Respiratory News and Research RSS Feed - Respiratory News and Research

Zika virus can have substantial economic impact in Americas

Zika virus can have substantial economic impact in Americas

"Zika virus isn't going anywhere," says Frank Esper, MD, infectious disease specialist at University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital. "If it's anything near what happened with SARS or with Ebola, people are going to be very hesitant to travel to those areas. [More]
CHLA researchers develop novel model for studying neonatal lung disorder

CHLA researchers develop novel model for studying neonatal lung disorder

Investigators at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have created a novel model for studying a lung disorder of newborn babies. Their study, published in PLOS ONE on February 10, describes the first model that allows investigators to consider the chronic effects of developmental lung disease. [More]
Behavioral interventions motivate doctors to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions

Behavioral interventions motivate doctors to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions

Behavioral interventions that appealed to doctors' competitive spirits and desire to strengthen their reputations motivated them to significantly reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions, a new study shows. [More]
Babies exposed to air pollution in womb at increased risk of developing asthma

Babies exposed to air pollution in womb at increased risk of developing asthma

Babies born to mothers exposed to air pollution from traffic during pregnancy have an increased risk of developing asthma before the age of six, according to new UBC research. [More]
Using corticosteroids before late preterm delivery reduces respiratory complications in babies

Using corticosteroids before late preterm delivery reduces respiratory complications in babies

A multicenter clinical trial led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian has found that the use of corticosteroids in mothers at risk for late preterm delivery significantly reduced the incidence of severe respiratory complications in their babies. [More]
BMPR2 mutations affect outcomes of PAH patients

BMPR2 mutations affect outcomes of PAH patients

Mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II gene affect not only the risk of developing pulmonary arterial hypertension but also the severity and outcomes of the disease, shows a meta-analysis of individual patient data. [More]
Use of antenatal steroids during late preterm delivery prevents neonatal respiratory complications

Use of antenatal steroids during late preterm delivery prevents neonatal respiratory complications

In a study to be presented on Feb. 4 in the oral plenary session at 8 a.m. EST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in Atlanta, researchers with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network found that the administration of antenatal steroids in pregnancies at risk for late preterm delivery prevents respiratory and other neonatal complications. [More]
LSTM-led researchers publish findings from lung health study in international respiratory journal

LSTM-led researchers publish findings from lung health study in international respiratory journal

A team of investigators led from LSTM has published findings from a lung health study to determine the prevalence of lung disease among adults in Malawi, in the leading international respiratory journal, the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Researchers show how bacterial colony protects itself against toxic substances

Researchers show how bacterial colony protects itself against toxic substances

Bacterial populations move over surfaces in coordinated way known as swarming, which allows them to spread further over organs and tissues and increases the virulence of the infection. This movement is driven by the action of the flagella and the chemoreceptors, the systems responsible for identifying chemical compounds in the environment and which are anchored at the poles of their cells, forming highly organised structures, of which the protein CheW forms part. [More]
Cherry-flavoured e-cigarette users may be exposed to potentially harmful chemical

Cherry-flavoured e-cigarette users may be exposed to potentially harmful chemical

An analysis of 145 different electronic-cigarette flavoring products reveals that many e-cigarette users may be exposed to a potentially harmful chemical. In a research letter published online today in the peer-reviewed journal Thorax, a research team led by Maciej Goniewicz, PhD, PharmD, of Roswell Park Cancer Institute reports that high levels of the respiratory irritant benzaldehyde were detected in the vapor from most of the flavored nicotine products they studied, with the highest concentrations in vapor from cherry-flavored products. [More]
Experts call for new approach to asthma and COPD patient management

Experts call for new approach to asthma and COPD patient management

Defining a patient's symptoms using the historical diagnostic labels of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an outdated approach to understanding an individual's condition, according to experts writing in the European Respiratory Journal today (Feb. 1, 2016). [More]
Framework for improving chemical hazard assessment without animals

Framework for improving chemical hazard assessment without animals

A new paper published in Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, co-authored by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, calls for ongoing development and regulatory acceptance of adverse outcome pathways (AOPs), a framework for improving chemical hazard assessment by prioritizing modern test methods that reduce animal use. [More]
Increased breastfeeding could save over 800000 children’s lives annually

Increased breastfeeding could save over 800000 children’s lives annually

Just 1 in 5 children in high-income countries are breastfed to 12 months, whilst only 1 in 3 children in low and middle-income countries are exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months. [More]
Costs of lower cognitive ability linked with not breastfeeding amount to over $300 billion each year

Costs of lower cognitive ability linked with not breastfeeding amount to over $300 billion each year

When countries, rich or poor, support breastfeeding through meaningful investments and programs, it has an impact on their bottom line and the health of women and children. The Lancet Breastfeeding Series, released today, finds that globally, the costs of lower cognitive ability associated with not breastfeeding amount to more than $300 billion each year, a figure comparable to the entire global pharmaceutical market. [More]
Researchers developing new methods to better analyze effects of e-cig flavorings

Researchers developing new methods to better analyze effects of e-cig flavorings

Faculty and student researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology's National Technical Institute for the Deaf are developing methods to better analyze the effects of flavorings used in electronic cigarettes (e-cigs). [More]
Refugee women have higher risk of giving birth too early than non-refugee immigrants

Refugee women have higher risk of giving birth too early than non-refugee immigrants

Refugee women who come to Canada have greater risk of giving birth prematurely than non-refugee immigrants, a study by a St. Michael's Hospital researcher has found. Those risks are fueled by the fact that the preterm birth rate was 7.1 per cent among secondary refugees - those who spent more than six months in a transit country before arriving in Canada -compared to five per cent among secondary, non-refugee immigrants. [More]
Researchers develop new painkiller as strong as morphine but not addictive

Researchers develop new painkiller as strong as morphine but not addictive

Researchers at Tulane University and Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System have developed a painkiller that is as strong as morphine but isn't likely to be addictive and with fewer side effects, according to a new study in the journal Neuropharmacology. [More]
Nearly 3.3 million children in U.S. have dizziness or balance problem

Nearly 3.3 million children in U.S. have dizziness or balance problem

More than 1 in 20 (nearly 3.3 million) children between the ages of 3 and 17 have a dizziness or balance problem, according to an analysis of the first large-scale, nationally representative survey of these problems in U.S. children. [More]
Dysport phase III study results in children with cerebral palsy with lower limb spasticity published in Pediatrics

Dysport phase III study results in children with cerebral palsy with lower limb spasticity published in Pediatrics

Ipsen today announced that the scientific journal Pediatrics published the detailed results of the phase III randomized study showing both the efficacy and the safety of Dysport in the treatment of dynamic equinus foot deformity, a condition associated with cerebral palsy in children. [More]
Indoor air quality in hospitality venues that allow smoking is worse than outdoor, study finds

Indoor air quality in hospitality venues that allow smoking is worse than outdoor, study finds

Research carried out in six cities with dangerous levels of air pollution indicates that air quality inside venues that allow smoking is even worse than outdoors. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement