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Three-day global symposium on Ebola virus, other infectious diseases

Three-day global symposium on Ebola virus, other infectious diseases

The 11th annual International Consortium on Anti-Virals (ICAV) symposium, Infectious Diseases: Global Public-Health Challenges of the Next Decade, will put the challenges posed by several infectious diseases under the microscope, including the Ebola virus, the H7N9 influenza virus, MERS coronavirus and dengue viruses, as well as drug-resistant tuberculosis. [More]
Social robots help diabetic children to become more confident about their futures

Social robots help diabetic children to become more confident about their futures

Social robots are helping diabetic children accept the nature of their condition and become more confident about their futures, scientists have announced following a four-and-a-half year research study. [More]
Researcher develops loudspeaker system for people with hearing problems

Researcher develops loudspeaker system for people with hearing problems

Families often watch TV together, but what happens when one member has hearing difficulties? Usually the result is a compromise on listening volume that doesn't really satisfy anyone. [More]
Representatives from 40 countries meet to discuss plan for antimicrobial resistance

Representatives from 40 countries meet to discuss plan for antimicrobial resistance

Every year, 25,000 people die as a result of antimicrobial resistance in Europe. A global action plan against one of the greatest health threats of our time is the aim of a conference being held in Oslo on 13th-14th November. [More]
Scientists awarded grant to investigate new drug-based treatment for NF2

Scientists awarded grant to investigate new drug-based treatment for NF2

Scientists from Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry have been awarded a grant from young person's cancer charity The Laura Crane Youth Cancer Trust to investigate a new drug-based treatment for a multi-tumour brain and nervous system cancer which affects teenagers and young adults. [More]
Gentiva Health Services reports revenues of $498.0 million for Q3 2014

Gentiva Health Services reports revenues of $498.0 million for Q3 2014

Gentiva Health Services, Inc., one of the largest providers of home health, hospice and community care services in the United States, today reported net revenues of $498.0 million, adjusted EBITDA of $48.5 million and adjusted income attributable to Gentiva shareholders per diluted share of $0.28. [More]
New technology could revolutionise the way medical staff treat people with degenerative condition

New technology could revolutionise the way medical staff treat people with degenerative condition

A pioneering piece of technology will allow users to experience the world through the eyes of a person with Young-Onset Parkinson's disease- which could revolutionise the way carers and medical staff treat people with the degenerative condition. [More]
Gates Foundation awards US$156 million to support PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative

Gates Foundation awards US$156 million to support PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative

In support of a bold quest to rid the world entirely of malaria, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation today announced an award of US$156 million to PATH to support the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative (MVI) in building new vaccines that will interrupt the cycle of malaria parasite transmission and help realize the "accelerating to zero" agenda. Such vaccines would ensure that parasite reintroduction is prevented by providing what could be called an "immunological bed net." [More]
New therapy appears to help tinnitus patients cope better with phantom noise

New therapy appears to help tinnitus patients cope better with phantom noise

Patients with tinnitus hear phantom noise and are sometimes so bothered by the perceived ringing in their ears, they have difficulty concentrating. A new therapy does not lessen perception of the noise but appears to help patients cope better with it in their daily lives, according to new research. [More]
Viewpoints: Health care opponent's legal strategy; the challenge for this open enrollment

Viewpoints: Health care opponent's legal strategy; the challenge for this open enrollment

In 2011 after the first appeals circuit struck down the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate, the White House asked the Supreme Court to take the case as soon as possible and "put these challenges to rest." [More]

FORUM ONE conference invites people to donate for Operation Smile charity

An actor, director, producer and screenwriter knows how important a smile is in a career and life. "The ability to smile is an integral part of life," said Van Damme. "The absence of a smile is hostile to our nature, to the joy. You must have a strange feeling when you see a child or an adult, who can't smile and you can. So I want to help. I became famous and I need to use it for good causes." [More]
NYSCF names six promising scientists as 2014 NYSCF – Robertson Investigators

NYSCF names six promising scientists as 2014 NYSCF – Robertson Investigators

The New York Stem Cell Foundation today named six of the most promising scientists as its 2014 NYSCF – Robertson Investigators. [More]

Precyse's CDI services receive high scores in KLAS report

Precyse, an industry leader in Health Information Management (HIM) performance solutions, is pleased to announce Precyse's Clinical Documentation Improvement services received high scores in a recent KLAS report, titled "CDI Services 2014: Providing Light to Documentation Darkness." [More]
Loyola neurologist lists seven surprising things about strokes

Loyola neurologist lists seven surprising things about strokes

In recognition of World Stroke Day Oct. 29, Loyola University Medical Center neurologist Jose Biller, MD, lists seven surprising things you may not know about strokes. [More]
Viewpoints: Ebola myths; Sen. McCain's 'opportunistic alarmism'; Gov. Jindal on CDC's misspent resources

Viewpoints: Ebola myths; Sen. McCain's 'opportunistic alarmism'; Gov. Jindal on CDC's misspent resources

Hubris is the greatest danger in wealthy countries -; a sort of smug assumption that advanced technologies and emergency-preparedness plans guarantee that Ebola and other germs will not spread. It was hubris that left Toronto's top hospitals battling SARS in 2003, long after the virus was conquered in poorer Vietnam. It was hubris that led the World Health Assembly in 2013 to cut the WHO's outbreak-response budget in favor of more programs to treat cancer and heart disease. [More]
Medical geneticists diagnose genetic syndromes, improve children’s quality of life

Medical geneticists diagnose genetic syndromes, improve children’s quality of life

The genes children inherit determine everything from their height to their hair color. But sometimes, a child's genetic code also contains hidden abnormalities that can cause an array of health issues, such as developmental delays or physical or mental illness. [More]

Abortion ads play big in N.H. and Colo. Senate campaigns

As the senatorial campaigns in New Hampshire and Colorado continue to highlight candidate positions on abortion, the rhetoric over the health law calms a bit. [More]
‘Priming’ may improve schizophrenia patients’ social skills

‘Priming’ may improve schizophrenia patients’ social skills

Study findings suggest that social priming can increase the use of nonverbal social behaviours in patients with schizophrenia. [More]
Longer looks: Limits on doctor training; a woman's campaign for end-of-life choices

Longer looks: Limits on doctor training; a woman's campaign for end-of-life choices

Dr. Dino Terzic got lucky the other day. In his seventh and final year as a neurosurgery resident at the University of Minnesota, the 32-year-old Bosnian got to operate on a rare type of brain aneurysm that required a special approach through the patient's forehead. As Terzic prepared to slice into the patient's scalp, he was asked if he'd ever seen this type of flaw in an artery, which occurs in just 2 to 3 percent of aneurysm cases. "On a video," Terzic replied with a chuckle. Terzic's hands-on experience shows why the nation's medical schools are beset by a nagging controversy over rules that limit the number of hours residents can work (Dan Browning, 10/8). [More]

Candidates for Calif. congressional seat clash over health law

A Wednesday debate between Democrat Ami Bera and Republican Doug Ose was marked by tense talk about health policy issues and the economy. Additionally, Cover Oregon assigns Sen. Jeff Merkley, D- Ore., who earns $174,000 a year in the U.S. Senate, to Oregon's Medicaid plan -- reserved only for the poor. Elsewhere, Hillary Clinton sidestepped a tricky issue when delivering a paid speech to a trade group. [More]