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Exeter scientists discover how two cell organelles interact at molecular level

Exeter scientists discover how two cell organelles interact at molecular level

Scientists have made a breakthrough in understanding how different compartments (or organelles) of human cells interact. [More]
Lipid content changes as cells age, new study reveals

Lipid content changes as cells age, new study reveals

As cells age and stop dividing, their fat content changes, along with the way they produce and break down fat and other molecules classified as lipids, according to a new University at Buffalo study. [More]
Study reveals mechanism for illness-induced sleepiness in humans and animals

Study reveals mechanism for illness-induced sleepiness in humans and animals

It's well known that humans and other animals are fatigued and sleepy when sick, but it's a microscopic roundworm that's providing an explanation of how that occurs, according to a study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
UC biologists use frog models to study how early stressors may play role in onset of adult diseases

UC biologists use frog models to study how early stressors may play role in onset of adult diseases

UC biologists have turned to amphibian sources -- specifically frogs and tadpoles -- to help shed light on how early stressors in the womb and shortly after birth may play a part in the onset of adult diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. [More]
RIT research explores impact of shear stress on cells moving through blood vessels

RIT research explores impact of shear stress on cells moving through blood vessels

How do cells and protein molecules respond to stress as they travel through blood vessels? Could resulting changes to these biological components impact how diseases are spread? [More]
New research provides insight into how estrogen modulates fear learning

New research provides insight into how estrogen modulates fear learning

Low estrogen levels may make women more susceptible to the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some points in their menstrual cycles or lifetimes, while high estrogen levels may be protective. [More]
Researcher awarded $1.8 million grant to explore how chronic stress impacts cancer development

Researcher awarded $1.8 million grant to explore how chronic stress impacts cancer development

A five-year, $1.8 million grant (R01CA203965) from the National Cancer Institute awarded to Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey resident research member Wenwei Hu, PhD, will support research to further elucidate the mechanisms behind the most frequently mutated gene in human tumors - p53. [More]
Researchers uncover how stress hormone prevents digestive enzymes from damaging pancreas

Researchers uncover how stress hormone prevents digestive enzymes from damaging pancreas

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have uncovered the mechanism by which the stress hormone FGF21 keeps digestive enzymes from damaging the pancreas. [More]
New guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations for family-centered care in ICU

New guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations for family-centered care in ICU

Critical illness is a stressful and traumatic experience that may have lasting effects on the health of patients and families, even months after discharge from the intensive care unit. [More]
BetterYou magnesium can raise cellular mineral levels faster than traditional tablets

BetterYou magnesium can raise cellular mineral levels faster than traditional tablets

Low magnesium levels are leading to a worrying level of undissolved calcium and increased heavy metal toxicity which can severely impact on our health and wellbeing, say mineral analysis experts. [More]
Study provides insights into CPEB4 gene and fatty liver disease

Study provides insights into CPEB4 gene and fatty liver disease

This condition generally leads to chronic inflammation (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis), which can trigger fibrosis, cirrhosis and ultimately liver cancer. This study on the basic biology of the liver paves the way to examine therapeutic strategies to fight and prevent fatty liver disease. [More]
People with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E, new research shows

People with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E, new research shows

New research has shown that people with metabolic syndrome need significantly more vitamin E - which could be a serious public health concern, in light of the millions of people who have this condition that's often related to obesity. [More]
Prolonged exposure to work-related stress linked to increased risk of cancers

Prolonged exposure to work-related stress linked to increased risk of cancers

For men, prolonged exposure to work-related stress has been linked to an increased likelihood of lung, colon, rectal, and stomach cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma [More]
Chemotherapy-induced senescent cells promote side effects and cancer relapse

Chemotherapy-induced senescent cells promote side effects and cancer relapse

Standard chemotherapy is a blunt force instrument against cancer - and it's a rare cancer patient who escapes debilitating side effects from systemic treatments that mostly affect dividing cells, both malignant and healthy, throughout the body. [More]
Acupuncture may be effective treatment option to resolve excessive crying in colicky babies

Acupuncture may be effective treatment option to resolve excessive crying in colicky babies

Acupuncture may be an effective treatment option for babies with infantile colic--those who cry for more than 3 hours a day on 3 or more days of the week--reveals research published online in Acupuncture in Medicine. [More]
Ludwig study uncovers ancient cellular response that underlies spread of aggressive skin cancer

Ludwig study uncovers ancient cellular response that underlies spread of aggressive skin cancer

Each day, more than 1,600 people die from cancer in the US, and 450 in the UK, mostly because the disease has spread beyond a stage when surgery is an effective cure and has become resistant to therapy. Despite decades of research, understanding why cancer cells become invasive has remained shrouded in mystery. [More]
MGH researchers identify protein that may protect tumor-initiating cells in breast cancer

MGH researchers identify protein that may protect tumor-initiating cells in breast cancer

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have identified a protein that may play an essential role in maintaining a population of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) -- treatment-resistant cells responsible for cancer recurrence and metastasis -- in breast cancer, as well as a compound that appears to reduce the molecule's ability to protect TICs from the effects of chemotherapy. [More]
LUNGevity Foundation launches new mobile app to help lung cancer patients manage life

LUNGevity Foundation launches new mobile app to help lung cancer patients manage life

LUNGevity, the nation’s leading lung cancer-focused nonprofit organization today launched a new mobile application designed to make understanding and living with lung cancer less daunting and considerably more manageable. [More]
Yoga may help improve quality of life in pediatric cancer patients, study reveals

Yoga may help improve quality of life in pediatric cancer patients, study reveals

Quality of life of patients doing yoga improved, according to the conclusions of “Results of a Pilot Yoga Intervention to Improve Pediatric Cancer Patients’ Quality of Life and Physical Activity and Parents' Well-being”. [More]
People with schizophrenia more likely to have diabetes than general population

People with schizophrenia more likely to have diabetes than general population

People with early schizophrenia are at an increased risk of developing diabetes, even when the effects of antipsychotic drugs, diet and exercise are taken out of the equation, according to an analysis by researchers from King's College London. [More]
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