Psychosis News and Research RSS Feed - Psychosis News and Research

Psychosis means abnormal condition of the mind, and is a generic psychiatric term for a mental state often described as involving a "loss of contact with reality". People suffering from psychosis are said to be ''psychotic.''
Researchers find way to prevent, reduce or delay cannabis use amongst at-risk youth

Researchers find way to prevent, reduce or delay cannabis use amongst at-risk youth

Responding to rapidly shifting legal and cultural environments, researchers at the University of Montreal and CHU Sainte-Justine Children's Hospital have found a way to prevent, reduce or delay cannabis use amongst some at-risk youth. Cannabis users are at risk of neurocognitive deficits, reduced educational and occupational attainment, motor vehicle accidents, exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms, and precipitation of psychosis. [More]
Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Today, Rhodes Pharmaceuticals L.P. announced that Aptensio XR, a once-daily central nervous system stimulant indicated for the treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) will be available to patients beginning Summer 2015. [More]
HQO report shows variations across Ontario's long-term care homes regarding antipsychotic drug use

HQO report shows variations across Ontario's long-term care homes regarding antipsychotic drug use

There are major differences across Ontario's long-term care homes in the percentage of residents who are being prescribed antipsychotic medications, according to Looking for Balance, a report from Health Quality Ontario, the provincial advisor on health care quality. [More]
New UCLA study finds Naltrexone drug as promising treatment for methamphetamine addiction

New UCLA study finds Naltrexone drug as promising treatment for methamphetamine addiction

A new study by UCLA researchers has found that Naltrexone, a drug used to treat alcoholism, may also be a promising treatment for addiction to methamphetamine. [More]
Brain & Behavior Research Foundation to award grants to 40 scientists for research into mental illness

Brain & Behavior Research Foundation to award grants to 40 scientists for research into mental illness

The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation today announced its 2015 Independent Investigator Grants which will award $3.9 million in funding to 40 mid-career scientists from 30 institutions in 16 countries. [More]
Hallucinations, delusions associated with psychiatric disorders seldom trigger violent crimes

Hallucinations, delusions associated with psychiatric disorders seldom trigger violent crimes

Mass shootings at the hands of unhinged loners - such as those in Aurora, Colorado; Santa Barbara, California, and Newtown, Connecticut - perpetuate a commonly held belief that mental illness triggers violent crimes. [More]
Study finds extremely high levels of cardiovascular risk factors in people with psychosis

Study finds extremely high levels of cardiovascular risk factors in people with psychosis

Extremely high levels of cardiovascular risk factors have been found in people with established psychosis, with central obesity evident in over 80 per cent of participants, in a study by researchers from the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London. [More]
New study finds that some immigrants, refugees in Ontario at higher risk of psychotic disorders

New study finds that some immigrants, refugees in Ontario at higher risk of psychotic disorders

Immigrants from the Caribbean and Bermuda, as well as refugees from East Africa and South Asia, have a 1.5 to 2 times higher risk of psychotic disorders compared to the general population of Ontario, Canada, according to a new study by researchers at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. [More]
New scanning methods could help predict people vulnerable to schizophrenia

New scanning methods could help predict people vulnerable to schizophrenia

New scanning methods which map the wiring of the brain could provide a valuable new tool to predict people at risk of schizophrenia, according to a new study. [More]
Orexigen Therapeutics provides update on business and financial results for Q1 2015

Orexigen Therapeutics provides update on business and financial results for Q1 2015

Orexigen Therapeutics, Inc. today announced business and financial results for the first quarter ended March 31, 2015. [More]
WHO and UNHCR jointly issue new guide to better identify, manage mental health needs

WHO and UNHCR jointly issue new guide to better identify, manage mental health needs

Worldwide close to 80 million people are currently impacted by humanitarian emergencies arising from natural disasters and armed conflicts, such as those in the Central African Republic, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen, and more recently, Nepal. WHO estimates 5% to 10% of these people suffer from a mental health condition such as depression as a result of the emergency. [More]
Predominant first Alzheimer’s symptoms vary with diagnosis age

Predominant first Alzheimer’s symptoms vary with diagnosis age

The symptoms presented by patients newly diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease vary with age, with younger patients less likely to have initial memory problems, research shows. [More]
Early neuropsychiatric symptoms prevalent in PD

Early neuropsychiatric symptoms prevalent in PD

Neuropsychiatric symptoms, but not cognitive impairment, are common in early untreated patients with Parkinson’s disease, suggest findings from the multicentre Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative. [More]
Study: Broken communication in brain regions appears to worsen Huntington's disease

Study: Broken communication in brain regions appears to worsen Huntington's disease

Indiana University researchers have found that broken communication in a specific part of the brain plays a role in the involuntary physical movements that affect individuals with Huntington's disease. [More]
Long-term effects of using cognitive-enhancing drugs by healthy people need to be determined

Long-term effects of using cognitive-enhancing drugs by healthy people need to be determined

The government, pharmaceutical industry, and national medical organisations need to work together to look at the harms and benefits of long-term use of cognitive-enhancing drugs by healthy individuals, say neuroscientists Professor Barbara Sahakian and Dr Sharon Morein-Zamir from the University of Cambridge in the UK, writing in a Personal View in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. [More]
Antibodies may trigger psychiatric illness in children

Antibodies may trigger psychiatric illness in children

A world first study revealing the presence of two antibodies in a sub-group of children experiencing their first episode of psychosis affirms a longstanding recognition that auto-immune disorders play a significant role in psychiatric illness. [More]
People with severe schizophrenia have major differences in brain networks

People with severe schizophrenia have major differences in brain networks

People with a severe form of schizophrenia have major differences in their brain networks compared to others with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and healthy individuals, a new study from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health shows. [More]
Tourette syndrome patients may face second psychiatric disorder during their lifetimes

Tourette syndrome patients may face second psychiatric disorder during their lifetimes

A new study of Tourette syndrome (TS) led by researchers from UC San Francisco and Massachusetts General Hospital has found that nearly 86 percent of patients who seek treatment for TS will be diagnosed with a second psychiatric disorder during their lifetimes, and that nearly 58 percent will receive two or more such diagnoses. [More]
Stepped-care strategy improves function, decreases pain severity in veterans

Stepped-care strategy improves function, decreases pain severity in veterans

Although U.S. military veterans who have returned from Iraq or Afghanistan are more likely to suffer chronic pain than veterans of any other conflict in American history, little headway has been made in helping them manage the often debilitating effects of chronic pain. [More]
Better interventions possible for children experiencing acute psychosis with antibodies

Better interventions possible for children experiencing acute psychosis with antibodies

Antibodies defend the body against bacterial, viral, and other invaders. But sometimes the body makes antibodies that attack healthy cells. In these cases, autoimmune disorders develop. [More]
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