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Children's Hospital Los Angeles successfully implants Melody Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve in child actor

Children's Hospital Los Angeles successfully implants Melody Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve in child actor

Cardiologists from Children's Hospital Los Angeles successfully implanted a Melody Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve in child actor Max Page, the boy who made headlines playing mini Darth Vader in a 2011 Super Bowl ad for Volkswagen. [More]
Scientists generate pluripotent stem cells with more stable genomes

Scientists generate pluripotent stem cells with more stable genomes

Damaged tissue, such as pancreas, heart, and neuronal tissue, which is regenerated to treat cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, or neurodegenerative diseases. This is one of the ambitious scenarios to which regenerative medicine aspires and that is being announced as one of the great promises of twenty-first century biomedicine for the treatment of a long list of diseases affecting people today. [More]
PFF, Veracyte partner on U.S. survey exploring patients' diagnostic experiences with interstitial lung diseases

PFF, Veracyte partner on U.S. survey exploring patients' diagnostic experiences with interstitial lung diseases

The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation and Veracyte, Inc. announced that the organizations are partnering on a U.S. patient survey to advance understanding of patients' diagnostic experiences with interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). [More]
Cornell study reveals how obesity changes consistency of breast tissue

Cornell study reveals how obesity changes consistency of breast tissue

Women who are obese have a higher risk and a worse prognosis for breast cancer, but the reasons why remain unclear. A Cornell study published this month in Science Translational Medicine explains how obesity changes the consistency of breast tissue in ways that are similar to tumors, thereby promoting disease. [More]
Researchers evaluate use of human fetal progenitor tenocyte to repair tendon injuries

Researchers evaluate use of human fetal progenitor tenocyte to repair tendon injuries

Tendon injuries, especially those acquired while engaging in sports, are not easily healed due to the fibrous nature of tendon tissues which transmit forces from muscle to bone and protect surrounding tissues against tension and compression. Tendon injuries to wrists, knees, elbows and rotator cuffs, often from over use when playing golf or tennis, are increasingly common for both professional and amateur athletes ("weekend warriors") alike. [More]
SAGE partners with The Katie Piper Foundation to launch journal Scars, Burns & Healing

SAGE partners with The Katie Piper Foundation to launch journal Scars, Burns & Healing

SAGE is delighted to announce a new partnership with The Katie Piper Foundation to launch the unique journal Scars, Burns & Healing. The journal brings together the specialist focus of scar and burns research with the breadth of the science and medicine related to wound healing, and will be accepting its first submissions from summer 2015. [More]
Sigma 1 receptor appears to play vital role in supporting the retina

Sigma 1 receptor appears to play vital role in supporting the retina

A receptor that is already a target for treating neurodegenerative disease also appears to play a key role in supporting the retina, scientists report. [More]
Pharmaxis, Synairgen partner to develop LOXL2 inhibitor to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Pharmaxis, Synairgen partner to develop LOXL2 inhibitor to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Australian pharmaceutical company Pharmaxis Ltd and UK biotechnology company Synairgen plc today announced they have entered into a research collaboration to develop a selective inhibitor to the lysyl oxidase type 2 enzyme (LOXL2) to treat the fatal lung disease idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). [More]
New study expands on the heart benefits of exercise

New study expands on the heart benefits of exercise

Exercise promotes heart health. However, many lifestyle factors cause heart disease, and regular activity may not be enough to prevent heart attacks. A new study in the American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology expands on the heart benefits of exercise, investigating whether regular exercise still helps the heart even after a heart attack occurs. [More]
FAU pre-medical student and surgeon work together on revolutionary procedure alternative to radical mastectomy

FAU pre-medical student and surgeon work together on revolutionary procedure alternative to radical mastectomy

Elizabeth Hopkins, an aspiring physician and pre-medical student in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Science at Florida Atlantic University, has spent more than 640 hours shadowing Hilton Becker, M.D., a local plastic and reconstructive surgeon, and an affiliate professor in FAU's Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine. Together, with Jeffrey Lind II, M.D., they authored a publication in the current issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Journal, which describes a revolutionary procedure developed by Becker that is an alternative to radical mastectomy. [More]
Researchers demonstrate direct connection between NOX proteins and liver fibrosis

Researchers demonstrate direct connection between NOX proteins and liver fibrosis

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have demonstrated a direct connection between two signaling proteins and liver fibrosis, a scarring process underlying chronic liver disease, the 12th leading cause of death in the United States. [More]

Moerae announces initiation of second MMI-0100 Phase 1 clinical trial for pulmonary disorders

Moerae Matrix Inc. announced today the initiation of its second Phase 1 clinical trial with MMI-0100, a first-in-class inhibitor of MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2) that is being developed for pulmonary disorders characterized by inflammation and fibrosis. The study, conducted in the United Kingdom, is a double-blind, two-way cross-over design lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge study further evaluating the safety and tolerability of MMI-0100 when given via inhalation to healthy subjects who smoke. [More]
Scientists reveal potential therapeutic approach to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Scientists reveal potential therapeutic approach to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a very aggressive form of pulmonary fibrosis and has a particularly poor prognosis. This fatal disease, for which so far no causal therapies exist, is characterized by a massive deposition of connective and scar tissue in the lung, which leads to a progressive loss of lung function and ultimately death. [More]
Vanderbilt researchers hope to give new dexterity to needlescopic surgery with tiny mechanical wrist

Vanderbilt researchers hope to give new dexterity to needlescopic surgery with tiny mechanical wrist

With the flick of a tiny mechanical wrist, a team of engineers and doctors at Vanderbilt University's Medical Engineering and Discovery Laboratory hope to give needlescopic surgery a whole new degree of dexterity. [More]
NeoGraft selects Verasoni Worldwide as marketing communications partner

NeoGraft selects Verasoni Worldwide as marketing communications partner

NeoGraft is pleased to announce the selection of Verasoni Worldwide as integrated marketing communications partner. NeoGraft is a world leader in hair replacement technology serving physicians and patients in the United States and around the world. NeoGraft is the first Class One FDA Listed automated medical device for hair restoration. [More]

New, nontoxic surgical glue helps heal wounds without scar or inflammation

One of the most basic yet important surgical skills to keep a patient alive and intact may be closing wounds. It seems that doctors will now get the job done with more ease thanks to new, nontoxic surgical glue that instantly seals a bleeding wound and helps it heal without a scar or inflammation. [More]
UT Southwestern dermatologist improves technique to treat skin discoloration from vitiligo

UT Southwestern dermatologist improves technique to treat skin discoloration from vitiligo

A UT Southwestern Medical Center dermatologist has improved a technique to transplant pigment cells that can repair the affected area of skin discoloration from vitiligo. [More]
Pioneering Southampton research investigates health impacts of spaceflight

Pioneering Southampton research investigates health impacts of spaceflight

Pioneering research from the University of Southampton into the health impacts of spaceflight has been identified as a possible experiment to be conducted by British astronaut Tim Peake on his maiden voyage to the International Space Station later this year. [More]
Penn State Hershey cardiologist explains causes and symptoms of heart attack

Penn State Hershey cardiologist explains causes and symptoms of heart attack

It's possible to have a heart attack and not even know it. Maybe it's because you're stoic when it comes to pain and fatigue. Or maybe you write off your symptoms as heartburn or indigestion. It's even possible that your own body is kicking up its reserves to mask symptoms of what is happening inside. [More]
Implantable microfluid system can efficiently stabilize intraocular pressure

Implantable microfluid system can efficiently stabilize intraocular pressure

Elevated or diminished eye pressure impairs our ability to see, and in the worst cases, can even lead to blindness. Until now, there has been no effective long-term treatment. In response, Fraunhofer researchers are developing an implantable microfluid system that can efficiently and durably stabilize intraocular pressure. [More]
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