Puberty News and Research RSS Feed - Puberty News and Research

Australian researchers find gene that drives aggressive form of triple-negative breast cancer

Australian researchers find gene that drives aggressive form of triple-negative breast cancer

Australian researchers have found that so-called 'triple-negative breast cancers' are two distinct diseases that likely originate from different cell types. This helps explain why survival prospects for women with the diagnosis tend to be either very good or very bad. [More]
New targeted therapy promises to reduce frequency and intensity of breakouts

New targeted therapy promises to reduce frequency and intensity of breakouts

Acne, a scourge of adolescence, may be about to meet its ultra high-tech match. By using a combination of ultrasound, gold-covered particles and lasers, researchers from UC Santa Barbara and the private medical device company Sebacia have developed a targeted therapy that could potentially lessen the frequency and intensity of breakouts, relieving acne sufferers the discomfort and stress of dealing with severe and recurring pimples. [More]
GH response poor in SGA children with good spontaneous catch-up growth

GH response poor in SGA children with good spontaneous catch-up growth

Spontaneous catch-up growth after birth in short children who were born small for gestational age is a negative predictor of their long-term response to growth hormone treatment, say researchers. [More]
Blunted cortisol response common in non-classic CAH

Blunted cortisol response common in non-classic CAH

Nearly two-thirds of children with non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia have an inadequate cortisol response, report researchers. [More]
Nomogram aids management of boys with constitutional delay in growth and puberty

Nomogram aids management of boys with constitutional delay in growth and puberty

A puberty nomogram is better than the classical criteria for identifying boys with constitutional delay in growth and puberty, report researchers. [More]
No adulthood metabolic consequences of central precocious puberty

No adulthood metabolic consequences of central precocious puberty

Researchers have found that girls with central precocious puberty have similar metabolic and general health to other women when they reach young to middle adulthood. [More]
Testosterone, estrogen raise men's risk of heart disease

Testosterone, estrogen raise men's risk of heart disease

Why men have more heart disease than premenopausal women has been unclear, but a new study shows that the sex hormones testosterone and estrogen alter cardiovascular risk factors in a way that raises a man's risk of heart disease. [More]
Study calls for improved accessibility to care for transgender youth with gender dysphoria

Study calls for improved accessibility to care for transgender youth with gender dysphoria

A new study has confirmed that transgender youth often have mental health problems and that their depression and anxiety improve greatly with recognition and treatment of gender dysphoria. [More]
Poll: Half of parents support delayed school start times for adolescents

Poll: Half of parents support delayed school start times for adolescents

Should teenagers be able to hit the snooze button one more time before school? Ask their parents and half say they would support later school start times, according to today's University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. [More]
Changes in moles and skin cancer: an interview with Dr Anjali Mahto, Consultant Dermatologist & British Skin Foundation Spokesperson

Changes in moles and skin cancer: an interview with Dr Anjali Mahto, Consultant Dermatologist & British Skin Foundation Spokesperson

Melanoma is the 5th most common cancer in the UK and its incidence is continuing to increase since the mid-1970s. Cancer Research UK reports that its rates have increased more rapidly than any of the current ten most common cancers in males and females.
Whilst some of this may be attributed to better surveillance and earlier detection, the real problem lies with sun-seeking behaviour and exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. [More]
EarlyBird study that tracks child-to-adult lifestyle receives financial support

EarlyBird study that tracks child-to-adult lifestyle receives financial support

A unique study which has followed 300 young people from age five since 2000, has received backing for a third phase which will see it become the first study of its kind in the world to track the same group from childhood to adulthood. [More]

Study explores gender identity in transgender children

A study with 32 transgender children, ages 5 to 12, indicates that the gender identity of these children is deeply held and is not the result of confusion about gender identity or pretense. [More]
Nomogram aids management of boys with constitutional delay in growth and puberty

Nomogram aids management of boys with constitutional delay in growth and puberty

A puberty nomogram is better than the classical criteria for identifying boys with constitutional delay in growth and puberty, report researchers. [More]
Childhood macroprolactinomas amenable to dopamine agonist treatment

Childhood macroprolactinomas amenable to dopamine agonist treatment

Dopamine agonist treatment normalises prolactin levels in about three-quarters of children with macroprolactinomas, show findings from a large series. [More]
Day-to-day chemical exposures linked to earlier menopause

Day-to-day chemical exposures linked to earlier menopause

Women whose bodies have high levels of chemicals found in plastics, personal-care products, common household items and the environment experience menopause two to four years earlier than women with lower levels of these chemicals, according to a new study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Study finds no evidence that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular risk

Study finds no evidence that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular risk

Fears of a link between testosterone replacement therapy and cardiovascular risk are misplaced, according to a review published in this month's Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The therapy has come under widespread scrutiny in recent months, including by a federal Food and Drug Administration panel convened last fall. [More]
Study: Prostate cancer drug stabilizes memory loss for a year in women with Alzheimer's disease

Study: Prostate cancer drug stabilizes memory loss for a year in women with Alzheimer's disease

Women with Alzheimer's disease showed stable cognition for a year when a drug that is more commonly used to treat advanced prostate cancer was added to their drug regimen, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. [More]
FDA grants orphan drug status to NBI-77860 for treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia

FDA grants orphan drug status to NBI-77860 for treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. announced today that NBI-77860, a proprietary corticotropin releasing factor 1 (CRF) receptor antagonist, has been granted orphan drug status by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) a disease that affects approximately 20,000-30,000 people in the United States. [More]
‘Positive’ report of growth hormone in idiopathic short stature

‘Positive’ report of growth hormone in idiopathic short stature

US researchers report “positive” experiences with growth hormone therapy in children with idiopathic short stature. [More]
Continued exposure to high blood sugars may impact brain function in young diabetic children

Continued exposure to high blood sugars may impact brain function in young diabetic children

Investigators have found that young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have slower brain growth compared to children without diabetes. A new study, published in the December issue of Diabetes, now available ahead of print, suggests that continued exposure to hyperglycemia, or high blood sugars, may be detrimental to the developing brain. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement