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Study finds that friends who are not biologically related still resemble each other genetically

Study finds that friends who are not biologically related still resemble each other genetically

If you consider your friends family, you may be on to something. A study from the University of California, San Diego, and Yale University finds that friends who are not biologically related still resemble each other genetically. [More]
Acupuncture can affect severity of hot flashes for women in natural menopause

Acupuncture can affect severity of hot flashes for women in natural menopause

In the 2,500+ years that have passed since acupuncture was first used by the ancient Chinese, it has been used to treat a number of physical, mental and emotional conditions including nausea and vomiting, stroke rehabilitation, headaches, menstrual cramps, asthma, carpal tunnel, fibromyalgia and osteoarthritis, to name just a few. [More]

Resarchers offer insight into how low-wage jobs affect public health, economy in Syracuse, N.Y.

As low-wage jobs continue to show strong gains since the recession, findings from the Low-Wage Workers' Health Project led by Upstate Medical University is offering insight into how these jobs affect public health and the economy in Syracuse, N.Y., and reflect national trends in issues related to low-wage workers. [More]
Study: Behavioral weight loss can help manage menopausal hot flashes

Study: Behavioral weight loss can help manage menopausal hot flashes

Now women have yet one more incentive to lose weight as a new study has shown evidence that behavioral weight loss can help manage menopausal hot flashes. [More]
Sociologists to discuss economic inequality at ASA's Annual Meeting in San Francisco

Sociologists to discuss economic inequality at ASA's Annual Meeting in San Francisco

More than 5,000 sociologists will convene in San Francisco this August to explore ideas and scientific research relating to economic inequality and many other topics, as part of the American Sociological Association's 109th Annual Meeting. This year's theme, "Hard Times: The Impact of Economic Inequality on Families and Individuals," draws attention to the many ways in which inequality reverberates throughout American society and the world. [More]
Researchers apply infection-modeling to tackle mass incarceration rates

Researchers apply infection-modeling to tackle mass incarceration rates

The incarceration rate has nearly quadrupled since the U.S. declared a war on drugs, researchers say. Along with that, racial disparities abound. Incarceration rates for black Americans are more than six times higher than those for white Americans, according to the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics. [More]
Study confirms association between older maternal age at birth of last child and exceptional longevity

Study confirms association between older maternal age at birth of last child and exceptional longevity

Women who had their children later in life will be happy to learn that a new study suggests an association between older maternal age at birth of the last child and greater odds for surviving to an unusually old age. [More]
Polly Toynbee to lead debate on public health at Sheffield Hallam University

Polly Toynbee to lead debate on public health at Sheffield Hallam University

Renowned journalist and Guardian columnist, Polly Toynbee will lead a debate on the power of research on public health outcomes at Sheffield Hallam University on Friday. [More]
NICHD urged to enhance scientific expertise of National Children's Study program

NICHD urged to enhance scientific expertise of National Children's Study program

A study that would track the health of 100,000 babies to age 21 has been put on hold following the release of an assessment report issued June 16 by the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine (IOM). [More]
Calcium, vitamin D supplements may send blood levels too high for some women

Calcium, vitamin D supplements may send blood levels too high for some women

Calcium and vitamin D are commonly recommended for older women, but the usual supplements may send calcium excretion and blood levels too high for some women, shows a new study published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Majority of non-college graduates skip marriage, shows study

Majority of non-college graduates skip marriage, shows study

Waiting until marriage to have babies is now "unusual" among less-educated adults close to 30 years old, Johns Hopkins University researchers found. [More]
Adolescents tend to be more powerful in influencing friends to start smoking than to quit

Adolescents tend to be more powerful in influencing friends to start smoking than to quit

Adolescents tend to be more powerful in influencing their friends to start smoking than in helping them to quit, according to sociologists. [More]
Researchers examine effects of testosterone on women after menopause

Researchers examine effects of testosterone on women after menopause

Testosterone supplementation for women is a hot topic. A new pharmacokinetics study of a brand of testosterone cream for women approved in Western Australia has been published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). [More]
Study provides new insight into the prevalence of obesity

Study provides new insight into the prevalence of obesity

A new study suggests that how one compares weight-wise with others in his or her community plays a key role in determining how satisfied the person is with his or her life. [More]
Study shows fertility decisions are influenced by high school friends

Study shows fertility decisions are influenced by high school friends

A new study suggests that having children is contagious among female high school friends during early adulthood. [More]

High-status female college students employ "slut discourse" to assert class advantage

A new study suggests that high-status female college students employ "slut discourse" - defining their styles of femininity and approaches to sexuality as classy rather than trashy or slutty - to assert class advantage and put themselves in a position where they can enjoy sexual exploration with few social consequences. [More]
Premenstrual syndrome may spell menopause symptoms later but not hot flashes

Premenstrual syndrome may spell menopause symptoms later but not hot flashes

Having premenstrual syndrome (PMS) before menopause does not mean women will be troubled by hot flashes afterward. But they may face more menopause complaints other than hot flashes, such as trouble with memory and concentration, finds a new study published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). [More]
Women who experience early menopause may have higher rate of heart failure

Women who experience early menopause may have higher rate of heart failure

Women who go through menopause early-at ages 40 to 45-have a higher rate of heart failure, according to a new study published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). [More]
Questionnaire to assess risk factors for OCD may help determine risk of depression, anxiety

Questionnaire to assess risk factors for OCD may help determine risk of depression, anxiety

A shortened version of a questionnaire used by psychologists to assess risk factors for obsessive-compulsive disorder also may help determine the risk of depression and anxiety, according to a Baylor University study. [More]
New title from Springer explores science and side effects of commercial confections industry

New title from Springer explores science and side effects of commercial confections industry

Have you ever wondered what makes those delectable little gummy bears gummy? Or why sugary candies cause cavities? Then Springer's new book - Candy Bites - should be at the top of your reading list. [More]