Spine News and Research RSS Feed - Spine News and Research

Researchers investigate link between diet, obesity-linked Type 2 diabetes, and spinal disc degeneration

Researchers investigate link between diet, obesity-linked Type 2 diabetes, and spinal disc degeneration

Can a diet high in processed fat and sugar and Type 2 diabetes cause degeneration of intervertebral discs in the spine? If so, what is happening, and can it be prevented? As part of an ongoing collaboration between Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai - a partnership that draws upon the expertise of both schools to address significant health problems - researchers hope to answer those questions by investigating the link between diet, obesity-linked Type 2 diabetes, and intervertebral disc degeneration. [More]
Scientists find how sleep deprivation negatively affects memory

Scientists find how sleep deprivation negatively affects memory

Researchers from the Universities of Groningen and Pennsylvania have discovered a piece in the puzzle of how sleep deprivation negatively affects memory. [More]
Research finding opens door to new treatment options for inflammatory rheumatism

Research finding opens door to new treatment options for inflammatory rheumatism

Enthesitis, inflammation of tendons where they attach to the bone, is a common medical problem which underlies various forms of inflammatory rheumatism. [More]
Vertebroplasty helps decrease acute pain in patients with osteoporotic fractures

Vertebroplasty helps decrease acute pain in patients with osteoporotic fractures

Vertebroplasty is a safe and effective procedure to reduce acute pain and disability in patients who have experienced spinal fractures within a 6-week period, according to a new study published this week in The Lancet. [More]
Microscale and macroscale brain disruptions may emerge together in schizophrenia

Microscale and macroscale brain disruptions may emerge together in schizophrenia

Brain abnormalities in schizophrenia have been identified at the microscale (alterations in synaptic connections between neurons) and the macroscale (altered connections between brain regions). [More]
First investigational treatment for infantile-onset SMA shows promising results in clinical trial

First investigational treatment for infantile-onset SMA shows promising results in clinical trial

A major milestone was reached when nusinersen, an investigational treatment for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), was shown to significantly improve achievement of motor milestones in babies with infantile-onset SMA, according to an interim analysis of the double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled Phase 3 clinical trial called ENDEAR. [More]
Study shows universal health insurance may mitigate surgical disparities for African Americans

Study shows universal health insurance may mitigate surgical disparities for African Americans

A new study from Brigham and Women's Hospital utilized claims data from more than 630,000 patients living in the state of California and found no significant differences in post-operative complications or mortality between African American patients and White patients who were treated in a universally insured military health system. [More]
Scientists discover tissue biomarkers that lead to joint degeneration linked to spine osteoarthritis

Scientists discover tissue biomarkers that lead to joint degeneration linked to spine osteoarthritis

A research team at the Krembil Research Institute has discovered a pair of tissue biomarkers that directly contribute to the harmful joint degeneration associated with spine osteoarthritis. [More]
Hyperkyphosis may be passed on from parents to children

Hyperkyphosis may be passed on from parents to children

Researchers from the Harvard affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research recently published a study in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, suggesting that hyperkyphosis may be heritable, or passed on from parents to offspring. [More]
Researchers quantify impact of hyperkyphosis on decline in pulmonary function

Researchers quantify impact of hyperkyphosis on decline in pulmonary function

Researchers from the Harvard affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research, have published a recent article in Journals of Gerontology: Medical Sciences, suggesting that preventing or slowing progression of hyperkyphosis may reduce pulmonary decline in older adults. [More]
UH uses proton therapy system to treat first patient with rare form of sarcoma

UH uses proton therapy system to treat first patient with rare form of sarcoma

Mevion Medical Systems, the leader in compact proton therapy, is announcing that University Hospitals in Cleveland used the industry-leading MEVION S250 proton therapy system to treat its first patient, a 24-year-old woman with, rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare form of sarcoma. The proton therapy treatment made history by being the first in the state of Ohio. [More]
Flow diversion shows high rate of visual improvement in patients with paraclinoid aneurysms

Flow diversion shows high rate of visual improvement in patients with paraclinoid aneurysms

Aneurysms of the paraclinoid region of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the interventions used to treat them often result in visual impairment. [More]
FDA-approved nerve ablation procedure may offer new treatment option for low back pain

FDA-approved nerve ablation procedure may offer new treatment option for low back pain

It's the most common reason people go to their doctors - back pain. According to the National Institutes of Health, 80 percent of adults will experience low back pain some time in their lives. [More]
Novel noninvasive scoring system can help predict strength and health of vascular network in the brain

Novel noninvasive scoring system can help predict strength and health of vascular network in the brain

A new study presented at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's 13th Annual Meeting in Boston found that the Opercular Score Index (OIS) is a practical, noninvasive scoring system that can be used to predict the strength and health of the vascular network in the brain (known as collateral robustness) and good clinical outcome among stroke patients undergoing endovascular recanalization. [More]
Study finds older adults who sustain wrist fractures more likely to have poor balance

Study finds older adults who sustain wrist fractures more likely to have poor balance

Elderly patients suffering a low energy wrist (distal radius) fracture are more likely to have difficulties with balance, placing them at risk for future injuries, according to a new study appearing in the July 20, 2016 issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. [More]
Patients with cLBP more likely to use illicit drugs, study reports

Patients with cLBP more likely to use illicit drugs, study reports

People living with chronic low back pain (cLBP) are more likely to use illicit drugs -- including marijuana, cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine -- compared to those without back pain, reports a study in Spine, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Chelsea and Westminster Hospital deploys new imaging systems from Siemens Healthineers following A&E expansion

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital deploys new imaging systems from Siemens Healthineers following A&E expansion

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital in West London has enhanced its provision of imaging services to ensure an efficient workflow throughout A&E as part of the first phase of a major redevelopment of the Emergency Department which includes a new imaging suite. [More]
Study shows spinal cord stimulation can be safe, effective treatment option for chronic pain sufferers

Study shows spinal cord stimulation can be safe, effective treatment option for chronic pain sufferers

Chronic pain affects up to 20% of people in developed countries, and represents not only a profound impact on individuals and their families but also a sizeable burden on employers, health care systems, and society in general. [More]
HANS device helps prevent fatal craniovertebral junction injuries in racecar drivers

HANS device helps prevent fatal craniovertebral junction injuries in racecar drivers

Before 2001, catastrophic craniovertebral junction (CVJ) injuries were the most common cause of death to drivers in the fast-paced sport of professional car racing. That changed with the development and implementation of the HANS (Head and Neck Support) device and similar restraints. [More]
Study provides more insights into abusive head injury in small children

Study provides more insights into abusive head injury in small children

Abusive head injury, sometimes referred to as shaken baby syndrome or non-accidental trauma, is the third leading cause of head injuries in small children in the US. For children under the age of 1 year, it is the cause of the majority of serious head injuries. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement