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Research by UCI, Salk Institute points to novel therapies for minimizing stroke-induced brain damage

Research by UCI, Salk Institute points to novel therapies for minimizing stroke-induced brain damage

​By discovering a new mechanism that allows blood to enter the brain immediately after a stroke, researchers at UC Irvine and the Salk Institute have opened the door to new therapies that may limit or prevent stroke-induced brain damage. [More]
FDA grants clearance for Breathe Technologies’ Non-Invasive Open Ventilation System

FDA grants clearance for Breathe Technologies’ Non-Invasive Open Ventilation System

Breathe Technologies, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted the fifth 510(k) clearance for its Non-Invasive Open Ventilation System, allowing its use with compressed air supply for non-oxygen dependent patients. [More]
Apathy signals brain shrinkage in old people

Apathy signals brain shrinkage in old people

Launer's team used brain volume as a measure of accelerated brain aging. Brain volume losses occur during normal aging, but in this study, larger amounts of brain volume loss could indicate brain diseases. [More]
Researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to turn into working spinal cord cells

Researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to turn into working spinal cord cells

The sponginess of the environment where human embryonic stem cells are growing affects the type of specialized cells they eventually become, a University of Michigan study shows. [More]
Study evaluates co-occurrence of cancers in patients with central nervous system disorders

Study evaluates co-occurrence of cancers in patients with central nervous system disorders

The study evaluated the co-occurrence of cancers in patients with central nervous system disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, autism spectrum disorders, Down's syndrome, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia. [More]
Scientists receive grant from Biogen Idec to study everyday activities in MS using actual reality

Scientists receive grant from Biogen Idec to study everyday activities in MS using actual reality

​John DeLuca, PhD, and Yael Goverover, PhD, OT, have received a grant from Biogen Idec to study how persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) perform everyday life tasks. The grant, entitled "The Use of Actual Reality to Measure Everyday Life Functional Activity in Multiple Sclerosis" provides financial support to conduct this research. [More]
Older people with memory and thinking problems may have lower risk of dying from cancer

Older people with memory and thinking problems may have lower risk of dying from cancer

Older people who are starting to have memory and thinking problems, but do not yet have dementia may have a lower risk of dying from cancer than people who have no memory and thinking problems, according to a study published in the April 9, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]

Researcher wins 2014 Abraham White Distinguished Science Award for contributions in treatment of neurological diseases

Michael Chopp, Ph.D., scientific director of the Henry Ford Neuroscience Institute at Henry Ford Hospital, won the 2014 Abraham White Distinguished Science Award for his discovery of the role of a protein in the treatment of brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
SLU researcher receives $608,376 grant to design better clinical treatments for multiple sclerosis

SLU researcher receives $608,376 grant to design better clinical treatments for multiple sclerosis

Saint Louis University researcher Daniel Hawiger, M.D., Ph.D., has been awarded $608,376 from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society to gain a better understanding of how the autoimmune process that causes multiple sclerosis (MS) may be stopped or slowed down. [More]

Research provides new approach to developing better treatment options for scleroderma

Scleroderma is a rare and often fatal disease, causing the thickening of tissue, that currently lacks a cure and any effective treatments. A group of researchers, including a Michigan State University professor, is looking to change that. [More]
Researcher pinpoints error in protein formation that could be root of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Researcher pinpoints error in protein formation that could be root of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

By studying nerve cells that originated in patients with a severe neurological disease, a University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher has pinpointed an error in protein formation that could be the root of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. [More]

Harvard stem cell scientists discover potential treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Harvard stem cell scientists have discovered that a recently approved medication for epilepsy may possibly be a meaningful treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-Lou Gehrig's disease, a uniformly fatal neurodegenerative disorder. The researchers are now collaborating with Massachusetts General Hospital to design an initial clinical trial testing the safety of the treatment in ALS patients. [More]

Auxogyn signs exclusive license agreement with Merck Serono for Eeva Test

Auxogyn, Inc., a company dedicated to advancing women's reproductive health, today announced an exclusive license agreement with Merck Serono, the biopharmaceutical division of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany which operates as EMD Serono in the United States and Canada, for Auxogyn's proprietary Early Embryo Viability Assessment (Eeva) Test. [More]

Study sheds light on brain mechanisms that make schizophrenia patients misinterpret what they see

People with schizophrenia often misinterpret what they see and experience in the world. New research provides insight into the brain mechanisms that might be responsible for this misinterpretation. [More]
Young adults participated in cardio fitness activities may preserve memory, thinking skills in middle age

Young adults participated in cardio fitness activities may preserve memory, thinking skills in middle age

Young adults who run or participate in other cardio fitness activities may preserve their memory and thinking skills in middle age, according to a new study published in the April 2, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Middle age was defined as ages 43 to 55. [More]

Endurance sport keeps both muscles and nerves fit

Endurance sport does not only change the condition and fitness of muscles but also simultaneously improves the neuronal connections to the muscle fibers based on a muscle-induced feedback. [More]

Kessler Foundation receives grant to study effect of speed of processing training on cognitive performance in MS

​Kessler Foundation received a four-year $750,000 grant from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society to conduct a randomized controlled trial of speed of processing training to improve cognition in multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]

Human motor neurons can be quickly generated from stem cells, say researchers

Researchers report they can generate human motor neurons from stem cells much more quickly and efficiently than previous methods allowed. The finding, described in Nature Communications, will aid efforts to model human motor neuron development, and to understand and treat spinal cord injuries and motor neuron diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). [More]
Cedars-Sinai earns grant to conduct clinical trial of gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease

Cedars-Sinai earns grant to conduct clinical trial of gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease

The Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute has received a $2.5 million grant from the Department of Defense to conduct animal studies that, if successful, could provide the basis for a clinical trial of a gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease, also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. [More]

U.S. Supreme Court agrees to hear Teva Pharmaceutical's appeal related to COPAXONE patent

Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (NYSE: TEVA) today announced that the U.S. Supreme Court has granted the Company's COPAXONE® certiorari petition and will hear its appeal of a decision from the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit that invalidated the claim of U.S. Patent 5,800,808 (the "'808 patent"). [More]