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FORUM ONE conference invites people to donate for Operation Smile charity

An actor, director, producer and screenwriter knows how important a smile is in a career and life. "The ability to smile is an integral part of life," said Van Damme. "The absence of a smile is hostile to our nature, to the joy. You must have a strange feeling when you see a child or an adult, who can't smile and you can. So I want to help. I became famous and I need to use it for good causes." [More]
NYSCF names six promising scientists as 2014 NYSCF – Robertson Investigators

NYSCF names six promising scientists as 2014 NYSCF – Robertson Investigators

The New York Stem Cell Foundation today named six of the most promising scientists as its 2014 NYSCF – Robertson Investigators. [More]

Precyse's CDI services receive high scores in KLAS report

Precyse, an industry leader in Health Information Management (HIM) performance solutions, is pleased to announce Precyse's Clinical Documentation Improvement services received high scores in a recent KLAS report, titled "CDI Services 2014: Providing Light to Documentation Darkness." [More]
Loyola neurologist lists seven surprising things about strokes

Loyola neurologist lists seven surprising things about strokes

In recognition of World Stroke Day Oct. 29, Loyola University Medical Center neurologist Jose Biller, MD, lists seven surprising things you may not know about strokes. [More]
Viewpoints: Ebola myths; Sen. McCain's 'opportunistic alarmism'; Gov. Jindal on CDC's misspent resources

Viewpoints: Ebola myths; Sen. McCain's 'opportunistic alarmism'; Gov. Jindal on CDC's misspent resources

Hubris is the greatest danger in wealthy countries -; a sort of smug assumption that advanced technologies and emergency-preparedness plans guarantee that Ebola and other germs will not spread. It was hubris that left Toronto's top hospitals battling SARS in 2003, long after the virus was conquered in poorer Vietnam. It was hubris that led the World Health Assembly in 2013 to cut the WHO's outbreak-response budget in favor of more programs to treat cancer and heart disease. [More]
Medical geneticists diagnose genetic syndromes, improve children’s quality of life

Medical geneticists diagnose genetic syndromes, improve children’s quality of life

The genes children inherit determine everything from their height to their hair color. But sometimes, a child's genetic code also contains hidden abnormalities that can cause an array of health issues, such as developmental delays or physical or mental illness. [More]

Abortion ads play big in N.H. and Colo. Senate campaigns

As the senatorial campaigns in New Hampshire and Colorado continue to highlight candidate positions on abortion, the rhetoric over the health law calms a bit. [More]
‘Priming’ may improve schizophrenia patients’ social skills

‘Priming’ may improve schizophrenia patients’ social skills

Study findings suggest that social priming can increase the use of nonverbal social behaviours in patients with schizophrenia. [More]
Longer looks: Limits on doctor training; a woman's campaign for end-of-life choices

Longer looks: Limits on doctor training; a woman's campaign for end-of-life choices

Dr. Dino Terzic got lucky the other day. In his seventh and final year as a neurosurgery resident at the University of Minnesota, the 32-year-old Bosnian got to operate on a rare type of brain aneurysm that required a special approach through the patient's forehead. As Terzic prepared to slice into the patient's scalp, he was asked if he'd ever seen this type of flaw in an artery, which occurs in just 2 to 3 percent of aneurysm cases. "On a video," Terzic replied with a chuckle. Terzic's hands-on experience shows why the nation's medical schools are beset by a nagging controversy over rules that limit the number of hours residents can work (Dan Browning, 10/8). [More]
Candidates for Calif. congressional seat clash over health law

Candidates for Calif. congressional seat clash over health law

A Wednesday debate between Democrat Ami Bera and Republican Doug Ose was marked by tense talk about health policy issues and the economy. Additionally, Cover Oregon assigns Sen. Jeff Merkley, D- Ore., who earns $174,000 a year in the U.S. Senate, to Oregon's Medicaid plan -- reserved only for the poor. Elsewhere, Hillary Clinton sidestepped a tricky issue when delivering a paid speech to a trade group. [More]

Hands-free, voice-controlled automobile infotainment systems can distract drivers, show studies

Two new AAA-University of Utah studies show that despite public belief to the contrary, hands-free, voice-controlled automobile infotainment systems can distract drivers, although it is possible to design them to be safer. [More]
Physical therapy before joint replacement surgery reduces need for postoperative care by nearly 30%

Physical therapy before joint replacement surgery reduces need for postoperative care by nearly 30%

Physical therapy after total hip (THR) or total knee replacement (TKR) surgery is standard care for all patients. A new study, appearing in the October 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery), also found that physical therapy before joint replacement surgery, or "prehabilitation," can diminish the need for postoperative care by nearly 30 percent, saving an average of $1,215 per patient in skilled nursing facility, home health agency or other postoperative care. [More]
Genesis Rehab Services, St. Catherine University to create online occupational therapy assistant program

Genesis Rehab Services, St. Catherine University to create online occupational therapy assistant program

Genesis Rehab Services and St. Catherine University (St. Paul-Minneapolis, Minn.) announced today their partnership to create the first online occupational therapy assistant program to address the rising need for professional occupational therapy assistants throughout the country. [More]

Children's oral language can be a good predictor of future writing difficulties

Children's future writing difficulties can be identified before they even learn how to begin writing, according to a new study by Professor Phaedra Royle and Postdoctoral fellow Alexandra Marquis of the University of Montreal's School of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology. [More]
Care lags for people who have stroke in hospital, study finds

Care lags for people who have stroke in hospital, study finds

At the first sign of a stroke, time is of the essence. For every minute of delay in treatment, people typically lose almost two million brain cells. Yet a new study presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress reveals that those delays - in getting the right tests and the right drugs - can be longer when people experience a stroke in a hospital. [More]
Viewpoints: Another troubled website rollout; insurers fight consumer measures in Calif.

Viewpoints: Another troubled website rollout; insurers fight consumer measures in Calif.

If the federal government's new Open Payments website were a consumer product, it would be returned to the manufacturer for a full refund. Open Payments is the government's site for publishing payments made to doctors and teaching hospitals by drug and medical device manufacturers. It includes 4.4 million payments, worth $3.5 billion, to more than half a million doctors and almost 1,360 teaching hospitals (Charles Ornstein, 10/1). [More]

Researchers create speech-to-text software for Google Glass to help hard-of-hearing users

A team of Georgia Institute of Technology researchers has created speech-to-text software for Google Glass that helps hard-of-hearing users with everyday conversations. A hard-of-hearing person wears Glass while a second person speaks directly into a smartphone. [More]
Large number of Canadian stroke patients not getting help to get back to active life

Large number of Canadian stroke patients not getting help to get back to active life

Too many stroke patients in Canada are not getting the rehabilitation they need to return to a healthy, active life, according to a new study which will be presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress in Vancouver tomorrow. [More]

MSU to provide specialized health benefits to veterans

Mississippi State University will be the first higher learning institution in the nation to partner with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to provide timely, specialized health benefits to veterans. [More]
Parent coaching intervention benefits preschool-aged children with autism

Parent coaching intervention benefits preschool-aged children with autism

A parent coaching intervention brings meaningful benefits for preschool-aged children with autism-spectrum disorders (ASD), according to a clinical trial in the October Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, the official journal of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. [More]