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New research shows higher risk of mortality in hotter, poorer neighbourhoods during extreme heat events

New research shows higher risk of mortality in hotter, poorer neighbourhoods during extreme heat events

In Vancouver, heat exposure and social vulnerability can be a lethal combination. [More]
Johns Hopkins students improve protective suit design to help Ebola health workers

Johns Hopkins students improve protective suit design to help Ebola health workers

For health workers in the field treating people stricken with Ebola and other diseases, a protective suit is the first defense against infection. The suit and head covering itself, however, can hamper their ability to help by impeding breathing, or heating up so quickly in high temperatures and humidity that they can scarcely work for more than an hour. [More]
New app could help reduce readmission rates, save healthcare industry billions

New app could help reduce readmission rates, save healthcare industry billions

Hospitals and healthcare providers are penalized for readmitting patients within a 30-day time period. An award-winning app developed by graduate students at Binghamton University, State University of New York, could help reduce these readmission rates and save the healthcare industry billions. [More]
Regular exercise can help retain, repair and regenerate damaged muscle in older adults

Regular exercise can help retain, repair and regenerate damaged muscle in older adults

Exercise may have some surprising benefits for seniors who experience rapid muscle loss and muscle injury and loss as they age. Researchers at McMaster University have found that physical activity can help retain, even repair and regenerate damaged muscle in the elderly. [More]
Study finds nearly half of older Americans spend heavily on end-of-life care

Study finds nearly half of older Americans spend heavily on end-of-life care

Last-ditch, high-tech heroic treatments. Days in the hospital intensive care unit. You might think this is what makes dying in America so expensive - and that it's where we should focus efforts to spend the nation's healthcare dollars more wisely. [More]
Insurance coverage of CT colonography and other USPSTF-recognized tests could help fight CRC

Insurance coverage of CT colonography and other USPSTF-recognized tests could help fight CRC

Final United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) colorectal cancer screening recommendations assigned an "A" grade to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in those ages 50-75 years and provided a list of recognized screening exams. [More]
U-M study compares early-use and longer-duration stimulant medication with nonstimulant therapy for ADHD

U-M study compares early-use and longer-duration stimulant medication with nonstimulant therapy for ADHD

Youth who take Ritalin, Adderall or other stimulant medications for ADHD over an extended period of time early in life are no more at risk for substance abuse in later adolescence than teens without ADHD, according to a University of Michigan study. [More]
Video conference technology connects hospital specialists and nursing home staff to care for dementia patients

Video conference technology connects hospital specialists and nursing home staff to care for dementia patients

Nursing homes in the United States care for increasing numbers of people with dementia, yet many lack access to geriatric psychiatrists, behavioral neurologists and other specialists who may help manage symptoms associated with dementia, including behavioral issues. [More]
In-home radar, bed sensors can capture early signs of illness in older adults

In-home radar, bed sensors can capture early signs of illness in older adults

Developing and evaluating motion-capture technology to help older adults "age in place" has been the focus of researchers at the University of Missouri for more than a decade. [More]
Older runners consume similar rate of metabolic energy as young runners, study finds

Older runners consume similar rate of metabolic energy as young runners, study finds

If you're an avid runner, logging dozens of miles every week and you happen to be over 65, odds are you're burning oxygen at nearly the same rate as a runner in her 20s. [More]
Majority of older mobile phone users face age or gray divide problems

Majority of older mobile phone users face age or gray divide problems

While close to 99 percent of seniors aged 65 and older in the United States and Europe use mobile phones, there appears to be a "gray divide" in how seniors use information and communication technology, according to a Ben-Gurion University of the Negev study. [More]
Melatonin can be of great value for elderly people suffering from hypertension

Melatonin can be of great value for elderly people suffering from hypertension

The older we get, the more likely our circadian rhythms are disrupted. For example, blood pressure (BP), not only tends to increase but as well become more irregular. Luckily, as we show in our research, melatonin helps to ameliorate both trends. [More]
LALES study analyzes risk, prevalence of early and late stage AMD among Latinos

LALES study analyzes risk, prevalence of early and late stage AMD among Latinos

The University of Southern California Roski Eye Institute researchers and clinicians published results of the largest population-based study of adult Latinos and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in the National Eye Institute-funded "Los Angeles Latino Eye Study." The study, published in JAMA Ophthalmology, is the first to analyze the risk and prevalence of early and late stage AMD and its impact on quality of life for older Latinos. [More]
Safety tips to prevent slips and falls among seniors

Safety tips to prevent slips and falls among seniors

May is National Trauma Awareness Month, and this year the American Trauma Society is raising awareness about senior safety and falls with "Safe Steps for Seniors." The Stony Brook Trauma Center is taking steps to shed light on the matter to help prevent serious injuries from occurring. [More]
Dog ownership and walking increase physical health among older adults

Dog ownership and walking increase physical health among older adults

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that adults of all ages should engage in 150 or more minutes of moderate physical activity per week. Among adults 60 years of age or more, walking is the most common form of leisure-time physical activity because it is self-paced, low impact and does not require equipment. [More]
Alzheimer's disease impairs visual face perception beyond causing memory problems

Alzheimer's disease impairs visual face perception beyond causing memory problems

A recent study has demonstrated that, beyond causing memory problems, Alzheimer's disease also impairs visual face perception. This finding may help families better understand their loved one's inevitable difficulties and lead to new avenues to postpone this painful aspect of the disease, such as the recognition of particular facial traits or voice recognition. [More]
Wake Forest Baptist researchers looking for ways to keep older adults on their feet

Wake Forest Baptist researchers looking for ways to keep older adults on their feet

There's no getting around it: Simply getting around is a major issue for older adults.
"People are in nursing homes for two reasons, either they can't think or they can't walk," said Stephen Kritchevsky, Ph.D., director of the Sticht Center on Aging at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. North Carolina. "We're working very hard on the thinking part, and the walking part is equally important. [More]
School fitness reports ineffective in promoting weight loss among students

School fitness reports ineffective in promoting weight loss among students

Teens being classified as overweight in school fitness reports does not appear to have any impact on short-term changes in body mass index, finds a new study by New York University's Institute for Education and Social Policy, the Center for Policy Research at Syracuse University's Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, and Columbia University. [More]
One-fourth of seniors acquire new superbugs during hospital stay

One-fourth of seniors acquire new superbugs during hospital stay

One in four seniors is bringing along stowaways from the hospital to their next stop: superbugs on their hands.Moreover, seniors who go to a nursing home or other post-acute care facility will continue to acquire new superbugs during their stay, according to findings made by University of Michigan researchers published today in a JAMA Internal Medicine research letter. [More]
PACE: A community-based long-term care model for elderly

PACE: A community-based long-term care model for elderly

A new article "A Case Exemplar for National Policy Leadership: Expanding Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE)," in the March 2016 Journal of Gerontology, chronicles the beginnings of PACE (Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly) and outlines its rise to nationwide acceptance. PACE is a viable and sustainable model of community-based long-term care that provides coordinated and comprehensive services with an interdisciplinary patient-centered team model that is paid for through Medicare, Medicaid, and other insurers. [More]
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