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CMU joins $12 million research project to reverse-engineer the brain's secret algorithms

CMU joins $12 million research project to reverse-engineer the brain's secret algorithms

Carnegie Mellon University is embarking on a five-year, $12 million research effort to reverse-engineer the brain, seeking to unlock the secrets of neural circuitry and the brain's learning methods. Researchers will use these insights to make computers think more like humans. [More]
Coordinated specialty care more cost-effective for young people with first episode psychosis

Coordinated specialty care more cost-effective for young people with first episode psychosis

New analysis from a mental health care study shows that "coordinated specialty care" (CSC) for young people with first episode psychosis is more cost-effective than typical community care. Cost-effectiveness analysis in health care is a way to compare the costs and benefits of two or more treatment options. [More]
Researchers link symptoms of schizophrenia with the brain's anatomical characteristics

Researchers link symptoms of schizophrenia with the brain's anatomical characteristics

An international team, made up of researchers from the University of Granada, Washington University in St. Louis, and the University of South Florida, has linked the symptoms of schizophrenia with the anatomical characteristics of the brain, by employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). [More]
Graphene-based electrodes could be safely implanted in the brain

Graphene-based electrodes could be safely implanted in the brain

Researchers have successfully demonstrated how it is possible to interface graphene - a two-dimensional form of carbon - with neurons, or nerve cells, while maintaining the integrity of these vital cells. The work may be used to build graphene-based electrodes that can safely be implanted in the brain, offering promise for the restoration of sensory functions for amputee or paralysed patients, or for individuals with motor disorders such as epilepsy or Parkinson's disease. [More]
Men with ASD have differences in brain connections

Men with ASD have differences in brain connections

Research at King's College London has revealed subtle brain differences in adult males with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which may go some way towards explaining why symptoms persist into adulthood in some people with the disorder. [More]
Hearing aids improve brain function in people with hearing loss

Hearing aids improve brain function in people with hearing loss

A recent study by Jamie Desjardins, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the speech-language pathology program at The University of Texas at El Paso, found that hearing aids improve brain function in persons with hearing loss. [More]
Brain's natural plasticity could compensate for inner ear damage

Brain's natural plasticity could compensate for inner ear damage

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School have described, for the first time, the adult brain's ability to compensate for a near-complete loss of auditory nerve fibers that link the ear to the brain. The findings, published in the current issue of Neuron, suggest that the brain's natural plasticity can compensate for inner ear damage to bring sound detection abilities back within normal limits; however, it does not recover speech intelligibility. [More]
Nearly 3.3 million children in U.S. have dizziness or balance problem

Nearly 3.3 million children in U.S. have dizziness or balance problem

More than 1 in 20 (nearly 3.3 million) children between the ages of 3 and 17 have a dizziness or balance problem, according to an analysis of the first large-scale, nationally representative survey of these problems in U.S. children. [More]

Four factors help predict later cognitive function, motor performance for children with low birth weight

Four factors - medical complications at birth, maternal education, early motor assessments, and early cognitive assessments - help predict later cognitive function and motor performance for children born early and at a very low birth weight, finds a new study by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. [More]

Audiologists investigating impact of remote care on cochlear implant users

Audiologists from the University of Southampton are investigating how a new patient-centred approach can help cochlear implant users manage their own care programme. [More]
Physiotherapy and occupational therapy not effective in patients with Parkinson's disease

Physiotherapy and occupational therapy not effective in patients with Parkinson's disease

New research from the University of Birmingham has shown that physiotherapy and occupational therapy do not produce improvements in quality of life for patients with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease. [More]
Interictal discharges have neuropsychological effects in rolandic epilepsy

Interictal discharges have neuropsychological effects in rolandic epilepsy

Centrotemporal spikes experienced between seizures by children with rolandic epilepsy may disrupt functional brain networks and contribute to language, behaviour and cognitive problems, research suggests. [More]
Cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin could become effective treatment for Parkinson's

Cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin could become effective treatment for Parkinson's

A clinical trial using cholesterol-lowering treatment Simvastatin in people living with Parkinson's is getting underway in centres across the country -- with the hope that it could become one of a number of effective treatments available to treat Parkinson's. [More]
3 out of 4 young adults with stroke symptoms delay trip to hospital

3 out of 4 young adults with stroke symptoms delay trip to hospital

Up to three hours after a person experiences the first symptom of a stroke is often referred to as the "golden window." That's the period of time doctors say is crucial for patients to get to a hospital to receive medical care in order to restore blood flow to the brain and minimize or reverse damage. [More]
Scientists discover molecular mechanism responsible for degeneration of Purkinje cells in SCA1

Scientists discover molecular mechanism responsible for degeneration of Purkinje cells in SCA1

Scientists from Bern have discovered a mechanism which is responsible for the degeneration of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum in a neurodegenerative disease called Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1. The results of their study open up new avenues for the future treatment of cerebellum associated degenerative disorders. [More]
Acute bulbar palsy variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome found

Acute bulbar palsy variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome found

Researchers have identified a new variant form of Guillain-Barré syndrome that is characterised by prominent acute bulbar palsy without neck or limb weakness. [More]
Emotions affect brain's creative network, new study finds

Emotions affect brain's creative network, new study finds

The workings of neural circuits associated with creativity are significantly altered when artists are actively attempting to convey emotions, according to a new brain-scanning study of jazz pianists. [More]

KNFB Reader named winner of Best Assistive iOS App of the year

The National Federation of the Blind is pleased to announce that KNFB Reader has been chosen by the AppleVis community as the winner of the Best Assistive iOS App of the year for the second year in a row. [More]
Novoron Bioscience receives NIH grant to study novel therapeutic approach for multiple sclerosis

Novoron Bioscience receives NIH grant to study novel therapeutic approach for multiple sclerosis

Novoron Bioscience, Inc., a private biotech company dedicated to developing new therapeutics for disorders of the central nervous system, today announced that the company has been awarded a National Institutes of Health grant under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. [More]
Endoscopic submucosal dissection appears to be effective treatment for patients with throat cancer

Endoscopic submucosal dissection appears to be effective treatment for patients with throat cancer

According to a study in the December issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) appears to be a safe and effective minimally invasive treatment for patients with superficial pharyngeal (throat) cancer. [More]
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