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Scientists identify factors that affect levels of toxic compounds in e-cigarette vapor

Scientists identify factors that affect levels of toxic compounds in e-cigarette vapor

Electronic cigarettes, or e-cigs, have grown in popularity as an alternative to traditional cigarette smoking. [More]
Lifestyle choices more likely to influence quality of life for ARDS survivors

Lifestyle choices more likely to influence quality of life for ARDS survivors

A new study of patients who survive the once-nearly fatal Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) finds their subsequent quality of life has more to do with lifestyle factors than how sick they were in the hospital. [More]
Women who start menstruation, menopause later in life have increased odds of living to 90-years-old

Women who start menstruation, menopause later in life have increased odds of living to 90-years-old

The number of women living to age 90 in the United States has increased significantly in the past century. [More]
Testing lung health online: an interview with Professor Stephen Holgate

Testing lung health online: an interview with Professor Stephen Holgate

In our latest report – The Battle for Breath – the impact of lung disease in the UK, figures suggest that 1 in 5 (around 12.7 million) have been diagnosed with a lung condition in the UK. If you’re over the age of 70, this rises to 1 in 3. [More]
Researchers study link between health insurance, tobacco and alcohol use among reproductive age women

Researchers study link between health insurance, tobacco and alcohol use among reproductive age women

Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health studied the relationship between health insurance coverage and tobacco and alcohol use among reproductive age women in the United States, and whether there were differences according to pregnancy status. [More]
New analysis reveals ways to reduce patient's risk of postoperative pneumonia after cardiac surgery

New analysis reveals ways to reduce patient's risk of postoperative pneumonia after cardiac surgery

Pneumonia is the most prevalent infection after open heart surgery, leading to longer hospital stays and lower odds of survival. [More]
Scientists develop prediction score to identify older adults at risk of developing pneumonia

Scientists develop prediction score to identify older adults at risk of developing pneumonia

In a study published in the Journal of American Geriatrics Society, researchers developed a "prediction score" to help healthcare professionals determine which older adults might be most at risk for developing pneumonia. [More]
Global standards for vaping products need to be harmonised to promote innovation

Global standards for vaping products need to be harmonised to promote innovation

Against a backdrop of a growing number of e-cigarette users globally, British American Tobacco is leading efforts to develop and harmonise standards around vaping products to further reassure consumers of these products potential in reducing the harm from smoking. [More]
Predictive power of computational toxicology demonstrated with crowd-sources scientific challenge

Predictive power of computational toxicology demonstrated with crowd-sources scientific challenge

Results of the Systems Toxicology Computational Challenge have demonstrated how transcriptomics information present in the blood can be used to predict whether people have been exposed or not exposed to specific toxicants. [More]
Researchers identify important therapeutic target for small cell lung cancer

Researchers identify important therapeutic target for small cell lung cancer

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a protein termed ASCL1 that is essential to the development of small cell lung cancer and that, when deleted in the lungs of mice, prevents the cancer from forming. [More]
Researchers developing and validating model to predict risk for colon cancer in people under 50

Researchers developing and validating model to predict risk for colon cancer in people under 50

While the incidence of colon cancer has been declining in individuals 50 years old and older in the United States, it is steadily rising in those under age 50. With funding from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Thomas F. Imperiale, M.D., a VA and Regenstrief Institute clinician-researcher, is developing and validating a model to predict risk for colon cancer in those under 50 with no family history of the disease. [More]
New study shows women with ADHD likely to have many mental, physical health problems

New study shows women with ADHD likely to have many mental, physical health problems

Women with ADHD are much more likely to have a wide range of mental and physical health problems in comparison to women without ADHD, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Toronto. [More]
Breakthrough research shows cellular stress could be key to variety of birth defects

Breakthrough research shows cellular stress could be key to variety of birth defects

For the first time, scientists believe they've discovered a cause of multiple types of birth defects triggered by environmental stresses. [More]
Researchers say sale of menthol-like cigarettes violates spirit of new laws in Canada

Researchers say sale of menthol-like cigarettes violates spirit of new laws in Canada

Despite a recent ban on the sale of menthol cigarettes in the Canadian provinces of Alberta and Nova Scotia, cigarettes made with similar coloring and marketed as having the same taste are still being sold, new research from the Institute for Global Tobacco Control at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. [More]
Self-care: achieving accessibility safely. An interview with Zephanie Jordan

Self-care: achieving accessibility safely. An interview with Zephanie Jordan

Self-care can be broadly defined to include measures taken by an individual in the pursuit of obtaining or maintaining good health. It ranges from healthy eating and exercise to good hygiene practices to appropriate use of products such as dietary supplements and over-the-counter medicines to accessing health promoting services. [More]
Eating more healthy fats may lower type 2 diabetes risk

Eating more healthy fats may lower type 2 diabetes risk

Eating more unsaturated fats, especially polyunsaturated fats, in place of either dietary carbohydrate or saturated fats lowers blood sugar levels and improves insulin resistance and secretion, according to a new meta-analysis of data from 102 randomised controlled feeding trials in adults. [More]
Use of nicotine patches or Zyban drug during pregnancy benefits both mother and child

Use of nicotine patches or Zyban drug during pregnancy benefits both mother and child

The results of a study conducted by Dr. Anick Bérard, Professor and Fonds de recherche du Québec - Santé Research Chair on Medications and Pregnancy, at the University of Montreal's Faculty of Pharmacy and the Ste-Justine University Hospital demonstrate that the use of nicotine patches or the drug Zyban has positive effects for the unborn child and allows pregnant women to stop smoking during and after pregnancy. [More]
Study identifies ten potentially modifiable risk factors for stroke

Study identifies ten potentially modifiable risk factors for stroke

Hypertension remains the single most important modifiable risk factor for stroke, and the impact of hypertension and nine other risk factors together account for 90% of all strokes, according to an analysis of nearly 27000 people from every continent in the world, published in The Lancet. [More]
Preventing sudden unexpected deaths of babies and children: an interview with Professor Peter Fleming

Preventing sudden unexpected deaths of babies and children: an interview with Professor Peter Fleming

SIDS is the sudden and unexpected death of a baby, which usually occurs during sleep. The great majority of the babies are aged between about two weeks and seven or eight months. [More]
Study finds sex differences in smoking cessation with medications

Study finds sex differences in smoking cessation with medications

A new study led by Assistant Medical Professor Philip Smith of The City College of New York's Sophie Davis Biomedical Education/CUNY School of Medicine, and conducted in collaboration with researchers at Yale University and Yeshiva University, found important differences between women and men in their ability to quit smoking when taking medications commonly prescribed to help smokers quit. [More]
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