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Cisplatin-based chemotherapy may lead to hearing loss in many testicular cancer survivors

Cisplatin-based chemotherapy may lead to hearing loss in many testicular cancer survivors

Many testicular cancer survivors experience hearing loss after cisplatin-based chemotherapy, according to researchers at Indiana University. [More]
Lessons on personality changes can help mitigate stress, improve academic performance in teenagers

Lessons on personality changes can help mitigate stress, improve academic performance in teenagers

Teaching teens that social and personality traits can change helps them cope with social challenges such as bullying, which in turn can help mitigate stress and improve academic performance, according to a study by psychologists at The University of Texas at Austin. [More]
Researchers develop AI-powered systems to make pathologic diagnoses more accurate

Researchers develop AI-powered systems to make pathologic diagnoses more accurate

Pathologists have been largely diagnosing disease the same way for the past 100 years, by manually reviewing images under a microscope. But new work suggests that computers can help doctors improve accuracy and significantly change the way cancer and other diseases are diagnosed. [More]
Targeted intervention helps improve effectiveness of newborn hearing screening programs

Targeted intervention helps improve effectiveness of newborn hearing screening programs

Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center found that targeted intervention helps improve follow-up rates by more than 70 percent for newborns who fail initial hearing screenings at birth hospitals. [More]
Music instruction improves cognitive, socio-emotional development in young children

Music instruction improves cognitive, socio-emotional development in young children

Music instruction appears to accelerate brain development in young children, particularly in the areas of the brain that are responsible for processing sound, language development, speech perception and reading skills, according to initial results of a five-year study by USC neuroscientists. [More]
Air pollution becomes leading risk factor for stroke worldwide

Air pollution becomes leading risk factor for stroke worldwide

Air pollution – including environmental and household air pollution - has emerged as a leading risk factor for stroke worldwide, associated with about a third of the global burden of stroke in 2013, according to a new study published in The Lancet Neurology journal. [More]
Advanced imaging technique helps predict recovery in concussion patients

Advanced imaging technique helps predict recovery in concussion patients

Using an advanced imaging technique, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System were able to predict which patients who'd recently suffered concussions were likely to fully recover. [More]
Researchers receive $2.4 million grant to study effects of parenting on behavior of adolescents with FXS

Researchers receive $2.4 million grant to study effects of parenting on behavior of adolescents with FXS

University of Kansas researchers have been awarded a five-year, $2.4 million grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to study the effects of parenting on the development and behavior of adolescents with Fragile X syndrome, a single-gene disorder that is the most common cause of inherited developmental disability and the leading genetic cause of autism. [More]
Late-term gestation may increase cognitive ability, physical disability risk in children

Late-term gestation may increase cognitive ability, physical disability risk in children

Researchers have found that spending a week longer in the womb may give babies a tiny leg up on cognitive ability. The trade-off, however, seems to be a slight increase in the chance of having a physical disability. [More]
Researchers explore how ALS develops from muscle perspective

Researchers explore how ALS develops from muscle perspective

In an effort to better understand what happens during Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), researchers at Umea University in Sweden have compared the impact of ALS on the eye and limb muscles. [More]
Vocal learning in songbirds sheds more light on developmental disorders in humans

Vocal learning in songbirds sheds more light on developmental disorders in humans

Adult songbirds modify their vocalizations when singing to juveniles in the same way that humans alter their speech when talking to babies. The resulting brain activity in young birds could shed light on speech learning and certain developmental disorders in humans, according to a study by McGill University researchers. [More]
New tool that simulates user interaction can help develop accessible ICT applications for people with disabilities

New tool that simulates user interaction can help develop accessible ICT applications for people with disabilities

A tool developed by researchers from UPM allows us to assess usability during the design and testing process of accessible ICT-based applications. [More]
Pharmacist suggests education as foremost strategy to control opioid abuse

Pharmacist suggests education as foremost strategy to control opioid abuse

Technologies that make it harder for people to abuse opioids - like doctoring pills so that they produce unpleasant side effects if broken, crushed or injected -- likely will have limited effectiveness in stemming the global epidemic of opioid abuse, according to Adam Kaye, a professor of pharmacy at University of the Pacific. [More]
Researchers find potential link between pulmonary function and vocal fatigue symptoms in women

Researchers find potential link between pulmonary function and vocal fatigue symptoms in women

Teaching is an occupation with a high risk of developing vocal problems -- teachers have more than twice the voice problems than people in other professions, as the voice is the major tool in classroom instruction and is often used for long periods of time and in noisy environments. [More]
Study highlights disparities in care for disadvantaged children with traumatic brain injuries

Study highlights disparities in care for disadvantaged children with traumatic brain injuries

Children who suffer traumatic brain injuries can face a difficult road to recovery, requiring services such as physical therapy and mental health treatment for months or years to get their young lives back on track. [More]
AHA/ASA targets acute ischemic stroke guidelines

AHA/ASA targets acute ischemic stroke guidelines

Acute Ischemic Stroke Guidelines are the subject of a new toolkit from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association aimed at accelerating adoption of the 2015 update regarding endovascular treatment. [More]
Important signs, symptoms of stroke that everyone should know

Important signs, symptoms of stroke that everyone should know

Almost 795,000 Americans suffer from stroke each year, 130,000 which are fatal, making stroke the fifth leading cause of death in the United States. [More]
Big data, mobile technology play key roles in stroke recovery

Big data, mobile technology play key roles in stroke recovery

Big data and mobile technology are playing key roles in the recovery from stroke­related language and cognitive impairment, according to an internal study conducted by Constant Therapy, which provides a science­based, customized brain rehabilitation software program. [More]
UCLA neurologist highlights steps that can help Americans reduce stroke risk

UCLA neurologist highlights steps that can help Americans reduce stroke risk

Getting more exercise, giving up cigarettes and monitoring cholesterol and blood pressure are a few steps Americans can take to reduce their risk of stroke, says Doojin Kim, MD, a neurologist at UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica who often treats patients who have suffered a stroke, the No. 4 cause of death and the No. 1 cause of adult disability in the U.S. [More]
Innovative noise reduction technology SEDA helps tackle babble signals from cochlear implants

Innovative noise reduction technology SEDA helps tackle babble signals from cochlear implants

Wearers of cochlear implants and hearing aids often have difficulty teasing out what someone is saying over "babble" -- the cacophony of other talkers -- and other ambient sounds. New York University researchers have devised a novel solution: an algorithmic approach that, like making drinkable water from pond water, distills the talker's voice from a turbid wash of noise. [More]
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