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New Penn study questions relevance of fish oil-derived SPMs and their anti-inflammatory effects in humans

New Penn study questions relevance of fish oil-derived SPMs and their anti-inflammatory effects in humans

The importance of a diet rich in fish oils - now a billion dollar food-supplement industry -- has been debated for over half a century. A few large clinical trials have supported the idea that fish oils confer therapeutic benefits to patients with cardiovascular disease. Researchers think that hearts and blood vessels may benefit in part from their anti-inflammatory properties. [More]
Using physical processes to treat ships' ballast water can prevent spread of harmful organisms into local environment

Using physical processes to treat ships' ballast water can prevent spread of harmful organisms into local environment

Untreated ballast water discharge from ships can spread living organisms and even pathogens across the world thereby introducing non-native or invasive species into the local environment. Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München therefore recommend using physical treatment processes such as filtration rather than electrochemical disinfection, which creates countless potentially toxic compounds. [More]
WSU scientists suggest that glyphosate not present in human breast milk

WSU scientists suggest that glyphosate not present in human breast milk

Washington State University scientists have found that glyphosate, the main ingredient in the herbicide Roundup, does not accumulate in mother's breast milk. [More]
Experts to highlight new diagnostic products, tools to identify heart attacks at 2015 AACC Annual Meeting

Experts to highlight new diagnostic products, tools to identify heart attacks at 2015 AACC Annual Meeting

The 2015 AACC Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo, the leading annual event for laboratory medicine, will open on Sunday, July 26, in Atlanta, Georgia. This year's meeting will host more than 400 educational sessions on topics ranging from personalized medicine and infectious diseases to point-of-care and laboratory-developed tests, and will feature more than 200 new cutting edge diagnostic products. [More]
Study points to potential treatment for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

Study points to potential treatment for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

A rare autoimmune disease creates sudden pain in the abdomen or the head, sending a patient to the emergency room with a potentially fatal condition. The pain comes from a multitude of blockages of tiny blood vessels, formed after the patient's own immune system somehow inhibits an enzyme that is vital to control clotting. [More]
C2N-8E12 (ABBV-8E12) gets orphan drug designation from FDA for PSP treatment

C2N-8E12 (ABBV-8E12) gets orphan drug designation from FDA for PSP treatment

C2N Diagnostics and AbbVie today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted their investigational recombinant humanized anti-tau antibody, C2N-8E12 (ABBV-8E12), an orphan drug designation for the treatment of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). [More]
Scientists gain insights into dynamic remodeling of tissue during lung repair

Scientists gain insights into dynamic remodeling of tissue during lung repair

Our lungs are permanently exposed to harmful environmental factors that can damage or even destroy their cells. In a specific regenerative process these injured cells must be replaced as soon as possible. In collaboration with colleagues from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have now, for the first time, gained detailed insights into the dynamic remodeling of the tissue during lung repair. [More]
Transitioning infrared imaging into clinical use: an interview with Dr Matthew Baker

Transitioning infrared imaging into clinical use: an interview with Dr Matthew Baker

The CLIRSPEC network is a UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC – EP/L012952/1) funded network in clinical infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy can identify the hallmarks of disease and distinguish between diseased and non-diseased samples based upon inherent chemistry. [More]
Histones steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life, find Mount Sinai researchers

Histones steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life, find Mount Sinai researchers

For decades, researchers in the genetics field have theorized that the protein spools around which DNA is wound, histones, remain constant in the brain, never changing after development in the womb. [More]
Nuclea and Aelan partner to develop, commercialize novel biomarker tests using STEM cells as models

Nuclea and Aelan partner to develop, commercialize novel biomarker tests using STEM cells as models

Nuclea Biotechnologies Inc. announced today that it is partnering with Aelan Cell Technologies Inc. (San Francisco, California) for the development, validation and commercialization of novel biomarker tests and companion diagnostics using human STEM cells as models. [More]
Bacterial ‘fight club’ approach effective for finding new drugs from natural sources

Bacterial ‘fight club’ approach effective for finding new drugs from natural sources

Creating bacterial "fight clubs" is an effective way to find new drugs from natural sources. That is the conclusion of a team of Vanderbilt chemists who have been exploring ways to get bacteria to produce biologically active chemicals that they normally hold in reserve. These compounds are called secondary metabolites. [More]
New informatics technology could accelerate search for potential new drug targets on protein structures

New informatics technology could accelerate search for potential new drug targets on protein structures

Researchers have developed a new informatics technology that analyzes existing data repositories of protein modifications and 3D protein structures to help scientists identify and target research on "hotspots" most likely to be important for biological function. [More]
New technology can detect illegal drugs from a single fingerprint

New technology can detect illegal drugs from a single fingerprint

An innovative technology pioneered by Sheffield Hallam University academics can detect the presence of a range of illegal and designer drugs from a single fingerprint, which could be a valuable new tool in bringing drug dealers and other criminals to justice. [More]
New method could help identify 'handedness' of different molecules in mixture

New method could help identify 'handedness' of different molecules in mixture

Scientists have demonstrated for the first time the ability to rapidly, reliably and simultaneously identify the 'handedness' of different molecules in a mixture. [More]
Automated droplet-based surface sampling probe analyzes liver biopsy sample in 10 minutes

Automated droplet-based surface sampling probe analyzes liver biopsy sample in 10 minutes

Surgeons could know while their patients are still on the operating table if a tissue is cancerous, according to researchers from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School. [More]
TGen, Phoenix Children's Hospital developing new methods to store and transport blood samples

TGen, Phoenix Children's Hospital developing new methods to store and transport blood samples

The Translational Genomics Research Institute and Phoenix Children's Hospital are developing new economical methods of preserving, storing and transporting high-quality blood plasma proteins for use in diagnosing and treating disease. [More]
Researchers examine proteins on surface of naive CD4+ T cells

Researchers examine proteins on surface of naive CD4+ T cells

The team headed by Dr. Kathrin Suttner, who, together with Prof. Dr. Carsten Schmidt-Weber, heads the airway immunology research group at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and Technische Universität München, concentrated its work on the so-called naive CD4+ T cells. [More]
Medical experts call for accurate, standardized estrogen testing methods

Medical experts call for accurate, standardized estrogen testing methods

Unreliable estrogen measurements have had a negative impact on the treatment of and research into many hormone-related cancers and chronic conditions. To improve patient care, a panel of medical experts has called for accurate, standardized estrogen testing methods in a statement published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
University of Chicago scientists develop new technique to accurately measure epigenetic changes

University of Chicago scientists develop new technique to accurately measure epigenetic changes

One of the most widely used tools in epigenetics research - the study of how DNA packaging affects gene expression - is chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), a technique that allows researchers to examine interactions between specific proteins and genomic regions. However, ChIP is a relative measurement, and has significant limitations that can lead to errors, poor reproducibility and an inability to be compared between experiments. [More]
Researchers identify 763 proteins in human aqueous humor that nourish the cornea and the lens

Researchers identify 763 proteins in human aqueous humor that nourish the cornea and the lens

Researchers conducting a comprehensive proteomics analysis of human aqueous humor samples identified 763 proteins - including 386 proteins detected for the first time - in this clear fluid that helps maintain pressure in the eye and nourishes the cornea and the lens. [More]
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