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Longer distance to clinics prompted by restrictive Texas law linked to drop in abortions

Longer distance to clinics prompted by restrictive Texas law linked to drop in abortions

New research from the Texas Policy Evaluation Project (TxPEP) exploring the impact of House Bill 2 (HB 2) - the restrictive Texas abortion law that was struck down by the Supreme Court - found that increases in travel distance to the nearest abortion clinic caused by clinic closures were closely associated with decreases in the official number of abortions. [More]
Access to health insurance can increase social cohesion in communities, study shows

Access to health insurance can increase social cohesion in communities, study shows

A new study shows that access to health insurance can help hold a community together socially, and lack of it can contribute to the fraying of neighborhood cohesion. [More]
IMF lending conditions impede West Africa's progress towards achieving universal health coverage

IMF lending conditions impede West Africa's progress towards achieving universal health coverage

A new study suggests that lending conditions imposed by the International Monetary Fund in West Africa squeeze "fiscal space" in nations such as Sierra Leone - preventing government investment in health systems and, in some cases, contributing to an exodus of medical talent from countries that need it most. [More]
Research shows that education plays smaller role in delaying motherhood among UK women

Research shows that education plays smaller role in delaying motherhood among UK women

Studies have suggested that over recent decades, UK women have postponed motherhood largely because they want to go onto college or university to gain qualifications or fulfil educational aspirations before starting a family. [More]
Study highlights importance of intimate, social relationships for older adults in assisted-living facilities

Study highlights importance of intimate, social relationships for older adults in assisted-living facilities

Intimate and social relationships remain important for older adults residing in assisted-living facilities, according to a recent study. [More]
Higher maternal age of successful child bearing may be marker of healthy aging

Higher maternal age of successful child bearing may be marker of healthy aging

Death and taxes have long been said to be the only two things guaranteed in life. Exactly when someone will die, in most instances, remains a mystery. [More]
Persistence of job insecurity linked to greater psychological distress in later life

Persistence of job insecurity linked to greater psychological distress in later life

The long-term threat of getting a pink slip is giving some older workers the blues. [More]
University of Leicester researcher reveals how new mothers turn to online support forums for advice

University of Leicester researcher reveals how new mothers turn to online support forums for advice

Many mothers are bypassing health services and turning to peer-to-peer support forums for advice and support as cuts are made to public funding, according to a researcher from the University of Leicester. [More]
CBD oil may reduce frequency and severity of seizures in patients with epilepsy, UAB study shows

CBD oil may reduce frequency and severity of seizures in patients with epilepsy, UAB study shows

Cannabidiol oil, also known as CBD oil, reduces the frequency and severity of seizures in children and adults with severe, intractable epilepsy, according to findings presented by researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham at the American Epilepsy Society 70th Annual Meeting. [More]
Electro-acupuncture may be effective in treating sleep disturbances in women with breast cancer

Electro-acupuncture may be effective in treating sleep disturbances in women with breast cancer

It's somewhat of a little-known adverse effect of having breast cancer, but studies suggest that approximately 30% to 40% of women with breast cancer report persistent hot flashes. Nocturnal hot flashes are among the most problematic because they can contribute to poor sleep. [More]
Education has greater influence on development of myopia than cognitive ability, study finds

Education has greater influence on development of myopia than cognitive ability, study finds

Environmental factors such as education and leisure activities have a greater influence on the development of short-sightedness or myopia than the ability to think logically and solve problems. [More]
UBC researchers find variation in kindergarten vaccination rates among local areas in Metro Vancouver

UBC researchers find variation in kindergarten vaccination rates among local areas in Metro Vancouver

Children in some local health areas of Metro Vancouver have much lower vaccination rates than others, according to a recent University of British Columbia study. [More]
Bisexual men and women receive less pay than similarly qualified heterosexual individuals, study finds

Bisexual men and women receive less pay than similarly qualified heterosexual individuals, study finds

Bisexual men and women are paid less for doing the same jobs than similarly qualified heterosexual men and women, according to Indiana University research that breaks new ground by treating bisexual individuals as distinct from gay men and lesbians in the workplace. [More]
Middle-aged women outperform age-matched men on all memory measures, study shows

Middle-aged women outperform age-matched men on all memory measures, study shows

In the battle of the sexes, women have long claimed that they can remember things better and longer than men can. [More]
New study finds one in seven older women have hypoactive sexual desire dysfunction

New study finds one in seven older women have hypoactive sexual desire dysfunction

Although many of us don't want to think about grandma still "getting it on," multiple studies show that older women are still sexually active beyond their seventh decade of life. [More]
Tight ‘social networks’ of physicians may help improve patient outcomes, study suggests

Tight ‘social networks’ of physicians may help improve patient outcomes, study suggests

To get the best results for patients, it may pay for their doctors to heed the words of legendary University of Michigan football coach Bo Schembechler: the team, the team, the team. [More]
Risk of fracture still higher among women experiencing early menopause

Risk of fracture still higher among women experiencing early menopause

If you're in menopause before the age of 40, you have a higher fracture risk. That fact has already been proven by the Women's Health Initiative clinical trials. Now a new study evaluating the same WHI data further concludes that, even with calcium and vitamin D supplements, your risk of fracture is still higher. [More]
New study provides detailed timetable of sexual decline over menopause transition

New study provides detailed timetable of sexual decline over menopause transition

Although most medical professionals (and their patients) agree that sexual function declines with age, there remains debate about the contribution of menopause to sexual activity and functioning. [More]
New cognitive behavioral therapy resource holds potential to reduce dental anxiety among children

New cognitive behavioral therapy resource holds potential to reduce dental anxiety among children

The International and American Associations for Dental Research have published an article titled "Development and Testing of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Resource for Children's Dental Anxiety" in the OnlineFirst portion of JDR Clinical & Translational Research. [More]
Comfortable living conditions, independence can help elderly Chinese immigrants feel at home in the U.S.

Comfortable living conditions, independence can help elderly Chinese immigrants feel at home in the U.S.

Having comfortable living conditions and independence from their adult children can help elderly Chinese immigrants find a sense of home and life satisfaction in the United States, but the inability to speak fluent English makes them feel unsettled, according to a research study. [More]
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