences influence risk of cognitive impairment in later life

Early life experiences, such as childhood socioeconomic status and literacy, may have greater influence on the risk of cognitive impairment late in life than such demographic characteristics as race and ethnicity, a large study by researchers with the UC Davis Alzheimer's Disease Center and the University of Victoria, Canada, has found. [More]
Parent involvement in primary care setting results in sustained weight loss for parent and child

Parent involvement in primary care setting results in sustained weight loss for parent and child

Primary care treatment of overweight and obese preschoolers works better when treatment targets both parent and child compared to when only the child is targeted, according to research published this week in Pediatrics and conducted at the University at Buffalo and Women and Children's Hospital of Buffalo. [More]

University of Miami researchers find that early joint attention predicts later autism symptoms

Some babies are at risk for autism because they have an older sibling that has the disorder. To find new ways to detect Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) earlier in life, researchers are exploring the subtleties of babies' interactions with others and how they relate to the possibility and severity of future symptoms. [More]
Blacks with depression and diabetes receive inadequate mental health treatment

Blacks with depression and diabetes receive inadequate mental health treatment

A new study in General Hospital Psychiatry confirms that Blacks with depression plus another chronic medical condition, such as Type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure, do not receive adequate mental health treatment. [More]
Children who experience stress early in life have emotional, physical health problems

Children who experience stress early in life have emotional, physical health problems

Children who have been abused or neglected early in life are at risk for developing both emotional and physical health problems. [More]
Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with autistic behaviors

Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with autistic behaviors

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that causes obsessive-compulsive and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. It is the most common inherited cause of mental impairment and the most common cause of autism. [More]
Caffeine intake may aggravate hot flashes and night sweats in postmenopausal women

Caffeine intake may aggravate hot flashes and night sweats in postmenopausal women

A new Mayo Clinic study, published online today by the journal Menopause, found an association between caffeine intake and more bothersome hot flashes and night sweats in postmenopausal women. [More]
Research: Sleep deprivation can cause false memories

Research: Sleep deprivation can cause false memories

Not getting enough sleep may increase the likelihood of forming false memories, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. [More]
Peer-led interventions can reduce depression and anxiety in mothers of kids with autism

Peer-led interventions can reduce depression and anxiety in mothers of kids with autism

Peer-led interventions that target parental well-being can significantly reduce stress, depression and anxiety in mothers of children with disabilities, according to new findings released today in the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Black women who strongly identified with race more likely to feel anxious in healthcare setting

Black women who strongly identified with race more likely to feel anxious in healthcare setting

A first-of-its-kind study by researchers at USC and Loyola Marymount University (LMU) has found evidence that the persistent health disparities across race may, in part, be related to anxiety about being confronted by negative racial stereotypes while receiving healthcare. [More]
Study: Lack of sleep can lead to errors in memory

Study: Lack of sleep can lead to errors in memory

Lack of sleep, already considered a public health epidemic, can also lead to errors in memory, finds a new study by researchers at Michigan State University and the University of California, Irvine. [More]