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Biogen Idec's revenue increases 51% to $2.1 billion in first quarter 2014

Biogen Idec's revenue increases 51% to $2.1 billion in first quarter 2014

Biogen Idec Inc. today reported first quarter 2014 results, including revenue of $2.1 billion, a 51% increase compared to the first quarter of 2013. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify potential new treatment for depression

UT Southwestern researchers identify potential new treatment for depression

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center are making breakthroughs that could benefit people suffering from depression. [More]
New studies may offer hope for people with migraine

New studies may offer hope for people with migraine

Two new studies may offer hope for people with migraine. The two studies released today will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. [More]
FDA announces expanded approval of Arzerra in combination with chlorambucil for CLL treatment

FDA announces expanded approval of Arzerra in combination with chlorambucil for CLL treatment

The US Food and Drug Administration has announced the expanded approval of Arzerra (ofatumumab) in combination with chlorambucil for the first-line treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Arzerra was previously approved by the FDA in October 2009 for the treatment of CLL resistant to other forms of chemotherapy. Diplomat has access to dispense Arzerra. [More]

Scientists uncover key mechanism that regulates nerve cell growth in damaged nervous system

New research published today out of the University of Calgary's Hotchkiss Brain Institute uncovers a mechanism to promote growth in damaged nerve cells as a means to restore connections after injury. Dr. Doug Zochodne and his team have discovered a key molecule that directly regulates nerve cell growth in the damaged nervous system. [More]
Narrowing of carotid artery in neck without any symptoms may be linked to memory problems

Narrowing of carotid artery in neck without any symptoms may be linked to memory problems

For the first time, researchers have demonstrated that narrowing of the carotid artery in the neck without any symptoms may be linked to problems in learning, memory, thinking and decision-making, compared to people with similar risk factors but no narrowing in the neck artery, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. [More]
AARDA launches autoimmune curriculum for teachers of grades three through eight

AARDA launches autoimmune curriculum for teachers of grades three through eight

Furthering its mission of educating all Americans about autoimmunity and autoimmune disease (AD), the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association, Inc. (AARDA) has launched the first-of-its kind autoimmune curriculum for teachers of grades three through eight. [More]
New hypothesis about emergence of Parkinson's disease

New hypothesis about emergence of Parkinson's disease

The cause of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is still unknown, but a new study proposes that neurons may be mistaken for foreign invaders and killed by the person's own immune system, similar to the way autoimmune diseases like type I diabetes, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis attack the body's cells. [More]

Researchers identify key genes linked to pain perception

Researchers may have identified key genes linked to why some people have a higher tolerance for pain than others, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. [More]
Harvard neuroscientists present new view of myelin

Harvard neuroscientists present new view of myelin

Harvard neuroscientists have made a discovery that turns 160 years of neuroanatomy on its head. [More]
U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

University of Virginia neurologist Dr. Erin Pennock Foff, biologist Sarah Kucenas and biomedical engineer Shayn Peirce-Cotter have been named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards to benefit children of the United States. Each scientist will receive $100,000 in direct annual research support from The Hartwell Foundation for three years. [More]

Research by UCI, Salk Institute points to novel therapies for minimizing stroke-induced brain damage

​By discovering a new mechanism that allows blood to enter the brain immediately after a stroke, researchers at UC Irvine and the Salk Institute have opened the door to new therapies that may limit or prevent stroke-induced brain damage. [More]

FDA grants clearance for Breathe Technologies’ Non-Invasive Open Ventilation System

Breathe Technologies, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted the fifth 510(k) clearance for its Non-Invasive Open Ventilation System, allowing its use with compressed air supply for non-oxygen dependent patients. [More]

Apathy signals brain shrinkage in old people

Launer's team used brain volume as a measure of accelerated brain aging. Brain volume losses occur during normal aging, but in this study, larger amounts of brain volume loss could indicate brain diseases. [More]
Researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to turn into working spinal cord cells

Researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to turn into working spinal cord cells

The sponginess of the environment where human embryonic stem cells are growing affects the type of specialized cells they eventually become, a University of Michigan study shows. [More]
Study evaluates co-occurrence of cancers in patients with central nervous system disorders

Study evaluates co-occurrence of cancers in patients with central nervous system disorders

The study evaluated the co-occurrence of cancers in patients with central nervous system disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, autism spectrum disorders, Down's syndrome, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia. [More]

Scientists receive grant from Biogen Idec to study everyday activities in MS using actual reality

​John DeLuca, PhD, and Yael Goverover, PhD, OT, have received a grant from Biogen Idec to study how persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) perform everyday life tasks. The grant, entitled "The Use of Actual Reality to Measure Everyday Life Functional Activity in Multiple Sclerosis" provides financial support to conduct this research. [More]
Older people with memory and thinking problems may have lower risk of dying from cancer

Older people with memory and thinking problems may have lower risk of dying from cancer

Older people who are starting to have memory and thinking problems, but do not yet have dementia may have a lower risk of dying from cancer than people who have no memory and thinking problems, according to a study published in the April 9, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]

Researcher wins 2014 Abraham White Distinguished Science Award for contributions in treatment of neurological diseases

Michael Chopp, Ph.D., scientific director of the Henry Ford Neuroscience Institute at Henry Ford Hospital, won the 2014 Abraham White Distinguished Science Award for his discovery of the role of a protein in the treatment of brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
SLU researcher receives $608,376 grant to design better clinical treatments for multiple sclerosis

SLU researcher receives $608,376 grant to design better clinical treatments for multiple sclerosis

Saint Louis University researcher Daniel Hawiger, M.D., Ph.D., has been awarded $608,376 from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society to gain a better understanding of how the autoimmune process that causes multiple sclerosis (MS) may be stopped or slowed down. [More]