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Study finds older adults who sustain wrist fractures more likely to have poor balance

Study finds older adults who sustain wrist fractures more likely to have poor balance

Elderly patients suffering a low energy wrist (distal radius) fracture are more likely to have difficulties with balance, placing them at risk for future injuries, according to a new study appearing in the July 20, 2016 issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. [More]
Patients with cLBP more likely to use illicit drugs, study reports

Patients with cLBP more likely to use illicit drugs, study reports

People living with chronic low back pain (cLBP) are more likely to use illicit drugs -- including marijuana, cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine -- compared to those without back pain, reports a study in Spine, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Chelsea and Westminster Hospital deploys new imaging systems from Siemens Healthineers following A&E expansion

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital deploys new imaging systems from Siemens Healthineers following A&E expansion

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital in West London has enhanced its provision of imaging services to ensure an efficient workflow throughout A&E as part of the first phase of a major redevelopment of the Emergency Department which includes a new imaging suite. [More]
Study shows spinal cord stimulation can be safe, effective treatment option for chronic pain sufferers

Study shows spinal cord stimulation can be safe, effective treatment option for chronic pain sufferers

Chronic pain affects up to 20% of people in developed countries, and represents not only a profound impact on individuals and their families but also a sizeable burden on employers, health care systems, and society in general. [More]
HANS device helps prevent fatal craniovertebral junction injuries in racecar drivers

HANS device helps prevent fatal craniovertebral junction injuries in racecar drivers

Before 2001, catastrophic craniovertebral junction (CVJ) injuries were the most common cause of death to drivers in the fast-paced sport of professional car racing. That changed with the development and implementation of the HANS (Head and Neck Support) device and similar restraints. [More]
Study provides more insights into abusive head injury in small children

Study provides more insights into abusive head injury in small children

Abusive head injury, sometimes referred to as shaken baby syndrome or non-accidental trauma, is the third leading cause of head injuries in small children in the US. For children under the age of 1 year, it is the cause of the majority of serious head injuries. [More]
Study suggests final fusion surgery in children with early-onset scoliosis can be eliminated

Study suggests final fusion surgery in children with early-onset scoliosis can be eliminated

In a look-back study of medical records, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine concluded that a major operation to fuse the spines of children with a rare form of severe, early-onset scoliosis can be eliminated in many cases. [More]
Study to evaluate outcomes of different hip replacement techniques using mobile gait analysis system

Study to evaluate outcomes of different hip replacement techniques using mobile gait analysis system

Researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery have launched a pilot study using a portable gait analysis mat to determine early outcomes of several different hip replacement techniques. [More]
Surgery after first-time shoulder dislocation reduces recurrent injury risk in young athletes

Surgery after first-time shoulder dislocation reduces recurrent injury risk in young athletes

Shoulder instability is most common in the young, athletic population, bringing a focus to how these injuries are best treated. Research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting in Colorado Springs, CO, demonstrated that surgery after a first-time shoulder dislocation lowered the re-injury risks and need for follow-up surgery when compared to those who were initially treated non-operatively and experienced a repeat dislocation prior to surgery. [More]
AMPK protein activated during fasting regulates hunger neurons in the brain

AMPK protein activated during fasting regulates hunger neurons in the brain

Neurons in the brain that control hunger are regulated by AMPK, a protein activated during fasting, report researchers from Tufts University School of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School in Neuron on July 6, 2016. [More]
Study finds no substantial link between gadolinium exposure and parkinsonism

Study finds no substantial link between gadolinium exposure and parkinsonism

In a study appearing in the July 5 issue of JAMA, Blayne Welk, M.D., M.Sc., of Western University, London, Canada, and colleagues conducted a study to assess the association between gadolinium exposure and parkinsonism, a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by tremor and impaired muscular coordination. [More]
Risk of blindness from spinal-fusion surgery has declined, study shows

Risk of blindness from spinal-fusion surgery has declined, study shows

The risk of blindness caused by spinal fusion, one of the most common surgeries performed in the U.S., has dropped almost three-fold since the late 1990s, according to the largest study of the topic to date. [More]
New non-invasive method may help treat people with inoperable or hard-to-reach tumors

New non-invasive method may help treat people with inoperable or hard-to-reach tumors

Matthew Gdovin, an associate professor in the UTSA Department of Biology, has developed a newly patented method to kill cancer cells. [More]
Prognostic factor could help identify tumor recurrence after surgery for prostate cancer

Prognostic factor could help identify tumor recurrence after surgery for prostate cancer

Slightly more than 10% of all patients who undergo successful surgery for prostate cancer have an elevated risk of tumor recurrence afterwards - especially as metastases. [More]
Research finds significant increase in use of chiropractic services among veterans

Research finds significant increase in use of chiropractic services among veterans

The use of chiropractic services in the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system has seen a steep rise over more than a decade, according to research published in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, the official scientific journal of the American Chiropractic Association. [More]
Neurofibromatosis causes benign tumor formation in normal nervous tissue

Neurofibromatosis causes benign tumor formation in normal nervous tissue

Although neurofibromatosis (NF) is not commonly discussed, it affects more than 2 million people worldwide. [More]
Bone Balance Index may help predict bone loss in women during menopause transition

Bone Balance Index may help predict bone loss in women during menopause transition

Researchers have developed an index to better predict which women may experience faster bone loss across the menopause transition, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Simple model can help predict complication risks after surgery for CSM

Simple model can help predict complication risks after surgery for CSM

A simple model consisting of four risk factors can help surgeons to predict the risk of complications after surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM)—a common condition causing compression of the spinal cord in the neck, reports a study in the July issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Scientific paper supports concept of CarThera's intracranial ultrasound implant to disrupt blood-brain barrier

Scientific paper supports concept of CarThera's intracranial ultrasound implant to disrupt blood-brain barrier

CarThera, a French company based at the Brain and Spine Institute, that designs and develops innovative ultrasound-based medical devices to treat brain disorders, today announces the publication in Science Translational Medicine of a scientific paper on initial successes in disrupting the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with the use of ultrasound. [More]
Adequate maternal folate may protect children from future obesity risk

Adequate maternal folate may protect children from future obesity risk

Proper maternal folate levels during pregnancy may protect children from a future risk of obesity, especially those born to obese mothers, according to a study led by researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
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