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Advances in inhaled drug delivery: an interview with Dr Robert Clarke

Advances in inhaled drug delivery: an interview with Dr Robert Clarke

Delivering drugs to the lungs via inhalation has a number of potential advantages over traditional routes of administration like pills or injections. For treating pulmonary diseases, the obvious logic we are applying is topical delivery to the airways via inhalation. [More]
Exposure to air pollution may increase risk of kidney disease

Exposure to air pollution may increase risk of kidney disease

While air pollution is known to cause respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, a new study indicates that it also likely causes damage to the kidneys. [More]
Novel therapeutic approach may be effective for disrupting bacterial biofilms

Novel therapeutic approach may be effective for disrupting bacterial biofilms

Biofilms are communities of bacteria that adhere to a surface and are nearly impossible to eradicate when they are pathogenic, or disease-causing. [More]
Philips introduces DreamMapper app and website in the UK for people living with sleep apnoea

Philips introduces DreamMapper app and website in the UK for people living with sleep apnoea

Royal Philips has today announced the UK launch of the DreamMapper app and website, designed to assist people living with sleep apnoea to improve treatment adherence by providing tools and real time tracking and analysis of their positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy. [More]
Researchers determine that physical therapy did not shorten hospital length of stay for ICU patients

Researchers determine that physical therapy did not shorten hospital length of stay for ICU patients

In a surprising reversal, researchers have determined that a particular protocol providing physical therapy to ICU patients with acute respiratory failure did not shorten hospital length of stay. [More]
Programs to prevent prescription drug misuse may be underused, study reveals

Programs to prevent prescription drug misuse may be underused, study reveals

Misuse of prescription pain medications remains a major public health problem -- but programs to prevent it may be underused, according to a study in the July issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. [More]
Structures on surface of pneumococci determine bacteria’s ability to cause meningitis

Structures on surface of pneumococci determine bacteria’s ability to cause meningitis

Structures on the surface of pneumococci determine the ability of these bacteria to enter the brain and cause severe infections, according to a paper published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation by researchers at Karolinska Institutet. [More]
Researchers test new drug with potential to reverse or slow progression of asthma

Researchers test new drug with potential to reverse or slow progression of asthma

A new drug with the potential to reverse or slow the development of asthma is being tested by researchers at The University of Queensland. [More]
Vice President Biden to host Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, D.C.

Vice President Biden to host Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, D.C.

Vice President Biden and Dr. Jill Biden will host a Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, D.C. at the White House. Cheryl Willman, MD, Director and CEO of The University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center, will attend. [More]
Depression reduces COPD maintenance medication adherence in older adults

Depression reduces COPD maintenance medication adherence in older adults

A recent study in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society found that in a nationally representative sample of Medicare beneficiaries who were newly diagnosed with COPD, adherence to maintenance medications decreased with new episodes of depression. [More]
Research shows enveloped viruses could survive on toys long enough to cause infection

Research shows enveloped viruses could survive on toys long enough to cause infection

Certain viruses, such as influenza, could survive on children's toys long enough to result in exposures, placing children at risk for getting infectious diseases, according to researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
Could artificial intelligence help to combat stress? An interview with Davide Morelli

Could artificial intelligence help to combat stress? An interview with Davide Morelli

Stress is actually a bit of a buzzword. The initial definition was “the reaction to changes”, which is why you get stressed also when good things happen, hence the distinction between good stress, eustress, and bad stress, distress. [More]
Radiometer launches the next generation of transcutaneous monitoring

Radiometer launches the next generation of transcutaneous monitoring

Radiometer has unveiled its CE-marked TCM5 transcutaneous monitor, addressing the critical care needs of neonatal, pediatric and adult patients, as well as sleep clinic and home care environments. [More]
Mobile devices of healthcare workers often contaminated by viral RNA

Mobile devices of healthcare workers often contaminated by viral RNA

In clinical settings, mobile phones benefit patients by placing useful data and information at the fingertips of health professionals during interactions on the ward. [More]
Telephone counseling can help make cancer genetic services more accessible to rural women

Telephone counseling can help make cancer genetic services more accessible to rural women

Ever since Angelina Jolie used cancer genetic counseling and testing to learn about her risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, many other women have chosen to do the same. [More]
E-cigarette use modifies gene expression important for upper airway immune defense

E-cigarette use modifies gene expression important for upper airway immune defense

When we smoke cigarettes, dozens of genes important for immune defense are altered in the epithelial cells that line the respiratory tract. Several of these changes likely increase the risk of bacterial infections, viruses, and inflammation. [More]
New blood test could help predict severity of pulmonary arterial hypertension

New blood test could help predict severity of pulmonary arterial hypertension

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that rising blood levels of a protein called hematoma derived growth factor (HDGF) are linked to the increasing severity of pulmonary arterial hypertension, a form of damaging high blood pressure in the lungs. [More]
NPS MedicineWise urges Australians to stop expecting antibiotics for colds and flu

NPS MedicineWise urges Australians to stop expecting antibiotics for colds and flu

With new findings launched today showing that antimicrobial use in the community in Australia is higher than in England, Canada, Norway, Denmark, Sweden and the Netherlands—and that the number of antimicrobials being prescribed in Australia continues to grow—NPS MedicineWise is again urging Australians to stop expecting antibiotics for viruses such as colds and flu. [More]
New device may enable painless, effective diagnosis of Helicobacter in exhaled air

New device may enable painless, effective diagnosis of Helicobacter in exhaled air

In the future, several illnesses can be quickly and painlessly diagnosed by the optical analysis of isotopes contained in exhaled air. VTT developed its first prototype for this purpose. [More]
Potential non-invasive screening biomarker for SSc-PAH

Potential non-invasive screening biomarker for SSc-PAH

Serum asymmetric dimethylarginine may be an effective non-invasive screening biomarker for systemic sclerosis-related pulmonary arterial hypertension, study findings indicate. [More]
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