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UC San Diego School of Medicine launches new NAFLD Research Center

UC San Diego School of Medicine launches new NAFLD Research Center

Roughly one-quarter of all Americans - an estimated 100 million adults and children - have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a chronic condition that can lead to cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver failure. [More]
Study: Prior surgical abortion appears to increase risk of later preterm birth

Study: Prior surgical abortion appears to increase risk of later preterm birth

Surgical methods used in a common form of abortion or to clear the womb after a spontaneous miscarriage appears to significantly increase the risk of a later preterm birth, say researchers at Thomas Jefferson University who analyzed 36 studies that enrolled more than 1 million women. [More]
Graphene-based electrodes could be safely implanted in the brain

Graphene-based electrodes could be safely implanted in the brain

Researchers have successfully demonstrated how it is possible to interface graphene - a two-dimensional form of carbon - with neurons, or nerve cells, while maintaining the integrity of these vital cells. The work may be used to build graphene-based electrodes that can safely be implanted in the brain, offering promise for the restoration of sensory functions for amputee or paralysed patients, or for individuals with motor disorders such as epilepsy or Parkinson's disease. [More]
Applying ultrasound therapies for recovery of cardiac stem cells

Applying ultrasound therapies for recovery of cardiac stem cells

A joint project of researchers from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), Julius Wolff Institute and led by Spanish National Center for Cardiovascular Research shows that when cardiac stem cells undergo low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment, these cells can perform continuing modifications, tissue remodeling and regeneration of damaged cardiac tissue after a heart attack. [More]
Pioneer calls on electrophysiologists to reexamine substrate mapping for deadly heart arrhythmia

Pioneer calls on electrophysiologists to reexamine substrate mapping for deadly heart arrhythmia

A pioneer in developing life-saving therapies for a deadly heart arrhythmia has called on electrophysiologists to reexamine a widely used technique to guide the treatment of the faulty electrical impulses responsible for these abnormal heartbeats. [More]
Four USF professors selected as AIMBE College of Fellows

Four USF professors selected as AIMBE College of Fellows

Four University of South Florida professors have been elected to the 2016 College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE): Cesario Borlongan and Shyam Mohapatra from the USF Morsani College of Medicine, USF Health; and Robert Frisina, Jr., and Sudeep Sarkar from the USF College of Engineering. [More]
Compensatory neural connections stave off bipolar disorder onset

Compensatory neural connections stave off bipolar disorder onset

Patients at high genetic risk of bipolar disorder may be able to avert onset of the condition due to natural adaptive neuroplasticity that allows the brain to compensate for underlying network dysfunction associated with the condition, researchers report. [More]
Standardized treatment approach makes outpatient thyroid surgery a safe option for elderly patients

Standardized treatment approach makes outpatient thyroid surgery a safe option for elderly patients

A standardized treatment approach that starts with good screening and ends with patients going home to well-prepared caregivers, means outpatient thyroid surgery is safe for the vast majority of patients, including the elderly and super-elderly, physician-scientists say. [More]
New classification of coronary congenital diseases helps surgeons identify secondary defects

New classification of coronary congenital diseases helps surgeons identify secondary defects

A new classification of coronary congenital diseases is set to help surgeons identify secondary defects in the operating theatre. The scheme is outlined in a novel European Society of Cardiology position paper published today in Cardiovascular Research.1 Clinical cardiologists will also know what to look for on cardiovascular images. [More]
Naturally occurring changes in brain wiring can help patients avert onset of bipolar disorder

Naturally occurring changes in brain wiring can help patients avert onset of bipolar disorder

Naturally occurring changes in brain wiring can help patients at high genetic risk of developing bipolar disorder avert the onset of the illness, according to a new study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online today in the journal Translational Psychiatry. [More]
YAP protein appears to play vital role in helping control inflammation inside the brain

YAP protein appears to play vital role in helping control inflammation inside the brain

Inside the brain, a protein called YAP, best known for its ability to help right-size our developing hearts and livers, appears to have the different but equally important task of helping control inflammation. [More]
New therapeutic target can prevent abnormal blood vessel growth that causes gastrointestinal bleeding

New therapeutic target can prevent abnormal blood vessel growth that causes gastrointestinal bleeding

A study by IRB Barcelona and IDIBAPS reveals a therapeutic target to prevent the development of the many abnormal blood vessels that cause gastrointestinal bleeding—the main complication in cirrhosis. [More]
DZNE molecular biologist to receive Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize for research on neurons

DZNE molecular biologist to receive Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize for research on neurons

The molecular biologist Frank Bradke (46), group leader at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and professor for neurobiology at the University of Bonn, will be awarded the "Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize", which is endowed with 2.5 million euros. [More]
Human heart can fully recover after massive damage

Human heart can fully recover after massive damage

The scientists report the case of a newborn that had suffered a massive heart attack in the first hours of life. It was caused by a blockage in a vital coronary vessel. "The baby's heart was severely damaged. Astonishingly, the baby recovered very quickly," said Bernhard Haubner, a cardiologist and researcher, and his colleague, Johanna Schneider, in an article just published in the journal "Circulation Research". [More]
Advances in leadless pacing: an interview with Dr. Reddy

Advances in leadless pacing: an interview with Dr. Reddy

Pacemakers have been around for a very long time, they're great devices, critical for many people who have slow heartbeats. While they're very effective, they have some issues. There are two main aspects relating to these issues. [More]
Combination of antiviral medications can eradicate HCV infection in patients with advanced liver disease

Combination of antiviral medications can eradicate HCV infection in patients with advanced liver disease

A large multi-center clinical trial has found that a combination of antiviral medications can eradicate hepatitis C infection in more than 90 percent of patients with advanced liver disease. Known as the ASTRAL-4 trial, the study was co-led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Intermountain Medical Center and published online Nov. 17 in The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Could statins treat muscular dystrophy? An interview with Dr. Nick Whitehead and Dr Stan Froehner

Could statins treat muscular dystrophy? An interview with Dr. Nick Whitehead and Dr Stan Froehner

In addition to their well established cholesterol lowering benefits, statins also have potent anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and antioxidant effects, which continue to be identified in a wide range of diseases. [More]
Researchers find ranibizumab drug as effective alternative to laser therapy for treating diabetic retinopathy

Researchers find ranibizumab drug as effective alternative to laser therapy for treating diabetic retinopathy

In a randomized clinical trial of more than 300 participants, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that ranibizumab — a drug most commonly used to treat retinal swelling in people with diabetes — is an effective alternative to laser therapy for treating the most severe, potentially blinding form of diabetic retinal disease. Results of the government-sponsored study also show that the drug therapy carries fewer side effects than the currently used laser treatment. [More]
Tyrogenex announces results from phase 1 study of orally-administered X-82 in patients with AMD

Tyrogenex announces results from phase 1 study of orally-administered X-82 in patients with AMD

Tyrogenex, a privately held company focused on the development of targeted therapeutics for cancer and ophthalmology, today announced data from its phase 1 open-label study of orally-administered X-82 in patients for wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). [More]
Armaron Bio starts Phase 2 trial for novel lead candidate drug for heart failure

Armaron Bio starts Phase 2 trial for novel lead candidate drug for heart failure

Armaron Bio, a Melbourne-based drug development company focused on heart failure and other diseases, is pleased to announce that it has begun its Phase II clinical trial for NP202, its novel lead candidate drug for heart failure. [More]
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