Radiology News and Research RSS Feed - Radiology News and Research

Radiology is the medical specialty directing medical imaging technologies to diagnose and sometimes treat diseases. Originally it was the aspect of medical science dealing with the medical use of electromagnetic energy emitted by X-ray machines or other such radiation devices for the purpose of obtaining visual information as part of medical imaging.
AHA/ASA targets acute ischemic stroke guidelines

AHA/ASA targets acute ischemic stroke guidelines

Acute Ischemic Stroke Guidelines are the subject of a new toolkit from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association aimed at accelerating adoption of the 2015 update regarding endovascular treatment. [More]
New research may increase understanding of link between olfactory decline and brain-related diseases

New research may increase understanding of link between olfactory decline and brain-related diseases

Deterioration in a person's ability to smell can sometimes be an early sign of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's. [More]
Lightpoint Medical signs exclusive global license agreement with UA for Beta Emission Tomography

Lightpoint Medical signs exclusive global license agreement with UA for Beta Emission Tomography

Lightpoint Medical, a clinical-stage medical device company developing advanced imaging technologies for intraoperative cancer detection, announced today that the company has signed an exclusive global license agreement for a molecular imaging technology called Beta Emission Tomography, developed by Professor Harrison Barrett, Regents Professor of Radiology and Optical Science, with his student Yijun Ding and colleague Dr. Luca Caucci at the University of Arizona Center for Gamma Ray Imaging. [More]
Carol Fabian inducted into KU Women's Hall of Fame for contributions to breast cancer research

Carol Fabian inducted into KU Women's Hall of Fame for contributions to breast cancer research

Among the women inducted into the University of Kansas Hall of Fame on April 14, 2016, was Carol Fabian, MD. Fabian, a professor of medicine at the University of Kansas Medical Center and director of the Breast Cancer Prevention Center at The University of Kansas Cancer Center, is a nationally recognized oncologist and a pioneer in in the field of breast cancer research. [More]
Clinical study shows sitagliptin drug not effective in treating NAFLD

Clinical study shows sitagliptin drug not effective in treating NAFLD

A diabetes medication described in some studies as an effective treatment for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) works no better than a placebo, report researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, after conducting the first randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial of sitagliptin, an oral antihyperglycemic marketed by Merck & Co. under the name Januvia. [More]
Single breath-hold for more than five minutes could make targeted radiotherapy feasible

Single breath-hold for more than five minutes could make targeted radiotherapy feasible

Researchers at the University of Birmingham working with clinical teams at University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust have successfully shown for the first time that breast cancer patients can be trained to achieve single prolonged breath holds of over five minutes, opening the door for targeted radiotherapy to be administered with just one dose in each daily session. [More]
Ga-68 DOTATATE PET/CT scans more effective than current imaging standard for detecting NETS

Ga-68 DOTATATE PET/CT scans more effective than current imaging standard for detecting NETS

A recent study reported in the May issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine demonstrates that Ga-68 DOTATATE PET/CT scans are superior to In-111 pentetreotide scans, the current imaging standard in the United States for detecting neuroendocrine tumors, and could significantly impact treatment management. [More]
MGH researchers develop device to rapidly diagnose health-care-associated infections

MGH researchers develop device to rapidly diagnose health-care-associated infections

A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has developed a device with the potential of shortening the time required to rapidly diagnose pathogens responsible for health-care-associated infections from a couple of days to a matter of hours. [More]
Implantable brain device shows promising results in animal study

Implantable brain device shows promising results in animal study

An implantable brain device that literally melts away at a pre-determined rate minimizes injury to tissue normally associated with standard electrode implantation, according to research led by a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Duke scientists develop human-derived antibody that preferentially attacks cancer cells

Duke scientists develop human-derived antibody that preferentially attacks cancer cells

A research team from Duke Health has developed an antibody from the body's own immune system that preferentially attacks cancer cells. [More]
Experimental drug ozanimod moderately effective in treatment of ulcerative colitis

Experimental drug ozanimod moderately effective in treatment of ulcerative colitis

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have shown that ozanimod (RPC1063), a novel drug molecule, is moderately effective in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Results of the Phase II clinical trial will appear in the May 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
University hospital in Finland invests in digital pathology from Sectra

University hospital in Finland invests in digital pathology from Sectra

Kuopio University Hospital will be Finland's first fully digital pathology department following its investment in Sectra's IT solution for efficient storage, review and sharing of digital pathology images. The Diagnostic Imaging Center at Kuopio University Hospital is thereby extending its existing solution for handling radiology images (PACS) to also include pathology images. This enables in-depth cooperation between the hospital's radiologists and pathologists; two of the key functions in effective clinical care. [More]
First-ever ACR-led imaging boot camp training for breast radiologists to be held in Jeddah

First-ever ACR-led imaging boot camp training for breast radiologists to be held in Jeddah

The American College of Radiology is partnering with GE Healthcare and King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center to bring the first-ever ACR-led imaging boot camp training for breast radiologists to the Middle East. The three-day Breast Imaging Boot Camp to be held May 23-25 in Jeddah will provide up to 40 practicing radiologists in Saudi Arabia and the Middle East with intensive hands-on experience in mammography and breast ultrasonography. [More]
New form of SBRT to deliver radiation to specific area of prostate cancer

New form of SBRT to deliver radiation to specific area of prostate cancer

University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center physicians have started the world's first clinical trial using a new form of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to deliver radiation to a specific area of the prostate invaded with cancer - instead of the entire gland. The study aims to determine if treating a targeted cancer region within the prostate in early stage prostate cancer can increase treatment options and reduce the side effects of radiation. [More]
Clinical study to evaluate safety of investigational cell therapy to treat chronic motor deficits after stroke

Clinical study to evaluate safety of investigational cell therapy to treat chronic motor deficits after stroke

University Hospitals Case Medical Center is the first surgical site for a Phase 2b clinical trial study to further evaluate the safety and efficacy of an investigational cell therapy for the treatment of chronic motor deficit following an ischemic stroke. [More]
Understanding need for supplemental cancer screening for women with dense breasts

Understanding need for supplemental cancer screening for women with dense breasts

In a study appearing in the April 26 issue of JAMA, Elizabeth A. Rafferty, M.D., formerly of Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, and colleagues evaluated the screening performance of digital mammography combined with tomosynthesis (a type of imaging) compared with digital mammography alone for women with varying levels of breast density. [More]
Single season of contact sports can cause measurable brain changes

Single season of contact sports can cause measurable brain changes

Repeated impacts to the heads of high school football players cause measurable changes in their brains, even when no concussion occurs, according to research from UT Southwestern Medical Center's Peter O'Donnell Jr. Brain Institute and Wake Forest University School of Medicine. [More]
Transforming MR images into body composition measurements: an interview with Olof Leinhard

Transforming MR images into body composition measurements: an interview with Olof Leinhard

Today's medical science utilizes relatively simple anthropometric measures that describe the body, such as body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. All of these measures are approximations of the body with the intention to characterize what's inside reflecting underlying phenomena that underpin the risk for different diseases. [More]
Pediatric researchers develop minimally invasive techniques to treat plastic bronchitis

Pediatric researchers develop minimally invasive techniques to treat plastic bronchitis

Pediatric researchers have devised an innovative, safe and minimally invasive procedure that helps relieve rare but potentially life-threatening airway blockages occurring in children who had surgery for congenital heart defects. [More]
Experts discuss recent controversies related to breast cancer screening recommendations

Experts discuss recent controversies related to breast cancer screening recommendations

In 2015, American Cancer Society caused a stir in the oncology community—and among women in general—with the updated recommendation that women of average risk for breast cancer should commence annual mammography at age 45. [More]
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