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Psychotherapy is “talk” therapy. It involves talking with a mental health professional to treat a mental illness. Psychotherapy can occur one-on-one or in a group. Research shows that support from family and friends can be an important part of therapy.
Five researchers named winners of 2016 Elsevier Foundation Awards

Five researchers named winners of 2016 Elsevier Foundation Awards

Five researchers have been named winners of the 2016 Elsevier Foundation Awards for Early Career Women Scientists in the Developing World, in recognition of research that has strong potential health and economic benefits. [More]
Authors examine link between irrational thoughts and psychological distress

Authors examine link between irrational thoughts and psychological distress

In the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics the link between irrational thoughts and distress is critically examined. Since the cognitive revolution of the early 1950s, thoughts have been discussed as central components in the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses. [More]
Coordinated specialty care more cost-effective for young people with first episode psychosis

Coordinated specialty care more cost-effective for young people with first episode psychosis

New analysis from a mental health care study shows that "coordinated specialty care" (CSC) for young people with first episode psychosis is more cost-effective than typical community care. Cost-effectiveness analysis in health care is a way to compare the costs and benefits of two or more treatment options. [More]
Unobtrusive patch on the forehead provides relief from PTSD

Unobtrusive patch on the forehead provides relief from PTSD

An average of 30 years had passed since the traumatic events that had left them depressed, anxious, irritable, hypervigilant, unable to sleep well and prone to nightmares. [More]
Researchers find no evidence that prenatal exposure to antidepressants increases risk for autism, ADHD

Researchers find no evidence that prenatal exposure to antidepressants increases risk for autism, ADHD

An analysis of medical records data from three Massachusetts health care systems finds no evidence that prenatal exposure to antidepressants increases the risk for autism and related disorders or for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). [More]
Using antidepressant drug during first trimester of pregnancy may increase risk of birth defects

Using antidepressant drug during first trimester of pregnancy may increase risk of birth defects

Using paroxetine--a medication prescribed to treat conditions including depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder--during the first trimester of pregnancy may increase newborns' risk of congenital malformations and cardiac malformations. That's the conclusion of a recent analysis published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. [More]
JGU employs new particle accelerator to enhance research into radiopharmaceutical chemistry

JGU employs new particle accelerator to enhance research into radiopharmaceutical chemistry

A new particle accelerator will further enhance the research landscape at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. It is to be employed to conduct research into potential applications of medical relevance. [More]
New book reveals that self-criticism can be mentally and physically harmful

New book reveals that self-criticism can be mentally and physically harmful

A new book by Prof. Golan Shahar of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev reveals that self-criticism can be both mentally and physically harmful, leading to mental disorder, chronic fatigue, chronic pain, and even suicide. [More]
Study looks at long-term effects of psychological therapies in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

Study looks at long-term effects of psychological therapies in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

For some time doctors have known that psychological therapies can reduce the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome in the short term. [More]
Music therapy in conjunction with standard rehabilitation benefits COPD patients

Music therapy in conjunction with standard rehabilitation benefits COPD patients

Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and other chronic respiratory disorders who received music therapy in conjunction with standard rehabilitation saw an improvement in symptoms, psychological well-being and quality of life compared to patients receiving rehabilitation alone, according to a new study by researchers at The Louis Armstrong Center of Music and Medicine at Mount Sinai Beth Israel (MSBI). [More]
Understanding the effects of psychotherapy in patients with borderline personality disorder

Understanding the effects of psychotherapy in patients with borderline personality disorder

According to newly published research, a specialized psychotherapy has been linked to changes in activation patterns in certain areas of the brain in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD), suggesting its impact may go deeper than symptom change. [More]
Findings may lead to new treatment strategy for phobia

Findings may lead to new treatment strategy for phobia

A new study published in the latest issue of Biological Psychiatry reports the successful and instant reduction of fear in spider-fearful participants following a 2-minute exposure combined with a single dose of a regular pharmacological treatment. [More]

Cognitive behavioral therapy can be equally effective as second generation antidepressant for depression

Major depressive disorder affects more than 32 million Americans, and their first stop for treatment is often their primary care provider. A recent evidence review of several alternatives to medication found that using cognitive behavioral therapy as the first treatment for depression can be equally effective as using a second generation antidepressant. [More]
Oxytocin hormone strengthens social ties

Oxytocin hormone strengthens social ties

Nowadays, much emphasis is placed on sustainability. The degree to which people are willing to donate their own money for this depends on their level of oxytocin. Scientists at the University of Bonn Hospital have discovered that the willingness to donate increases with the quantity of this bonding hormone. However, oxytocin only has an effect with regard to social sustainability projects. The hormone does not increase the ability to participate in the case of purely environmentally oriented projects. [More]
Health insurance coverage for transgender people is cost-effective, study finds

Health insurance coverage for transgender people is cost-effective, study finds

A new analysis led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that while most U.S. health insurance plans deny benefits to transgender men and women for medical care necessary to transition to the opposite sex, paying for sex reassignment surgery and hormones is actually cost-effective. [More]
Researchers identify genetic mutation associated with reckless drunken behavior

Researchers identify genetic mutation associated with reckless drunken behavior

University of Helsinki researchers have identified a genetic mutation which renders carriers susceptible to particularly impulsive and reckless behaviour when drunk. More than one hundred thousand Finns carry this mutation. [More]
Medication not psychotherapy intensity sways treatment outcome in adult ADHD

Medication not psychotherapy intensity sways treatment outcome in adult ADHD

Psychological interventions for adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder are best combined with methylphenidate, show findings from the COMPAS trial. [More]
Novel culturally-informed treatment benefits caregivers of people with schizophrenia

Novel culturally-informed treatment benefits caregivers of people with schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a chronic, severe and disabling psychiatric disorder that affects about one percent of the population in the United States. Approximately 60 percent of those suffering from this condition live with a relative. Despite the fact that that family interventions have shown to significantly improve outcomes for individuals with schizophrenia, only about seven percent of patients with this illness receive any family therapy. [More]
Expressive writing may improve functioning among combat veterans with reintegration problems

Expressive writing may improve functioning among combat veterans with reintegration problems

In a study of nearly 1,300 returning veterans reporting reintegration problems, those who completed online expressive-writing sessions showed more improvements than peers who had not written at all or who had engaged only in factual writing. [More]
Hypersexual disorder can be linked to hyperactive stress systems

Hypersexual disorder can be linked to hyperactive stress systems

New research from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows that hypersexual disorder - known popularly as sex addiction - can be linked to hyperactive stress systems. In a stress regulation test using the cortisone drug dexamethasone, men with hypersexual disorder showed higher levels of stress hormones than controls, a finding that the researchers hope will contribute to improved therapy for this patient group. [More]
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