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UC San Diego Health System designated as Center of Excellence for Huntington's disease

UC San Diego Health System designated as Center of Excellence for Huntington's disease

The Huntington's Disease Clinical Research Center at UC San Diego Health System has been designated a Center of Excellence by the Huntington's Disease Society of America. UC San Diego was one of only 29 centers nationwide to receive this prestigious designation, which recognizes centers for their elite multidisciplinary approach to Huntington's disease care and research. [More]

Racial stereotypes can impact the way we communicate, understand others

Racial stereotypes and expectations can impact the way we communicate and understand others, according to UBC research. The new study, published in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, highlights how non-verbal "social cues" - such as photographs of Chinese Canadians - can affect how we comprehend speech. [More]
New investments may enable two Canadian organizations to improve life for people with hearing loss

New investments may enable two Canadian organizations to improve life for people with hearing loss

New investments from public and private sources in Canada and the USA, including Grand Challenges Canada and Google.org, will enable two Canadian organizations to contribute to a better life for people with hearing loss in developing countries. [More]
Essential fatty acids play crucial role in human brain growth and function

Essential fatty acids play crucial role in human brain growth and function

New research conducted in a rural community in Pakistan highlights the crucial role that essential fatty acids play in human brain growth and function. [More]
Researchers map out surgical anatomy, approaches for auditory brainstem implant placement

Researchers map out surgical anatomy, approaches for auditory brainstem implant placement

A technique called auditory brainstem implantation can restore hearing for patients who can't benefit from cochlear implants. A team of US and Japanese experts has mapped out the surgical anatomy and approaches for auditory brainstem implantation in the June issue of Operative Neurosurgery, published on behalf of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Existing anti-stroke drug can be effective in treating middle-ear infections

Existing anti-stroke drug can be effective in treating middle-ear infections

An existing anti-stroke drug is an effective treatment for middle-ear infections, showing the ability to suppress mucus overproduction, improve bacterial clearance and reduce hearing loss, according to researchers at Georgia State University and the University of Rochester. [More]
First-of-its-kind DNA bank aims at advancing research into genetics of stuttering

First-of-its-kind DNA bank aims at advancing research into genetics of stuttering

Scientists at the University of Alberta's Institute for Stuttering Treatment and Research want Albertans to give a spit -- five millilitres to be precise -- to help find the cause and a cure for stuttering. [More]
Omega-3 fatty acids improve cognitive flexibility in older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease

Omega-3 fatty acids improve cognitive flexibility in older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease

A study of older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease found that those who consumed more omega-3 fatty acids did better than their peers on tests of cognitive flexibility -- the ability to efficiently switch between tasks -- and had a bigger anterior cingulate cortex, a brain region known to contribute to cognitive flexibility. [More]
Duke and MIT scientists discover brain area sensitive to the timing of speech

Duke and MIT scientists discover brain area sensitive to the timing of speech

Duke and MIT scientists have discovered an area of the brain that is sensitive to the timing of speech, a crucial element of spoken language. [More]
UAB opens third multidisciplinary clinic for transverse myelitis

UAB opens third multidisciplinary clinic for transverse myelitis

Mike Jezdimir knows firsthand how hard it is to get appropriate medical treatment for his condition, a disease of the spinal cord called transverse myelitis. He has had it for 48 years, since he was 17. TM is fairly uncommon, and many physicians rarely encounter it. Treatment options are limited. [More]
Catatonia may cause regression in Down syndrome patients

Catatonia may cause regression in Down syndrome patients

Down syndrome, the most common chromosomal disorder in America, can be complicated by significant deterioration in movement, speech and functioning in some adolescents and young adults. Physicians previously attributed this regression to depression or early-onset Alzheimer's, and it has not responded to treatments. [More]
SLU professor reveals why women have higher rates of strokes than men, suggests steps to reduce risk

SLU professor reveals why women have higher rates of strokes than men, suggests steps to reduce risk

Each year, around 55,000 more women than men will have a stroke. Longer lifespans, pregnancies and hormones all contribute to the disparity, as do illnesses that tend to strike women more frequently. Crunch the numbers and the math adds up to more strokes for women, making it important for women monitor their risk. [More]
UT Southwestern testing Vivistim System device in stroke patients

UT Southwestern testing Vivistim System device in stroke patients

UT Southwestern Medical Center will be one of three national sites to pioneer U.S. testing for an implant device that stimulates the vagus nerve in stroke patients to see whether it can help restore lost arm function. [More]
RIT's Behnaz Ghoraani awarded NIH grant to develop new atrial fibrillation solution

RIT's Behnaz Ghoraani awarded NIH grant to develop new atrial fibrillation solution

Behnaz Ghoraani, engineering faculty at Rochester Institute of Technology, was recently awarded a $456,000 grant from the National Institutes for Health for the project "Catheter guidance algorithm for identification of atrial fibrillation ablation." [More]
Indivior reports top-line results from RBP-7000 phase 3 trial for treatment of schizophrenia

Indivior reports top-line results from RBP-7000 phase 3 trial for treatment of schizophrenia

Indivior PLC today announced top-line results from its phase 3 clinical trial of RBP-7000, an investigational drug in development for the treatment of schizophrenia. In this pivotal study, both doses of RBP-7000 tested, 90 mg and 120 mg administered once-monthly, met the primary endpoint with statistically and clinically significant reductions in the symptoms of acute schizophrenia over an 8-week treatment period. [More]
Chickenpox virus can cause strokes in patients with compromised immune systems

Chickenpox virus can cause strokes in patients with compromised immune systems

Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can, in rare cases, experience bleeding on the brain that causes a type of stroke called intracerebral hemorrhage. [More]

Patients with traumatic brain injuries need effective cognitive neuroscience-based therapies

Patients with traumatic brain injuries are not benefiting from recent advances in cognitive neuroscience research - and they should be, scientists report in a special issue of Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences. [More]
Innovative, active post-discharge intervention program benefits thoracic surgery patients

Innovative, active post-discharge intervention program benefits thoracic surgery patients

Post-surgical hospital readmission after discharge and repeat emergency room (ER) visits are not unusual for patients who have undergone major thoracic surgery. Recognizing this problem, clinicians at McMaster University have implemented an innovative, active post-discharge intervention for thoracic surgery patients that is based on the principle of a "one team-one approach" that is initiated while the patient is still hospitalized. [More]
Findings open pathway to studying bat brains to understand certain human language disorders

Findings open pathway to studying bat brains to understand certain human language disorders

Researchers from Georgetown University Medical Center and American University have shown that, like humans, mustached bats use the left and right sides of their brains to process different aspects of sounds. Aside from humans, no other animal that has been studied, not even monkeys or apes, has proved to use such hemispheric specialization for sound processing -- meaning that the left brain is better at processing fast sounds, and the right processing slow ones. [More]
UO researchers uncover how the brain encodes and translates sounds

UO researchers uncover how the brain encodes and translates sounds

When people hear the sound of footsteps or the drilling of a woodpecker, the rhythmic structure of the sounds is striking, says Michael Wehr, a professor of psychology at the University of Oregon. [More]
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