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Electrical stimulation technology can help SCI patients regain bladder control

Electrical stimulation technology can help SCI patients regain bladder control

When individuals suffer a spinal cord injury, paralysis is only a part of the major impact on quality of life. Often they also lose bladder control, which frequently causes infections that can lead to kidney damage. [More]

K2M receives FDA clearance to market CAPRI Corpectomy Cage System

K2M Group Holdings, Inc., a global medical device company focused on designing, developing and commercializing innovative and proprietary complex spine technologies, techniques and minimally invasive procedures, today announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to market the CAPRI Corpectomy Cage System, an expandable vertebral body replacement device that provides structural stability following a corpectomy or vertebrectomy. [More]
Researchers create microtube platform to analyze neuron growth

Researchers create microtube platform to analyze neuron growth

Tiny, thin microtubes could provide a scaffold for neuron cultures to grow so that researchers can study neural networks, their growth and repair, yielding insights into treatment for degenerative neurological conditions or restoring nerve connections after injury. [More]
Study: Even mild depressive symptoms can weaken outcome of lumbar spinal stenosis surgery

Study: Even mild depressive symptoms can weaken outcome of lumbar spinal stenosis surgery

Even mild depressive symptoms can weaken the outcome of lumbar spinal stenosis surgery, according to a recent study completed at the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital. Patients with depressive symptoms had a weaker functional capacity post-surgery even five years after surgery. [More]
Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon explains how scoliosis affects Baby Boomers

Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon explains how scoliosis affects Baby Boomers

For many adults, the word scoliosis conjures up childhood memories of lining up in gym class for an examination by the school nurse. But scoliosis isn't just a pediatric condition. Curvature of the spine can develop in adults too, and the osteoporosis that can accompany menopause is a risk factor. [More]
Researchers receive EPSRC grant to develop real-time diagnostic technique for dementia

Researchers receive EPSRC grant to develop real-time diagnostic technique for dementia

A research team from Plymouth University, together with colleagues from Swansea University, has received funding of £1M from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council to develop an innovative, real-time diagnostic technique for dementia using wonder-material graphene. [More]
Women with bad backs have renewed hope for better sex lives

Women with bad backs have renewed hope for better sex lives

Newly published findings from the University of Waterloo are giving women with bad backs renewed hope for better sex lives. The findings—part of the first-ever study to document how the spine moves during sex—outline which sex positions are best for women suffering from different types of low-back pain. The new recommendations follow on the heels of comparable guidelines for men released last month. [More]
IOF data shows 93% of US adults are unaware of men’s susceptibility to osteoporosis

IOF data shows 93% of US adults are unaware of men’s susceptibility to osteoporosis

New survey findings released by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) for World Osteoporosis Day show that on average, 93 percent of nearly 1,200 adults surveyed are unaware how common osteoporotic fractures are in men. [More]
Leica Microsystems launches new neurosurgical microscope

Leica Microsystems launches new neurosurgical microscope

Leica Microsystems has launched a new neurosurgical microscope, the Leica M530 OH6. To enable surgeons to see better into deep, narrow cavities, it is equipped with FusionOptics technology, advanced Small Angle Illumination (SAI) and apochromatic optics. The ergonomic design of the microscope enables surgeons and assistants to work in a neutral, upright posture which helps prevent strain and fatigue. [More]
Bone mineral density not linked to musculoskeletal pain

Bone mineral density not linked to musculoskeletal pain

Bone mineral density does not contribute to musculoskeletal pain, researchers report in findings that shed light on the controversy over whether osteoporosis is a painless disease. [More]
Researchers compare effects of early and late epidurals given during labour

Researchers compare effects of early and late epidurals given during labour

When a woman is in labour, the appropriate time to give an epidural during childbirth is when she asks for it, a new study suggests. [More]
Poor body mechanics cause chronic lower back pain

Poor body mechanics cause chronic lower back pain

If you want to steer clear of lower back pain, remember this: Arch is good, flat is bad. [More]
Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share common pathophysiological features

Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share common pathophysiological features

Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder both appear to be associated with dendritic spine loss in the brain, suggesting the two distinct disorders may share common pathophysiological features, write author Glenn T. Konopaske, M.D., and colleagues at McLean Hospital, Belmont, Mass., and Harvard Medical School, Boston. [More]
Dendritic spine density also reduced in bipolar disorder

Dendritic spine density also reduced in bipolar disorder

Patients with bipolar disorder have significant dendritic spine loss in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, postmortem findings show. [More]
Thirteen research projects to explore nondrug approaches to manage pain, other health conditions

Thirteen research projects to explore nondrug approaches to manage pain, other health conditions

Thirteen research projects totaling approximately $21.7 million over 5 years will explore nondrug approaches to managing pain and related health conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), drug abuse, and sleep issues. The effort seeks to enhance options for the management of pain and associated problems in U.S. military personnel, veterans, and their families. [More]
Researchers explore gene expression in normal vestibular nerves, vestibular schwannomas

Researchers explore gene expression in normal vestibular nerves, vestibular schwannomas

Researchers from the University of Toronto, directed by Drs. Gelareh Zadeh and Boris Krischek, investigated gene expression in normal vestibular nerves and vestibular schwannomas (VSs). [More]
Misonix provides ultrasonic BoneScalpel to support Uganda Spine Surgery Mission

Misonix provides ultrasonic BoneScalpel to support Uganda Spine Surgery Mission

Misonix, Inc., an international surgical device company that designs, manufactures and markets innovative therapeutic ultrasonic products for spine surgery, skull based surgery, neurosurgery, wound debridement, cosmetic surgery, laparoscopic surgery and other surgical applications, announces that it has once again supported the Uganda Spine Surgery Mission organized by leading spine surgeon Dr. Isador Lieberman, from the Texas Back Institute in Plano, TX, by providing an ultrasonic BoneScalpel for use in a number of advanced spinal surgeries. [More]
Olympus signs agreement with Brainlab to become exclusive U.S. distributor of Kick Navigation

Olympus signs agreement with Brainlab to become exclusive U.S. distributor of Kick Navigation

Olympus, a global technology leader in designing and delivering innovative solutions for medical and surgical procedures, among other core businesses, announced today it has reached a deal with Munich-based Brainlab to be the exclusive U.S. distributor of Kick Navigation. [More]
Health law's ripple effects on hospitals, schools, uninsured

Health law's ripple effects on hospitals, schools, uninsured

The Kansas City Star reports that some uninsured patients fall through the cracks as hospitals cut back on charity care to persuade people to sign up for coverage. Some schools, meanwhile, are turning to private substitutes to avoid having to pay for their health coverage next year. In Colorado, Denver Health is back in the black, partly due to a dramatic decrease in uninsured patients. [More]
MU researchers make new breakthrough in spinal muscular atrophy drug

MU researchers make new breakthrough in spinal muscular atrophy drug

According to recent studies, approximately one out of every 40 individuals in the United States is a carrier of the gene responsible for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a neurodegenerative disease that causes muscles to weaken over time. [More]