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Obesity drug under clinical trials could help treat anxiety

Obesity drug under clinical trials could help treat anxiety

Did you know that our body produces its own marijuana-like compound to protect us against anxiety? A study led by Ottawa researchers, published today in Neuron, reveals a new biological pathway that regulates this system and suggests that a drug currently in clinical trials to treat obesity might also provide an attractive way to combat anxiety disorders. [More]
Smoking during pregnancy increases ovarian and breast cancer risks for daughters

Smoking during pregnancy increases ovarian and breast cancer risks for daughters

A new study has found women who smoke when pregnant are putting their daughters at a greater risk of developing ovarian and breast cancer later in life. [More]
BIAS recognized as one of 2015 Atlanta's Healthiest Employers

BIAS recognized as one of 2015 Atlanta's Healthiest Employers

BIAS Corporation, a leading Oracle Systems Integrator and Oracle Platinum Partner, has been named one of the 2015 Atlanta's Healthiest Employers, an annual awards program presented by the Atlanta Business Chronicle. [More]
Early symptoms of post-traumatic stress strongly predict later disability in military personnel

Early symptoms of post-traumatic stress strongly predict later disability in military personnel

Evaluating military personnel with blast-related mild traumatic brain injuries, researchers have found that early symptoms of post-traumatic stress, such as anxiety, emotional numbness, flashbacks and irritability, are the strongest predictors of later disability. [More]
GeneSight test better predicts antidepressant outcomes for patients with depression

GeneSight test better predicts antidepressant outcomes for patients with depression

The combinatorial, multi-gene GeneSight test has been found to better predict antidepressant treatment outcomes for patients with depression, and their use of health care resources, than any of the individual genes that comprise the test, according to a peer-reviewed analysis by investigators from the Mayo Clinic and Assurex Health, and published online by The Pharmacogenomics Journal. [More]
New healthcare law may threaten federally subsidized coverage for over 2.5 million Americans

New healthcare law may threaten federally subsidized coverage for over 2.5 million Americans

A new study shows that over 2.5 million Americans who have a serious mental health condition in 34 states will become uninsured in 2016, if the Supreme Court rolls back tax credit subsidies that currently make it affordable for those individuals to purchase coverage on federally-run health insurance marketplaces under the Affordable Care Act. [More]
Study findings question benefit of giving sedatives before surgery for patients under general anesthesia

Study findings question benefit of giving sedatives before surgery for patients under general anesthesia

Although sedatives are often administered before surgery, a randomized trial finds that among patients undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia, receiving the sedative lorazepam before surgery, compared with placebo or no premedication, did not improve the self-reported patient experience the day after surgery, but was associated with longer time till removal off a breathing tube (extubation) and a lower rate of early cognitive recovery, according to a study in the March 3 issue of JAMA. [More]
Children likelier to drink sugar-sweetened beverages post parents' divorce

Children likelier to drink sugar-sweetened beverages post parents' divorce

Children of recently separated or divorced families are likelier to drink sugar-sweetened beverages than children in families where the parents are married, putting them at higher risk for obesity later in life, according to a new study from San Francisco State University. [More]
UC Berkeley research explores link between ADHD and childhood maltreatment

UC Berkeley research explores link between ADHD and childhood maltreatment

Young women with ADHD who have been exposed to abuse, neglect or other traumas in childhood and adolescence are at greater risk for self-injury, eating disorders and suicide than those with ADHD who were not mistreated in early youth, according to new research from UC Berkeley. [More]

Women with alcoholic partners may benefit from Internet-based interactive support program

Women married to men with alcohol abuse problems can face a slew of problems themselves, with finding support for their situation near the top of the list. [More]
Direct effects of stress increases mortality, ill-health among unemployed people

Direct effects of stress increases mortality, ill-health among unemployed people

Research from the ESRC International Centre for Lifecourse Studies at UCL suggests direct biological effects of stress during unemployment may help explain the increased mortality and morbidity among jobseekers. [More]
New poll reveals U.S. public's perceptions of causes of health problems

New poll reveals U.S. public's perceptions of causes of health problems

A new NPR/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health poll finds that more than six in ten people living in the U.S. (62%) are concerned about their future health. Nearly four in ten (39%) said that they had one or more negative childhood experiences that they believe had a harmful impact on their adult health. [More]
New poll finds pain as key correlates of shorter sleep durations, worse sleep quality

New poll finds pain as key correlates of shorter sleep durations, worse sleep quality

A new poll by the National Sleep Foundation finds that pain is a key factor in the gap between the amount of sleep Americans say they need and the amount they're getting - an average 42 minute sleep debt for those with chronic pain and 14 minutes for those who've suffered from acute pain in the past week. [More]

UTHealth study focuses on new cognitive behavioral therapy to treat PTSD, substance use disorders

A new cognitive behavioral therapy designed to treat both post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders is the focus of research at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School. [More]
People with diabetes more prone to depression, anxiety

People with diabetes more prone to depression, anxiety

People with diabetes are more prone to anxiety and depression than those with other chronic diseases that require similar levels of management. The reasons for this aren't well understood, but Joslin Diabetes Center researchers have discovered one potential explanation. [More]
Study shows heart valve repair can benefit patients with mitral regurgitation

Study shows heart valve repair can benefit patients with mitral regurgitation

Patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR) often suffer from psycho-emotional symptoms, such as depression and anxiety, but after undergoing mitral valve repair surgery patients experience a marked improvement in emotional and physical wellbeing, according to an article in the March 2015 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
New algorithm can gauge long-term death risk based on treadmill exercise performance

New algorithm can gauge long-term death risk based on treadmill exercise performance

Analyzing data from 58,000 heart stress tests, Johns Hopkins cardiologists report they have developed a formula that estimates one's risk of dying over a decade based on a person's ability to exercise on a treadmill at an increasing speed and incline. [More]
Study: African Americans who moved from the South during Great Migration face shorter life expectancy

Study: African Americans who moved from the South during Great Migration face shorter life expectancy

Millions of African Americans moved from the South in the early 20th century to seek better job opportunities and higher wages, but a new study on the historic Great Migration shows that with improved economic conditions came a greater risk of mortality. [More]
Medicare Part D, adherence can help save patients with high cholesterol

Medicare Part D, adherence can help save patients with high cholesterol

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in three American adults has high cholesterol. For those struggling with high cholesterol, getting needed prescriptions and adhering to the prescribed treatment regimen is critical. [More]
Genetic decanalization can lead to complex genetic diseases in humans

Genetic decanalization can lead to complex genetic diseases in humans

The information encoded in the DNA of an organism is not sufficient to determine the expression pattern of genes. This fact has been known even before the discovery of epigenetics, which refers to external modifications to the DNA that turn genes "on" or "off". [More]