Radiology News and Research RSS Feed - Radiology News and Research

Radiology is the medical specialty directing medical imaging technologies to diagnose and sometimes treat diseases. Originally it was the aspect of medical science dealing with the medical use of electromagnetic energy emitted by X-ray machines or other such radiation devices for the purpose of obtaining visual information as part of medical imaging.
MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

Treatment with MRI-guided focused ultrasound significantly improves tremors and quality of life in patients with essential tremor (ET), the most common movement disorder, according to a study published in the August 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
New report documents fetal brain abnormalities linked to congenital Zika infection

New report documents fetal brain abnormalities linked to congenital Zika infection

In a special report released August 23 in the journal Radiology, a team of researchers including Deborah Levine, MD, Director of Obstetric & Gynecologic ultrasound at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School, documented the brain abnormalities associated with congenital Zika in 45 confirmed and presumed cases from northeastern Brazil. [More]
New noninvasive treatment option improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

New noninvasive treatment option improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

Treatment with MRI-guided focused ultrasound significantly improves tremors and quality of life in patients with essential tremor (ET), the most common movement disorder, according to a study published in the August 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Malformations in the brains of fetuses caused by Zika virus go beyond microcephaly

Malformations in the brains of fetuses caused by Zika virus go beyond microcephaly

A recent study published by Brazilian researchers from the D'Or Institute for Research and Education, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Institute for Research Professor Amorim Neto, alongside Tel Aviv University and the Boston Children's Hospital in the US, indicates that microcephaly, a very usual feature in cases of Zika virus gestational infection, is just one of several observed brain changes. [More]
New MRI method detects low zinc levels to help identify healthy prostate tissue from cancer

New MRI method detects low zinc levels to help identify healthy prostate tissue from cancer

A novel MRI method that detects low levels of zinc ion can help distinguish healthy prostate tissue from cancer, UT Southwestern Medical Center radiologists have determined. [More]
Vertebroplasty helps decrease acute pain in patients with osteoporotic fractures

Vertebroplasty helps decrease acute pain in patients with osteoporotic fractures

Vertebroplasty is a safe and effective procedure to reduce acute pain and disability in patients who have experienced spinal fractures within a 6-week period, according to a new study published this week in The Lancet. [More]
Breast cancer screening provides framework for radiologist-led bundled payment models, study reports

Breast cancer screening provides framework for radiologist-led bundled payment models, study reports

According to a new report by the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute, mammography may present an opportunity for the expanded use of bundled payments in radiology. [More]
Many medical specialists accept shaken baby syndrome as valid medical diagnosis

Many medical specialists accept shaken baby syndrome as valid medical diagnosis

A University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues have conducted the first-ever survey of physicians on the validity of "abusive head trauma" as a medical diagnosis. [More]
Computers could be more accurate than pathologists in assessing lung cancer tissues, study shows

Computers could be more accurate than pathologists in assessing lung cancer tissues, study shows

Computers can be trained to be more accurate than pathologists in assessing slides of lung cancer tissues, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
New MRI technology harnesses imperfections to create superior images for consistent diagnoses

New MRI technology harnesses imperfections to create superior images for consistent diagnoses

A new technology harnesses imperfections that typically compromise MRI exams to create images resolved enough to enable consistent diagnoses across populations for the first time. [More]
Integration of multiple types of protein biomarkers improves ability to detect breast cancer

Integration of multiple types of protein biomarkers improves ability to detect breast cancer

A first-time study published in PLOS ONE shows that a combined assessment of multiple types of protein biomarkers in the blood offers an important advancement for detecting early breast cancer. [More]
Novel PET radiotracer reveals epigenetic activity in the human brain for the first time

Novel PET radiotracer reveals epigenetic activity in the human brain for the first time

A novel PET radiotracer developed at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital is able for the first time to reveal epigenetic activity - the process that determines whether or not genes are expressed - within the human brain. [More]
UTA researcher to design computing tools to analyze large, complex patient data

UTA researcher to design computing tools to analyze large, complex patient data

A UTA researcher is developing computing tools that will employ multiple methods of accessing and analyzing very large, complex patient data. [More]
Scientists develop novel multifunctional platform to integrate imaging and photo-induced cancer therapy

Scientists develop novel multifunctional platform to integrate imaging and photo-induced cancer therapy

Physicists from The University of Texas at Arlington are leading a multidisciplinary project with The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston to develop a new multifunctional platform that can integrate imaging and photo-induced cancer therapy in a single, portable device. [More]
UW-Madison scientists working to screen mosquitoes for ability to carry, transmit Zika virus

UW-Madison scientists working to screen mosquitoes for ability to carry, transmit Zika virus

It's no accident that researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have taken a lead role addressing the Zika virus epidemic gripping the Americas. Many of them were already at work fighting viruses and mosquito-borne diseases in Central and South America. [More]
Experts recommend several measures to reduce firearm suicide rates in the U.S.

Experts recommend several measures to reduce firearm suicide rates in the U.S.

Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center nd New York State Psychiatric Institute have found that legislation reducing access to firearms has lowered firearm suicide rates in other countries. [More]
Novel noninvasive scoring system can help predict strength and health of vascular network in the brain

Novel noninvasive scoring system can help predict strength and health of vascular network in the brain

A new study presented at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's 13th Annual Meeting in Boston found that the Opercular Score Index (OIS) is a practical, noninvasive scoring system that can be used to predict the strength and health of the vascular network in the brain (known as collateral robustness) and good clinical outcome among stroke patients undergoing endovascular recanalization. [More]
Penn researchers use iron-containing nanoparticles to reduce plaque and prevent tooth decay

Penn researchers use iron-containing nanoparticles to reduce plaque and prevent tooth decay

The bacteria that live in dental plaque and contribute to tooth decay often resist traditional antimicrobial treatment, as they can "hide" within a sticky biofilm matrix, a glue-like polymer scaffold. [More]
VCU Health radiologist uses MRI technology to detect difficult prostate cancers

VCU Health radiologist uses MRI technology to detect difficult prostate cancers

For three years, Andrew Harder wondered if he had prostate cancer. In 2009, he had routine blood work that revealed an elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. [More]
Background parenchymal enhancement of the breast not linked to increased risk of cancer

Background parenchymal enhancement of the breast not linked to increased risk of cancer

Women with a certain gene mutation are among the high-risk patients for breast cancer. With a magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) it is possible to detect tissue with measurable active blood supply which indicates an increased breast cancer risk. [More]
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