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Research finds association between fine particulate air pollution and childhood autism risk

Research finds association between fine particulate air pollution and childhood autism risk

Exposure to fine particulate air pollution during pregnancy through the first two years of a child's life may be associated with an increased risk of the child developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a condition that affects one in 68 children, according to a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health investigation of children in southwestern Pennsylvania. [More]
Women more likely to be hospitalised after asthma emergency care

Women more likely to be hospitalised after asthma emergency care

US research shows that women who attend the emergency department with acute asthma are almost twice as likely to be admitted to hospital than men despite several measures of asthma control, treatment and severity being more favourable in women. [More]
COPD associated with increased mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation, but not stroke

COPD associated with increased mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation, but not stroke

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, is associated with increased risk of dying from a cardiovascular disease such as heart failure or a heart attack, as well as diseases not associated with the heart. However, COPD is not by itself associated with increased likelihood of having a stroke or a systemic embolism, according to a new research study. [More]
Heavy metallic elements influence AMD progression

Heavy metallic elements influence AMD progression

Researchers report associations between age-related macular degeneration and five heavy metallic elements, in findings that highlight the detrimental effects of pollution but the possible benefits of essential elements supplementation. [More]
Teens with slower cognitive processing speed experience depression, anxiety symptoms as adults

Teens with slower cognitive processing speed experience depression, anxiety symptoms as adults

Teens with slower performance on a test of "cognitive processing speed" are more likely to have depression and anxiety symptoms as adults, reports a paper in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. [More]
Current menopausal hormone therapy users at increased risk of experiencing GI bleeding

Current menopausal hormone therapy users at increased risk of experiencing GI bleeding

Current users of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) are more than twice as likely than non-users to develop lower gastrointestinal bleeding and ischemic colitis, especially if they use the therapy for longer durations, according to a study at Digestive Disease Week 2015. [More]
Study: Air pollution, impaired lung function independently affect cognition

Study: Air pollution, impaired lung function independently affect cognition

Studies have shown that both air pollution and impaired lung function can cause cognitive deficits, but it was unclear whether air pollution diminishes cognition by reducing breathing ability first or whether air pollution represents an independent risk factor for cognitive deficit. [More]
Type 2 diabetes screening followed by treatment could reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, death

Type 2 diabetes screening followed by treatment could reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, death

Screening to identify Type 2 diabetes followed by early treatment could result in substantial health benefits, according to new research published today in Diabetes Care that combined large scale clinical observations and innovative computer modelling. [More]
Pre-pregnancy maternal weight has significant impact on baby's immune system

Pre-pregnancy maternal weight has significant impact on baby's immune system

Almost 60 percent of women of childbearing age in the United States are overweight or obese. Obesity is a major public health issue, and has been linked to health problems like heart disease, cancer and hypertension. It can complicate pregnancy by increasing the mother's risk of having gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, preterm birth or a baby with birth defects. Maternal obesity is also linked to several adverse health outcomes for the infant that can persist into adulthood, such as type-2 diabetes, heart disease and mortality. [More]
Regular use of aspirin may slow the progression of early emphysema, new research shows

Regular use of aspirin may slow the progression of early emphysema, new research shows

Regular use of aspirin may help slow the progression of early emphysema, according to new research presented at the 2015 American Thoracic Society International Conference. [More]
No data exists to support long-term efficacy, safety of e-cigarettes as smoking cessation tool

No data exists to support long-term efficacy, safety of e-cigarettes as smoking cessation tool

There is little reliable evidence that electronic cigarettes are effective for long-term smoking cessation, according to a new analysis of the currently available research which was presented at the 2015 American Thoracic Society International Conference. [More]
Information needs of cancer survivors differ depending on the type of cancer

Information needs of cancer survivors differ depending on the type of cancer

Judging by the nature and topics of their information seeking, cancer patients' information needs appear to differ depending on the type of cancer they have and where they are in their survivorship. [More]
Quitting smoking can help improve outcomes after major urologic surgery

Quitting smoking can help improve outcomes after major urologic surgery

Quitting smoking can lead to a significant improvement in outcomes after major urologic surgery. These new data and their impact on urologic surgery will be highlighted by study authors during a special press conference at the 110th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association. [More]
Smoking-related DNA damage can be detected in cheek swabs

Smoking-related DNA damage can be detected in cheek swabs

DNA damage caused by smoking can be detected in cheek swabs, finds research published today in JAMA Oncology. The study provides evidence that smoking induces a general cancer program that is also present in cancers which aren't usually associated with it - including breast and gynaecological cancers. [More]
Financial incentive programs help smokers kick the habit, finds Penn study

Financial incentive programs help smokers kick the habit, finds Penn study

Four different financial incentive programs, each worth roughly $800 over six months, all help more smokers kick the habit than providing free access to behavioral counseling and nicotine replacement therapy. Further, the way in which equally-sized payouts are structured influences their effectiveness. [More]
Discovery could help identify molecules that selectively target cancer cells

Discovery could help identify molecules that selectively target cancer cells

A new family of molecules that kill cancer cells and protect healthy cells could be used to treat a number of different cancers, including cervical, breast, ovarian and lung cancers. Research published in EBioMedicine shows that as well as targeting and killing cancer cells, the molecules generate a protective effect against toxic chemicals in healthy cells. [More]
Misperceptions about miscarriage are widespread, survey finds

Misperceptions about miscarriage are widespread, survey finds

A survey of more than 1,000 U.S. adults has found that misperceptions about miscarriage and its causes are widespread. Results of the survey, conducted by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Health System, show that feelings of guilt and shame are common after a miscarriage and that most people erroneously believe that miscarriages are rare. [More]
MD Anderson researchers discover link between telomere degeneration and MDS

MD Anderson researchers discover link between telomere degeneration and MDS

A study revealing fresh insight about chromosome "tails" called telomeres may provide scientists with a new way to look at developing treatments or even preventing a group of blood cell disorders known as myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). [More]
Study finds extremely high levels of cardiovascular risk factors in people with psychosis

Study finds extremely high levels of cardiovascular risk factors in people with psychosis

Extremely high levels of cardiovascular risk factors have been found in people with established psychosis, with central obesity evident in over 80 per cent of participants, in a study by researchers from the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London. [More]
Use of hookah steam stones could lead to dangerous, false sense of security

Use of hookah steam stones could lead to dangerous, false sense of security

New research suggests the use of hookah steam stones - commonly considered a safer alternative to cigarette smoking - could be leaving users with a dangerous, false sense of security. The findings out of the University of Cincinnati/Agilent Technologies Metallomics Center of the Americas are published this month in the Microchemical Journal. [More]
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