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Mediterranean Diet linked to mortality risk reduction in patients with cardiovascular disease

Mediterranean Diet linked to mortality risk reduction in patients with cardiovascular disease

The Mediterranean diet is associated with a reduced risk of death in patients with a history of cardiovascular disease, according to results from the observational Moli-sani study presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. [More]
Novel activity tracker calculates personalised information about exercise required to reduce CVD risk

Novel activity tracker calculates personalised information about exercise required to reduce CVD risk

A novel activity tracker has been developed that uses heart rate data to personalise the amount of exercise needed to reduce the risk of death from cardiovascular disease. The science behind the tracker is presented for the first time today at ESC Congress 2016. [More]
ESC releases novel position paper on tackling cardiotoxicity of anticancer treatments

ESC releases novel position paper on tackling cardiotoxicity of anticancer treatments

The European Society of Cardiology has launched a novel position paper, under the auspices of its Committee for Practice Guidelines, on tackling the cardiac toxicity of anticancer therapies. The cardio-oncology paper is published online today in European Heart Journal and on the ESC Website. [More]
Moderate physical activity reduces risk of acute cardiovascular event in older people

Moderate physical activity reduces risk of acute cardiovascular event in older people

Moderate physical activity is associated with a greater than 50% reduction in cardiovascular death in over-65s, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. The 12 year study in nearly 2500 adults aged 65 to 74 years found that moderate physical activity reduced the risk of an acute cardiovascular event by more than 30%. High levels of physical activity led to greater risk reductions. [More]
Study: Low socioeconomic status linked to higher risk of second heart attack or stroke

Study: Low socioeconomic status linked to higher risk of second heart attack or stroke

Low socioeconomic status is associated with a higher risk of a second heart attack or stroke, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. The study in nearly 30 000 patients with a prior heart attack found that the risk of a second event was 36% lower for those in the highest income quintile compared to the lowest and increased by 14% in divorced compared to married patients. [More]
Banning tobacco product sales near schools could reduce disparities in tobacco retailer density

Banning tobacco product sales near schools could reduce disparities in tobacco retailer density

Banning tobacco sales within 1,000 feet of schools could reduce socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in tobacco density across neighborhoods, according to a study being published today in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research. [More]
Baby simulator programme ineffective in reducing risk of teenage pregnancy

Baby simulator programme ineffective in reducing risk of teenage pregnancy

A teenage pregnancy prevention programme involving a baby simulator does not appear to have any long-term effect on reducing the risk of teenage pregnancy, according to the first randomised controlled trial to test the effectiveness of this intervention, published in The Lancet today. [More]
Scientists develop new predictive model to help identify sudden cardiac death

Scientists develop new predictive model to help identify sudden cardiac death

Researchers from Emory's Rollins School of Public Health developed a sudden cardiac death (SCD) predictive model that can help identify and prevent the disease in individuals at high risk. [More]
New study uses evolutionary theory to predict cancer risk in patients with Barrett's esophagus

New study uses evolutionary theory to predict cancer risk in patients with Barrett's esophagus

A disorder known as Barrett's esophagus (BE) affects some 200,000 Americans each year. The condition, which is caused by stomach acid damaging the lining of the esophagus, can lead to the development of a serious, potentially fatal cancer of epithelial tissue, known as esophageal adenocarcinoma. [More]
Simple changes to car’s ventilation system during traffic jams may limit exposure to pollution

Simple changes to car’s ventilation system during traffic jams may limit exposure to pollution

With millions of motorists set to hit the road for the bank holiday weekend, drivers have been urged to close windows and turn off fans while in traffic jams to avoid breathing in dangerously high levels of air pollution. [More]
New genetic markers linked to fast rate of nicotine metabolism in smokers may raise risk for lung cancer

New genetic markers linked to fast rate of nicotine metabolism in smokers may raise risk for lung cancer

University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researchers discovered new genetic markers associated with a fast rate of nicotine metabolism, which potentially leads smokers to smoke more, thereby, increasing their risk for lung cancer. [More]
Scientists identify eight cancer types linked to excess weight and obesity

Scientists identify eight cancer types linked to excess weight and obesity

There's yet another reason to maintain a healthy weight as we age. An international team of researchers has identified eight additional types of cancer linked to excess weight and obesity: stomach, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, ovary, meningioma (a type of brain tumor), thyroid cancer and the blood cancer multiple myeloma. [More]
People with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, study reveals

People with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, study reveals

A large international study of more than 200,000 people in nearly 50 countries has revealed that people with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, and men with psychosis are over two times more likely to miss global activity targets compared to people without the illness. [More]
HMS study reveals key instigator of nerve cell damage in ALS patients

HMS study reveals key instigator of nerve cell damage in ALS patients

Scientists from Harvard Medical School have identified a key instigator of nerve cell damage in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, a progressive and incurable neurodegenerative disorder. [More]
Morbidly obese individuals more likely to experience heart failure, say researchers

Morbidly obese individuals more likely to experience heart failure, say researchers

A study by Johns Hopkins researchers of more than 13,000 people has found that even after accounting for such risk factors as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes, so-called morbid obesity appears to stand alone as a standout risk for heart failure, but not for other major types of heart disease. [More]
Low selenium levels linked to liver cancer risk? An interview with Dr David Hughes

Low selenium levels linked to liver cancer risk? An interview with Dr David Hughes

Food provides us with a variety of substances we need to maintain life. These substances are essential nutrients and are classified as macronutrients (water, protein, fats, and carbohydrates) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals). [More]
Smokers who switch to vaping may have fewer respiratory infections, study reveals

Smokers who switch to vaping may have fewer respiratory infections, study reveals

The majority of smokers who successfully switch to vaping say they have fewer respiratory infections, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London. [More]
Men experience greater pain relief than women after smoking marijuana, study finds

Men experience greater pain relief than women after smoking marijuana, study finds

Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center found that men had greater pain relief than women after smoking marijuana. [More]
Researchers discover gene linked to age-related hearing loss

Researchers discover gene linked to age-related hearing loss

A large screening programme has identified several genes associated with age-related conditions including hearing loss, retinal degeneration and osteoarthritis. [More]
Mexican scientists develop micro valve to decrease microcephaly effects in developing fetus

Mexican scientists develop micro valve to decrease microcephaly effects in developing fetus

Microcephaly is a condition in which a decreased size in the skull of fetuses or babies occurs, preventing the full development of his brain. [More]
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