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Good Samaritan Hospital receives $417,560 grant to implement telemedicine program

Good Samaritan Hospital receives $417,560 grant to implement telemedicine program

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development awards Good Samaritan Hospital, a prominent downtown Los Angeles hospital, a $417,560 grant to implement a telemedicine program that will connect members of the medical staff at Good Samaritan Hospital with public health and primary care providers and their patients at six Public Health sites on the island of Guam. [More]
National Spine & Pain Centers opens new pain management center in Cumberland, Maryland

National Spine & Pain Centers opens new pain management center in Cumberland, Maryland

Over 100 million adults suffer from chronic pain and about half of those suffer from this pain daily. Chronic and acute pain dramatically impacts quality of life. The specialty of pain management is born to fulfill the need for non-surgical, interventional solutions and medication management to treat all types of pain. [More]

Centinel Spine releases next generation Lumbar Integrated Interbody fusion device

Centinel Spine, Inc., the pioneer of Stand-Alone, No-Profile fusion devices, introduced MIDLINE II, its next generation STALIF Family Lumbar Integrated Interbody fusion device. [More]

Interventional Spine's Lateral Opticage Expandable Intervertebral Body Fusion Device gets FDA approval

Interventional Spine, Inc. today announced FDA clearance of its Lateral Opticage Expandable Intervertebral Body Fusion Device. This device joins the Interventional Spine family of Opticage Expandable Interbody Fusion Devices previously cleared for TLIF earlier this year, and used with the Company's PerX360 System. [More]
TSRI scientists find simple method to convert human skin cells into sensory neurons

TSRI scientists find simple method to convert human skin cells into sensory neurons

A team led by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute has found a simple method to convert human skin cells into the specialized neurons that detect pain, itch, touch and other bodily sensations. These neurons are also affected by spinal cord injury and involved in Friedreich's ataxia, a devastating and currently incurable neurodegenerative disease that largely strikes children. [More]
Scientists discover that brown fat could be used to manage type 2 diabetes

Scientists discover that brown fat could be used to manage type 2 diabetes

Scientists from Monash University and Stockholm University have discovered that brown fat, nicknamed the 'good fat' because it warms up the body in cold temperatures, burning up calories in the process, also 'hoovers up' excess sugar. [More]
Electrical stimulation technology can help SCI patients regain bladder control

Electrical stimulation technology can help SCI patients regain bladder control

When individuals suffer a spinal cord injury, paralysis is only a part of the major impact on quality of life. Often they also lose bladder control, which frequently causes infections that can lead to kidney damage. [More]

K2M receives FDA clearance to market CAPRI Corpectomy Cage System

K2M Group Holdings, Inc., a global medical device company focused on designing, developing and commercializing innovative and proprietary complex spine technologies, techniques and minimally invasive procedures, today announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to market the CAPRI Corpectomy Cage System, an expandable vertebral body replacement device that provides structural stability following a corpectomy or vertebrectomy. [More]
Researchers create microtube platform to analyze neuron growth

Researchers create microtube platform to analyze neuron growth

Tiny, thin microtubes could provide a scaffold for neuron cultures to grow so that researchers can study neural networks, their growth and repair, yielding insights into treatment for degenerative neurological conditions or restoring nerve connections after injury. [More]
Study: Even mild depressive symptoms can weaken outcome of lumbar spinal stenosis surgery

Study: Even mild depressive symptoms can weaken outcome of lumbar spinal stenosis surgery

Even mild depressive symptoms can weaken the outcome of lumbar spinal stenosis surgery, according to a recent study completed at the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital. Patients with depressive symptoms had a weaker functional capacity post-surgery even five years after surgery. [More]
Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon explains how scoliosis affects Baby Boomers

Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon explains how scoliosis affects Baby Boomers

For many adults, the word scoliosis conjures up childhood memories of lining up in gym class for an examination by the school nurse. But scoliosis isn't just a pediatric condition. Curvature of the spine can develop in adults too, and the osteoporosis that can accompany menopause is a risk factor. [More]
Researchers receive EPSRC grant to develop real-time diagnostic technique for dementia

Researchers receive EPSRC grant to develop real-time diagnostic technique for dementia

A research team from Plymouth University, together with colleagues from Swansea University, has received funding of £1M from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council to develop an innovative, real-time diagnostic technique for dementia using wonder-material graphene. [More]
Women with bad backs have renewed hope for better sex lives

Women with bad backs have renewed hope for better sex lives

Newly published findings from the University of Waterloo are giving women with bad backs renewed hope for better sex lives. The findings—part of the first-ever study to document how the spine moves during sex—outline which sex positions are best for women suffering from different types of low-back pain. The new recommendations follow on the heels of comparable guidelines for men released last month. [More]
IOF data shows 93% of US adults are unaware of men’s susceptibility to osteoporosis

IOF data shows 93% of US adults are unaware of men’s susceptibility to osteoporosis

New survey findings released by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) for World Osteoporosis Day show that on average, 93 percent of nearly 1,200 adults surveyed are unaware how common osteoporotic fractures are in men. [More]
Leica Microsystems launches new neurosurgical microscope

Leica Microsystems launches new neurosurgical microscope

Leica Microsystems has launched a new neurosurgical microscope, the Leica M530 OH6. To enable surgeons to see better into deep, narrow cavities, it is equipped with FusionOptics technology, advanced Small Angle Illumination (SAI) and apochromatic optics. The ergonomic design of the microscope enables surgeons and assistants to work in a neutral, upright posture which helps prevent strain and fatigue. [More]
Bone mineral density not linked to musculoskeletal pain

Bone mineral density not linked to musculoskeletal pain

Bone mineral density does not contribute to musculoskeletal pain, researchers report in findings that shed light on the controversy over whether osteoporosis is a painless disease. [More]
Researchers compare effects of early and late epidurals given during labour

Researchers compare effects of early and late epidurals given during labour

When a woman is in labour, the appropriate time to give an epidural during childbirth is when she asks for it, a new study suggests. [More]
Poor body mechanics cause chronic lower back pain

Poor body mechanics cause chronic lower back pain

If you want to steer clear of lower back pain, remember this: Arch is good, flat is bad. [More]
Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share common pathophysiological features

Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share common pathophysiological features

Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder both appear to be associated with dendritic spine loss in the brain, suggesting the two distinct disorders may share common pathophysiological features, write author Glenn T. Konopaske, M.D., and colleagues at McLean Hospital, Belmont, Mass., and Harvard Medical School, Boston. [More]
Dendritic spine density also reduced in bipolar disorder

Dendritic spine density also reduced in bipolar disorder

Patients with bipolar disorder have significant dendritic spine loss in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, postmortem findings show. [More]