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Nuvo Research completes WF10 Phase 2 trial in patients with refractory allergic rhinitis

Nuvo Research completes WF10 Phase 2 trial in patients with refractory allergic rhinitis

Nuvo Research Inc., a specialty pharmaceutical company with a diverse portfolio of immunology and topical products, today announced that 179 patients have completed its 16-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase 2 clinical trial to investigate the safety and efficacy of WF10 in patients with refractory allergic rhinitis. [More]
Simple tips to keep families safe from flu

Simple tips to keep families safe from flu

The flu, or seasonal influenza virus, is extremely unpredictable. Its severity can vary widely from one season to the next depending on many things, including the strains of flu spreading, availability of vaccines, how many people get vaccinated and how well the flu vaccine is matched to the flu viruses circulating each season. [More]
Longer Looks: An Alabama Judge's Dismantling Of Roe V. Wade; The Mystery Of Enterovirus; Mutating Ebola

Longer Looks: An Alabama Judge's Dismantling Of Roe V. Wade; The Mystery Of Enterovirus; Mutating Ebola

In the nine years Parker has now served on the court, he has made the most of his opportunities. Child custody disputes, for instance, have made good occasions to expound on the role of religion in parental rights. [More]
CHLA reports first confirmed case of enterovirus D68 in Los Angeles

CHLA reports first confirmed case of enterovirus D68 in Los Angeles

In September, Children's Hospital Los Angeles physicians predicted it was a matter of when, and not if, Los Angeles children would become infected with Enterovirus EV-D68, commonly referred to as enterovirus D68. On Oct. 1, that day came. CHLA and public health officials announced that a young patient who had been hospitalized at CHLA with a respiratory illness and later experienced partial limb paralysis had tested positive for enterovirus D68. [More]
Getting a flu vaccination helps moms help their babies

Getting a flu vaccination helps moms help their babies

Only about half of all pregnant women in the U.S. get a flu shot each season, leaving thousands of moms-to-be and their babies at increased risk of serious illness. [More]
Installing alcohol-based hand sanitizers in classrooms does not reduce school absences in kids

Installing alcohol-based hand sanitizers in classrooms does not reduce school absences in kids

Installing alcohol-based hand sanitizer dispensers in the classrooms does not lead to reductions in the rate of school absences in children, according to a study published in this week's PLOS Medicine led by Patricia Priest and colleagues from the University of Otago, New Zealand. [More]
Ragweed pollen reported for first time in 2014 allergy reporting season

Ragweed pollen reported for first time in 2014 allergy reporting season

Later summer triggers ragweed allergies in 10 to 20 percent of Americans and today spells misery for those with sensitive systems. Ragweed pollen was reported for the first time in the 2014 allergy reporting season, causing a pollen vortex of sneezing, itching and headaches for Midwesterners. [More]
Tips from ACAAI to help kids enjoy healthy, symptom-free days in classroom

Tips from ACAAI to help kids enjoy healthy, symptom-free days in classroom

Your kids may be enjoying the lazy days of summer, but if they have asthma, allergies, or both, they need to be prepared for back-to-school. And so do their classrooms. More than 10 million kids under age 18 have asthma, and 11 percent suffer from respiratory allergies. About 6 percent have also been diagnosed with food allergies. [More]
Kaleo announces U.S. availability of EVZIO for emergency treatment of opioid overdose

Kaleo announces U.S. availability of EVZIO for emergency treatment of opioid overdose

Kaleo, a privately-held pharmaceutical company headquartered in Richmond, Virginia, today announced the United States (U.S.) commercial availability of EVZIO for the emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose, as manifested by respiratory and/or central nervous system depression. [More]
Scientists demonstrate that proteins in urine play important role in stress incontinence

Scientists demonstrate that proteins in urine play important role in stress incontinence

Incontinence is the world's most common chronic condition. Around ten per cent of Austrians are affected by it. However the problem continues to be a taboo subject: two out of three sufferers do not talk about it, preventing access to successful treatment. [More]
Reforestation can reduce ragweed pollen that triggers hay fever

Reforestation can reduce ragweed pollen that triggers hay fever

When it comes to controlling hay fever-triggering ragweed plants on Detroit vacant lots, occasional mowing is worse than no mowing at all, and promoting reforestation might be the best solution. [More]
Tips to help kids enjoy healthy, symptom-free days in classroom and on sports field

Tips to help kids enjoy healthy, symptom-free days in classroom and on sports field

Your kids may be enjoying the lazy days of summer, but if they have asthma, allergies - or both - they need to be prepared for back-to-school. And so do their classrooms. More than 10 million kids under age 18 have asthma, and 11 percent suffer from respiratory allergies. About 6 percent have also been diagnosed with food allergies. [More]
Knowing summer allergies

Knowing summer allergies

As if a runny nose and red eyes weren't enough to ruin your warm weather look, summer allergies can gift you with even more than you've bargained for this year. In fact, some unusual symptoms can leave you looking like you lost a round in a boxing ring. [More]
Researchers figure out way to disable a part of SARS virus

Researchers figure out way to disable a part of SARS virus

A Purdue University-led research team has figured out how to disable a part of the SARS virus responsible for hiding it from the immune system; a critical step in developing a vaccine against the deadly disease. [More]
Northwestern Medicine allergist offers tips to fight allergies

Northwestern Medicine allergist offers tips to fight allergies

Nasal congestion, sneezing, and itchy and watery eyes — for the nearly 50 million Americans with seasonal allergies, these are the true rites of spring [More]
Hand sanitizer powerful weapon against current measles outbreak

Hand sanitizer powerful weapon against current measles outbreak

With measles cases in the U.S. at a 20-year high, it's more important than ever to keep your hands clean. Measles, caused by an airborne virus that's spread by breathing, coughing, and sneezing, can linger for up to two hours in the air or on surfaces. [More]
InControl Medical’s InToneMV gains FDA clearance for treatment of urinary, fecal incontinence in male

InControl Medical’s InToneMV gains FDA clearance for treatment of urinary, fecal incontinence in male

InControl Medical gains FDA clearance for InTone®MV providing the 12 million men nationally who suffer with urinary or fecal incontinence a non-surgical, implant-free solution [More]
UCSF researchers discover natural way to avoid urinary incontinence

UCSF researchers discover natural way to avoid urinary incontinence

An ancient form of meditation and exercise could help women who suffer from urinary incontinence, according to a new study from UC San Francisco. [More]
Allergist says people allergic to multiple trees may have tough allergy this spring

Allergist says people allergic to multiple trees may have tough allergy this spring

The polar vortex may be on its way out, but it's certainly leaving its footprints behind. As spring rolls in, people allergic to multiple trees may have a tough allergy season - a consequence of the cold winter, says Mark Dykewicz, M.D., professor of allergy and immunology at Saint Louis University. [More]
Sneeze and cough generate cloud of invisible gas that propels droplets of infectious material

Sneeze and cough generate cloud of invisible gas that propels droplets of infectious material

Each sneeze, cough or burp generates a cloud of invisible gas that propels droplets of infectious material farther than originally thought, and smaller droplets actually travel farther than larger ones. A new study from MIT researchers published in the Journal of Fluid Mechanics says this gas cloud extends the reach of droplets by 5 to 200 times. [More]