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Combating pre-pregnancy obesity helps both mother and child

Combating pre-pregnancy obesity helps both mother and child

Before a woman gets pregnant it is very common for her to plan and prepare for her child's arrival to ensure that the baby will benefit from the healthiest, most comfortable life possible. Sometimes, these preparations may be financial or they may involve taking such important healthcare steps as quitting smoking. Now, according to data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register, one of the best things that a mother can do for the health of her child is to ensure that she is at a healthy weight. [More]
UofL study investigates safety, effectiveness of EBV for treating emphysema symptoms

UofL study investigates safety, effectiveness of EBV for treating emphysema symptoms

The University of Louisville has launched a research trial to study an investigational medical device designed to aid patients with emphysema by shutting off the diseased part of the lung. UofL is the only site in Kentucky among 14 nationwide testing the device. [More]
Plymouth researchers awarded grant to evaluate pulmonary rehabilitation programme in East Africa

Plymouth researchers awarded grant to evaluate pulmonary rehabilitation programme in East Africa

Chronic lung disease is a growing and debilitating health issue for countries in East Africa. Resulting from respiratory infections such as TB and HIV, and lifestyle problems such as tobacco smoking and poor nutrition, chronic lung disease affects one in five adults in Africa and is a major threat to health. [More]
Tackling preventable blindness: a House of Commons reception review

Tackling preventable blindness: a House of Commons reception review

“Macular degeneration is not life threatening, but it is life changing,” these were the words of Michael Valenzia, of the Macular Society at the recent House of Commons Reception held by AMD Alliance International. [More]
High cholesterol in mid-life can impact heart health later

High cholesterol in mid-life can impact heart health later

Most young adults might assume they have years before needing to worry about their cholesterol. [More]
Alcohol drinking pattern influences risk of cirrhosis

Alcohol drinking pattern influences risk of cirrhosis

Approximately 170,000 people die from alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver in Europe every year. Although alcohol is the most important risk factor, less is known about the significance of different patterns of drinking. Currently scientists believe that cirrhosis is a function of the volume of alcohol consumed irrespective of patterns of drinking. Investigators have now established that alcohol drinking pattern has a significant influence on the risk of cirrhosis and that daily drinking increases that risk compared with drinking less frequently. [More]
Study uses 'systems genetics' approach to identify potential target for epilepsy

Study uses 'systems genetics' approach to identify potential target for epilepsy

A single gene that coordinates a network of about 400 genes involved in epilepsy could be a target for new treatments, according to research. [More]
Inherited factors linked to head and neck cancers in young adults

Inherited factors linked to head and neck cancers in young adults

An article published online today in the International Journal of Epidemiology pools data from 25 case-control studies and conducts separate analyses to show that head and neck cancers (HNC) in young adults are more likely to be as a result of inherited factors, rather than lifestyle factors such as smoking or drinking alcohol. [More]
Twitter can indicate community's psychological well being, predict rates of heart disease

Twitter can indicate community's psychological well being, predict rates of heart disease

Twitter has broken news stories, launched and ended careers, started social movements and toppled governments, all by being an easy, direct and immediate way for people to share what's on their minds. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have now shown that the social media platform has another use: Twitter can serve as a dashboard indicator of a community's psychological well being and can predict rates of heart disease. [More]
Minnesota continues to make progress in reducing tobacco use

Minnesota continues to make progress in reducing tobacco use

Findings from the latest Minnesota Adult Tobacco Survey (MATS) show that Minnesota is continuing to make progress in reducing tobacco use. Minnesota's adult smoking rate has declined to 14.4 percent, the lowest rate ever recorded in the state and a significant decrease from 2010, the last time the rate was measured. [More]
New American Lung Association report calls on California to reduce tobacco-caused death and disease

New American Lung Association report calls on California to reduce tobacco-caused death and disease

Once a national leader in tobacco control efforts, progress is at a standstill in California as advances in statewide tobacco control policies have stagnated. These were the findings of the 13th annual American Lung Association State of Tobacco Control 2015 report released today. [More]
People hospitalized for pneumonia at greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease

People hospitalized for pneumonia at greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease

Your chance of having a heart attack or stroke increases significantly if you have been hospitalized for pneumonia, according to a paper published today in the influential JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association). [More]
Couples who decide to get healthy together have more successful outcomes

Couples who decide to get healthy together have more successful outcomes

People are more successful in taking up healthy habits if their partner makes positive changes too, according to research published in JAMA Internal Medicine today (Monday). [More]
Tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may trigger age-related macular degeneration

Tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may trigger age-related macular degeneration

New research from scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine has found that tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may be an important triggering factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a degenerative eye disease that can cause severe vision loss and blindness. [More]
Moderate drinking may reduce heart failure risk

Moderate drinking may reduce heart failure risk

Evidence already exists for the beneficial effects of drinking moderate amounts of alcohol on the risk of developing a number of heart conditions; however, the role it plays in the risk of developing heart failure has been under-researched with conflicting results. [More]
WHO calls for urgent action to reduce premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases

WHO calls for urgent action to reduce premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases

Urgent government action is needed to meet global targets to reduce the burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), and prevent the annual toll of 16 million people dying prematurely - before the age of 70 - from heart and lung diseases, stroke, cancer and diabetes, according to a new WHO report. [More]
Study: Michigan autoworkers are at increased risk for heart disease

Study: Michigan autoworkers are at increased risk for heart disease

A Michigan State University study is the first to indicate that the state's autoworkers are at a higher risk of heart disease compared to the U.S. population overall. [More]
Almost 42% of US drinkers use alcohol-interactive prescription medications, study finds

Almost 42% of US drinkers use alcohol-interactive prescription medications, study finds

Approximately 71 percent of American adults drink alcohol. While alcohol interacts negatively with a number of commonly prescribed medications, little is known on a population level about the use of alcohol-interactive (AI) prescription medication among US drinkers. A new study has found that almost 42 percent of drinkers in the US population have used one or more alcohol-interactive prescription medications. [More]
Vascular and Alzheimer's-related brain abnormalities cause dementia in older people

Vascular and Alzheimer's-related brain abnormalities cause dementia in older people

A growing body of research suggests that the most common cause of dementia in older people is a mix of vascular and Alzheimer's-related brain abnormalities, and that approximately half of people who die with Alzheimer's also have evidence of strokes in their brains. Furthermore, when strokes and hallmark Alzheimer's plaques and tangles are combined, it increases a person's likelihood of experiencing dementia. [More]
Lung cancer rates are lower in higher-elevation counties, new study finds

Lung cancer rates are lower in higher-elevation counties, new study finds

Here's another potential reason to live up in the mountains. Lung cancer rates in both smokers and non-smokers are lower in higher-elevation counties in the western part of the United States, suggesting that oxygen may promote the incidence of lung cancer, according to a new study co-authored by a student at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]