Radiology News and Research RSS Feed - Radiology News and Research

Radiology is the medical specialty directing medical imaging technologies to diagnose and sometimes treat diseases. Originally it was the aspect of medical science dealing with the medical use of electromagnetic energy emitted by X-ray machines or other such radiation devices for the purpose of obtaining visual information as part of medical imaging.
3D-printed models of children's brain anatomy help reduce operative risk of complex procedures

3D-printed models of children's brain anatomy help reduce operative risk of complex procedures

Boston Children's Hospital physicians report the first cases of children benefiting from 3D printing of their anatomy before undergoing high-risk brain procedures. [More]
Pantheon announces acquisition of IBSL

Pantheon announces acquisition of IBSL

Pantheon Holdco Ltd., doing business as the Pantheon Healthcare Group, announced today the acquisition of Ingegneria Biomedica Santa Lucia S.p.A., a key Italian-based provider of Clinical Engineering and a large range of biomedical equipment services, from Gruppo Giglio. [More]
New study reports creation of genetic porcine model of cancer

New study reports creation of genetic porcine model of cancer

With many types of cancers, early detection offers the best hope for survival. However, research into new early-detection screenings, as well as possible interventional radiology and surgical treatments, has been hindered by the lack of a large animal model that would accurately reflect the types of cancers seen in human cells. [More]
CHOP surgeons successfully complete world's first bilateral hand transplant on child

CHOP surgeons successfully complete world's first bilateral hand transplant on child

Surgeons at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia joined with colleagues from Penn Medicine recently to complete the world's first bilateral hand transplant on a child. Earlier this month, the surgical team successfully transplanted donor hands and forearms onto eight-year-old Zion Harvey who, several years earlier, had undergone amputation of his hands and feet and a kidney transplant following a serious infection. [More]
Girls are born with weaker spines compared to boys, study finds

Girls are born with weaker spines compared to boys, study finds

Looking at measurements of the vertebrae - the series of small bones that make up the spinal column - in newborn children, investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles found that differences between the sexes are present at birth. Results of the study, now online in advance of publication in the August issue of the Journal of Pediatrics, suggest that this difference is evolutionary, allowing the female spine to adapt to the fetal load during pregnancy. [More]
New book provides overview of treatment options for paediatric calcium and bone disorders

New book provides overview of treatment options for paediatric calcium and bone disorders

Knowledge about paediatric calcium and bone disorders has increased rapidly over the past twenty years. Great advances have been made in the underlying genetic basis for many conditions, in bone density and geometry imaging and in the development of new treatment options, calling for a new edition of 'Calcium and Bone Disorders in Children and Adolescents' which was first published in 2009. [More]
Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

The Endocrine Society today announced it has chosen 18 accomplished endocrinologists as winners of the organization's prestigious 2016 Laureate Awards. [More]
ADPT generates systemwide net patient services revenue of $104.5 million for Q2 2015

ADPT generates systemwide net patient services revenue of $104.5 million for Q2 2015

Adeptus Health Inc., the largest operator of freestanding emergency rooms in the U.S., announced its results for the second quarter ended June 30, 2015. [More]
New diagnostic criteria can help distinguish malignant cancerous chest cavity masses from histoplasmosis

New diagnostic criteria can help distinguish malignant cancerous chest cavity masses from histoplasmosis

Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have developed new diagnostic criteria to enable clinicians to distinguish malignant cancerous chest cavity masses from those caused by fungal histoplasmosis infection. [More]
Tyrone Regional Health Network signs letter of intent to become member of Penn State Health

Tyrone Regional Health Network signs letter of intent to become member of Penn State Health

Tyrone Regional Health Network and Penn State Health have signed a letter of intent to enter into formal affiliation. With approval by organizational boards and state authorities, Tyrone Regional will become a member of Penn State Health. [More]
Stanford researchers identify iron-containing microglia in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease

Stanford researchers identify iron-containing microglia in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease

Examining post-mortem tissue from the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease, Stanford University School of Medicine investigators identified what appear to be iron-containing microglia -- specialized scavenger cells that sometimes become inflammatory -- in a particular part of the hippocampus, a key brain structure whose integrity is critical to memory formation. [More]
Big data project: CWRU wins federal grant to develop platform for collection, analysis of clinical data

Big data project: CWRU wins federal grant to develop platform for collection, analysis of clinical data

Case Western Reserve University is one of three institutions nationwide to win federal 'big data' grants focused on developing ways to ensure the integrity and comparability of the reams of information the U.S. health care system collects every day. If successful, the work could create enormous new opportunities to glean insights that help physicians cure or even prevent illness and disease. [More]
Alzheimer's disease may be 'at work' years ahead of actual symptoms, say IU researchers

Alzheimer's disease may be 'at work' years ahead of actual symptoms, say IU researchers

The best-known genetic variant linked to Alzheimer's disease may be "at work" promoting deposits of plaque in the brain long before any symptoms of the disease can be measured on tests, according to a national research study led by Indiana University School of Medicine investigators. [More]
Elsevier, ANPD and OSU CON collaborate to launch new survey on evidence-based practice in nursing

Elsevier, ANPD and OSU CON collaborate to launch new survey on evidence-based practice in nursing

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, will collaborate with the Association for Nursing Professional Development and the Ohio State University College of Nursing to launch a second national survey on evidence-based practice in nursing. [More]
Shape of the cerebral cortex strongly correlates with genetic ancestry

Shape of the cerebral cortex strongly correlates with genetic ancestry

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego and the School of Medicine have found that the three-dimensional shape of the cerebral cortex - the wrinkled outer layer of the brain controlling many functions of thinking and sensation - strongly correlates with ancestral background. [More]
Agfa HealthCare to launch new mobile DR system with FreeView telescopic column at AHRA 2015

Agfa HealthCare to launch new mobile DR system with FreeView telescopic column at AHRA 2015

Agfa HealthCare announces today that it will launch its new mobile DR system with FreeView telescopic column at AHRA 2015, the Association for Medical Imaging Management's annual meeting, in Las Vegas, Nevada, July 19-22. [More]
Dual breast exam using MRI and NIRST more accurate than MRI alone

Dual breast exam using MRI and NIRST more accurate than MRI alone

By combining two modalities of imaging, investigators from Norris Cotton Cancer Center at Dartmouth, led by Keith Paulsen, PhD with first author Michael Mastanduno and collaborators from Xijing Hospital in Xian, China, demonstrated that a dual breast exam using MRI and Near Infrared Spectral Tomography (NIRST) is feasible and more accurate than MRI alone. [More]
Researchers develop novel technique to generate activated T cells to tackle advanced melanoma

Researchers develop novel technique to generate activated T cells to tackle advanced melanoma

T cells from patients with melanoma can trigger a protective immune response against the disease according to a new study out of University Hospitals Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. [More]
The future of MPI: an interview with Dr Nikolaos Panagiotopoulos, University Hospital Schleswig Holsten

The future of MPI: an interview with Dr Nikolaos Panagiotopoulos, University Hospital Schleswig Holsten

I’m Dr Panagiotopoulos and I am a resident at the University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein. I work in the Radiological and Nuclear Medicine Department, at the Lübeck campus. [More]
July issue of JACR highlights cancer imaging status, breast imaging performance

July issue of JACR highlights cancer imaging status, breast imaging performance

The July 2015 issue of the Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR) highlights residency breast imaging training as it applies to tomosynthesis, the status of cancer imaging, and the quality and cost effect of patient movement during MRI. [More]
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