Puberty News and Research RSS Feed - Puberty News and Research

Puberty is the maturation stage a person goes through when they develop secondary sexual characteristics. Usually, puberty occurs between the ages of 8 and 12 years in girls and between 9 and 14 years in boys.
Novel inhibitory brain receptor reduces seizure-like activity in pubertal mice

Novel inhibitory brain receptor reduces seizure-like activity in pubertal mice

More than half of children with epilepsy outgrow their seizures, yet the mechanism underlying this remission is unknown. [More]
New research discovers how opposite-sex hormonal therapy influences the brain

New research discovers how opposite-sex hormonal therapy influences the brain

Women and men often show marked differences as regards mental illnesses. In order to learn more about this phenomenon, a project supported by the Austrian Science Fund FWF explored how opposite-sex hormonal therapy applied to transgender individuals influences the brain. [More]
Soluble corn fiber can help build and retain calcium in bone during adolescence and post-menopause

Soluble corn fiber can help build and retain calcium in bone during adolescence and post-menopause

Supplementing with soluble corn fiber at two critical times in a woman's life - adolescence and post-menopause - can help build and retain calcium in bone, according to new research from Purdue University. [More]
Study may show ways to maintain immunity in older people

Study may show ways to maintain immunity in older people

A study from Oxford and Basel universities may point the way to maintaining our immune systems as we get older. [More]
Review provides new insights into diagnosis, treatment for PCOS

Review provides new insights into diagnosis, treatment for PCOS

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) afflicts over 14 million women in the United States. The disorder increases the risk of endometrial cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, asthma, obesity, depression and anxiety, as well as infertility and a variety of reproductive disorders. [More]
Naturally occurring estrogen in cow’s milk does not affect blood hormone levels, study shows

Naturally occurring estrogen in cow’s milk does not affect blood hormone levels, study shows

Estrogen occurs naturally in cow's milk. Recently, there has been concern that consuming milk containing elevated amounts of estrogen could affect blood levels of the hormone in humans, leading to an increased risk of some cancers. [More]
New consensus statement recommends transition of care for adolescents with neurologic disorders

New consensus statement recommends transition of care for adolescents with neurologic disorders

A new consensus statement provides recommendations for transitioning adolescents and young adults with neurologic disorders to adult care. [More]
Study uses ethnically diverse sample to identify predictors of early substance use

Study uses ethnically diverse sample to identify predictors of early substance use

Girls who were overweight as children are likely to begin using cigarettes, marijuana or alcohol at an earlier age than their healthy-weight peers, according to a new study by researchers in the Indiana University School of Education. [More]
Study demonstrates epigenetic link between environment and pubertal onset in humans

Study demonstrates epigenetic link between environment and pubertal onset in humans

Danish researchers have discovered a possible epigenetic link between the environment and pubertal timing. [More]
Failure to recognise gender diversity causes major gaps in understanding transgender health

Failure to recognise gender diversity causes major gaps in understanding transgender health

2015 was an unprecedented year in the recognition of transgender rights in some high-income countries. However, as a new Series published in The Lancet today reveals, public recognition has yet to translate to a concerted effort to support and improve the health of transgender people across the world. [More]
OTC remains best option to preserve fertility of prepubertal girls treated with gonadotoxic chemotherapy

OTC remains best option to preserve fertility of prepubertal girls treated with gonadotoxic chemotherapy

Ovarian tissue cryopreservation (OTC), harvesting and freezing ovarian tissue, is the most promising complication-free strategy to preserve potential fertility in pre-pubescent girls undergoing sterilising chemotherapy, according to a 13 year study by Fanny Chambon et al. in the journal, Human Fertility. [More]
Study finds link between late onset of puberty and subsequent semen quality in men

Study finds link between late onset of puberty and subsequent semen quality in men

A new study from Rigshospitalet and EDMaRC finds a strong association between late onset of puberty and subsequent semen quality. This is the first study of its kind to investigate the influence of pubertal timing on male reproductive health. [More]
Study links low- and high-birthweight babies to increased cardiovascular disease risk

Study links low- and high-birthweight babies to increased cardiovascular disease risk

For reasons that remain unclear at least in the smaller babies, both birthweight extremes appear to increase the likelihood of early development of dangerous fat around major organs in the abdomen that significantly increases these risks, said Dr. Brian Stansfield, neonatologist at the Children's Hospital of Georgia and the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. [More]
Study finds link between placenta and offspring bone

Study finds link between placenta and offspring bone

Researchers at the Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, studied 518 children in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) who underwent bone scans at nine, 15 and 17 years old. Measurements such as thickness, volume and weight, were also taken from the mothers' placenta. [More]
Total cessation of GnRH production by hypothalamic neurons can lead to infertility

Total cessation of GnRH production by hypothalamic neurons can lead to infertility

Individual small RNAs are responsible for controlling the expression of gonadoliberin or GnRH (Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone), a neurohormone that controls sexual maturation, the appearance of puberty, and fertility in adults. [More]
Brain receptor that initiates adolescent synaptic pruning appears to go awry in autism, schizophrenia

Brain receptor that initiates adolescent synaptic pruning appears to go awry in autism, schizophrenia

Research led by SUNY Downstate Medical Center has identified a brain receptor that appears to initiate adolescent synaptic pruning, a process believed necessary for learning, but one that appears to go awry in both autism and schizophrenia. [More]
Exposure to SSRI during gestation increases chances of adolescent offspring depression

Exposure to SSRI during gestation increases chances of adolescent offspring depression

A study to be published in the May 2016 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP) reports that use of certain antidepressants during pregnancy can result in offspring depression by early adolescence. [More]
New book aims to guide women through menopause

New book aims to guide women through menopause

As preteens, girls often take health classes to teach them about their changing bodies during puberty. For moms-to-be, classes deal with pregnancy and newborn care. [More]
Researchers gain new insights into female pelvis development

Researchers gain new insights into female pelvis development

Women have wider hips than men because their pelves must allow for the birth of large-brained babies. Nevertheless, many female pelves are still not wide enough, which can result in difficult births. Traditionally, the human pelvis has been considered an evolutionary compromise between birthing and walking upright; a wider pelvis would compromise efficient bipedal locomotion. But this hypothesis has now been called into question: According to new studies, wide hips do not reduce locomotor efficiency. [More]
UAB lab to offer new tests for genetic diseases using next-generation sequencing

UAB lab to offer new tests for genetic diseases using next-generation sequencing

The Medical Genomics Laboratory at the University of Alabama at Birmingham is expanding its technological array with a new panel of diagnostic tests for genetic diseases known as neurofibromatoses and rasopathies. Beginning April 18, the UAB lab will offer new tests using the technique called customized deep-coverage, next-generation sequencing or NGS. [More]
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