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Children exposed to toxic air pollutants at home more likely to have lower GPAs

Children exposed to toxic air pollutants at home more likely to have lower GPAs

A University of Texas at El Paso study on children's health has found that fourth and fifth graders who are exposed to toxic air pollutants at home are more likely to have lower GPAs. [More]
Blind people categorize many fewer people by race compared to sighted people

Blind people categorize many fewer people by race compared to sighted people

Most people who meet a new acquaintance, or merely pass someone on the street, need only a glance to categorize that person as a particular race. But, sociologist Asia Friedman wondered, what can we learn about that automatic visual processing from people who are unable to see? Friedman, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Delaware, set out to explore that question by interviewing 25 individuals who are blind. She will present her findings in a study at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association. [More]

Women's sexuality may be more flexible, adaptive than men's, study reveals

Romantic opportunities appear to influence women's sexual identities -- but not men's, suggests a new study that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association. [More]

Splitting childcare duties boosts relationships, sex lives

Heterosexual couples that split childcare duties have higher quality relationships and sex lives than those who don't, according to new research that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association. [More]
Same-sex couples encounter more obstacles to infertility treatment compared to opposite-sex couples

Same-sex couples encounter more obstacles to infertility treatment compared to opposite-sex couples

Same-sex couples encounter more obstacles to treatment for infertility than opposite-sex couples, suggests a new study that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association. [More]
Study shows TV's powerful role in shaping pregnant expectations

Study shows TV's powerful role in shaping pregnant expectations

In an era where popular culture is increasingly recognized for its impact on lay understanding of health and medicine, few scholars have looked at television's powerful role in the creation of patient expectations, especially regarding pregnancy and birth. [More]
Elsevier launches open access journal Reproductive Biomedicine & Society Online

Elsevier launches open access journal Reproductive Biomedicine & Society Online

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, announces the launch of open access journal Reproductive Biomedicine & Society Online. [More]
People near the middle of social hierarchies suffer higher rates of depression and anxiety

People near the middle of social hierarchies suffer higher rates of depression and anxiety

Individuals near the middle of the social hierarchy suffer higher rates of depression and anxiety than those at the top or bottom, according to researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
Growing availability of heroin changing the face of opiate addiction in the U.S.

Growing availability of heroin changing the face of opiate addiction in the U.S.

The growing availability of heroin, combined with programs aimed at curbing prescription painkiller abuse, may be changing the face of opiate addiction in the U.S., according to sociologists. [More]
Women's health, marital status and education may put children, grandchildren at higher risk of low birth weight

Women's health, marital status and education may put children, grandchildren at higher risk of low birth weight

A woman's weight at birth, education level and marital status pre-pregnancy can have repercussions for two generations, putting her children and grandchildren at higher risk of low birth weight, according to a new study by Jennifer B. Kane, assistant professor of sociology at the University of California, Irvine. The findings are the first to tie social and biological factors together using population data in determining causes for low birth weight. [More]
Postmenopausal women more likely to use vaginal estrogen to achieve significantly higher sexual quality of life

Postmenopausal women more likely to use vaginal estrogen to achieve significantly higher sexual quality of life

Local vaginal estrogen (VE) appears to have escaped the shroud of doubt cast upon hormone therapy as a result of the Women's Health Initiative Study by providing numerous medical benefits without systemic effects. That's according to a new study reported online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Swedish study reveals combined effects of smoking and early menopause on overall mortality

Swedish study reveals combined effects of smoking and early menopause on overall mortality

Women may now have yet another reason to quit smoking given the results of a new study that is being reported online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. The Swedish study involving 25,474 women is the first to quantify the combined effects of smoking and age at menopause on overall mortality in terms of survival time by investigating the role of smoking as a possible effect modifier. [More]
UBC research finds that gender plays vital role in healthy diets for seniors

UBC research finds that gender plays vital role in healthy diets for seniors

Strategies to support healthier diets among seniors need to take into account differences between elderly men and women, according to UBC research. [More]
Sociologists to explore ideas, scientific research relating to sexuality at ASA's Annual Meeting

Sociologists to explore ideas, scientific research relating to sexuality at ASA's Annual Meeting

More than 5,500 sociologists will convene in Chicago this August to explore ideas and scientific research relating to sexuality and many other topics, as part of the American Sociological Association's 110th Annual Meeting. This year's theme, "Sexualities in the Social World," shows the importance of research by sociologists in illuminating how social norms and social inequalities affect what sexual behavior is acceptable and who partners with whom. [More]

One-third of US population provides unpaid care to another person, study shows

There has been much recent discussion in the press of the plight of the so-called "sandwich generation," that is, adults who are responsible for the care of children as well as aging parents. [More]
Rice University study reveals that gays, lesbians and heterosexuals have better health than bisexuals

Rice University study reveals that gays, lesbians and heterosexuals have better health than bisexuals

Bisexual males and females report poorer health than gays, lesbians and heterosexuals, according to a new study from sociologists at Rice University. [More]
ProfNet network experts available to discuss timely issues in your coverage area

ProfNet network experts available to discuss timely issues in your coverage area

Below are experts from the ProfNet network that are available to discuss timely issues in your coverage area. You can also submit a query to the hundreds of thousands of experts in our network – it's easy and free! [More]

Studies compare self-reported health between unemployed and working populations

In an international context, Norway stands as an egalitarian country with only small class and income disparities, in which everyone basically has equal access to universal health care. [More]
New study analyses how policy actions affect tobacco consumption among Spanish women

New study analyses how policy actions affect tobacco consumption among Spanish women

Cigarette prices and images on cigarette packets have an impact on women in terms of continuing to smoke or quitting. In fact, less educated women are more responsive to pictorial labels on cigarette packets, as revealed by a study that has analysed, for the first time, the generation differences among female smokers, a group which, despite policy measures, has not stopped growing. [More]
New UW study uncovers surprising findings about caregivers

New UW study uncovers surprising findings about caregivers

Caregiving is a part of daily life for millions of Americans, particularly the so-called sandwich generation balancing the needs of aging parents with looking after their own children. [More]
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