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Scientists discover link between two genes involved in PD and autoimmune diseases

Scientists discover link between two genes involved in PD and autoimmune diseases

A study publish in the journal CELL indicates that two genes associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) are key regulators of the immune system, providing direct evidence linking Parkinson's to autoimmune disease. [More]
AMSBIO launches new cell lines and controls for PD-1 research

AMSBIO launches new cell lines and controls for PD-1 research

AMSBIO has introduced new cell lines and controls for Programmed Cell Death Protein 1 (PD-1) research, and to test inhibitors of the PD-1 / PD-L1 pathway. [More]
Study shows many people may have potential to develop Huntington's disease

Study shows many people may have potential to develop Huntington's disease

More people may have the potential to develop Huntington's disease than previously thought, according to a study published in the June 22, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Switch to rituximab shows anti-inflammatory effect in relapsing-remitting MS

Switch to rituximab shows anti-inflammatory effect in relapsing-remitting MS

Rituximab may be an attractive treatment option for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, suggest phase II study findings showing its efficacy in controlling inflammatory activity. [More]
TUM scientists identify four new risk genes altered in MS patients

TUM scientists identify four new risk genes altered in MS patients

Scientists of the Technical University of Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry have identified four new risk genes that are altered in German patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Vitamin D supplementation may not heal all health problems

Vitamin D supplementation may not heal all health problems

As Canadians prepare for long summer days in the sun, a new publication is shedding light on the suggested medical benefits of a nutrient that comes with the sun's rays: vitamin D. [More]
Epilepsy in immediate family member may increase person’s chances of being diagnosed with autism

Epilepsy in immediate family member may increase person’s chances of being diagnosed with autism

Having a first-degree relative with epilepsy may increase a person's risk of being diagnosed with autism, according to a study published in the June 15, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Leaky blood vessels in the brain called cerebral microbleeds are associated with an increased risk of physical and cognitive disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study by researchers in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo. [More]
S1P1R variation may cause differential patient responses to fingolimod treatment

S1P1R variation may cause differential patient responses to fingolimod treatment

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder that results in demyelination of neurons. The FDA-approved drug fingolimod (Gilenya, FTY-720) modulates signaling by the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), which is linked to MS pathogenesis. [More]
New survey shows how patients use social media to gain better understanding of health condition

New survey shows how patients use social media to gain better understanding of health condition

A new survey from Health Union of more than 2,200 people with chronic health conditions and their caregivers illustrates how patients use online health information to better understand their health condition, learn about symptoms and treatment, and share experiences with other patients living with the same health condition. [More]
Potential non-invasive screening biomarker for SSc-PAH

Potential non-invasive screening biomarker for SSc-PAH

Serum asymmetric dimethylarginine may be an effective non-invasive screening biomarker for systemic sclerosis-related pulmonary arterial hypertension, study findings indicate. [More]
New UCLA study reveals strategy to fight against pesticide-associated Parkinson’s disease

New UCLA study reveals strategy to fight against pesticide-associated Parkinson’s disease

Exposure to a group of common pesticides, called dithiocarbamates, has long been associated with an increased risk of Parkinson's disease, although the mechanism by which the compounds exert their toxicity on the brain has not been completely understood. [More]
Researcher employs high-resolution imaging, mechanical mapping to gauge structural integrity of cornea

Researcher employs high-resolution imaging, mechanical mapping to gauge structural integrity of cornea

A biomedical engineer at the University of Houston is developing new techniques to map the structural integrity of the human cornea, work that could lead to more effective therapies for degenerative corneal disease. [More]
U-M researchers explore new way to improve cognitive issues in MS patients

U-M researchers explore new way to improve cognitive issues in MS patients

Multiple sclerosis looks different from person to person. In many individuals, though, the difficulty in maintaining a sense of self and in keeping up intellectually can be the disease's most devastating manifestations. [More]
PET imaging can help identify autoimmune inflammation in MS

PET imaging can help identify autoimmune inflammation in MS

The triggers of autoimmune inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS) have eluded scientists for many years, but molecular imaging is bringing researchers closer to identifying them, while providing a means of evaluating next-generation therapies for MS, say researchers introducing a study at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. [More]
New stem cell treatment may halt clinical relapses, development of new brain lesions in patients MS

New stem cell treatment may halt clinical relapses, development of new brain lesions in patients MS

A new use of chemotherapy followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT) has fully halted clinical relapses and development of new brain lesions in 23 of 24 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for a prolonged period without the need for ongoing medication, according to a new phase 2 clinical trial, published in The Lancet. [More]
Study opens up possibility of developing potential hormone therapies for SSc skin disease

Study opens up possibility of developing potential hormone therapies for SSc skin disease

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed for the first time a beneficial effect of oestrogens in experimental models of skin fibrosis that are representative of the disease process in systemic sclerosis (SSc). [More]
Immunoablation strengthens haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation effects in MS

Immunoablation strengthens haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation effects in MS

Intensifying current transplant conditioning to remove rather than suppress immune cells ahead of autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation may result in long-term remission of multiple sclerosis, phase II trial findings show. [More]
Implantable loop recorder can help diagnose heart rhythm abnormalities in SSc patients

Implantable loop recorder can help diagnose heart rhythm abnormalities in SSc patients

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed that use of an easy to insert heart monitor in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and no known heart disease enables early detection and treatment of potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias. [More]
New drug for chronic migraine may reduce headache hours in few days

New drug for chronic migraine may reduce headache hours in few days

A new drug to prevent migraine was associated with fewer headache hours for people with chronic migraine within three to seven days after the first injection, according to a study published in the June 8, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
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