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Adaptive immune system plays active role in guiding development of mammary glands

Adaptive immune system plays active role in guiding development of mammary glands

In experiments with mouse tissue, UC San Francisco researchers have discovered that the adaptive immune system, generally associated with fighting bacterial and viral infections, plays an active role in guiding the normal development of mammary glands, the only organs--in female humans as well as mice--that develop predominately after birth, beginning at puberty. [More]
NTNU researchers find link between aggression and gene variant in children

NTNU researchers find link between aggression and gene variant in children

Some children react more strongly to negative experiences than others. Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology have found a link between aggression and variants of a particular gene. [More]
Pre-birth arsenic exposure associated with early puberty, obesity in mice

Pre-birth arsenic exposure associated with early puberty, obesity in mice

Female mice exposed in utero, or in the womb, to low levels of arsenic through drinking water displayed signs of early puberty and became obese as adults, according to scientists from the National Institutes of Health. [More]
New study reveals effect of light exposure at night on the biology of teen sleep

New study reveals effect of light exposure at night on the biology of teen sleep

A new study has an important implication for tweens and young teens as they head back to school: Taking a gadget to bed could really hurt their sleep. [More]
New assessment tool under development can help detect physical traits of Klinefelter syndrome

New assessment tool under development can help detect physical traits of Klinefelter syndrome

Klinefelter syndrome is the most common disorder of the male sex chromosomes, yet is rarely diagnosed in children. A new assessment tool is being developed by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) to help pediatricians detect the physical traits of the syndrome. The tool could pave the way for early interventions that prevent and treat a range of physical, psychological, social, and cognitive impairments. [More]
NIH funds multicenter study to evaluate impact of medical treatment in transgender youth

NIH funds multicenter study to evaluate impact of medical treatment in transgender youth

The National Institutes of Health has awarded $5.7M for a five-year, multicenter study, which will be the first in the U.S. to evaluate the long-term outcomes of medical treatment for transgender youth. [More]
Eating habits linked to faster weight gain in children

Eating habits linked to faster weight gain in children

Some children gain weight faster than others. Eating habits seem to have far more to say than physical activity, research from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology suggests. [More]
UMass Amherst scientist to study how estrogen-mimicking chemicals in the womb can increase breast cancer risk

UMass Amherst scientist to study how estrogen-mimicking chemicals in the womb can increase breast cancer risk

Much attention has been paid to genetics in breast cancer as disease rates rise, but most women have no family history of the disease, suggesting that there is an environmental risk we don't yet understand, says environmental health scientist Laura Vandenberg in the School of Public Health and Health Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. [More]
Breakthrough discovery could help young girls suffering from rare form of epilepsy

Breakthrough discovery could help young girls suffering from rare form of epilepsy

An international team, led by a University of Adelaide genetics expert, has made a breakthrough discovery which is expected to help thousands of young girls worldwide who are suffering from a rare yet debilitating form of epilepsy. [More]
UC Riverside researchers explore effects of early-life exercise

UC Riverside researchers explore effects of early-life exercise

More than one in three adults in the United States is considered to be obese. What impact can exercise done early in life have on the propensity for exercising during the adult years? A team of researchers at the University of California, Riverside did experiments on mice in the lab to find out. Specifically, they evaluated the effects of early exercise on adult physical activity, body mass, food consumption and circulating leptin levels. [More]
Early menstrual cycle could play role in development of ER-negative breast cancer among African-American women

Early menstrual cycle could play role in development of ER-negative breast cancer among African-American women

Early age at menarche, or first menstrual cycle, could play a role in the disproportionate incidence of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancers diagnosed among African-American women, according to a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. [More]
Researchers find persistent gender bias in provision of growth hormone treatment for idiopathic short stature

Researchers find persistent gender bias in provision of growth hormone treatment for idiopathic short stature

Short boys are three times more likely than short girls to receive recombinant human growth hormone treatment for idiopathic short stature (ISS), even though in a general pediatric population, equal proportions of both genders fall under the height threshold designating ISS. Researchers who analyzed records of over 283,000 U.S. children and adolescents found a clear-cut and persistent gender bias in the provision of treatment. [More]
Medical experts call for accurate, standardized estrogen testing methods

Medical experts call for accurate, standardized estrogen testing methods

Unreliable estrogen measurements have had a negative impact on the treatment of and research into many hormone-related cancers and chronic conditions. To improve patient care, a panel of medical experts has called for accurate, standardized estrogen testing methods in a statement published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
GnRH infusion recommended for adolescent hypogonadotropic hypogonadodism

GnRH infusion recommended for adolescent hypogonadotropic hypogonadodism

Pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone may be more effective than human chorionic gonadotropin for the treatment of peripubescent boys with hypogonadotropic hypogonadodism, say Chinese researchers. [More]
Puberty timing complicates adiposity measurements

Puberty timing complicates adiposity measurements

Research suggests that the timing of puberty affects the accuracy and interpretation of body mass index z-scores for judging adiposity in both girls and boys. [More]
Lafora rare disease could be aggravated by oxidative stress

Lafora rare disease could be aggravated by oxidative stress

Neurodegenerative Lafora disease usually becomes apparent through seizures during adolescence and puberty and occurs as a consequence of defects in glycogen metabolism and in the cellular mechanisms that are responsible for its disposal. Researchers at the University of Valencia have led a study in which they propose that Lafora rare disease could be aggravated by oxidative stress. [More]
Study finds similarity in clinical progression between human patients and Huntington's disease monkeys

Study finds similarity in clinical progression between human patients and Huntington's disease monkeys

Transgenic Huntington's disease monkeys show similarity to humans with Huntington's in their progressive neurodegeneration and decline of motor control, scientists from Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, report. [More]
DNMT1 gene essential to maintain breast and cancer stem cells

DNMT1 gene essential to maintain breast and cancer stem cells

The gene and hormone soup that enables women to breastfeed their newborns also can be a recipe for breast cancer, particularly when the first pregnancy is after age 30. [More]
Study: Women hospitalized for asthma treatment more than men

Study: Women hospitalized for asthma treatment more than men

While it may be a stereotype, it's also true that women seek medical care more frequently than men do. And a recent study shows that women with acute asthma who are treated in the emergency department (ED) are 60 percent more likely than men treated in the ED to need hospitalization. [More]
Long-term histrelin implant shows promise for central precocious puberty

Long-term histrelin implant shows promise for central precocious puberty

Long-term subcutaneous histrelin implant therapy is a viable option for patients with central precocious puberty who require continuous gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue therapy, say researchers. [More]
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