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Feminine girls, masculine boys more likely to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks

Feminine girls, masculine boys more likely to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks

Young people who conform most strongly to norms of masculinity and femininity-the most "feminine" girls and the most "masculine" boys-are significantly more likely than their peers to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. [More]

Researchers explore new standard of continuity of care for stroke patients

A new study from the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry is looking at nurse- and pharmacist-led interventions to improve the standard of care for patients who have suffered minor stroke or transient ischemic attack, also known as "mini stoke." [More]
Measurement of calcium in coronary arteries can predict heart disease risk

Measurement of calcium in coronary arteries can predict heart disease risk

With growing evidence that a measurement of the buildup of calcium in coronary arteries can predict heart disease risk, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed) researchers found that the process of "calcium scoring" was also accurate in predicting the chances of dying of heart disease among adults with little or no known risk of heart disease. [More]

Study shows 25 percent of Colorado foster kids on psychotropic drugs

The rate is 12 times greater than for other children on government insurance, a new study in Colorado finds. [More]
Genetic evidence confirms role of group of virus-fighting genes in cancer development

Genetic evidence confirms role of group of virus-fighting genes in cancer development

Researchers have found a major piece of genetic evidence that confirms the role of a group of virus-fighting genes in cancer development. [More]
Irrational health beliefs associated with lower adherence to prescribed cardiac rehab program, says study

Irrational health beliefs associated with lower adherence to prescribed cardiac rehab program, says study

​Heart patients with beliefs about health that aren't based on medical evidence are more likely to skip sessions of cardiac rehabilitation, new research suggests. [More]

Study shows obstructive sleep apnea is associated with increased risk of stroke, cancer and death

​A new study shows that moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea is independently associated with an increased risk of stroke, cancer and death. [More]
New Dartmouth study offers roadmap for better risk adjustment in Medicare

New Dartmouth study offers roadmap for better risk adjustment in Medicare

The methodology Medicare uses to adjust the billions of dollars it pays health plans and hospitals to account for how sick their patients are is flawed and should be replaced, according to a new study by Dartmouth investigators published in the journal BMJ that weighed the performance of Medicare's methodology against alternatives. [More]
Study looks at factors that influence life expectancy of childhood cancer survivors

Study looks at factors that influence life expectancy of childhood cancer survivors

Many factors influence the life expectancy of childhood cancer survivors: not getting enough exercise, being underweight, and being worried about their future health or their health insurance. These are the findings of research led by Cheryl Cox of the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in the US, published in Springer's Journal of Cancer Survivorship. The study found that, on average, childhood cancer survivors passed away before they were 40 years old. [More]

NextGen earns ONC 2014 Edition criteria certification for Emergency Department Solution

NextGen Healthcare Information Systems, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Quality Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ: QSII) and a leading provider of healthcare information systems and connectivity solutions, announced today that NextGen® Emergency Department Solution version 6.0 is compliant with the ONC 2014 Edition criteria and was certified as an electronic health record (EHR) Module on March 7, 2014 by the Certification Commission for Health Information Technology (CCHIT®), an ONC-ACB, in accordance with the applicable Hospital certification criteria adopted by the Secretary of Health and Human Services. [More]

Studies provide evidence to clarify role of NAFLD as independent risk factor for development of CVD

Two new studies presented today at the International Liver CongressTM 2014 have provided more evidence to clarify the role of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) as an independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). [More]
Older people with memory and thinking problems may have lower risk of dying from cancer

Older people with memory and thinking problems may have lower risk of dying from cancer

Older people who are starting to have memory and thinking problems, but do not yet have dementia may have a lower risk of dying from cancer than people who have no memory and thinking problems, according to a study published in the April 9, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Medison Pharma inks agreement with Brainsway for exclusive marketing of Deep TMS system in Israel

Medison Pharma inks agreement with Brainsway for exclusive marketing of Deep TMS system in Israel

Medison Pharma has concluded an agreement with the medical device company Brainsway for exclusive marketing and distribution of the Deep TMS (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation) system in Israel. [More]
Study examines links between parental obesity and risk of autism developmental in child

Study examines links between parental obesity and risk of autism developmental in child

Several studies have looked at possible links between maternal obesity during pregnancy and the risk of developmental disorders in the child. However, paternal obesity could be a greater risk factor than maternal obesity, according to a new study from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. [More]
Women who had radiotherapy for breast cancer may have increased risk of lung tumour

Women who had radiotherapy for breast cancer may have increased risk of lung tumour

Women who have radiotherapy for breast cancer have a small but significantly increased risk of subsequently developing a primary lung tumour, and now research has shown that this risk increases with the amount of radiation absorbed by the tissue. [More]

Study examines link between higher screen time and bone mineral density in adolescents

Results of a study presented today at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases, showed that in boys, higher screen time was adversely associated to bone mineral density (BMD) at all sites even when adjusted for specific lifestyle factors. [More]
Study: Moderate to severe depression increases risk of heart failure by 40%

Study: Moderate to severe depression increases risk of heart failure by 40%

Moderate to severe depression increases the risk of heart failure by 40%, a study of nearly 63 000 Norwegians has shown. The findings were presented for the first time today at EuroHeartCare 2014. [More]

Cigarette smoking among obese women appears to interfere with ability to taste fats, sweets, says study

Cigarette smoking among obese women appears to interfere with their ability to taste fats and sweets, a new study shows. Despite craving high-fat, sugary foods, these women were less likely than others to perceive these tastes, which may drive them to consume more calories. [More]
Researchers examine risks and benefits of E-cigarettes

Researchers examine risks and benefits of E-cigarettes

Some believe e-cigarettes are less harmful than smoking tobacco since e-cig vapor doesn't contain the chemicals found in tobacco smoke. [More]
Young adults participated in cardio fitness activities may preserve memory, thinking skills in middle age

Young adults participated in cardio fitness activities may preserve memory, thinking skills in middle age

Young adults who run or participate in other cardio fitness activities may preserve their memory and thinking skills in middle age, according to a new study published in the April 2, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Middle age was defined as ages 43 to 55. [More]