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Cell transplantation researchers successfully treat laboratory rats modeled with severe burns

Cell transplantation researchers successfully treat laboratory rats modeled with severe burns

Cell transplantation researchers have successfully used bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to treat a variety of diseases and conditions. Now, using injections of MSCs, a research team in Brazil has successfully treated laboratory rats modeled with severe burns. [More]
Researchers develop new implantable drug-delivery system using nanowire

Researchers develop new implantable drug-delivery system using nanowire

A team of researchers has created a new implantable drug-delivery system using nanowires that can be wirelessly controlled. [More]
Researchers explore the science of exosomes in heart repair

Researchers explore the science of exosomes in heart repair

A little more than a decade ago, researchers discovered that all cells secrete tiny communications modules jammed with an entire work crew of messages for other cells. Today, a team of researchers, led by stem cell researcher Raj Kishore, PhD, Director of the Stem Cell Therapy Program at the Center for Translational Medicine at Temple University School of Medicine, is harnessing the communications vesicles excreted by stem cells and using them to induce the damaged heart to repair itself. [More]
CellResearch receives new patent approval from USPTO for stem cell technology

CellResearch receives new patent approval from USPTO for stem cell technology

CellResearch Corporation Pte Ltd, a Singaporean company that specializes in stem cell technology, has received approval for its latest patent on 6 May 2015 from the US Patent and Trademark Office. [More]
Autoantibodies play major role in IPF patients with acute exacerbations

Autoantibodies play major role in IPF patients with acute exacerbations

Patients with acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis responded well to therapies similar to those used to treat autoimmune diseases, according to findings published today in PLOS ONE. The study suggests that autoantibodies — implicated in many autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus — also play an important role in patients with acute exacerbations of IPF, a devastating lung disease. [More]
New study reports more practical approach to heal the heart after a heart attack

New study reports more practical approach to heal the heart after a heart attack

Stem cell have been the main focus of healing therapy research because they can morph into new cells, and using a patient's own stem cells will not induce an autoimmune response. For healing after a heart attack, the ideal time to administer these therapies is when reopening the clogged blood vessel because the heart is easily accessible. While stem cells show promise for heart attack treatment, the process of harvesting and reintroducing the cells—which can take days or weeks—is too slow for this window. [More]
New therapeutic target discovered for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

New therapeutic target discovered for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic lung disease for which as yet no causal therapy exists. It is, however, known that the lung interstitium - the connective tissue between the air sacs in the lower part of the lung - is affected. [More]
Actavis receives FDA approval to market NATRELLE INSPIRA round gel-filled textured breast implants

Actavis receives FDA approval to market NATRELLE INSPIRA round gel-filled textured breast implants

Actavis plc, which recently completed the acquisition of Allergan, Inc., today announced that the company has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to market NATRELLE INSPIRA round gel-filled textured breast implants, offering women undergoing reconstruction, augmentation or revision surgery another breast shaping option for a customized result. [More]
Study explores 'laser welding' for sealing corneal transplants

Study explores 'laser welding' for sealing corneal transplants

Some 30,000 years ago, prehistoric man wielded animal bones as needles to suture otherwise lethal wounds. This tactic has been used, and improved upon, over time and remains the basis of surgical procedures conducted today. Even with radical new surgical techniques, which rely on metallic and polymeric staples or chemical adhesives to seal incisions, infection and permanent scarring remain major concerns. The success of any wound closure is entirely dependent on the physician's skill set alone. [More]
Scar management: an interview with Adele Atkinson, Associate Professor, School of Nursing

Scar management: an interview with Adele Atkinson, Associate Professor, School of Nursing

Scarring has been shown to have a significant impact on patients’ lives. As well as the physical burden associated with skin scarring, psychological strains can also negatively affect the quality of life for patients, with the majority (56%) considering themselves to be ‘abnormal’ due to their scars... [More]
RXi Pharmaceuticals receives Notice of Allowance from USPTO for novel, self-delivering RNAi platform

RXi Pharmaceuticals receives Notice of Allowance from USPTO for novel, self-delivering RNAi platform

RXi Pharmaceuticals Corporation, a biotechnology company focused on discovering and developing innovative therapeutics, primarily in the areas of dermatology and ophthalmology, today announced that it received a Notice of Allowance from the United States Patent and Trademark Office on its novel, self-delivering RNAi platform (sd‑rxRNA). [More]
Study addresses children's basic perspectives on living with Type 1 diabetes

Study addresses children's basic perspectives on living with Type 1 diabetes

If a picture is worth a thousand words, UF Health Type 1 diabetes researchers and their colleagues have tapped into an encyclopedia, revealing new insights into how young people cope with the disease. [More]
Positive results from pacritinib Phase 3 trial for treatment of myelofibrosis presented at ASCO 2015

Positive results from pacritinib Phase 3 trial for treatment of myelofibrosis presented at ASCO 2015

CTI BioPharma Corp. and Baxter International's Bioscience business today announced data from PERSIST-1 – a randomized Phase 3 registration-directed trial examining pacritinib for the treatment of myelofibrosis – in a late-breaking oral session at the 51st Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, May 29-June 2, 2015 in Chicago, Ill. [More]
DNA analysis reveals how ovarian cancer takes genetic twists and turns to outsmart chemotherapy

DNA analysis reveals how ovarian cancer takes genetic twists and turns to outsmart chemotherapy

The largest complete DNA analysis of ovarian cancer in the world, published overnight in Nature, has revealed unprecedented new insight into the genetic twists and turns a deadly form of the disease takes to outsmart chemotherapy, potentially changing treatment approaches for women around the world. [More]
Novel survey shows high rates of tattoo-related infection, itching and swelling in New Yorkers

Novel survey shows high rates of tattoo-related infection, itching and swelling in New Yorkers

In what they believe to be the first survey of its kind in the United States, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have found that as many as 6 percent of adult New Yorkers who get "inked" — in other words, those who get a tattoo — have experienced some form of tattoo-related rash, severe itching or swelling that lasted longer than four months and, in some cases, for many years. [More]
Research findings cast new light on biological process that can lead to diabetes

Research findings cast new light on biological process that can lead to diabetes

Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientists have pinpointed a cell that begins the process of scarring in fatty tissue. The findings cast new light on a biological process that occurs with obesity and can lead to diabetes. [More]
Endo Pharmaceuticals supports efforts to bring first ever treatment guidelines for Peyronie's Disease

Endo Pharmaceuticals supports efforts to bring first ever treatment guidelines for Peyronie's Disease

Endo Pharmaceuticals Inc., a subsidiary of Endo International plc, supports efforts to bring the medical community the first ever treatment guidelines for Peyronie's Disease (PD), a condition in which collagen plaque, or scar tissue, develops on the shaft of the penis, and may harden and reduce flexibility. [More]
MIT researchers find way to develop implantable devices that can avoid scar-tissue buildup

MIT researchers find way to develop implantable devices that can avoid scar-tissue buildup

Biomedical devices that can be implanted in the body for drug delivery, tissue engineering, or sensing can help improve treatment for many diseases. However, such devices are often susceptible to attack by the immune system, which can render them useless. [More]

New Bio-Oil research demonstrates need for greater education on scar management

New research from Bio-Oil conducted amongst UK nurses demonstrates the need for greater education and resources on the management of patients with scarring following surgery or trauma. [More]
Scientists report that enzyme that alters testosterone to estrogen has big impact in healthy, injured brain

Scientists report that enzyme that alters testosterone to estrogen has big impact in healthy, injured brain

An enzyme that converts testosterone to estrogen appears to have significant impact in a healthy and injured brain, scientists report. [More]
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