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AAN urges for more research on use of medical marijuana for brain, nervous system disorders

AAN urges for more research on use of medical marijuana for brain, nervous system disorders

The American Academy of Neurology is calling for more research on the use of medical marijuana for brain, spine and nervous system disorders in a new position statement released by the AAN, the world's largest association of neurologists with more than 28,000 members. [More]
Migraine headache may double risk of nervous system condition that causes Bell's palsy

Migraine headache may double risk of nervous system condition that causes Bell's palsy

Migraine headache may double the risk of a nervous system condition that causes facial paralysis, called Bell's palsy, according to a new study published in the December 17, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Researchers gain new insight into how motor neurons in the brain die during ALS

Researchers gain new insight into how motor neurons in the brain die during ALS

Researchers look to understand the causes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), in the hope of finding new ways to treat the disease. A new study published online today (December 17th) in the Cell Press journal Neuron shows that a common gene mutation in ALS generates a deadly protein that may cause the damage in the brain that leads to ALS. [More]
VirtualScopics signs software licence, support agreement with IXICO

VirtualScopics signs software licence, support agreement with IXICO

VirtualScopics, Inc., a leading provider of clinical trial imaging solutions, today announced that they have signed a multi-year software licence and support agreement with existing alliance partner, IXICO plc, the brain health company, for their proprietary imaging data and query management digital platform, TrialTracker™. [More]
ALS Association announces research funds to further understand genetic cause of ALS

ALS Association announces research funds to further understand genetic cause of ALS

The ALS Association is pleased to announce the award of $326,662 in research funds to expand ongoing natural history studies in order to further understand the most common genetic cause of ALS, in preparation for clinical trials in those whose disease is affected by this gene. [More]
Diplomat announces new partnership with Novation through Hospital Specialty Rx Program

Diplomat announces new partnership with Novation through Hospital Specialty Rx Program

Diplomat, the nation's largest independent specialty pharmacy, has announced a new partnership with Novation through their Hospital Specialty Rx Program. [More]
OPTIMISE project to collect data that provides in-depth picture of MS experiences

OPTIMISE project to collect data that provides in-depth picture of MS experiences

Researchers will track the lives of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) in unprecedented detail in a project to improve the evaluation of treatments. [More]
Researchers develop new how-to exercise program to help MS people stay more physically active

Researchers develop new how-to exercise program to help MS people stay more physically active

Fatigue and pain, along with other symptoms, prevent many people with multiple sclerosis (MS) from exercising. But a new how-to guide for a home-based exercise program, tested by researchers at Case Western Reserve University's nursing school and the Lerner Research Institute at the Cleveland Clinic, offers a way for people with MS to stay more physically active. [More]
Study reveals how the human brain heals itself after surgical removal of brain tumor

Study reveals how the human brain heals itself after surgical removal of brain tumor

An interdisciplinary team of neuroscientists and neurosurgeons from the University of Rochester has used a new imaging technique to show how the human brain heals itself in just a few weeks following surgical removal of a brain tumor. [More]
New study finds that poor sleep may lead to dementia

New study finds that poor sleep may lead to dementia

People who have sleep apnea or spend less time in deep sleep may be more likely to have changes in the brain that are associated with dementia, according to a new study published in the December 10, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
New study investigates ways to help people with MS respond to sudden balance challenge

New study investigates ways to help people with MS respond to sudden balance challenge

Many people with multiple sclerosis (MS) have trouble with balance and a fear of falling, which can have severe negative effects on their quality of life by keeping them away from social events, regular exercise and community activities. And, if they do get out, the fatigue and anxiety of walking can be very taxing. [More]
UT Southwestern biophysicist named recipient of 2015 Edith and Peter O'Donnell Award in Science

UT Southwestern biophysicist named recipient of 2015 Edith and Peter O'Donnell Award in Science

The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas has selected Dr. Yuh Min Chook, Professor of Pharmacology and of Biophysics at UT Southwestern Medical Center, as the recipient of the 2015 Edith and Peter O'Donnell Award in Science. [More]
PAH markers identified among Chinese systemic sclerosis patients

PAH markers identified among Chinese systemic sclerosis patients

A study of Chinese patients with systemic sclerosis has identified predictive markers for accompanying pulmonary arterial hypertension similar to those that have been identified in other ethnic groups. [More]
Vaccinex completes VX15/2503 Phase 1 clinical trial in patients with advanced, refractory solid tumors

Vaccinex completes VX15/2503 Phase 1 clinical trial in patients with advanced, refractory solid tumors

Vaccinex, Inc. today announced the successful completion of a multicenter Phase 1, multiple ascending dose clinical trial of VX15/2503 anti-Semaphorin 4D (SEMA4D) antibody in 42 adult patients with advanced, refractory solid tumors. [More]
BUSM's Carmela Abraham receives 2014 Massachusetts Neuroscience Consortium Award

BUSM's Carmela Abraham receives 2014 Massachusetts Neuroscience Consortium Award

Carmela Abraham, PhD, professor of biochemistry and pharmacology at Boston University School of Medicine, was one of six recipients of this year's Massachusetts Neuroscience Consortium Award out of nearly 60 applicants. The grant was awarded to her for her work on multiple sclerosis and the role of the life extension protein Klotho in the limited repair of white matter in the disease. [More]
Researchers reveal that genetic mutations may cause more cases of ALS

Researchers reveal that genetic mutations may cause more cases of ALS

Genetic mutations may cause more cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) than scientists previously had realized, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. The scientists also showed that the number of mutated genes influences the age when the fatal paralyzing disorder first appears. [More]
Genetics may play major role in Lou Gehrig's disease, study reveals

Genetics may play major role in Lou Gehrig's disease, study reveals

Genetics may play a larger role in causing Lou Gehrig's disease than previously believed, potentially accounting for more than one-third of all cases, according to one of the most comprehensive genetic studies to date of patients who suffer from the condition also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. [More]
Jakafi receives expanded approval from FDA for use in treatment of polycythemia vera

Jakafi receives expanded approval from FDA for use in treatment of polycythemia vera

Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc., the nation's largest independent specialty pharmacy, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved an expanded indication of Jakafi (ruxolitinib). [More]
CNF names Elizabeth A. Thiele as winner of 2014 Infantile Spasms Heroes Award

CNF names Elizabeth A. Thiele as winner of 2014 Infantile Spasms Heroes Award

Today the Child Neurology Foundation, named Elizabeth A. Thiele, MD, PhD, as its 2014 Infantile Spasms (IS) Heroes Award winner to help kick off IS Awareness Week (December 5-11, 2014). The IS Heroes Award was established in 2010 by CNF, www.childneurologyfoundation.org, to recognize a deserving healthcare professional for making a positive difference in the life of a child with infantile spasms. [More]
New drug offers hope for victims of spinal cord injury

New drug offers hope for victims of spinal cord injury

Scientist in the U.S have developed a drug that could help paralysed victims of spinal cord injury regain their ability to move. [More]