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Bionic hand reconstruction offers hope for patients with global brachial plexopathies

Bionic hand reconstruction offers hope for patients with global brachial plexopathies

​Bionic hand? No longer only an image conjured by science fiction, bionic hands return functionality in cases of traumatic nerve and muscle loss. [More]
New augmented-reality technology designed by Philips for spine surgery

New augmented-reality technology designed by Philips for spine surgery

Royal Philips, a leader in integrated image-guided therapy solutions, today announced the development of an industry-first augmented-reality surgical navigation technology that is designed to help surgeons perform image-guided open and minimally-invasive spine surgery. Philips is a pioneer in hybrid operating room (hybrid OR) solutions to facilitate both surgical and minimally-invasive endovascular procedures, with over 750 hybrid ORs installed globally. The addition of this new augmented reality technology will further widen the scope of Philips hybrid OR solutions to other fast-growing areas of image-guided surgery including spine, cranial and trauma procedures. [More]
Review addresses level of progress in digitising NHS patient records

Review addresses level of progress in digitising NHS patient records

Health scientists at the University of York have shown that in the 25 years since the NHS was tasked with digitising patient records there has been limited progress made. [More]
Folic acid supplements can reduce risk of having pregnancy affected by neural tube defects

Folic acid supplements can reduce risk of having pregnancy affected by neural tube defects

Despite the mandatory addition of folic acid to enriched grain products in the United States, many women still do not consume adequate amounts of this important vitamin, according to an editorial written by Laura E. Mitchell, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health. [More]
Archaeologist discovers 800-year-old genomes from bacterial infection in Byzantine skeleton

Archaeologist discovers 800-year-old genomes from bacterial infection in Byzantine skeleton

Eight hundred years ago, in a hardscrabble farming community on the outskirts of what was once one of the fabled cities of the ancient world, Troy, a 30-year-old woman was laid to rest in a stone-lined grave. [More]
March of Dimes provides New Year's resolution for moms-to-be to help have healthy baby

March of Dimes provides New Year's resolution for moms-to-be to help have healthy baby

If you're a woman who's pregnant or planning a baby this season, make a New Year's resolution to be as healthy as you can, says the March of Dimes Foundation. The first step is to start taking a daily multivitamin containing the B vitamin folic acid, even if you're not trying to get pregnant. [More]
Columbia University Medical Center to evaluate Biocept's Target Selector platform to diagnose LM in breast cancer patients

Columbia University Medical Center to evaluate Biocept's Target Selector platform to diagnose LM in breast cancer patients

Biocept, Inc., a leading commercial provider of clinically actionable liquid biopsy tests designed to improve the outcomes of cancer patients, announces that Columbia University Medical Center will conduct a study to evaluate the clinical utility of the Company's Target Selector™ platform to diagnose leptomeningeal metastases (LM) in patients with breast cancer. [More]
Kingwood’s respiratory therapist recognized as Pinnacle Professional in the field of Healthcare

Kingwood’s respiratory therapist recognized as Pinnacle Professional in the field of Healthcare

Kimberly A. Johnson, RRT, MBA, is recognized by Continental Who's Who as a Pinnacle Professional in the field of Healthcare. Kimberly is a Respiratory Therapist at Kingwood Hospital. [More]
Scientists develop 'LevelCheck' algorithm to help identify, label vertebrae during spine surgery

Scientists develop 'LevelCheck' algorithm to help identify, label vertebrae during spine surgery

Researchers funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering have developed a way to automatically label images of individual vertebrae during spine surgery, preventing mistakes and saving surgeons both time and stress in the operating room. [More]
High levels of enzyme can predict memory impairment and Type 2 diabetes

High levels of enzyme can predict memory impairment and Type 2 diabetes

An enzyme found in the fluid around the brain and spine is giving researchers a snapshot of what happens inside the minds of Alzheimer's patients and how that relates to cognitive decline. [More]
Cedars-Sinai surgeons use high-definition imaging device to map the brain during surgery

Cedars-Sinai surgeons use high-definition imaging device to map the brain during surgery

Cedars-Sinai neurosurgeons have begun using a high-definition imaging device to see inside the brain during surgery, allowing them to map safer pathways to reach and remove tumors. [More]
Experts explore if DXA-derived measurements could predict fracture risk in diabetic patients

Experts explore if DXA-derived measurements could predict fracture risk in diabetic patients

Increased risk of fracture has been shown to be one of the complications arising from longstanding diabetes. With the worldwide increase in Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), in part due to aging populations, there is also increasing concern about how to identify and manage patients with diabetes who are at high risk of osteoporotic fracture. [More]
How old is your heart?

How old is your heart?

There have been a number of ways to measure the biological health and age of your heart, which has been done conventionally in the past. Blood pressure is one indicator. Other risk indicators include family history of heart disease, level of cholesterol and exercise testing, where you can get heart rate... [More]
New guidelines recommend evaluation of osteoporosis risk for all postmenopausal women

New guidelines recommend evaluation of osteoporosis risk for all postmenopausal women

Osteoporosis is preventable and treatable, but only a small proportion of people at risk for fractures are evaluated and treated, according to new osteoporosis guidelines written by an expert panel headed by Loyola Medicine endocrinologist Pauline M. Camacho, MD, FACE. [More]
Scientists develop new symmetry-recognition system for early detection of idiopathic scoliosis

Scientists develop new symmetry-recognition system for early detection of idiopathic scoliosis

Hokkaido University researchers have developed a symmetry-recognition system for the surface of the human back that can three-dimensionally detect the early stages of idiopathic scoliosis, a type of spinal deformity, without the help of a specialist doctor. [More]
Study shows menopausal hormone therapy can improve bone mass and structure

Study shows menopausal hormone therapy can improve bone mass and structure

Women who undergo hormone therapy for menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes can not only increase bone mass, but also can improve bone structure, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Fraunhofer researchers use new deep learning approach to facilitate tumor measurement

Fraunhofer researchers use new deep learning approach to facilitate tumor measurement

Physicians have long used visual judgment of medical images to determine the course of cancer treatment. [More]
Surgery more effective in reducing sex life-related pain in patients with spinal disorders, study finds

Surgery more effective in reducing sex life-related pain in patients with spinal disorders, study finds

For patients with degenerative spinal disease, surgery is more effective in reducing pain that interferes with sexual activity, compared to nonsurgical treatment, reports a study in the November 15 issue of Spine, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Wireless brain–spine interface enables primates with spinal cord injury to walk again

Wireless brain–spine interface enables primates with spinal cord injury to walk again

Scientists have developed a wireless brain implant that restores movement in the legs of paralyzed macaques, enabling the animals to walk again. [More]
Researchers discover signaling pathway that can stop brain tumor formation in animal models

Researchers discover signaling pathway that can stop brain tumor formation in animal models

A research team at the Krembil Research Institute has discovered that a signaling pathway which controls blood vessel development in the brain has the ability to stop brain tumor formation in animal models of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor diagnosed in children. [More]
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