Radiology News and Research RSS Feed - Radiology News and Research

Radiology is the medical specialty directing medical imaging technologies to diagnose and sometimes treat diseases. Originally it was the aspect of medical science dealing with the medical use of electromagnetic energy emitted by X-ray machines or other such radiation devices for the purpose of obtaining visual information as part of medical imaging.
Siemens Healthineers' new CT and MRI technologies to aid research across various common clinical pathways

Siemens Healthineers' new CT and MRI technologies to aid research across various common clinical pathways

The Transforming Outcomes and Health Economics Through Imaging (TOHETI) programme is looking to change the way medical imaging works by undertaking a range of pioneering research. [More]
New study finds many healthcare providers underestimate actual radiation dose from CT scans

New study finds many healthcare providers underestimate actual radiation dose from CT scans

Computed tomography (CT) scans are an invaluable diagnostic tool in modern medicine, but they do come at a price: exposing patients to potentially dangerous ionizing radiation. [More]
Moffitt researchers develop mathematical model to show differences in subpopulations of tumors

Moffitt researchers develop mathematical model to show differences in subpopulations of tumors

Tumors are composed of many subpopulations of cells. A general consensus among scientists is that these subpopulations are due to random mutations. However, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers found that these assumptions may be incorrect. [More]
Natural molecule NAC could benefit patients with Parkinson's disease

Natural molecule NAC could benefit patients with Parkinson's disease

The natural molecule, n-acetylcysteine (NAC), with strong antioxidant effects, shows potential benefit as part of the management for patients with Parkinson's disease, according to a study published today in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Leaky blood vessels in the brain called cerebral microbleeds are associated with an increased risk of physical and cognitive disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study by researchers in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo. [More]
Neck device can protect sportsmen from devastating effects of head  injuries

Neck device can protect sportsmen from devastating effects of head  injuries

Two new studies involving high school football and hockey players indicate wearing a specifically designed compression collar around the neck may prevent or reduce the devastating effects of head collisions in sports. [More]
Insurance coverage of CT colonography and other USPSTF-recognized tests could help fight CRC

Insurance coverage of CT colonography and other USPSTF-recognized tests could help fight CRC

Final United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) colorectal cancer screening recommendations assigned an "A" grade to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in those ages 50-75 years and provided a list of recognized screening exams. [More]
Brain's reward system in obese people operates differently in response to food and dopamine

Brain's reward system in obese people operates differently in response to food and dopamine

As young people reach adulthood, their preferences for sweet foods typically decline. But for people with obesity, new research suggests that the drop-off may not be as steep and that the brain's reward system operates differently in obese people than in thinner people, which may play a role in this phenomenon. [More]
PET imaging can help identify autoimmune inflammation in MS

PET imaging can help identify autoimmune inflammation in MS

The triggers of autoimmune inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS) have eluded scientists for many years, but molecular imaging is bringing researchers closer to identifying them, while providing a means of evaluating next-generation therapies for MS, say researchers introducing a study at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. [More]
Advanced imaging technique helps predict recovery in concussion patients

Advanced imaging technique helps predict recovery in concussion patients

Using an advanced imaging technique, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System were able to predict which patients who'd recently suffered concussions were likely to fully recover. [More]
Pre-procedure medication regimen could lower incidence of hospital readmission in lung caner patients

Pre-procedure medication regimen could lower incidence of hospital readmission in lung caner patients

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have found that putting liver cancer patients on a medication regimen prior to undergoing a certain treatment could lead to shorter hospital stays and less chance for readmission due to complications. [More]
Standard and intensive blood pressure treatments equally effective in controlling acute intracerebral hemorrhage

Standard and intensive blood pressure treatments equally effective in controlling acute intracerebral hemorrhage

An international stroke study found that standard and intensive blood pressure treatments were equally effective in the emergency treatment of acute intracerebral hemorrhage, a type of stroke caused by bleeding into the brain. [More]
UAB receives new image-guided robotic system for early prostate cancer diagnosis

UAB receives new image-guided robotic system for early prostate cancer diagnosis

The world-renowned iSR'obotTM Mona Lisa makes its way to the United States, providing urologic surgeons with a tool to diagnose prostate cancer earlier through accurate diagnosis and precise localization that may allow for targeted treatments in the future. [More]
New drug-capture device can soak up chemotherapy drugs to limit toxicity

New drug-capture device can soak up chemotherapy drugs to limit toxicity

Doctors have a powerful arsenal of cancer-fighting chemotherapy drugs to choose from, though a key challenge is to better target these drugs to kill tumors while limiting their potentially harmful side effects. [More]
New technique helps identify link between fatty acids and breast cancer in postmenopausal women

New technique helps identify link between fatty acids and breast cancer in postmenopausal women

The presence of high saturated fatty acids in breast tissue may be a useful indicator of cancer in postmenopausal women, according to a new study by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center, published online June 7 in Radiology, a journal of the Radiological Society of North America. [More]
RSI-MRI imaging technology can effectively differentiate aggressive prostate cancer

RSI-MRI imaging technology can effectively differentiate aggressive prostate cancer

Physicians have long used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect cancer but results of a University of California San Diego School of Medicine study describe the potential use of restriction spectrum imaging (RSI) as an imaging biomarker that enhances the ability of MRI to differentiate aggressive prostate cancer from low-grade or benign tumors and guide treatment and biopsy. [More]
UA researcher aims to identify imaging biomarkers for effective screening of ovarian cancer

UA researcher aims to identify imaging biomarkers for effective screening of ovarian cancer

University of Arizona researcher Jennifer Barton is leading a two-year, $1 million project funded by the National Cancer Institute to identify imaging biomarkers of ovarian cancer, the most deadly gynecological cancer in the United States. [More]
Researchers detect blood-brain barrier leakage in people with early AD using contrast-enhanced MRI

Researchers detect blood-brain barrier leakage in people with early AD using contrast-enhanced MRI

Researchers using contrast-enhanced MRI have identified leakages in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of people with early Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology. The results suggest that increased BBB permeability may represent a key mechanism in the early stages of the disease. [More]
UTHealth's Mobile Stroke Unit fights stroke through research, technology and patient care

UTHealth's Mobile Stroke Unit fights stroke through research, technology and patient care

About 800,000 strokes occur in America each year; that's about one every 40 seconds. Houston resident Joe Carrabba experienced one of them. [More]
Researcher explores whether DBS can help improve life of bipolar disorder patients

Researcher explores whether DBS can help improve life of bipolar disorder patients

Jennifer Sweet, MD, a neurosurgeon at University Hospitals Case Medical Center, recently opened a clinical research study to learn if there is a structural target in the brain for patients suffering from bipolar disorder and whether deep brain stimulation (DBS) can bring them relief. [More]
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