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A sedative is a substance that induces sedation by reducing irritability or excitement.
Study explores relationship between moderate-vigorous exercise and psychotic symptoms

Study explores relationship between moderate-vigorous exercise and psychotic symptoms

Physical activity can help reduce cardiovascular disease and premature mortality in people with psychological problems. [More]
RACP releases new Choosing Wisely Australia recommendations on appropriate use of medicines for older adults

RACP releases new Choosing Wisely Australia recommendations on appropriate use of medicines for older adults

The latest lists developed by specialties from the Royal Australasian College of Physicians as part of the Choosing Wisely Australia initiative deliver a strong message on appropriate use of medicines for older Australians. [More]
European Union may be catching up to the United States in nonmedical prescription drug abuse

European Union may be catching up to the United States in nonmedical prescription drug abuse

There is a high rate of prescription pain reliever abuse in Europe, largely accounted by opioids, according to the first comparative study of prescription drug abuse in the European Union, which was conducted by researchers at RTI International and published in BMC Psychiatry. [More]
Majority of American adults use prescription drugs inappropriately and dangerously

Majority of American adults use prescription drugs inappropriately and dangerously

The majority of American adults taking opioids and other commonly prescribed medications use them in ways that put their health at risk, including potentially dangerous combinations with other drugs, according to a new study from Quest Diagnostics, the world’s leading provider of diagnostic information services. [More]
Study assesses prevalence of delirium among survivors of cardiac arrest treated with hypothermia

Study assesses prevalence of delirium among survivors of cardiac arrest treated with hypothermia

A study in the American Journal of Critical Care found a remarkably high prevalence of delirium in a small cohort of critically ill patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. [More]
Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Nonmedical use of prescription opioids more than doubled among adults in the United States from 2001-2002 to 2012-2013, based on a study from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, part of the National Institutes of Health. Nearly 10 million Americans, or 4.1 percent of the adult population, used opioid medications in 2012-2013 a class of drugs that includes OxyContin and Vicodin, without a prescription or not as prescribed (in greater amounts, more often, or longer than prescribed) in the past year. [More]
Women need more propofol to stay sedated during oral surgery

Women need more propofol to stay sedated during oral surgery

Anesthesia Progress – The stress that oral surgery patients experience during a procedure can cause elevated heart rates and blood pressure during operations. [More]
Single, short duration exposure of general anesthesia appears to cause no cognitive harm in healthy, young children

Single, short duration exposure of general anesthesia appears to cause no cognitive harm in healthy, young children

A recent study concluded that very young, healthy children undergoing short surgical procedures requiring a single exposure to general anesthesia did not exhibit any effect on the cognitive outcomes tested, according to SmartTots, a public-private partnership of the International Anesthesia Research Society and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. [More]
TUM researchers uncover molecular mechanism of thalidomide

TUM researchers uncover molecular mechanism of thalidomide

In the 1950s, thalidomide (Contergan) was prescribed as a sedative drug to pregnant women, resulting in a great number of infants with serious malformations. Up to now, the reasons for these disastrous birth defects have remained unclear. [More]
Study ignores possibility that drugs, chemicals affect sexes differently

Study ignores possibility that drugs, chemicals affect sexes differently

Many of the medicines we take were only ever tested on men during clinical studies. This poses a distinct danger that females are receiving suboptimal care—and that treatments specifically benefiting women are going undiscovered. [More]
Scientists find ketamine as effective sedative for treating highly-agitated patients prior to hospitalisation

Scientists find ketamine as effective sedative for treating highly-agitated patients prior to hospitalisation

Scientists have shown that ketamine is far more effective than the more commonly used haloperidol for treating highly-agitated patients prior to hospitalisation. [More]
Drinking tea flavored with herbs may improve mood and memory

Drinking tea flavored with herbs may improve mood and memory

The herbs peppermint, chamomile, rosemary and lavender have been proven to have an impact on mood and memory, with significant benefits displayed for older people, according to new research from Northumbria University. [More]
Opioids could be dangerous, deadly at high doses

Opioids could be dangerous, deadly at high doses

Most people know that heroin is a dangerous drug, but its cousins, the legal, pharmaceutical opioids, such as codeine or hydrocodone, must be safe, right?Not so fast.Opioids—which include the illegal drug heroin as well as prescription medications, including hydrocodone (such as Vicodin), oxycodone (such as OxyContin and Percocet), morphine and codeine—can be dangerous, even deadly, at high doses. [More]
Trimeprazine improves β cell function, slows progression of diabetes

Trimeprazine improves β cell function, slows progression of diabetes

β cells in pancreatic islets are responsible for producing insulin, which is essential to regulate blood glucose homeostasis. In type 1 diabetes, pancreatic β cells are destroyed due to an autoimmune attack, whereas in type 2 diabetes, pancreatic β cells may have deficiencies in secreting insulin or insulin-responding tissues can become insulin resistant. [More]
1 in 10 veterans and civilian patients experiences new ICU-related PTSD up to one year after discharge

1 in 10 veterans and civilian patients experiences new ICU-related PTSD up to one year after discharge

One in ten patients is at risk of having new post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to their ICU experience up to a year post-discharge. This was the finding from a multicenter, prospective cohort research study of veterans and civilians. [More]
UC San Diego Health offers safe weight loss option for patients

UC San Diego Health offers safe weight loss option for patients

Patients seeking rapid but safe weight loss have a new option at the Bariatric Metabolic Institute at UC San Diego Health. During an outpatient procedure, surgeons place an adjustable saline balloon in the stomach. The volume and shape of the balloon take up space in the stomach, which encourages food portion control. The device, called Orbera, has been shown to reduce total body weight by 10 percent. [More]
New test can detect drug abuse faster

New test can detect drug abuse faster

A new test for club drugs like ketamine can detect low levels of drugs in urine and plasma, making it faster, easier and cheaper to identify them. The authors of the study, published in Journal of Chromatography B, say it could give authorities the boost they need to keep up with trends drug (ab)use. [More]
Brain scans may predict possibility of recovering from coma

Brain scans may predict possibility of recovering from coma

Brain scans of people in a coma may help predict who will regain consciousness, according to a study published in the November 11, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study looked at connections between areas of the brain that play a role in regulating consciousness. [More]
Brief exposure to general anesthesia during infancy does not affect neurological development

Brief exposure to general anesthesia during infancy does not affect neurological development

Although the medical community has raised concerns about the safety of anesthesia on the developing brains of young children, new research presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2015 annual meeting, found brief exposure to general anesthesia during infancy did not impair neurological development. This is the first prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial to assess the long-term, neurological effects of anesthesia in children. [More]
Most drug residues discharged to wastewater come from private households

Most drug residues discharged to wastewater come from private households

Most drug residues discharged to wastewater come from private households. As contributors of pollution by Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs), health establishments, such as hospitals, psychiatric and nursing facilities are hardly worth mentioning. [More]
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