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Perrigo: Shareholders may reject Mylan' offer

Perrigo: Shareholders may reject Mylan' offer

Perrigo Company plc today commented on the Mylan N.V. shareholder vote regarding its planned unsolicited offer to acquire Perrigo. [More]

Perrigo closes acquisition of leading OTC brands from GSK

Perrigo Company plc today announced that it has completed the acquisition of leading OTC brands from GSK in an all cash transaction valued at €200 million. The transaction is a clear demonstration of Perrigo's unique ability to maximize brand value across the Company's leading European distribution network spanning 36 countries. [More]
Isolated tauopathy ‘surprisingly common’ in AD dementia

Isolated tauopathy ‘surprisingly common’ in AD dementia

A study shows that about a quarter of people with clinically diagnosed mild or moderate Alzheimer’s disease have only minimal β-amyloid deposition on autopsy. [More]
Two studies highlight important new discovery around most common genetic defect linked to ALS

Two studies highlight important new discovery around most common genetic defect linked to ALS

In today's issue of Nature, two new studies funded in part by The ALS Association both highlight an important new discovery around the C9orf72 mutation, the most common genetic defect associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). [More]

Cryoport to support future clinical trials for Opexa's personalized T-cell immunotherapy programs for MS, NMO

Cryoport, Inc., the leading provider of advanced cryogenic logistics solutions for the life sciences industry, today announced that its validated cryogenic logistics solution will support future clinical trials for Opexa Therapeutics' lead personalized T-cell immunotherapy programs for Multiple Sclerosis ("MS") and Neuromyelitis Optica ("NMO"). [More]
Dementia sufferers may begin to lose awareness of memory problems 2-3 years before onset

Dementia sufferers may begin to lose awareness of memory problems 2-3 years before onset

People who will develop dementia may begin to lose awareness of their memory problems two to three years before the actual onset of the disease, according to a new study published in the August 26, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Common gene mutation may cause brain damage associated with ALS and FTD

Common gene mutation may cause brain damage associated with ALS and FTD

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have discovered some of the first steps in how a very common gene mutation causes the brain damage associated with both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). [More]
Scientists reveal how a common gene mutation in ALS and FTD disrupts normal cell function

Scientists reveal how a common gene mutation in ALS and FTD disrupts normal cell function

Researchers have determined how the most common gene mutation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) disrupts normal cell function, providing insight likely to advance efforts to develop targeted therapies for these brain diseases. [More]
Mental visual imagery training may improve AM/EFT functioning in RR-MS patients

Mental visual imagery training may improve AM/EFT functioning in RR-MS patients

Patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS), the most common form of the disease, often have deficits in two neuropsychological functions, autobiographical memory (AM) and episodic future thinking (EFT), which impact quality of life. [More]
Cognitive factors associated with activity, participation in everyday life among people with MS

Cognitive factors associated with activity, participation in everyday life among people with MS

Kessler Foundation researchers found that processing speed is the primary limiting factor associated with activity and participation in everyday life among people with multiple sclerosis (MS). "Factors that moderate activity limitation and participation restriction in people with multiple sclerosis" was published in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy. [More]
FDA accepts Allergan's resubmission of BOTOX sBLA for treatment of adults with upper limb spasticity

FDA accepts Allergan's resubmission of BOTOX sBLA for treatment of adults with upper limb spasticity

Allergan plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted the company's resubmission of its Supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) for BOTOX (onabotulinumtoxinA) for the treatment of adults with lower limb (involving ankle and toe muscles) spasticity in adults. [More]
Stress hormone cortisol tied to thinking problems in healthy older people

Stress hormone cortisol tied to thinking problems in healthy older people

Testing the saliva of healthy older people for the level of the stress hormone cortisol may help identify individuals who should be screened for problems with thinking skills, according to a study published in the August 19, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Early exposure to inflammatory cytokines can paralyze CD4 T cells

Early exposure to inflammatory cytokines can paralyze CD4 T cells

In a discovery that is likely to rewrite immunology text books, researchers at UC Davis have found that early exposure to inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 2, can "paralyze" CD4 T cells, immune components that help orchestrate the body's response to pathogens and other invaders. [More]
Survey identifies key factors linked to pediatric safety events in out-of-hospital emergent care situations

Survey identifies key factors linked to pediatric safety events in out-of-hospital emergent care situations

A national survey of more than 750 emergency medical services providers conducted by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University identified airway management skills, personal anxiety and limited pediatric care proficiency among key factors that may contribute to pediatric safety events for children in out-of-hospital emergent care situations. [More]
Physical activity linked to reduced paediatric MS burden

Physical activity linked to reduced paediatric MS burden

A cross-sectional study has found an association between moderate or strenuous physical activity and reduced fatigue, lesion volumes and relapse rates in children and adolescents with multiple sclerosis. [More]
Nuclear process in the brain may play critical role in health and disease

Nuclear process in the brain may play critical role in health and disease

Every brain cell has a nucleus, or a central command station. Scientists have shown that the passage of molecules through the nucleus of a star-shaped brain cell, called an astrocyte, may play a critical role in health and disease. [More]
Others consider our moral traits, not memory, to be core component of our identity

Others consider our moral traits, not memory, to be core component of our identity

We may view our memory as being essential to who we are, but new findings suggest that others consider our moral traits to be the core component of our identity. Data collected from family members of patients suffering from neurodegenerative disease showed that it was changes in moral behavior, not memory loss, that caused loved ones to say that the patient wasn't "the same person" anymore. [More]
Kessler Foundation researcher confirms link between sleep disturbances and MS-related fatigue

Kessler Foundation researcher confirms link between sleep disturbances and MS-related fatigue

Kessler Foundation's Lauren Strober, PhD, explores the association of secondary fatigue and sleep disturbances in multiple sclerosis (MS). "Fatigue in multiple sclerosis: a look at the role of poor sleep" was published in Frontiers in Neurology. [More]
Inhibikase Therapeutics launches observational clinical study in patients who survived PML

Inhibikase Therapeutics launches observational clinical study in patients who survived PML

Inhibikase Therapeutics, Inc. announces the launch of an observational clinical study in patients who contracted Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML), the rare and often fatal brain infection that arises as an unintended side effect of some medications used for treatment of Multiple Sclerosis, Crohn's disease, Ulcerative Colitis and certain cancers of the blood and lymph. [More]
Netrin1 protein acts as cellular "marriage broker"

Netrin1 protein acts as cellular "marriage broker"

Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, at McGill University and the McGill University Health Centre, have made a breakthrough in understanding an important protein that appears to act as a kind of cellular "marriage broker." [More]
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