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Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a biologically important type of molecule that consists of a long chain of nucleotide units. Each nucleotide consists of a nitrogenous base, a ribose sugar, and a phosphate.
New CRISPR-EZ method makes genome editing much easier in mice

New CRISPR-EZ method makes genome editing much easier in mice

University of California, Berkeley scientists have developed a quicker and more efficient method to alter the genes of mice with CRISPR-Cas9, simplifying a procedure growing in popularity because of the ease of using the new gene-editing tool. [More]
NASA releases new video that highlights Mark and Scott Kelly's metabolites

NASA releases new video that highlights Mark and Scott Kelly's metabolites

NASA's Human Research Program is releasing "Metabolomics: You Are What You Eat" video to highlight its Twins Study which uses omics to study Mark and Scott Kelly's metabolites. [More]
Researchers discover ANKRD55 gene linked to multiple sclerosis

Researchers discover ANKRD55 gene linked to multiple sclerosis

The Ikerbasque researcher Koen Vandenbroeck, who heads the Neurogenomiks laboratory which reports to the Achucarro centre and the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country, together with other national and international groups, has shown that a genetic variant in the 5q11 chromosome, which is associated with susceptibility to developing multiple sclerosis, greatly regulates a gene known as ANKRD55. ANKRD55 is a gene with an unknown function. [More]
Increasing specific microRNA levels can restore chemotherapy sensitivity in pancreatic cancer cells

Increasing specific microRNA levels can restore chemotherapy sensitivity in pancreatic cancer cells

By increasing the level of a specific microRNA (miRNA) molecule, researchers have for the first time restored chemotherapy sensitivity in vitro to a line of human pancreatic cancer cells that had developed resistance to a common treatment drug. [More]
Meta-genomics analysis tool Taxonomer can rapidly and accurately detect pathogens

Meta-genomics analysis tool Taxonomer can rapidly and accurately detect pathogens

Scientists at the University of Utah, ARUP Laboratories, and IDbyDNA, Inc., have developed ultra-fast, meta-genomics analysis software called Taxonomer that dramatically improves the accuracy and speed of pathogen detection. [More]
Gene expression patterns of normal tissue may predict survival rates of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients

Gene expression patterns of normal tissue may predict survival rates of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients

Breast tissue surrounding tumors could be used to gauge future survival outcomes for women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, a study led by University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers has found. [More]
Novel method for designing geometric structures created from DNA

Novel method for designing geometric structures created from DNA

Among the valuable holdings in London's Wellcome Library is a rough pencil sketch made in 1953 by Francis Crick. The drawing is one of the first to show the double-helix structure of DNA--Nature's blueprint for the design of sea snails, human beings, and every other living form on earth. [More]
High quality exosome research products

High quality exosome research products

AMSBIO has introduced a wide selection of new high quality products for exosome research. Formulated to be quick, affordable and easy to use, AMSBIO's new expanded suite of quantification kits, isolation tools, standards, DNA & RNA extraction kits, antibodies and cell culture reagents will facilitate your understanding of exosomes using a wide variety of samples. [More]
Oxford researchers discover genes that make children more susceptible to bacteraemia

Oxford researchers discover genes that make children more susceptible to bacteraemia

A team led by Oxford University has identified genes that make certain children more susceptible to invasive bacterial infections by performing a large genome-wide association study in African children. [More]
RBFOX2 dysregulation may cause heart damage in diabetic patients

RBFOX2 dysregulation may cause heart damage in diabetic patients

Cardiac complications are the number one cause of death among diabetics. Now a team of scientists has uncovered a molecular mechanism involved in a common form of heart damage found in people with diabetes. [More]
Researchers partially restore lost function of isolated cystic fibrosis lung cells

Researchers partially restore lost function of isolated cystic fibrosis lung cells

In experiments with isolated cystic fibrosis lung cells, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers and colleagues from two other institutions have partially restored the lost function of those cells. [More]
Scientists study how viral evolution occurs

Scientists study how viral evolution occurs

Viruses evolve quickly. A small tweak to the genetic makeup of a mostly mild strain of influenza can give rise to the next pandemic. An equally small change to the same strain in a different setting can fade it into obscurity. [More]
Scientists take key step towards understanding link between obesity and physically distant diseases

Scientists take key step towards understanding link between obesity and physically distant diseases

Obesity is on the rise throughout the world, and in some developed countries two-third of the adult population is either overweight or obese. This brings with it an increased risk of serious conditions such as heart disease, stroke, cancer and osteoarthritis. [More]
Wresting back control of CHI3L1 protein could stave off cancer spread in mice

Wresting back control of CHI3L1 protein could stave off cancer spread in mice

For cancer to spread, the cells that take off into the bloodstream must find a tissue that will permit them to thrive. They don't just go looking, though. Instead, they actively prepare the tissue, in one case by co-opting a protein that suppresses defenses the body would otherwise mount. [More]
LIGR-Seq tool opens door to developing new understanding of ncRNA function

LIGR-Seq tool opens door to developing new understanding of ncRNA function

What used to be dismissed by many as "junk DNA" is back with a vengeance as growing data points to the importance of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) -- genome's messages that do not code for proteins -- in development and disease. [More]
New study aims to identify biomarkers linked to cartilage degradation in OA patients

New study aims to identify biomarkers linked to cartilage degradation in OA patients

Joint injury can lead to post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). In fact, about half of all people who rupture the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in their knee will develop PTOA within 10-20 years of the injury. [More]
Gene editing technology helps excise segment of HIV-1 DNA from genomes of living animals

Gene editing technology helps excise segment of HIV-1 DNA from genomes of living animals

Using gene editing technology, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have, for the first time, successfully excised a segment of HIV-1 DNA - the virus responsible for AIDS - from the genomes of living animals. [More]
Landmark study characterizes evolution of symptoms, signs of acute HIV infection

Landmark study characterizes evolution of symptoms, signs of acute HIV infection

Acute HIV infection (AHI) contributes significantly to HIV transmission and may be important for intervention strategies seeking to reduce incidence and achieve a functional cure. [More]
Maintaining balance of P1 and P2 isoforms vital for reducing colon cancer, colitis risk

Maintaining balance of P1 and P2 isoforms vital for reducing colon cancer, colitis risk

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), of which Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the main types, is on the increase in the United States, affecting more than 1.6 million people and explaining perhaps the increase in advertisements offering treatments and cures. [More]
Ipsen partners with IMCB to advance understanding and research of Botulinum Neurotoxin Biology

Ipsen partners with IMCB to advance understanding and research of Botulinum Neurotoxin Biology

Ipsen S.A., a global specialty-driven pharmaceutical company, and the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), a research institute under the aegis of the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore, today announced the signature of a research partnership to study the intracellular trafficking of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) within neurons. [More]
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