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Researchers evaluate effect of cognitive training program on tinnitus

Researchers evaluate effect of cognitive training program on tinnitus

In a study published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, researchers evaluated the effect of a cognitive training program on tinnitus. [More]
Interactive book reading strategy shows promise for treating children with SLI

Interactive book reading strategy shows promise for treating children with SLI

A clinical trial of book reading to help kindergarten children with Specific Language Impairment learn words has determined the number of times a child with SLI needs to hear a word to learn it: that would be 36 times or exposures compared to 12 times for typically developing children. [More]
Scientists discover gene that may open new door to developing treatments for Alzheimer's disease

Scientists discover gene that may open new door to developing treatments for Alzheimer's disease

Scientists at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg have identified a gene that may provide a new starting point for developing treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
EMBL scientists trace neural connections that control instinctive behaviours

EMBL scientists trace neural connections that control instinctive behaviours

From fighting the urge to hit someone to resisting the temptation to run off stage instead of giving that public speech, we are often confronted with situations where we have to curb our instincts. [More]
BGU researchers develop new system to assess OSA severity without overnight sleep study

BGU researchers develop new system to assess OSA severity without overnight sleep study

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev researchers have developed a new system to assess obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) severity while a patient is awake and analyze sleep-wake activity, using his or her smartphone. [More]
Bilingualism makes the brain more efficient and economical with resources, research shows

Bilingualism makes the brain more efficient and economical with resources, research shows

New research findings show that bilingual people are great at saving brain power, that is. To do a task, the brain recruits different networks, or the highways on which different types of information flow, depending on the task to be done. [More]
Stuttering linked to reductions in blood flow in the brain area that controls speech production

Stuttering linked to reductions in blood flow in the brain area that controls speech production

A study led by researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles demonstrates what lead investigator Bradley Peterson, MD, calls "a critical mass of evidence" of a common underlying lifelong vulnerability in both children and adults who stutter. [More]
Welders can develop Parkinson's disease-like symptoms that get worse with exposure

Welders can develop Parkinson's disease-like symptoms that get worse with exposure

Welders can develop Parkinson's disease-like symptoms that may get worse the longer and more they are exposed to the chemical element manganese from welding fumes, according to a study published in the December 28, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Cedars-Sinai expert explains how to recognize signs and symptoms of stroke during the holidays

Cedars-Sinai expert explains how to recognize signs and symptoms of stroke during the holidays

Along with increased cheer and festivities during the holidays comes an increased risk of stroke, one of the leading causes of death and disability in the U.S. [More]
Simple listening tactic could benefit cochlear implant users in noisy social settings

Simple listening tactic could benefit cochlear implant users in noisy social settings

Listeners in a noisy situation benefit from facing slightly away from the person they are listening to, turning one ear towards the speech, concludes a study by Cardiff University, funded by UK charity Action on Hearing Loss (RNID). [More]
Neuroscientists uncover how the brain retunes to pull meaning out of noisy environment

Neuroscientists uncover how the brain retunes to pull meaning out of noisy environment

When you're suddenly able to understand someone despite their thick accent, or finally make out the lyrics of a song, your brain appears to be re-tuning to recognize speech that was previously incomprehensible. [More]
Technological advancements in hearing implants

Technological advancements in hearing implants

Hearing aids capture sound, make the sound louder and then send the sound down the ear canal, through the middle ear to the inner ear where the hearing nerves are located. They are most beneficial for people with mild to moderate hearing loss... [More]
Researchers track severely brain injured woman to reveal biological process of recovery

Researchers track severely brain injured woman to reveal biological process of recovery

A severely brain injured woman, who recovered the ability to communicate using her left eye, restored connections and function of the areas of her brain responsible for producing expressive language and responding to human speech, according to new research from Weill Cornell Medicine scientists. [More]
IBM and Rice University create prototype of Watson-enabled robot for assisting elderly people

IBM and Rice University create prototype of Watson-enabled robot for assisting elderly people

IBM Research today announced the creation of the prototype IBM Multi-Purpose Eldercare Robot Assistant (IBM MERA) done in collaboration with Rice University. IBM MERA is a first of a kind Watson-enabled application designed to help assist the elderly and their caregivers. [More]
New supersmart phone makes communication easier for sick, elderly and blind people

New supersmart phone makes communication easier for sick, elderly and blind people

A few years ago, Richard Chan's mother had a stroke and became physically disabled. She was living in England, while he was in Norway. [More]
Investigational diabetes drug that impedes Parkinson's progression getting ready for human trials

Investigational diabetes drug that impedes Parkinson's progression getting ready for human trials

A new investigational drug originally developed for type 2 diabetes is being readied for human clinical trials in search of the world's first treatment to impede the progression of Parkinson's disease following publication of research findings today in the journal Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Baby's first words most likely to depend upon visual experience, IU research finds

Baby's first words most likely to depend upon visual experience, IU research finds

Indiana University psychologists have shown that a baby's most likely first words are based upon their visual experience, laying the foundation for a new theory of infant language learning. [More]
Scientists develop new method of care to maintain speech in throat cancer patients

Scientists develop new method of care to maintain speech in throat cancer patients

Through the work of the School of Biosciences team, in collaboration with East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust, Kent has developed a new method of care for patients who have to have their larynx removed. [More]
Stuttering linked to changes in speech and language-based brain circuits

Stuttering linked to changes in speech and language-based brain circuits

Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have conducted the first study of its kind, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to look at brain regions in both adults and children who stutter. [More]
Preschool-aged children monitor and self-repair speech errors when talking aloud

Preschool-aged children monitor and self-repair speech errors when talking aloud

One of the differences between adults and preschoolers when it comes to private speech is that adults typically talk to themselves in their heads, while preschoolers talk to themselves aloud, particularly while playing or working on a task. [More]
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