Puberty News and Research RSS Feed - Puberty News and Research

UAB research explores neurofibromatosis type 1

UAB research explores neurofibromatosis type 1

It is easy to tell a medical research story that has a simple and dramatic moment. But disease is often much more complex, and the work to understand it can be painstaking. A vivid example of that is seen in the University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Genomics Laboratory, headed by Ludwine Messiaen, Ph.D., professor of genetics. This lab offers clinical genetic testing for a broad array of common and rare genetic disorders. [More]
Early puberty may increase risk of developing gestational diabetes

Early puberty may increase risk of developing gestational diabetes

Women who began having menstrual cycles at a younger age are at greater risk of developing gestational diabetes, a disease affecting up to 7 percent of pregnant women that can cause babies to develop type 2 diabetes and other complications, new research shows. [More]
Half of British schoolgirls avoid sport because of breasts, study finds

Half of British schoolgirls avoid sport because of breasts, study finds

About half of all girls at UK secondary schools might be avoiding sport because of embarrassment or pain caused by their breasts, according to new research. [More]
Genetic factors in puberty timing: an interview with Dr John Perry

Genetic factors in puberty timing: an interview with Dr John Perry

The study focused on the genetic regions that influence age at voice breaking - a distinct developmental milestone that happens to young men as their larynx (voice box) lengthens when exposed to male hormones. [More]
Rutgers study explores early abuse experiences of LGBT migrants

Rutgers study explores early abuse experiences of LGBT migrants

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) migrants who obtained refuge or asylum in the U.S. or Canada on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity report extensive recollections of abuse by parents and caregivers, peers and school personnel, according to a new Rutgers study. [More]

Clinical depression during early childhood can change the brain's anatomy

The brains of children who suffer clinical depression as preschoolers develop abnormally, compared with the brains of preschoolers unaffected by the disorder, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Finding may lead to better understanding of male genital birth defects

Finding may lead to better understanding of male genital birth defects

University of Florida Health researchers have identified genes that are disrupted by abnormal hormone signaling at crucial points during development, a finding that may lead to a better understanding of how the most common male genital birth defects arise in humans. [More]
First male puberty timing study conducted

First male puberty timing study conducted

In the largest genomic analysis of puberty timing in men, new research conducted by scientists at the University of Cambridge and 23andMe* shows that the timing of puberty in males and females is influenced by many of the same-shared genetic factors. The study results are the first to quantify the strongly shared genetic basis for puberty timing between the sexes. [More]
Doing exercise during puberty can improve bone health in adulthood, Spanish study confirms

Doing exercise during puberty can improve bone health in adulthood, Spanish study confirms

Osteoporosis is a serious health issue that mainly affects postmenopausal women. Now, a Spanish study has confirmed that doing exercise during puberty can improve bone health in adulthood. In this scope, sports such as football, handball and basketball are better than others such as swimming. [More]
Lower doses of chemicals found in personal care products may contribute to breast cancer risk

Lower doses of chemicals found in personal care products may contribute to breast cancer risk

Estrogen-mimicking chemicals called parabens, which are commonly found in an array of personal care products, may be more dangerous at lower doses than previously thought, according to a new study. [More]
Melatonin and the circadian rhythm: an interview with Professor Kennaway, University of Adelaide

Melatonin and the circadian rhythm: an interview with Professor Kennaway, University of Adelaide

The production of melatonin is controlled by a part of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and its timing fine-tuned by our exposure to light during the morning. [More]
Women born in summer months are more likely to be healthy adults, suggests new research

Women born in summer months are more likely to be healthy adults, suggests new research

Women who were born in the summer are more likely to be healthy adults, suggests new research published in the journal Heliyon. [More]
No lasting metabolic health costs from combined GH and GnRH analogue therapy

No lasting metabolic health costs from combined GH and GnRH analogue therapy

Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue given alongside growth hormone during puberty in order to increase adult height does not have long-term metabolic health consequences in children born small for gestational age, research shows. [More]
UH researcher investigates two new avenues for detection, treatment of prostate cancer

UH researcher investigates two new avenues for detection, treatment of prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy and second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the U.S. The challenge with prostate cancer is that the standard treatment methods in the advanced stage of the disease lose effectiveness after about one to two years, leading to recurrence and, ultimately, death. A University of Houston researcher and his team are working to change that. [More]
Depression and suicide risk screening can help healthcare providers prevent suicides in teens

Depression and suicide risk screening can help healthcare providers prevent suicides in teens

A new paper from nursing researchers with The University of Texas at Arlington and Texas Woman's University finds that depression and suicide risk screening can assist healthcare providers in preventing suicides in teens. [More]
Research suggests potential drug targets to stop cancer spread

Research suggests potential drug targets to stop cancer spread

It only takes seconds: one cancerous cell breaks off from a tumor, slips into the bloodstream and quickly lodges elsewhere in the body. These colonizers may bloom into deadly metastatic cancer right away or lie dormant for years, only to trigger a recurrence decades after the primary tumor is removed. [More]
Dynamic spine brace in development for children with scoliosis

Dynamic spine brace in development for children with scoliosis

Some six million people in the U.S. suffer from scoliosis, a sideways curvature of the spine. These include approximately 2 to 3% of adolescents who are diagnosed each year with idiopathic scoliosis, which is usually identified during puberty and progresses until skeletal maturity. [More]
Researchers developing dynamic spine brace for children with scoliosis

Researchers developing dynamic spine brace for children with scoliosis

Some six million people in the U.S. suffer from scoliosis, a sideways curvature of the spine. These include approximately 2 to 3% of adolescents who are diagnosed each year with idiopathic scoliosis, which is usually identified during puberty and progresses until skeletal maturity. [More]
Reducing SSB intake among children and adolescents associated with greater increase in HDL-C

Reducing SSB intake among children and adolescents associated with greater increase in HDL-C

In the first study to investigate blood lipid levels in association with consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) in a racially and ethnically diverse sample of Boston area schoolchildren, researchers found there was an inverse association between SSB intake changes and HDL-cholesterol increases (HDL-C is the "good cholesterol"). [More]
Adaptive immune system plays active role in guiding development of mammary glands

Adaptive immune system plays active role in guiding development of mammary glands

In experiments with mouse tissue, UC San Francisco researchers have discovered that the adaptive immune system, generally associated with fighting bacterial and viral infections, plays an active role in guiding the normal development of mammary glands, the only organs--in female humans as well as mice--that develop predominately after birth, beginning at puberty. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement