Stomach Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Stomach Cancer News and Research

Stomach cancer or gastric cancer affects around 7,000 people each year in the UK. Stomach cancer is difficult to detect in the early stages because the initial symptoms are also seen in less serious conditions such as persistent indigestion, heart burn, trapped wind, burping and stomach ache.
Precision medicine trial shows analysing person's DNA improves treatment options for cancer patients

Precision medicine trial shows analysing person's DNA improves treatment options for cancer patients

A clinical trial for types of advanced cancer is the first of its kind to show that precision medicine - or tailoring treatment for individual people - can slow down the time it takes for a tumour to grow back, according to research presented at the Molecular Analysis for Personalised Therapy (MAP) conference, today (Friday). [More]
Combination of ginger and chili peppers could help reduce cancer risk

Combination of ginger and chili peppers could help reduce cancer risk

For many people, there's nothing more satisfying than a hot, spicy meal. But some research has suggested that capsaicin, the compound that gives chili peppers their kick, might cause cancer. [More]
Added benefit not proven for orphan drug in treatment of adults with stomach cancer

Added benefit not proven for orphan drug in treatment of adults with stomach cancer

Ramucirumab (trade name: Cyramza) is a monoclonal antibody, which blocks a receptor, reducing the growth of blood vessels and so reducing blood supply to the tumours. [More]
People diagnosed with bowel cancer under 50 not tested for Lynch syndrome, research finds

People diagnosed with bowel cancer under 50 not tested for Lynch syndrome, research finds

The UK’s leading bowel cancer research charity, Bowel Cancer UK, and the Royal College of Pathologists have today published findings which show that people under 50 diagnosed with bowel cancer are not being tested for Lynch syndrome – a genetic condition that increases the risk of bowel cancer by 80 per cent. [More]
Fraunhofer scientists show how seaweed has potential to substitute salt

Fraunhofer scientists show how seaweed has potential to substitute salt

Salt (sodium chloride) is an essential nutrient, but one that is often present in surprising quantities in industrially processed foods. [More]
Researchers find increased cancer incidence among patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders

Researchers find increased cancer incidence among patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders

Primary immunodeficiency disorders are a group of more than 300 single gene defects that affect the role of the immune system and prevent it from functioning properly. When Roswell Park Cancer Institute researchers evaluated the overall and site-specific incidence of cancer among patients registered in the United States Immune Deficiency Network, they found increased cancer incidence rates among patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases — and, in particular, a significant increase in lymphoma cases. [More]
Study identifies potential new treatment for subset of gastric cancer patients

Study identifies potential new treatment for subset of gastric cancer patients

Testing cancers for 'addiction' to a gene that boosts cell growth can pick out patients who may respond to a targeted drug under development, a major new study reports. [More]
Fujitsu develops portable breath sensor that can quickly measure concentration of gas components in people's breath

Fujitsu develops portable breath sensor that can quickly measure concentration of gas components in people's breath

Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. today announced that it has developed a portable breath sensor that can extract and quickly measure the concentration of only specified gas components, such as ammonia, that are included at low concentrations in people's breath and are suggested to be correlated with lifestyle diseases. [More]
Older people undergoing cancer surgery more likely to experience injuries, health issues

Older people undergoing cancer surgery more likely to experience injuries, health issues

Older people who undergo cancer surgery are more likely than their younger counterparts to experience injuries and health issues such as falling down, breaking bones, dehydration, bed sores, failure to thrive and delirium. These age-related issues may lead to longer hospital stays, increased health care costs and a greater risk of death, a UCLA study found. [More]
Overall EU cancer, leukaemia mortality rates to fall in 2016

Overall EU cancer, leukaemia mortality rates to fall in 2016

Total cancer-related mortality rates for men and women in the European Union will decline in 2016, say researchers who predict falls in death rates from most neoplasms, including leukaemia. [More]
New study finds familial risk and heritability of cancer among twins

New study finds familial risk and heritability of cancer among twins

A large new study of twins has found that having a twin sibling diagnosed with cancer poses an excess risk for the other twin to develop any form of cancer. Among the 23 different types of cancer studied, an excess familial risk was seen for almost all of the cancers, including common cancers such as breast and prostate cancer, but also more rare cancers such as testicular cancer, head and neck cancer, melanoma, ovarian and stomach cancer. [More]
Researchers reveal inherited genetic errors across 12 cancer types

Researchers reveal inherited genetic errors across 12 cancer types

Researchers long have known that some portion of the risk of developing cancer is hereditary and that inherited genetic errors are very important in some tumors but much less so in others. [More]
Seaweed extract shows promise in treating H. pylori-related diseases, gastric cancer

Seaweed extract shows promise in treating H. pylori-related diseases, gastric cancer

A unique seaweed extract shows promise for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori-related diseases and gastric cancer, according to new research undertaken at the University of Western Australia. [More]
Certain drugs could be used to treat gastric cancers with particular pattern of mutations

Certain drugs could be used to treat gastric cancers with particular pattern of mutations

Gastric cancer, otherwise known as stomach cancer, does not respond well to existing treatments and it is currently the third leading cause of cancer death in the world (after lung and liver cancer). Researchers have discovered that certain drugs, currently used to treat breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancers, could also be used to treat certain gastric cancers with a particular pattern of mutations (genomic molecular fingerprint). [More]
Experts call for better risk profiling for GI cancers

Experts call for better risk profiling for GI cancers

Cancers of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract continue to exert their toll across Europe, with many diagnosed too late for effective treatment. Bowel cancer screening programmes are now underway in most European countries, but screening for other GI cancers is patchy and not necessarily well-targeted. [More]
New drug delivery method could be used to target cancer, tuberculosis

New drug delivery method could be used to target cancer, tuberculosis

Scientists have designed a novel method for improving the delivery of therapeutic molecules into diseased cells such as those found in cancer and tuberculosis. [More]
Major UK trial to examine role of aspirin in cancer recurrence

Major UK trial to examine role of aspirin in cancer recurrence

The world's largest ever clinical trial looking at whether taking aspirin every day stops some of the most common cancers coming back, launches across the UK today (Thursday). [More]
Poorly-designed animal study threatens validity of preclinical research

Poorly-designed animal study threatens validity of preclinical research

Badly designed studies may lead to the efficacy of drugs being overestimated and money being wasted on trials that prove fruitless, according to new a study from McGill University in Canada. [More]
New online Smart Map shows progress in UK lung cancer care

New online Smart Map shows progress in UK lung cancer care

Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation (RCLCF) today launches a new online Smart Map that shows how standards of lung cancer care vary throughout the UK.(1) The resource, available at http://www.roycastle.org/how-we-help/our-campaigns/improving-treatment-and-care/interactive-map, is based on the latest research by the National Lung Cancer Audit (NLCA), published in December 2014.2 This shows encouraging improvements have been made in standards of lung cancer care across multiple UK regions. [More]
EUROCARE 5 study shows large variations in blood cancer patients' survival in Europe

EUROCARE 5 study shows large variations in blood cancer patients' survival in Europe

Comparisons of cancer patients' survival and care in Europe up to 2007 show that although more patients are surviving for at least five years after diagnosis, there are large variations between countries, which are particularly significant in cancers of the blood. [More]
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