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Researcher finds income, education disparity in reasons for not vaccinating

Researcher finds income, education disparity in reasons for not vaccinating

Not all students returning to school this month will be up to date on their vaccinations. A new study conducted by Jennifer Reich, a researcher at the University of Colorado Denver, shows that the reasons why children may not be fully vaccinated depends on the class privilege of their mothers. [More]
Study to clarify findings about domestic violence among pot-smoking couples

Study to clarify findings about domestic violence among pot-smoking couples

New research findings from a study of 634 couples found that the more often they smoked marijuana, the less likely they were to engage in domestic violence. [More]
Many rural health care providers do not routinely screen women for IPV, say Penn State researchers

Many rural health care providers do not routinely screen women for IPV, say Penn State researchers

Many primary care physicians in rural communities do not routinely screen women for intimate partner violence (IPV), according to Penn State medical and public health researchers. Rural women who are exposed to such violence have limited resources if they seek help. [More]

Women provide much elderly parent care, while men contribute as little as possible

Parents are better off having daughters if they want to be cared for in their old age suggests a new study, which finds that women appear to provide as much elderly parent care as they can, while men contribute as little as possible. [More]
Researchers examine parental availability and kids’ eating habits

Researchers examine parental availability and kids’ eating habits

The way parents balance their work schedules may affect their adolescent children's eating habits, according to Penn State researchers. Those schedules may be even more important than the number of hours the parents spend at work, said Molly Martin, associate professor of sociology and demography. [More]
Nurses who are motivated primarily by desire to help others are more likely to burn out on job

Nurses who are motivated primarily by desire to help others are more likely to burn out on job

Nurses who are motivated primarily by the desire to help others, rather than by enjoyment of the work itself or the lifestyle it makes possible, are more likely to burn out on the job, University of Akron researchers say. [More]

Springer launches new book series, Healthy Aging and Longevity

As the longevity of the world's population continues to increase, the challenges accompanying this become more complex and touch nearly every aspect of society. Springer has therefore launched a new book series, Healthy Aging and Longevity, to address issues related to this achievement. [More]
Love and commitment can make sex physically more satisfying for many women

Love and commitment can make sex physically more satisfying for many women

Love and commitment can make sex physically more satisfying for many women, according to a Penn State Abington sociologist. [More]
Workers who survived the Great Recession are accustomed to stressful environments

Workers who survived the Great Recession are accustomed to stressful environments

The Great Recession of 2007-2009 had little direct effect on the health of workers who survived the waves of job cuts that took place during that period, according to a new University of Akron study. [More]
New study highlights the need for evidence-based sexual and reproductive health education

New study highlights the need for evidence-based sexual and reproductive health education

A new national survey reveals that the political divide among red-versus-blue states does not support the hypothesis that knowledge about abortion and health is shaped by the state in which one lives. [More]
Flexible work arrangement may exacerbate discrimination based on parental status, gender

Flexible work arrangement may exacerbate discrimination based on parental status, gender

While some suggest that flexible work arrangements have the potential to reduce workplace inequality, a new study finds these arrangements may exacerbate discrimination based on parental status and gender. [More]
People's educational attainment influences level of physical activity

People's educational attainment influences level of physical activity

People's educational attainment influences their level of physical activity both during the week and on weekends, according to a study whose authors include two University of Kansas researchers. [More]

Research highlights influence of neighborhoods on older Mexican-American men's problem drinking

LSU Sociology Professor Samuel Stroope is the lead author of a new study, "Neighborhood Ethnic Composition and Problem Drinking among Older Mexican American Men," that will appear in the Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. [More]
Over 40% of older adults experienced less financial strain during the recession period

Over 40% of older adults experienced less financial strain during the recession period

The "Great Recession" may have put a dent in many older adults' pocketbooks, but a new study, which will be presented at the 109th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, finds that more than 40 percent reported a decrease in "financial strain" between 2006 and 2010. [More]

Study shows how people's attitudes differ based on sexual orientation

An Indiana University study found that how "in love" a romantic couple appears to be is interpreted differently based on the couple's sexual orientation, affecting what formal and informal rights people think that couple deserves. [More]

Study explores men’s sexual confusion before and after marriage

Bragging of sexual conquests, suggestive jokes and innuendo, and sexual one-upmanship can all be a part of demonstrating one's manhood, especially for young men eager to exert their masculinity. [More]
Efforts to prevent prescription drug misuse among adults need to consider peers, not peer pressure

Efforts to prevent prescription drug misuse among adults need to consider peers, not peer pressure

Current efforts to prevent prescription drug misuse among young adults need to consider peers - but not peer pressure - according to a Purdue University study. [More]

Federal law enacted to combat use of "club drugs" fails to reduce drugs' popularity

A federal law enacted to combat the use of "club drugs" such as Ecstasy - and today's variation known as Molly - has failed to reduce the drugs' popularity and, instead, has further endangered users by hampering the use of measures to protect them. [More]
Women seek hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians

Women seek hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians

Feeling that conventional doctors did not take their suffering seriously, women instead sought out hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians, according to a Case Western Reserve University study that investigated the appeal of anti-aging medicine. [More]
Researchers examine mental health conditions of "super mom" and "super dad“

Researchers examine mental health conditions of "super mom" and "super dad“

Mental health experts in the past three decades have emphasized the dangers of post-partum depression for mothers, but a University of Kansas researcher says expanding awareness of several other perinatal mental health conditions is important for all new parents, including fathers. [More]