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Methamphetamine use may increase Parkinson's disease risk

Methamphetamine use may increase Parkinson's disease risk

In addition to incurring serious dental problems, memory loss and other physical and mental issues, methamphetamine users are three times more at risk for getting Parkinson's disease than non-illicit drug users, new research from the University of Utah and Intermountain Healthcare shows. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify cell signaling mechanism that plays vital role in brain cancer

UT Southwestern researchers identify cell signaling mechanism that plays vital role in brain cancer

UT Southwestern Medical Center neurology researchers have identified an important cell signaling mechanism that plays an important role in brain cancer and may provide a new therapeutic target. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify possible therapy to treat neurofibromatosis type 1

UT Southwestern researchers identify possible therapy to treat neurofibromatosis type 1

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a possible therapy to treat neurofibromatosis type 1 or NF1, a childhood neurological disease characterized by learning deficits and autism that is caused by inherited mutations in the gene encoding a protein called neurofibromin. [More]
OPTIMISE project to collect data that provides in-depth picture of MS experiences

OPTIMISE project to collect data that provides in-depth picture of MS experiences

Researchers will track the lives of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) in unprecedented detail in a project to improve the evaluation of treatments. [More]
Study points to need for improving pediatric benefits under the Affordable Care Act

Study points to need for improving pediatric benefits under the Affordable Care Act

An article published in the Health Affairs December issue is the first ever comprehensive analysis to investigate the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) Essential Health Benefit (EHB) as it relates to children. The study found that the EHB has resulted in a state-by-state patchwork of coverage for children and adolescents that has significant exclusions, particularly for children with developmental disabilities and other special health care needs. [More]
Amgen announces new data from BLINCYTO Phase 2 study for treatment of patients with ALL

Amgen announces new data from BLINCYTO Phase 2 study for treatment of patients with ALL

Amgen today announced that new data from a pivotal Phase 2 study evaluating BLINCYTO (blinatumomab) for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was presented at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. [More]
Verizon announces winners of 2014 Powerful Answers Award

Verizon announces winners of 2014 Powerful Answers Award

The wait is over. Verizon is proud to announce the winners of Verizon's 2014 Powerful Answers Award, three in each of the following categories: education, health care, sustainability and transportation. [More]
Orexo announces positive results from ISTART/006 study

Orexo announces positive results from ISTART/006 study

Orexo US, Inc. announced results from the ISTART/006 study, being presented today at the 25th Annual Meeting and Symposium of the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry in Aventura, Florida, USA. [More]
Five speech pathology students from Griffith to take on jobs with Queensland Health

Five speech pathology students from Griffith to take on jobs with Queensland Health

Griffith’s Master of Speech Pathology department is delighted following the amazing success of five of its graduating students who are set to take on jobs with Queensland Health. [More]
Aging in Rural Places: A new book examines health and wellness in rural areas

Aging in Rural Places: A new book examines health and wellness in rural areas

Kristina Hash, associate professor in the School of Social Work at West Virginia University, has co-edited and co-authored a book examining rural areas and discussing the issues, programs and policies designed to meet residents' needs. [More]
Northwestern Medicine neurosurgeons use new adaptive hybrid surgery technology to treat brain tumor

Northwestern Medicine neurosurgeons use new adaptive hybrid surgery technology to treat brain tumor

It started with numbness on the left side of his face. A few months later, Steve Mores couldn't feel his tongue or chew on the left side of his mouth. TV commercials featuring food or even being in a grocery store made him nauseous. A long time drummer in a popular band, Mores lost 30 pounds and had to find a replacement. [More]
Identifying infant and toddler injuries that require emergency medical care

Identifying infant and toddler injuries that require emergency medical care

Bianca Edison, MD, MS is an attending physician in the Children's Orthopaedic Center at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, and is assistant clinical professor of Orthopaedics at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California. Edison is a licensed, Board-Certified pediatrician and Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics who completed a fellowship in Primary Care SportsMedicine. Her interests and experience include orthopaedic conditions affecting young children, teens, and athletes. Here she reviews common infant and toddler injuries, and how parents can determine if emergency medical care is needed. [More]
Researchers explore how to turn on the activity of paternal gene

Researchers explore how to turn on the activity of paternal gene

Most genes are inherited as two working copies, one from the mother and one from the father. However, in a few instances, a gene is imprinted, which means that one copy is silenced. This is called genomic imprinting. If the active copy is mutated, then disease results, even though the silenced gene copy may be normal. [More]
Researchers identify key molecule that drives excess protein production in Fragile X patients' brain

Researchers identify key molecule that drives excess protein production in Fragile X patients' brain

People affected by a common inherited form of autism could be helped by a drug that is being tested as a treatment for cancer. [More]
CMU scientists use Harry Potter book to identify brain activity

CMU scientists use Harry Potter book to identify brain activity

Some people say that reading "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" taught them the importance of friends, or that easy decisions are seldom right. Carnegie Mellon University scientists used a chapter of that book to learn a different lesson: identifying what different regions of the brain are doing when people read. [More]
STAR Analytical Services awarded NIH grant to develop system for hearing-impaired listeners

STAR Analytical Services awarded NIH grant to develop system for hearing-impaired listeners

STAR Analytical Services announces the award of a 3-year $1,500,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop an assistive conversation system for hearing-impaired listeners, including many aging baby-boomers, who have difficulty understanding and participating in conversations in noisy environments. [More]
Three-day global symposium on Ebola virus, other infectious diseases

Three-day global symposium on Ebola virus, other infectious diseases

The 11th annual International Consortium on Anti-Virals (ICAV) symposium, Infectious Diseases: Global Public-Health Challenges of the Next Decade, will put the challenges posed by several infectious diseases under the microscope, including the Ebola virus, the H7N9 influenza virus, MERS coronavirus and dengue viruses, as well as drug-resistant tuberculosis. [More]
Social robots help diabetic children to become more confident about their futures

Social robots help diabetic children to become more confident about their futures

Social robots are helping diabetic children accept the nature of their condition and become more confident about their futures, scientists have announced following a four-and-a-half year research study. [More]

Researcher develops loudspeaker system for people with hearing problems

Families often watch TV together, but what happens when one member has hearing difficulties? Usually the result is a compromise on listening volume that doesn't really satisfy anyone. [More]
Representatives from 40 countries meet to discuss plan for antimicrobial resistance

Representatives from 40 countries meet to discuss plan for antimicrobial resistance

Every year, 25,000 people die as a result of antimicrobial resistance in Europe. A global action plan against one of the greatest health threats of our time is the aim of a conference being held in Oslo on 13th-14th November. [More]