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Scientists detect new molecule that contributes to development of liver fibrosis

Scientists detect new molecule that contributes to development of liver fibrosis

Liver fibrosis, which is the progressive formation of scar tissue in the liver, is a massive medical problem. An estimated ten percent of the population is affected by liver fibrosis or its corresponding later stage, liver cirrhosis. A variety of causes can lead to liver fibrosis, the most widely recognized ones being alcohol consumption and virus-induced chronic liver inflammation. [More]
Possible cause of liver disease identified in adolescents with cystic fibrosis

Possible cause of liver disease identified in adolescents with cystic fibrosis

A professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus and his colleagues have found a possible cause of liver disease in adolescents with cystic fibrosis. [More]
Rutgers patient gets second chance at life following liver transplant

Rutgers patient gets second chance at life following liver transplant

Mati Muñoz is 65 years old - filled with the enthusiastic energy that comes with a second chance at life. A decade ago, says Muñoz, who lives in Woodbridge Township, N.J., her liver was being destroyed by hepatitis C, a viral disease she believes she contracted as a girl in her native Cuba from a poorly sterilized needle used in a medical procedure. [More]
Xenics and VUmc collaborate in thermography project for clinical research

Xenics and VUmc collaborate in thermography project for clinical research

Xenics, Europe's leading developer and manufacturer of advanced infrared imagers, cameras and customized imaging solutions from the LWIR to the visible realm, is collaborating in path breaking clinical research programs with the VU University Medical Center of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. [More]
Loyola orthopaedic surgeon uses new minimally invasive technique to repair ruptured Achilles tendon

Loyola orthopaedic surgeon uses new minimally invasive technique to repair ruptured Achilles tendon

Orthopaedic surgeon Adam Schiff, MD, of Loyola University Medical Center, used a new minimally invasive technique to repair the ruptured Achilles tendon on Mr. Frias' left leg. The technique requires a smaller incision, minimizes wound healing complications and leaves less scar tissue. [More]
Researchers develop new MRI-based technique to better detect NAFLD in children

Researchers develop new MRI-based technique to better detect NAFLD in children

Between 5 and 8 million children in the United States have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), yet most cases go undiagnosed. To help address this issue, researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine have developed a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based technique to help clinicians and researchers better detect and evaluate NAFLD in children. [More]
Scripps Green Hospital treats peripheral artery disease patient using new drug-coated balloon

Scripps Green Hospital treats peripheral artery disease patient using new drug-coated balloon

A doctor at Scripps Green Hospital this week became the first in California to use a new drug-coated balloon to treat peripheral artery disease in a patient since regulatory approval of the IN.PACT Admiral device in January by the Food and Drug Administration. [More]
ISP shows promise in stopping fatal arrhythmias after heart attack

ISP shows promise in stopping fatal arrhythmias after heart attack

Case Western Reserve's chemical compound aimed at restoring spinal cord function may have an additional purpose: stopping potentially fatal arrhythmias after heart attack. [More]
UCLA offers new hope to patients suffering from phrenic nerve damage

UCLA offers new hope to patients suffering from phrenic nerve damage

David Powell could not catch his breath. The 35-year-old from San Diego got winded walking up the stairs, exercising or even just bending over to tie his shoes. [More]
Inhibition of SIRT1 protein may hold promise for treatment of metastatic Ewing sarcoma

Inhibition of SIRT1 protein may hold promise for treatment of metastatic Ewing sarcoma

Researchers at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), led by Oscar Martínez Tirado participated in an international study which suggests inhibition of Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) protein as a future treatment option for metastatic Ewing sarcoma. The results of the study were published in the journal Cancer Research. [More]

Texting better than apps to treat people with mental illness

Texting may be a more suitable treatment aid for those with mental illness than mobile applications. [More]
Sexual objectification can increase women's fears of incurring physical, sexual harm

Sexual objectification can increase women's fears of incurring physical, sexual harm

A study to be published in Sex Roles, published by Springer, offers an explanation for why women fear face-to-face crime more than men, despite being less likely to experience most crimes. The findings by Laurel Watson from the University of Missouri-Kansas City, support the theory that women may have a greater fear of crime due to the potential of also being raped during these encounters. [More]
Virginia Tech scientists plan to design virus to switch wound-healing drug into cancer fighter

Virginia Tech scientists plan to design virus to switch wound-healing drug into cancer fighter

At the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, three scientists are planning to create a virus capable of destroying brain cancer. [More]
Sirnaomics submits STP705 IND Application to CFDA for skin scar treatment

Sirnaomics submits STP705 IND Application to CFDA for skin scar treatment

Sirnaomics, Inc. and its affiliate Suzhou Sirnaomics Pharmaceutics, Co. Ltd., together with its partner Guangzhou Xiangxue Pharmaceutical, Co. Ltd., (SZSE: 300147), have formally submitted an Investigational New Drug (IND) Application to the China Food and Drug Administration for STP705, an anti-fibrosis RNA interference (RNAi) therapeutic for prevention and treatment of human skin hypertrophic scars. [More]
Stem cells from healthy eye could one day be used to repair scarred cornea

Stem cells from healthy eye could one day be used to repair scarred cornea

Treating the potentially blinding haze of a scar on the cornea might be as straightforward as growing stem cells from a tiny biopsy of the patient's undamaged eye and then placing them on the injury site, according to mouse model experiments conducted by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. [More]
Myriad Genetics highlights three new studies at SABCS 2014

Myriad Genetics highlights three new studies at SABCS 2014

Myriad Genetics, Inc. today announced results from a new study that demonstrated the ability of the myRisk Hereditary Cancer test to detect 105 percent more mutations in cancer causing genes than conventional BRCA testing alone. The Company also presented two key studies in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) that show the myChoice HRD test accurately predicted response to platinum-based therapy in patients with early-stage TNBC and that the BRACAnalysis molecular diagnostic test significantly predicted response to platinum-based drugs in patients with metastatic TNBC. [More]
New drug offers hope for victims of spinal cord injury

New drug offers hope for victims of spinal cord injury

Scientist in the U.S have developed a drug that could help paralysed victims of spinal cord injury regain their ability to move. [More]
New chemical compound shows promise in restoring function lost to spinal cord injury

New chemical compound shows promise in restoring function lost to spinal cord injury

Case Western Reserve scientists have developed a new chemical compound that shows extraordinary promise in restoring function lost to spinal cord injury. The compound, which the researchers dubbed intracellular sigma peptide (ISP), allowed paralyzed muscles to activate in more than 80 percent of the animals tested. [More]
BWH researchers identify cells responsible for fibrosis

BWH researchers identify cells responsible for fibrosis

Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital have identified what they believe to be the cells responsible for fibrosis, the buildup of scar tissue. Fibrotic diseases, such as chronic kidney disease and failure, lung disease, heart failure and cirrhosis of the liver, are estimated to be responsible for up to 45 percent of deaths in the developed world. [More]
New therapeutic targets can prevent scarring within transplanted kidneys

New therapeutic targets can prevent scarring within transplanted kidneys

Kidneys donated by people born with a small variation in the code of a key gene may be more likely, once in the transplant recipient, to accumulate scar tissue that contributes to kidney failure, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. [More]