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Actor Stephen McGann explains how issues of medical accuracy were addressed in Call the Midwife drama

Actor Stephen McGann explains how issues of medical accuracy were addressed in Call the Midwife drama

Actor Stephen McGann, who plays GP Dr Patrick Turner in the hit BBC period drama Call the Midwife, has described the steps taken by the writers, production team and actors to ensure the series has sufficient medical accuracy and authenticity. In an essay published today by the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, McGann writes of the unique insight that the role of Dr Turner has given him into questions regarding the way popular culture portrays medics and medicine. [More]
Scientists find genetic link between autism and prodigy

Scientists find genetic link between autism and prodigy

Researchers have uncovered the first evidence of a genetic link between prodigy and autism. The scientists found that child prodigies in their sample share some of the same genetic variations with people who have autism. [More]
Study examines impact of smoking on cardiovascular risk in older people

Study examines impact of smoking on cardiovascular risk in older people

In the most comprehensive study ever on the impact of smoking on cardiovascular disease in older people, epidemiologist Dr. Ute Mons from the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) analyzed 25 individual studies, compiling data from over half a million individuals age 60 and older. [More]
Miriam Hospital awarded BDC designation for bariatric surgery

Miriam Hospital awarded BDC designation for bariatric surgery

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Rhode Island has awarded The Miriam Hospital a Blue Distinction Center+ (BDC) designation for bariatric surgery. A designation by the Blue Distinction Centers for Specialty Care program, BDCs are nationally designated health care facilities that deliver quality specialty care based on objective measures for patient safety and better health outcomes. [More]
Electronic cigarettes pose particular risks to the developing brains, organs of young people

Electronic cigarettes pose particular risks to the developing brains, organs of young people

Although heavily promoted as a safer cigarette and an aid to quit smoking, electronic cigarettes and the nicotine they deliver pose particular risks to the developing brains and organs of children. Use of electronic cigarettes by school-age children has surpassed traditional cigarette smoking, and it is critical to recognize and understand the risks related to nicotine exposure, addiction, and the poor regulation of these products, as described in the comprehensive Review article "Electronic Cigarettes: Vulnerability of Youth," published in Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
EuroPRevent congress to focus on cardiovascular disease

EuroPRevent congress to focus on cardiovascular disease

While death rates from heart disease in Europe have more than halved in many countries and in most population groups since the early 1980s, heart disease remains by far the leading cause of death. [More]
Smoking and genetics can increase women's likelihood of giving birth to twins

Smoking and genetics can increase women's likelihood of giving birth to twins

African American mothers who smoke and have a genetic profile that includes a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the TP53 gene have an increased likelihood of having twins, concluded a team of researchers from the University of South Florida and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. [More]
Statistical analyses identifies higher-than-expected rates of pediatric cancers in 2 Florida areas

Statistical analyses identifies higher-than-expected rates of pediatric cancers in 2 Florida areas

Higher-than-expected rates of pediatric cancers have been identified in the Miami metro area and an area west of the Everglades in a series of five statistical analyses conducted for Science and Public Policy, an open-access, online public-policy journal published by the American Statistical Association. [More]
Many people still underestimate health risks associated with smoking few cigarettes a day

Many people still underestimate health risks associated with smoking few cigarettes a day

Many people still dangerously underestimate the health risks associated with smoking even a few cigarettes a day, despite decades of public health campaigning, French researchers have reported at the European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC) in Geneva, Switzerland. [More]
E-cigarette use among American high school students is at an all time high

E-cigarette use among American high school students is at an all time high

A new government report has shown that the use of electronic cigarettes has tripled among American high school students between 2013 and 2014, raising concerns that the fight against teen smoking is failing... [More]
Study: Cardiorespiratory fitness associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers

Study: Cardiorespiratory fitness associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers

Cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers, according to researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health. [More]
UC Irvine professor explores the link between autism and ADHD

UC Irvine professor explores the link between autism and ADHD

For the better part of the last decade, a growing body of research has been revealing more and more similarities between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism. [More]
E-cigarette users less likely to quit smoking, shows study

E-cigarette users less likely to quit smoking, shows study

The rapid increase in use of e-cigarettes has led to heated debates between opponents who question the safety of these devices and proponents who claim the battery-operated products are a useful cessation tool. [More]
Genetic study may help identify novel targets for treatment of high blood pressure

Genetic study may help identify novel targets for treatment of high blood pressure

A genetic investigation of individuals in the Framingham Heart Study may prove useful to identify novel targets for the prevention or treatment of high blood pressure. The study, which takes a close look at networks of blood pressure-related genes, is published in the journal Molecular Systems Biology. [More]
New study finds that breastfeeding may help reduce smoking

New study finds that breastfeeding may help reduce smoking

While a large number of women quit or reduce smoking upon pregnancy recognition, many resume smoking postpartum. Previous research has estimated that approximately 70% of women who quit smoking during pregnancy relapse within the first year after childbirth, and of those who relapse, 67% resume smoking by three months, and up to 90% by six months. [More]
Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

A national survey suggests that slightly more than half of the older adults in the United States are now taking a daily dose of aspirin, even though its use is not recommended by the Food and Drug Administration for most people who have not yet had a heart attack or stroke. [More]
Children who experience multiple traumatic events face risk of being hypertensive adults

Children who experience multiple traumatic events face risk of being hypertensive adults

Children who experience multiple traumatic events, from emotional and sexual abuse to neglect, have higher blood pressures as young adults than their peers, researchers report. [More]
Veracyte launches new genomic test to improve lung cancer diagnosis

Veracyte launches new genomic test to improve lung cancer diagnosis

Veracyte, Inc., a molecular diagnostic company pioneering the field of molecular cytology, today announced the launch of its Percepta Bronchial Genomic Classifier, a new genomic test to resolve ambiguity in lung cancer diagnosis. The company will soon begin testing patient samples in its CLIA-certified laboratory, with the Percepta test now available to a limited number of institutions around the country. [More]
Two UC Davis researchers awarded grant to help improve surveillance for patients with small lung nodules

Two UC Davis researchers awarded grant to help improve surveillance for patients with small lung nodules

Two UC Davis researchers will help run a major national study to improve surveillance practices for patients with small lung nodules identified on CT imaging and extremely low risk for lung cancer. [More]
Racial and ethnic minority groups face disproportionate rates of smoking, health-related illnesses

Racial and ethnic minority groups face disproportionate rates of smoking, health-related illnesses

April is National Minority Health Month, and one of the most significant health issues minorities face is disproportionate rates of smoking and health-related illnesses. [More]
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