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AAN releases new position statement on opioids for chronic non-cancer pain

AAN releases new position statement on opioids for chronic non-cancer pain

According to a new position statement from the American Academy of Neurology, the risk of death, overdose, addiction or serious side effects with prescription opioids outweigh the benefits in chronic, non-cancer conditions such as headache, fibromyalgia and chronic low back pain. [More]
Diplomat's clinical technology manager honored as finalist in 2014 Next-Generation Pharmacist awards

Diplomat's clinical technology manager honored as finalist in 2014 Next-Generation Pharmacist awards

Diplomat, the nation's largest independent specialty pharmacy, is proud to announce that clinical technology manager Mike Crowe, PharmD, MBA, CSP, FMPA, was honored as a finalist in the 2014 Next-Generation Pharmacist awards. [More]
Dr. Nancy Chiaravalloti of Kessler Foundation receives Alumni Achievement in Science award

Dr. Nancy Chiaravalloti of Kessler Foundation receives Alumni Achievement in Science award

Nancy (Donofrio) Chiaravalloti, PhD, of Kessler Foundation received the Alumni Achievement in Science award from her alma mater, Muhlenberg College at the Alumni Association luncheon on September 13th. [More]
EMD Serono declares winners of first Grant for Oncology Innovation

EMD Serono declares winners of first Grant for Oncology Innovation

EMD Serono, the biopharmaceutical division of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, today announced the winners of the first Grant for Oncology Innovation (GOI), who will receive grants totaling $1.3 million. [More]
Cedars-Sinai to participate in a consortium studying motor neuron disorders

Cedars-Sinai to participate in a consortium studying motor neuron disorders

Investigators at the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute have received a grant from the National Institutes of Health to participate in a consortium taking the study of motor neuron disorders - such as Lou Gehrig's disease and spinal muscular atrophy - to a new, comprehensive perspective. [More]
People with memory loss more likely to develop dementia later, study finds

People with memory loss more likely to develop dementia later, study finds

New research suggests that people without dementia who begin reporting memory issues may be more likely to develop dementia later, even if they have no clinical signs of the disease. [More]
Northwestern scientists develop first animal model for ALS dementia

Northwestern scientists develop first animal model for ALS dementia

The first animal model for ALS dementia, a form of ALS that also damages the brain, has been developed by Northwestern Medicine- scientists. The advance will allow researchers to directly see the brains of living mice, under anesthesia, at the microscopic level. This will allow direct monitoring of test drugs to determine if they work. [More]
Pilot study shows benefits of psychoeducational wellness program in MS people

Pilot study shows benefits of psychoeducational wellness program in MS people

Kessler researchers have published a pilot study showing the benefits of a 10-week psychoeducational wellness program in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Improvements were seen in mood, overall mental health, perceived stress, and pain. [More]
People who experience migraine in middle age may develop movement disorders later in life

People who experience migraine in middle age may develop movement disorders later in life

A new study suggests that people who experience migraine in middle age may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, or other movement disorders later in life. Those who have migraine with aura may be at double the risk of developing Parkinson's, according to the study published in the September 17, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study links slowed processing speed with executive deficits in individuals with multiple sclerosis

Study links slowed processing speed with executive deficits in individuals with multiple sclerosis

Kessler Foundation researchers have published a study supporting the role of slowed processing speed in the executive deficits found in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Six research institutions awarded NIH grants to create database of human cellular responses

Six research institutions awarded NIH grants to create database of human cellular responses

Building on a successful three-year pilot project, the National Institutes of Health has awarded more than $64 million to six research institutions to create a database of human cellular responses, the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures. [More]
UC Irvine study sheds light on cognitive losses

UC Irvine study sheds light on cognitive losses

Brain inflammation can rapidly disrupt our ability to retrieve complex memories of similar but distinct experiences, according to UC Irvine neuroscientists Jennifer Czerniawski and John Guzowski. [More]
Synthetic Biologics' SYN-005 antibody gets FDA Orphan Drug designation for Pertussis treatment

Synthetic Biologics' SYN-005 antibody gets FDA Orphan Drug designation for Pertussis treatment

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a biotechnology company developing novel anti-infective biologic and drug programs targeting specific pathogens that cause serious infections and diseases, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted Orphan Drug designation to the Company's proprietary SYN-005 monoclonal antibody (mAb) combination for the treatment of Pertussis, more commonly known as whooping cough. [More]
New class of compounds protect brain cells from traumatic brain injury

New class of compounds protect brain cells from traumatic brain injury

A new class of compounds has now been shown to protect brain cells from the type of damage caused by blast-mediated traumatic brain injury (TBI). [More]
Research gives scientists new insight into evolution of gibbon genome

Research gives scientists new insight into evolution of gibbon genome

A team led by an Oregon Health & Science University researcher has sequenced and annotated the genome of the only ape whose DNA had yet to be sequenced - the gibbon, an endangered small ape that inhabits the tropical forests of Southeast Asia. [More]
Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

People with blood type AB may be more likely to develop memory loss in later years than people with other blood types, according to a study published in the September 10, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Pollution in many cities threatens brain development in children

Pollution in many cities threatens brain development in children

Pollution in many cities threatens the brain development in children. Findings by University of Montana Professor Dr. Lilian Calder-n-Garcidue-as, MA, MD, Ph.D., and her team of researchers reveal that children living in megacities are at increased risk for brain inflammation and neurodegenerative changes, including Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. [More]
Working memory may be underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in MS

Working memory may be underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in MS

Kessler Foundation scientists have shown that working memory may be an underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
People with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in gray matter

People with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in gray matter

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) lose myelin in the gray matter of their brains and the loss is closely correlated with the severity of the disease, according to a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. [More]
Transparency Life receives SBIR program grant to fund Phase 2a proof-of-concept study for MS

Transparency Life receives SBIR program grant to fund Phase 2a proof-of-concept study for MS

Transparency Life Sciences, LLC (TLS), the world's first clinical-stage drug development company based on open innovation, today announced that it has received a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program grant to fund a Phase 2a proof-of-concept study testing the utility of the ACE inhibitor lisinopril as an adjunctive therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]