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Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a biologically important type of molecule that consists of a long chain of nucleotide units. Each nucleotide consists of a nitrogenous base, a ribose sugar, and a phosphate.
Internal production of hydrogen peroxide can lead cells to exit cell cycle and become senescent

Internal production of hydrogen peroxide can lead cells to exit cell cycle and become senescent

What happens inside cells when they detect the activation of a cancer-inducing gene? Sometimes, cells are able to signal internally to stop the cell cycle. Such cells are able to enter, at least for a time, a protective non-growth state. [More]
CTC clusters cause metastasis

CTC clusters cause metastasis

Circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters - clumps of from 2 to 50 tumor cells that break off a primary tumor and are carried through the bloodstream - appear to be much more likely to cause metastasis than are single CTCs, according to a study from investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center. [More]
Research report: Orphan Diseases Partnering Terms and Agreements

Research report: Orphan Diseases Partnering Terms and Agreements

The Orphan Diseases Partnering Terms and Agreements report provides an understanding and access to the orphan diseases partnering deals and agreements entered into by the worlds leading healthcare companies. [More]
Report on Co-development Terms & Agreements in Pharma, Biotech and Diagnostics

Report on Co-development Terms & Agreements in Pharma, Biotech and Diagnostics

The Co-development Terms and Agreements in Pharma, Biotech and Diagnostics report provides comprehensive understanding and unprecedented access to the co-development deals and agreements entered into by the worlds leading life science companies. [More]
Researchers reveal how Listeria is able to survive antibiotics

Researchers reveal how Listeria is able to survive antibiotics

Listeria is a dreaded bacterium that can be found in both unprocessed and processed foods. Over the last few weeks, 28 persons in Denmark have been infected with Listeria from processed food, sold in supermarkets. 13 have died. [More]
Acromegaly and antisense therapy: an interview with Mark Diamond, CEO Antisense Therapeutics

Acromegaly and antisense therapy: an interview with Mark Diamond, CEO Antisense Therapeutics

Acromegaly is a chronic, life-threatening disease triggered by a benign tumour of the pituitary gland causing excessive growth hormone release. Oversupply of growth hormone stimulates liver, fat and kidney cells to produce excess levels of Insulin-Like Growth Factor I (IGFI), which causes abnormal growth of the bones of the hands, face and feet and bodily organs. [More]
Statistical genetic analysis can detect aggressiveness of lymphoma

Statistical genetic analysis can detect aggressiveness of lymphoma

Each year, more than one thousand Norwegians develop lymphoma. A statistical genetic analysis can detect when the disease will be aggressive. Thereby, treatment can be initiated in time. [More]
FDA approves ViiV Healthcare's Triumeq tablets for treatment of HIV-1 infection

FDA approves ViiV Healthcare's Triumeq tablets for treatment of HIV-1 infection

ViiV Healthcare announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Triumeq (abacavir 600mg, dolutegravir 50mg and lamivudine 300mg) tablets for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. [More]
Study shows new role for protein APC in suppressing colorectal cancer

Study shows new role for protein APC in suppressing colorectal cancer

A study recently published in the journal Carcinogenesis by researchers at the University of Kansas shows a new role for the protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) in suppressing colorectal cancer - the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. [More]
Newborn screening for SCID holds promise that affected children can lead healthy lives

Newborn screening for SCID holds promise that affected children can lead healthy lives

Using population-based screening outcomes of approximately 3 million infants, a team of scientists across 14 states, including four researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, have shown that newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) can be successfully implemented across public health newborn screening programs. [More]
CD157 important in malignant pleural mesothelioma

CD157 important in malignant pleural mesothelioma

CD157 plays a pivotal role in the progression of malignant pleural mesothelioma and may be useful in the stratification of patients into different prognostic groups, Italian research suggests. [More]
Researchers made important step towards creating medical nanorobots

Researchers made important step towards creating medical nanorobots

Researchers from the Institute of General Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences and MIPT have made an important step towards creating medical nanorobots. [More]
Scientists identify biomarker strongly associated with aggressive breast cancer

Scientists identify biomarker strongly associated with aggressive breast cancer

Two Northwestern University scientists have identified a biomarker strongly associated with basal-like breast cancer, a highly aggressive carcinoma that is resistant to many types of chemotherapy. The biomarker, a protein called STAT3, provides a smart target for new therapeutics designed to treat this often deadly cancer. [More]
Research shows long non-coding RNAs regulate circadian clocks

Research shows long non-coding RNAs regulate circadian clocks

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found a new way that internal body clocks are regulated by a type of molecule known as long non-coding RNA. [More]
Researchers identify microRNAs that differentiate male and female fruit flies

Researchers identify microRNAs that differentiate male and female fruit flies

Men and women differ in plenty of obvious ways, and scientists have long known that genetic differences buried deep within our DNA underlie these distinctions. In the past, most research has focused on understanding how the genes that encode proteins act as sex determinants. [More]
Globavir plans to seek approval, launch novel drug for treatment of Ebola infection

Globavir plans to seek approval, launch novel drug for treatment of Ebola infection

Globavir Biosciences, Inc., a biotechnology company developing therapeutics to treat infectious diseases, has announced intentions to develop its lead drug candidate, GBV006, for the treatment of the current Ebola Virus outbreak in West Africa. Globavir will seek approval for the use of GBV006, a combination of Food and Drug Administration approved drugs, through an established compassionate use regulatory pathway. [More]
Researchers reveal how early changes in DNA methylation involved in Alzheimer's disease

Researchers reveal how early changes in DNA methylation involved in Alzheimer's disease

A new study led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) and Rush University Medical Center, reveals how early changes in brain DNA methylation are involved in Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Researchers now have a clear picture of bacterial immune system

Researchers now have a clear picture of bacterial immune system

Bacteria's ability to destroy viruses has long puzzled scientists, but researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say they now have a clear picture of the bacterial immune system and say its unique shape is likely why bacteria can so quickly recognize and destroy their assailants. [More]
Research offers promise for personalized RNA combination therapies to treat lung cancer

Research offers promise for personalized RNA combination therapies to treat lung cancer

Small RNA molecules, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), offer tremendous potential for new therapeutic agents to inhibit cancer cell growth. However, delivering these small RNAs to solid tumors remains a significant challenge, as the RNAs must target the correct cells and avoid being broken down by enzymes in the body. [More]
New therapeutic strategy to combat common genetic risk factor for ALS, FTD

New therapeutic strategy to combat common genetic risk factor for ALS, FTD

A team of researchers at Mayo Clinic and The Scripps Research Institute in Florida have developed a new therapeutic strategy to combat the most common genetic risk factor for the neurodegenerative disorders amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). [More]