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Researchers find potential link between pulmonary function and vocal fatigue symptoms in women

Researchers find potential link between pulmonary function and vocal fatigue symptoms in women

Teaching is an occupation with a high risk of developing vocal problems -- teachers have more than twice the voice problems than people in other professions, as the voice is the major tool in classroom instruction and is often used for long periods of time and in noisy environments. [More]
Researchers partially restore lost function of isolated cystic fibrosis lung cells

Researchers partially restore lost function of isolated cystic fibrosis lung cells

In experiments with isolated cystic fibrosis lung cells, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers and colleagues from two other institutions have partially restored the lost function of those cells. [More]
Pre-treatment with antihistamines may suppress gastrointestinal symptoms of food allergy

Pre-treatment with antihistamines may suppress gastrointestinal symptoms of food allergy

Simultaneous pre-treatment with antihistamines that block both the H1 and H4 antihistamine receptors suppressed the gastrointestinal symptoms of food allergy in mice, according to researchers at National Jewish Health. [More]
Heart failure patients who receive influenza vaccine less likely to develop dementia

Heart failure patients who receive influenza vaccine less likely to develop dementia

Influenza vaccination is associated with a lower risk of dementia in patients with heart failure, according to a study in more than 20 000 patients presented today at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure by Dr Ju-Chi Liu, director of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Taipei Medical University - Shuang Ho Hospital, in New Taipei City, Taiwan. [More]
Flu jab linked to reduced hospitalisation risk in heart failure patients

Flu jab linked to reduced hospitalisation risk in heart failure patients

The flu jab is associated with a reduced risk of hospitalisation in patients with heart failure, according to research presented today in a late breaking trial session at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure. [More]
Nanoparticle-based gene therapy may hold promise for patients with asthma

Nanoparticle-based gene therapy may hold promise for patients with asthma

A new study has demonstrated a way to deliver a nanoparticle-based gene therapy, in order to repair lungs damaged by chronic allergic asthma and to reduce inflammation that causes asthma attacks. [More]
MERS individuals develop severe critical illness, higher mortality than non-MERS SARI patients

MERS individuals develop severe critical illness, higher mortality than non-MERS SARI patients

Patients with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) develop more severe critical illness and have higher mortality than patients with non-MERS severe acute respiratory infection (SARI), according to investigators involved with the largest study of critically ill patients with MERS. [More]
Hydroxyurea treatment improves pulmonary function decline in children with sickle cell disease

Hydroxyurea treatment improves pulmonary function decline in children with sickle cell disease

For the first time, researchers were able to demonstrate that children diagnosed with sickle cell disease showed improvement in lung function after treatment with hydroxyurea, a treatment that is underused despite its demonstrated benefits. [More]
Play-based procedural preparation helps reduce sedation use and costs tied to cranial radiation therapy

Play-based procedural preparation helps reduce sedation use and costs tied to cranial radiation therapy

New research from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital shows support interventions by child life specialists decrease sedation use and costs associated with cranial radiation therapy. [More]
UD scientists merge electronic health records to improve care, clinical outcomes for CKD patients

UD scientists merge electronic health records to improve care, clinical outcomes for CKD patients

Electronic health records have the potential to reduce the incidence of medical errors, duplication of tests, and delays in treatment. [More]
Overnight extubations in ICU patients linked to higher mortality

Overnight extubations in ICU patients linked to higher mortality

Adult patients who were admitted to U.S. intensive care units had higher mortality if they were extubated overnight. The results reported at the ATS 2016 International Conference may discourage hospital administrators from expanding the practice of overnight extubations in ICUs, which the lead author noted are rapidly being transformed to provide continuity of care. [More]
Researchers design questionnaire to screen CP patients for sleep apnea

Researchers design questionnaire to screen CP patients for sleep apnea

When people think of sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), images of middle aged adults likely come to mind. However, a recent study by Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare sheds light on another population of people who are affected by the disorder: children who have cerebral palsy (CP). [More]
Japanese surgeons develop new technique to relieve airway obstruction in children

Japanese surgeons develop new technique to relieve airway obstruction in children

Several pediatric medical conditions, such as congenital heart disease, vascular compression, and congenital softening of the cartilage lining the trachea or bronchi, can compromise the airway and cause breathing difficulty. [More]
Comprehensive outlook of COPD care in the U.S.

Comprehensive outlook of COPD care in the U.S.

Fifteen million: That's the number of adults in the United States affected by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD. [More]
Overdiagnosis of asthma in Canadian communities

Overdiagnosis of asthma in Canadian communities

Asthma is overdiagnosed in an estimated 30 percent of Canadian adult , according to a study presented at the ATS 2016 International Conference. [More]
Researchers identify risk factors for unplanned readmissions following esophageal resection

Researchers identify risk factors for unplanned readmissions following esophageal resection

Esophagectomy is a major surgical procedure associated with significant complications with up to 1 in 5 patients readmitted following hospital discharge. These unplanned readmissions are an important problem as they negatively impact patient care and, in the future, may have implications for reimbursement through the Hospital Readmissions Reduction program. [More]
COPD exacerbations accelerate lung decline

COPD exacerbations accelerate lung decline

In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), exacerbations accelerated lung function loss, according to a new study presented at the ATS 2016 International Conference. The effect was particularly prominent in those with mild disease. [More]
Study shows half of smokers experience respiratory symptoms similar to COPD

Study shows half of smokers experience respiratory symptoms similar to COPD

A new study in the New England Journal of Medicine finds that smokers, who wouldn't typically be diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, are still showing symptoms consistent with the diagnosis. [More]
Phase 2 results of AbbVie’s venetoclax in patients with R/R CLL with 17p deletion published in The Lancet Oncology

Phase 2 results of AbbVie’s venetoclax in patients with R/R CLL with 17p deletion published in The Lancet Oncology

AbbVie, a global biopharmaceutical company, today announced The Lancet Oncology published results from the Phase 2, single arm, open label trial studying venetoclax in patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) with 17p deletion. [More]
Severe obstructive sleep apnea may increase likelihood of cognitive deficits in children

Severe obstructive sleep apnea may increase likelihood of cognitive deficits in children

Sleep assessments in young children showed that, in the context of habitual snoring and enlarged tonsils and adenoids, moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea increased the likelihood and magnitude of cognitive deficits. [More]
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