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Physical health management below par in schizophrenia patients

Physical health management below par in schizophrenia patients

The diagnosis and treatment of physical ailments in patients with schizophrenia falls below acceptable standards, shows a national audit of patients in England and Wales. [More]
Study details crucial role of culture in achieving better health

Study details crucial role of culture in achieving better health

The systematic neglect of culture is the single biggest barrier to advancing the highest attainable standard of health worldwide, say the authors of a major new report on culture and health, led by Professor David Napier, a leading medical anthropologist from University College London (UCL), UK, and published in The Lancet. [More]
UCLA scientists find link between gigaxonin protein and HPV-positive head and neck cancers

UCLA scientists find link between gigaxonin protein and HPV-positive head and neck cancers

UCLA scientists have discovered for the first time that a protein usually linked to rare neurological disorders is also associated with human papilloma virus (HPV) positive head and neck cancers. The protein was also shown to help improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy treatments, laying the groundwork for the development of more specialized therapies. [More]
Mediterranean-style diets, physical activity can lower risk of first-time stroke

Mediterranean-style diets, physical activity can lower risk of first-time stroke

Eating Mediterranean or DASH-style diets, regularly engaging in physical activity and keeping your blood pressure under control can lower your risk of a first-time stroke, according to updated AHA/ASA guideline published in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke. [More]
Dietary linoleic acid lowers risk of coronary heart disease

Dietary linoleic acid lowers risk of coronary heart disease

People who swap 5% of the calories they consume from saturated fat sources such as red meat and butter with foods containing linoleic acid—the main polyunsaturated fat found in vegetable oil, nuts, and seeds—lowered their risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events by 9% and their risk of death from CHD by 13%, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health researchers. [More]
UMass Amherst epidemiologist investigates risk of early menopause

UMass Amherst epidemiologist investigates risk of early menopause

The estimated 10 percent of women in Western nations who enter menopause before age 45 have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as lower fertility. Now epidemiologist Elizabeth Bertone-Johnson at the University of Massachusetts Amherst is conducting the first large study to investigate whether vitamin D deficiency, inflammatory factors, hormones and other factors are associated with risk of early menopause, funded by NIH. [More]
Pre-treatment pain intensity predicts survival of patients with head and neck cancer

Pre-treatment pain intensity predicts survival of patients with head and neck cancer

Pre-treatment pain intensity is an independent survival predictor for patients with head and neck cancer, according to new research published in The Journal of Pain, the peer-reviewed publication of the American Pain Society. [More]
Dartmouth College reveals first-ever sensor that detects secondhand smoke in real time

Dartmouth College reveals first-ever sensor that detects secondhand smoke in real time

Dartmouth College researchers are going to market with the first-ever sensor that detects secondhand and thirdhand tobacco and marijuana smoke in real time. [More]
Early brain imaging studies may help prevent vascular diseases

Early brain imaging studies may help prevent vascular diseases

Future prevention and treatment strategies for vascular diseases may lie in the evaluation of early brain imaging tests long before heart attacks or strokes occur, according to a systematic review conducted by a team of cardiologists, neuroscientists, and psychiatrists from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the October issue of JACC Cardiovascular Imaging. [More]
Virginia Tech professor developing vaccine that could help smokers overcome nicotine addiction

Virginia Tech professor developing vaccine that could help smokers overcome nicotine addiction

A Virginia Tech professor is working on a vaccine that could help smokers conquer their nicotine addiction, making many smoking-related diseases and deaths relics of the 21st century. [More]
UCSF report: California Tobacco Control Program under threat

UCSF report: California Tobacco Control Program under threat

California's position as a leader in tobacco control is under threat, according to a new report from the UC San Francisco Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education. Once a highly successful program and international model, the state's anti-tobacco efforts now appear to be waning due to the decreased spending power of the California Tobacco Control Program, a resurgence of the tobacco industry in state politics, and the emergence of new unregulated tobacco products. [More]
Mindfulness improves cardiovascular health

Mindfulness improves cardiovascular health

Pay attention to the implication of these new research results: People who pay more attention to their feelings and experiences tend to have better cardiovascular health. [More]
Research finds link between autism spectrum disorder and air toxics

Research finds link between autism spectrum disorder and air toxics

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were more likely to have been exposed to higher levels of certain air toxics during their mothers' pregnancies and the first two years of life compared to children without the condition, according to the preliminary findings of a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health investigation of children in southwestern Pennsylvania. [More]
‘Neuroprotective’ effects of smoking disputed

‘Neuroprotective’ effects of smoking disputed

The apparent neuroprotective effect of smoking may simply be because ease of quitting smoking is a marker of prodromal Parkinson’s disease, say researchers. [More]
Flu vaccines have protective effect against heart disease

Flu vaccines have protective effect against heart disease

Flu vaccines are known to have a protective effect against heart disease, reducing the risk of a heart attack. For the first time, this research, published in Vaccine, reveals the molecular mechanism that underpins this phenomenon. The scientists behind the study say it could be harnessed to prevent heart disease directly. [More]
New screening tools detect heart and lung disease

New screening tools detect heart and lung disease

Two Michigan high school students, sisters Ilina and Medha Krishen, have developed screening tools using electronic stethoscopes to detect lung and heart disease. [More]
NIH announces 11 awards to improve public health outcomes related to substance use, addiction

NIH announces 11 awards to improve public health outcomes related to substance use, addiction

More than $11 million over three years will be used to support research exploring the use of social media to advance the scientific understanding, prevention, and treatment of substance use and addiction. [More]
Newborns of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have altered stress hormones, DNA

Newborns of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have altered stress hormones, DNA

Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have studied the effects of smoking during pregnancy and its impact on the stress response in newborn babies. Their research indicates that newborns of mothers who smoke cigarettes during pregnancy show lower levels of stress hormones, lowered stress response, and alterations in DNA for a gene that regulates passage of stress hormones from mother to fetus. [More]
Low vitamin D levels linked to poor brain function after sudden cardiac arrest

Low vitamin D levels linked to poor brain function after sudden cardiac arrest

Vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of poor brain function after sudden cardiac arrest by seven-fold, according to research presented at Acute Cardiovascular Care 2014 by Dr Jin Wi from Korea. Vitamin D deficiency also led to a higher chance of dying after sudden cardiac arrest. [More]
Depression, anxiety after MI more common in women than men

Depression, anxiety after MI more common in women than men

Women are more likely to develop anxiety and depression after a heart attack (myocardial infarction; MI) than men, according to research presented at Acute Cardiovascular Care 2014 by Professor Pranas Serpytis from Lithuania. [More]