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Brainstorm Cell Therapeutics provides business update, announces financial results for 2014

Brainstorm Cell Therapeutics provides business update, announces financial results for 2014

BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc., a leading developer of adult stem cell technologies for neurodegenerative diseases, today announced financial results for the three months and year ended December 31, 2014. [More]
Funding helps researchers to kiss MS goodbye

Funding helps researchers to kiss MS goodbye

Murdoch University researchers have received funding to investigate the link between the Epstein-Barr virus infection, more commonly known as glandular fever or the ‘kissing disease’, and the debilitating disease Multiple Sclerosis (MS). [More]
Newly identified proteins could shed light on the mechanisms of ALS

Newly identified proteins could shed light on the mechanisms of ALS

Where ALS comes from and how it progresses are mysteries that continue to vex medical science. But recent research at Sweden's KTH Royal Institute of Technology has found three proteins that could shed some light on the mechanisms behind this deadly disease. [More]
Funding helps researchers to kiss Multiple Sclerosis (MS) goodbye

Funding helps researchers to kiss Multiple Sclerosis (MS) goodbye

Murdoch University researchers have received funding to investigate the link between the Epstein-Barr virus infection, more commonly known as glandular fever or the ‘kissing disease’, and the debilitating disease Multiple Sclerosis (MS). [More]
Copenhagen researchers develop secure way of measuring apo-M protein in human blood

Copenhagen researchers develop secure way of measuring apo-M protein in human blood

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen are the first in the world to develop a secure way of measuring the important protein apo-M. This could prove relevant for research into diseases such as diabetes, arteriosclerosis and sclerosis. [More]
Hypermethylation serves as protective barrier inhibiting development of ALS, FTD

Hypermethylation serves as protective barrier inhibiting development of ALS, FTD

Penn Medicine researchers have discovered that hypermethylation - the epigenetic ability to turn down or turn off a bad gene implicated in 10 to 30 percent of patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) - serves as a protective barrier inhibiting the development of these diseases. [More]
AbbVie signs exclusive worldwide license agreement with C2N for Alzheimer's disease therapies

AbbVie signs exclusive worldwide license agreement with C2N for Alzheimer's disease therapies

AbbVie today announced that it has entered into an exclusive worldwide license agreement with C2N Diagnostics, a privately held protein diagnostic and therapeutic discovery company, to develop and commercialize a portfolio of anti-tau antibodies for the treatment of Alzheimer's Disease and other neurological disorders. [More]
Neurology Times features special coverage of MS in observance of MS Awareness Month

Neurology Times features special coverage of MS in observance of MS Awareness Month

UBM Medica US announces that Neurology Times, a leading online community and information resource for neurologists and other healthcare providers, is featuring special coverage of multiple sclerosis in observance of MS Awareness Month. [More]
New scoring system may help predict memory and thinking problems in elderly people

New scoring system may help predict memory and thinking problems in elderly people

Researchers have developed a new scoring system to help determine which elderly people may be at a higher risk of developing the memory and thinking problems that can lead to dementia, according to a new study published in the March 18, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology develops method to reduce production costs of valuable drugs

Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology develops method to reduce production costs of valuable drugs

Imagine a loved relative suffering from cancer - and you could not afford a treatment because the drugs are too expensive. The Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology (acib) developed a method with the power to reduce production costs of highly valued drugs significantly. [More]
TSRI scientists successfully test potential preventative therapy for type 1 diabetes in animal models

TSRI scientists successfully test potential preventative therapy for type 1 diabetes in animal models

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have successfully tested a potent synthetic compound that prevents type 1 diabetes in animal models of the disease. [More]
Researchers working on new tool for diagnosing concussions in young Canadians

Researchers working on new tool for diagnosing concussions in young Canadians

Researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, at McGill University and the MUHC, are working to develop a much needed tool for helping diagnose concussions or mild traumatic brain injuries suffered by thousands of young Canadians ---hockey and football players among them. [More]

New drug-like molecule shows promise in preventing MS progression

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute scientists have developed a new drug-like molecule that can halt inflammation and has shown promise in preventing the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Researchers identify new gene variants that could contribute to sporadic motor neurone disease

Researchers identify new gene variants that could contribute to sporadic motor neurone disease

Researchers have identified a new host of gene variants that could make people vulnerable to sporadic motor neurone disease, according to a report published today in the journal, Scientific Reports. [More]
Guanabenz drug prevents myelin loss, alleviates symptoms of MS in animal models

Guanabenz drug prevents myelin loss, alleviates symptoms of MS in animal models

An FDA-approved drug for high blood pressure, guanabenz, prevents myelin loss and alleviates clinical symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) in animal models, according to a new study. [More]
New database on healthy immune system may help design future studies on autoimmune disorders

New database on healthy immune system may help design future studies on autoimmune disorders

An extensive database identifying immune traits, such as how immune cell function is regulated at the genetic level in healthy people, is reported by researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and their collaborators in the journal Cell. [More]
Neuralstem reports top line data from NSI-566 Phase II trial for treatment of ALS

Neuralstem reports top line data from NSI-566 Phase II trial for treatment of ALS

Neuralstem, Inc. announced top line data from the Phase II trial of NSI-566 spinal cord-derived neural stem cells under development for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The study met primary safety endpoints. The maximum tolerated dose of 16 million transplanted cells and the surgery was well tolerated. [More]
TSRI researchers create picture of whole dynein-dynactin structure

TSRI researchers create picture of whole dynein-dynactin structure

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has determined the basic structural organization of a molecular motor that hauls cargoes and performs other critical functions within cells. [More]
Physical activity may protect older people from effects of brain damage

Physical activity may protect older people from effects of brain damage

Older people who are physically active may be protecting themselves from the effects of small areas of brain damage that can affect their movement abilities, according to a new study published in the March 11, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Glucocorticoid therapies promote functional recovery of blood-brain barrier after blast injury

Glucocorticoid therapies promote functional recovery of blood-brain barrier after blast injury

Barclay Morrison III, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia Engineering, has led the first study to determine underlying biological mechanisms that promote functional recovery of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) after blast injury. The research demonstrates that treatment with the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, after primary blast injury promotes rapid recovery of an in vitro model of the BBB, a highly restrictive semi-permeable barrier whose primary function is to maintain the brain's microenvironment and protect it from potentially toxic substances. [More]
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