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Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a biologically important type of molecule that consists of a long chain of nucleotide units. Each nucleotide consists of a nitrogenous base, a ribose sugar, and a phosphate.
New treatment fights respiratory syncytial virus in children

New treatment fights respiratory syncytial virus in children

Researchers at Le Bonheur Children's Hospital and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center announced results of a clinical trial of a new drug shown to safely reduce the viral load and clinical illness of healthy adult volunteers intranasally infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). [More]
Vanderbilt-led research team identifies protein "signatures" that drive colorectal cancer

Vanderbilt-led research team identifies protein "signatures" that drive colorectal cancer

A Vanderbilt University-led research team has identified protein "signatures" of genetic mutations that drive colorectal cancer, the nation's second leading cause of cancer deaths after lung cancer. [More]
Unnatural DNA bases: an interview with Professor Floyd E. Romesberg, The Scripps Research Institute

Unnatural DNA bases: an interview with Professor Floyd E. Romesberg, The Scripps Research Institute

The natural DNA bases that form the letters of DNA are usually referred to as G, C, A, and T. Those are only the first letters of the chemical names. They’re often called nucleotides by their scientific name and all of them have in common a phosphate part, a sugar part and a nucleobase part. [More]
Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

A team of scientists from around the world led by Baylor College of Medicine and Washington University in St. Louis has completed the genome sequence of the common marmoset - the first sequence of a New World Monkey - providing new information about the marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system, physiology and growth, shedding new light on primate biology and evolution. [More]
UT Southwestern researcher named recipient of ASBMB Merck Award for research on molecular biology

UT Southwestern researcher named recipient of ASBMB Merck Award for research on molecular biology

Dr. Zhijian "James" Chen, Professor of Molecular Biology and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at UT Southwestern Medical Center, has been named the 2015 recipient of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Merck Award, which recognizes outstanding contributions to research in biochemistry and molecular biology. [More]
Encapsula releases 2 new liposome based products

Encapsula releases 2 new liposome based products

Encapsula NanoSciences announces the release of two new liposome ­based products; Curcusome® and Taurosome™. Curcusome® or liposomal curcumin is a nutraceutical supplement that comes innovatively packaged in a powder ­release cap for consumer ease. [More]
Researchers discover how dengue suppresses human immune system

Researchers discover how dengue suppresses human immune system

Scientists have discovered a new pathway the dengue virus takes to suppress the human immune system. This new knowledge deepens our understanding of the virus and could contribute to the development of more effective therapeutics. [More]
CIP2A pathway involved in erlotinib response

CIP2A pathway involved in erlotinib response

Researchers have identified a novel mechanism, involving the cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A pathway, which mediates the anti-tumour effects of erlotinib in non-small-cell lung cancer cells without epidermal growth factor receptor mutations. [More]
Researchers reveal molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA

Researchers reveal molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA

The Roquin protein, discovered in 2005, controls T-cell activation and differentiation by regulating the expression of certain mRNAs. In doing so, it helps to guarantee immunological tolerance and prevents immune responses against the body's own structures that can lead to autoimmune disease. [More]
New tools for detecting and monitoring TB in captive elephants

New tools for detecting and monitoring TB in captive elephants

Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the organism that causes tuberculosis in humans, also afflicts Asian (and occasionally other) elephants. Diagnosing and treating elephants with TB is a challenge, however, as little is known about how their immune systems respond to the infection. [More]
Inflammatory shift in long-standing bipolar disorder

Inflammatory shift in long-standing bipolar disorder

Patients with chronic bipolar disorder, but not those with schizophrenia, have a shift towards an M1 rather than an M2 macrophage response, research suggests. [More]
Advanced Cell Diagnostics’ in situ hybridization technology reaches two major milestones

Advanced Cell Diagnostics’ in situ hybridization technology reaches two major milestones

Advanced Cell Diagnostics Inc. (ACD), a leader in the field of molecular pathology and developer of cell and tissue-based analysis tools, has announced that its RNAscope® RNA in situ hybridization technology has reached two major milestones. In just three years, over 100 peer-reviewed papers featuring the technology have been published, and with the significant increase in use of RNAscope, ACD has now built a library of over 4000 target probes for numerous species. Probes are designed to order in under two weeks, and in just six months the library has grown by over 1500, reflecting the wide interest in ACD’s breakthrough technology. [More]
New potential avenues to predict and prevent ovarian cancer metastasis

New potential avenues to predict and prevent ovarian cancer metastasis

Circulating tumor cells spread ovarian cancer through the bloodstream, homing in on a sheath of abdominal fatty tissue where it can grow and metastasize to other organs, scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in Cancer Cell. [More]
Researchers describe innovative technique for early disease detection

Researchers describe innovative technique for early disease detection

Despite impressive medical strides, cancer remains a leading killer and overwhelming burden to healthcare systems, causing well over a half million fatalities per year with a projected cost of $174 billion by 2020, according to the National Cancer Institute. [More]
New genetic programs for taking blank-slate stem cells and turning them into human blood

New genetic programs for taking blank-slate stem cells and turning them into human blood

The ability to reliably and safely make in the laboratory all of the different types of cells in human blood is one key step closer to reality. [More]
Study to understand molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA to treat autoimmune diseases

Study to understand molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA to treat autoimmune diseases

Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, the Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich (LMU) and the Technische Universität München (TUM) have moved an important step closer to understanding molecular mechanisms of autoimmune diseases. [More]
Scientists develop RNA that binds cGMP

Scientists develop RNA that binds cGMP

The transmission of signals within cells is dependent on cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) as an important secondary messenger. German scientists have now developed an RNA that binds cGMP. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, it is possible to suppress the cGMP signal cascade in genetically modified cells that produce this RNA. [More]
NANOG gene linked to tumours derived from stratified epithelia

NANOG gene linked to tumours derived from stratified epithelia

Scientists from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have discovered that NANOG, an essential gene for embryonic stem cells, also regulates cell division in stratified epithelia-those that form part of the epidermis of the skin or cover the oesophagus or the vagina-in adult organisms. [More]
TCGA finds novel mutations in key cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma

TCGA finds novel mutations in key cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma

Researchers from The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network have identified novel mutations in a well-known cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of lung cancer. [More]
Rockefeller scientists identify protein that makes breast cancer cells more likely to metastasize

Rockefeller scientists identify protein that makes breast cancer cells more likely to metastasize

Using an innovative tool that captures heretofore hidden ways that cells are regulated, scientists at Rockefeller University have identified a protein that makes breast cancer cells more likely to metastasize. [More]