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Atypical heart attack symptoms lead to delayed treatment, increased injury in women

Atypical heart attack symptoms lead to delayed treatment, increased injury in women

When having a heart attack, most people will experience some kind of chest pain or pressure that worsens. Pain and pressure, along with sweating, shortness of breath and pain that migrates into the arms or neck are the typical heart attack symptoms. [More]
Marijuana use among U.S. adults not as high as predicted before

Marijuana use among U.S. adults not as high as predicted before

Marijuana use is on the rise, with an estimated 12.5 percent of adults living in the United States reportedly using the drug at least once in 2013, according to a new study that looked at drug usage over the span of a decade. [More]
Saint Louis University research finds that China's smoking rates may start to decline

Saint Louis University research finds that China's smoking rates may start to decline

Younger Chinese teenage boys are less likely to start smoking than those born longer ago, according to research from Saint Louis University and Chongqing University. [More]
Penn investigators explore new treatment option for cocaine dependence

Penn investigators explore new treatment option for cocaine dependence

In the ongoing fight against drug addiction, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania's School of Nursing and Perelman School of Medicine have discovered a unique application for an FDA-approved drug currently used for obese patients and type 2 diabetics: treatment for cocaine dependence. [More]
Study sheds light on role of red raspberries in metabolically-based chronic diseases

Study sheds light on role of red raspberries in metabolically-based chronic diseases

Components in red raspberries may have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and metabolic stabilizing activity, according to a comprehensive review of the available scientific literature published in the January issue of Advances in Nutrition. [More]
Benzodiazepine dementia risk refuted

Benzodiazepine dementia risk refuted

Benzodiazepines, commonly used by older adults to manage sleep, anxiety and depressive disorders, do not increase the risk of dementia or hasten cognitive decline, study findings show. [More]
Findings may help states optimize tobacco cessation, cancer control programs

Findings may help states optimize tobacco cessation, cancer control programs

A new analysis indicates that states' Web-based and phone-based tobacco cessation programs can help people quit smoking, but certain personal characteristics may lead individuals to prefer one type of program over the other. [More]
Study shows association between traffic-related air pollution and dark spots on the skin

Study shows association between traffic-related air pollution and dark spots on the skin

A largescale study that included women from Germany and China has demonstrated a link between levels of traffic-related air pollution and air pollution-associated gases with the formation of dark spots on the skin, known as lentigenes. The most pronounced changes were observed on the cheeks of Asian women over the age of 50. [More]
Study estimates prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across U.S. using SAE method

Study estimates prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across U.S. using SAE method

The International and American Associations for Dental Research have published an article titled "Predicting Periodontitis at State and Local Levels in the United States" in the OnlineFirst portion of the Journal of Dental Research. In it, authors P.I. Eke, X. Zhang, H. Lu, L. Wei, G. Thornton-Evans, K.J. Greenlund, J.B. Holt and J.B. Croft estimate the prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across the United States by using a novel, small area estimation (SAE) method. [More]
Strong link found between incarceration of family members during childhood and heart attacks in men

Strong link found between incarceration of family members during childhood and heart attacks in men

A parent's incarceration has immediate, devastating effects on a family. Now, Virginia Tech and University of Toronto researchers say there may be a longer term risk: Men who as children experienced a family member's incarceration are approximately twice as likely to have a heart attack in later adulthood in comparison with men who were not exposed to such a childhood trauma. [More]
African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

A study based on medical records from more than a quarter million adult patients found that African-American patients with connective tissue diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis were twice as likely as white patients to suffer from narrowed or atherosclerotic blood vessels, which increase the risk of a heart attack, stroke or death. [More]
WHO calls on governments to rate movies that portray tobacco use

WHO calls on governments to rate movies that portray tobacco use

The World Health Organization is calling on governments to rate movies that portray tobacco use in a bid to prevent children and adolescents from starting to smoke cigarettes and use other forms of tobacco. [More]
Higher aerobic fitness levels may improve chances of survival after first heart attack

Higher aerobic fitness levels may improve chances of survival after first heart attack

People who are fit are more likely to survive their first heart attack, according to a study of nearly 70,000 patients of Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. [More]
Cherry-flavoured e-cigarette users may be exposed to potentially harmful chemical

Cherry-flavoured e-cigarette users may be exposed to potentially harmful chemical

An analysis of 145 different electronic-cigarette flavoring products reveals that many e-cigarette users may be exposed to a potentially harmful chemical. In a research letter published online today in the peer-reviewed journal Thorax, a research team led by Maciej Goniewicz, PhD, PharmD, of Roswell Park Cancer Institute reports that high levels of the respiratory irritant benzaldehyde were detected in the vapor from most of the flavored nicotine products they studied, with the highest concentrations in vapor from cherry-flavored products. [More]
Experts call for new approach to asthma and COPD patient management

Experts call for new approach to asthma and COPD patient management

Defining a patient's symptoms using the historical diagnostic labels of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an outdated approach to understanding an individual's condition, according to experts writing in the European Respiratory Journal today (Feb. 1, 2016). [More]
Frequent traumatic experiences throughout infancy increase risk of psychosis during adulthood

Frequent traumatic experiences throughout infancy increase risk of psychosis during adulthood

A research carried out with participation of the University of Granada proves that suffering repeated traumatic experiences throughout infancy and adolescence multiplies by 7 the risk of suffering psychosis during adulthood. [More]
HealthMine survey: 74% of people say activity trackers help them cope with heart condition

HealthMine survey: 74% of people say activity trackers help them cope with heart condition

Consumers are beginning to embrace mobile tools for heart health—but not enough. A January HealthMine survey of 501 consumers with known heart disease and/or risk found that just 27% of people are using an activity tracker. Only 16% say they are using their tracker to manage their heart condition/risk. Yet 74% of those who do use an activity tracker report the device is helping them cope with their heart condition. [More]
Researchers develop new sensor for continuous monitoring of blood flow in vascular diseases patients

Researchers develop new sensor for continuous monitoring of blood flow in vascular diseases patients

Frequent measurement of blood flow changes could improve the ability of health care providers to diagnose and treat patients with vascular conditions, such as those associated with diabetes and high blood pressure. [More]
Early puberty may increase risk of developing gestational diabetes

Early puberty may increase risk of developing gestational diabetes

Women who began having menstrual cycles at a younger age are at greater risk of developing gestational diabetes, a disease affecting up to 7 percent of pregnant women that can cause babies to develop type 2 diabetes and other complications, new research shows. [More]
Education level influences cognitive training outcomes in older adults

Education level influences cognitive training outcomes in older adults

The first study to investigate the effects of cognitive training on the cognitive functioning of older adults by education level has found that individuals with fewer than 12 years of schooling benefit more from cognitive training than their more highly educated counterparts. [More]
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