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DNA analysis reveals how ovarian cancer takes genetic twists and turns to outsmart chemotherapy

DNA analysis reveals how ovarian cancer takes genetic twists and turns to outsmart chemotherapy

The largest complete DNA analysis of ovarian cancer in the world, published overnight in Nature, has revealed unprecedented new insight into the genetic twists and turns a deadly form of the disease takes to outsmart chemotherapy, potentially changing treatment approaches for women around the world. [More]
Novel survey shows high rates of tattoo-related infection, itching and swelling in New Yorkers

Novel survey shows high rates of tattoo-related infection, itching and swelling in New Yorkers

In what they believe to be the first survey of its kind in the United States, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have found that as many as 6 percent of adult New Yorkers who get "inked" — in other words, those who get a tattoo — have experienced some form of tattoo-related rash, severe itching or swelling that lasted longer than four months and, in some cases, for many years. [More]
Research findings cast new light on biological process that can lead to diabetes

Research findings cast new light on biological process that can lead to diabetes

Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientists have pinpointed a cell that begins the process of scarring in fatty tissue. The findings cast new light on a biological process that occurs with obesity and can lead to diabetes. [More]
Endo Pharmaceuticals supports efforts to bring first ever treatment guidelines for Peyronie's Disease

Endo Pharmaceuticals supports efforts to bring first ever treatment guidelines for Peyronie's Disease

Endo Pharmaceuticals Inc., a subsidiary of Endo International plc, supports efforts to bring the medical community the first ever treatment guidelines for Peyronie's Disease (PD), a condition in which collagen plaque, or scar tissue, develops on the shaft of the penis, and may harden and reduce flexibility. [More]
MIT researchers find way to develop implantable devices that can avoid scar-tissue buildup

MIT researchers find way to develop implantable devices that can avoid scar-tissue buildup

Biomedical devices that can be implanted in the body for drug delivery, tissue engineering, or sensing can help improve treatment for many diseases. However, such devices are often susceptible to attack by the immune system, which can render them useless. [More]

New Bio-Oil research demonstrates need for greater education on scar management

New research from Bio-Oil conducted amongst UK nurses demonstrates the need for greater education and resources on the management of patients with scarring following surgery or trauma. [More]
Scientists report that enzyme that alters testosterone to estrogen has big impact in healthy, injured brain

Scientists report that enzyme that alters testosterone to estrogen has big impact in healthy, injured brain

An enzyme that converts testosterone to estrogen appears to have significant impact in a healthy and injured brain, scientists report. [More]
Novel method predicts risk of sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients

Novel method predicts risk of sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients

A new test has been developed to predict sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients in whom such forecasts were previously impossible. The novel method was presented at ICNC 12 by Dr Akiyoshi Hashimoto, a cardiologist at Sapporo Medical University in Japan. The test uses a combination of nuclear medicine, C-reactive protein and electrocardiogram (ECG). [More]

Study show that silymarin may be a useful treatment for NASH

Results from a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of silymarin, which is derived from the milk thistle plant, have shown that this herbal remedy may be a useful treatment option for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). [More]
Diabetes drug liraglutide could prove to be a new treatment option for NASH

Diabetes drug liraglutide could prove to be a new treatment option for NASH

A drug approved to treat type 2 diabetes could prove to be a powerful new treatment option for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), according to research presented today at The International Liver Congress 2015. Results from a randomised controlled trial showed liraglutide met the primary endpoint of histological clearance of NASH, and a reduction in the progression of fibrosis. [More]
Study supports use of vitamin E as effective treatment for NASH

Study supports use of vitamin E as effective treatment for NASH

Results revealed today at The International Liver Congress 2015 show that vitamin E (d-alpha-tocopherol) is an effective treatment for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH occurs when the liver becomes inflamed due to the accumulation of fat. Over time, persistent inflammation can lead to the formation of fibrous scar tissue in the liver and around its blood vessels, which can eventually cause cirrhosis. [More]

Capsaicin has beneficial effects on liver damage, study reveals

Results revealed today at the International Liver Congress 2015 show that the daily consumption of capsaicin, the active compound of chilli peppers, was found to have beneficial effects on liver damage. [More]
Data from pacritinib Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial in patients with myelofibrosis to be highlighted at ASCO

Data from pacritinib Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial in patients with myelofibrosis to be highlighted at ASCO

CTI BioPharma Corp. and Baxter International Inc. today announced that data from the randomized Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial evaluating the investigational agent pacritinib in patients with myelofibrosis will be highlighted in a late-breaking oral presentation at the upcoming American Society of Clinical Oncology 2015 Meeting (May 29-June 2, 2015 in Chicago, Ill). [More]
Study reveals new target for research into liver disease

Study reveals new target for research into liver disease

In a recent study, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine researchers predicted which cirrhosis patients would suffer inflammations and require hospitalization by analyzing their saliva, revealing a new target for research into a disease that accounts for more than 30,000 deaths in the United States each year. [More]
Manchester scientists develop enhanced surface for silicone breast implants

Manchester scientists develop enhanced surface for silicone breast implants

Scientists at The University of Manchester have created an enhanced surface for silicone breast implants which could reduce complications and make them less likely to be rejected by the body. [More]
New approach to improve cardiac regeneration

New approach to improve cardiac regeneration

The heart tissue of mammals has limited capacity to regenerate after an injury such as a heart attack, in part due to the inability to reactivate a cardiac muscle cell and proliferation program. Recent studies have indicated a low level of cardiac muscle cell (cardiomyocytes) proliferation in adult mammals, but it is insufficient to repair damaged hearts. [More]
Study compares latest drug-coated stents with traditional bypass surgery

Study compares latest drug-coated stents with traditional bypass surgery

Newer drug-coated stents that keep arteries open have similar long-term rates of death compared with traditional bypass surgery for patients with more than one diseased coronary artery. [More]
Results of pacritinib Phase 2 study in myelofibrosis patients published in journal 'Blood'

Results of pacritinib Phase 2 study in myelofibrosis patients published in journal 'Blood'

CTI BioPharma Corp. today announced that results of a Phase 2 study of pacritinib, in patients with myelofibrosis were published in the journal Blood. Pacritinib is a next-generation oral JAK2/FLT3 multikinase inhibitor currently in Phase 3 development in the PERSIST program. [More]
Cancer drug promotes neuronal regeneration after spinal cord injury

Cancer drug promotes neuronal regeneration after spinal cord injury

Damage to the spinal cord rarely heals because the injured nerve cells fail to regenerate. The regrowth of their long nerve fibers is hindered by scar tissue and molecular processes inside the nerves. [More]
Pacritinib for myelofibrosis meets primary endpoint in Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial

Pacritinib for myelofibrosis meets primary endpoint in Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial

CTI BioPharma Corp. and Baxter International Inc. today announced positive top-line results for the primary endpoint from PERSIST-1, the randomized, controlled Phase 3 registration clinical trial examining pacritinib, a next generation oral JAK2/FLT3 multikinase inhibitor, for the treatment of patients with primary or secondary myelofibrosis. [More]
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