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Penn State dermatologist clarifies common myths about psoriasis

Penn State dermatologist clarifies common myths about psoriasis

Psoriasis is a much-misunderstood disease, often kept under wraps by sufferers who want to hide their skin lesions. [More]
UW-Madison joins with Madison Police Department to study impact of mindfulness practices on officers' well-being

UW-Madison joins with Madison Police Department to study impact of mindfulness practices on officers' well-being

The Center for Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Madison Police Department are launching a pilot study to better understand the impact of mindfulness-based practices on police officers' physical and mental well-being. [More]
Researchers explore molecular mechanisms through which lead exposure may affect neural stem cells

Researchers explore molecular mechanisms through which lead exposure may affect neural stem cells

Researchers have identified a potential molecular mechanism through which lead, a pervasive environmental toxin, may harm neural stem cells and neurodevelopment in children. [More]
Anesthetic administered with nasal spray effective in preventing pain during dental treatment

Anesthetic administered with nasal spray effective in preventing pain during dental treatment

A fear of pain causes many people with dental phobias to avoid or delay needed treatment. In some cases, the injection of a numbing agent can be the most painful part of the visit. [More]
Arab uprising linked to detrimental effects on health and life expectancy in several countries

Arab uprising linked to detrimental effects on health and life expectancy in several countries

The Arab uprising in 2010 and subsequent wars in the eastern Mediterranean region have had serious detrimental effects on the health and life expectancy of the people living in many of the 22 countries in the region, according to a major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), published in The Lancet Global Health journal. [More]
First trial of Cognition Kit wearables demonstrates effectiveness in measuring mental health

First trial of Cognition Kit wearables demonstrates effectiveness in measuring mental health

The neuroscience company Cambridge Cognition Holdings PLC, which develops near patient technologies for the assessment of brain health, has announced results from a new technology feasibility study. The results demonstrate for the first time that consumer grade wearables such as the Apple Watch® and Microsoft Band can be used to accurately measure clinically relevant cognitive performance in everyday life using the Company’s new Cognition Kit software. [More]
New study uses evolutionary theory to predict cancer risk in patients with Barrett's esophagus

New study uses evolutionary theory to predict cancer risk in patients with Barrett's esophagus

A disorder known as Barrett's esophagus (BE) affects some 200,000 Americans each year. The condition, which is caused by stomach acid damaging the lining of the esophagus, can lead to the development of a serious, potentially fatal cancer of epithelial tissue, known as esophageal adenocarcinoma. [More]
Study suggests structural changes in the brain help cope with stressful situations

Study suggests structural changes in the brain help cope with stressful situations

People who experience job loss, divorce, death of a loved one or any number of life's upheavals often adopt coping mechanisms to make the situation less traumatic. [More]
UNC researchers map anxiety circuit in the brain that may explain side effects of antidepressants

UNC researchers map anxiety circuit in the brain that may explain side effects of antidepressants

More than 100 million people worldwide take selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as Prozac and Zoloft, to treat depression, anxiety and related conditions, but these drugs have a common and mysterious side effect: they can worsen anxiety in the first few weeks of use, which leads many patients to stop treatment. [More]
Researchers find better mental health in older age despite more physical ailments

Researchers find better mental health in older age despite more physical ailments

While even the best wines eventually peak and turn to vinegar, a new study by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine suggests a paradoxical trend in the mental health of aging adults: They seem to consistently get better over time. [More]
Study explores how parental use of religious coping strategies in NICU affects family's interactions

Study explores how parental use of religious coping strategies in NICU affects family's interactions

Understanding how parents cope while their child is in the neonatal intensive care unit could lead to better support for the family and a more successful transition to home when the baby is healthy, according to Penn State College of Medicine and Penn State Harrisburg researchers. [More]
Avoiding foods high in AGEs could help protect from developing diabetes

Avoiding foods high in AGEs could help protect from developing diabetes

Simple changes in how we cook could go a long way towards preventing diabetes, say researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Researchers identify brain circuit that helps take major developmental step despite nutritional stress

Researchers identify brain circuit that helps take major developmental step despite nutritional stress

When we go hungry, we have the ability to ignore the urge to eat such that we can carry out the task at hand. It has long been known that the brain is involved in such decisions. [More]
AgriLife scientists examine role of ghrelin receptor in age-related adipose tissue inflammation in mice

AgriLife scientists examine role of ghrelin receptor in age-related adipose tissue inflammation in mice

Scientists have proposed that inflammation is the harbinger of aging and central to the aging process, a phenomenon described as 'inflamm-aging,' said Dr. Yuxiang Sun. [More]
NIH researchers discover rare, lethal inflammatory disease that affects young children

NIH researchers discover rare, lethal inflammatory disease that affects young children

National Institutes of Health researchers have discovered a rare and sometimes lethal inflammatory disease - otulipenia - that primarily affects young children. They have also identified anti-inflammatory treatments that ease some of the patients' symptoms: fever, skin rashes, diarrhea, joint pain and overall failure to grow or thrive. [More]
Seeds of tropical shrub guarana contain ten times more amount of catechins than green tea

Seeds of tropical shrub guarana contain ten times more amount of catechins than green tea

The millions of people who consume green tea all over the world benefit from the catechins it contains. [More]
Low selenium levels linked to liver cancer risk? An interview with Dr David Hughes

Low selenium levels linked to liver cancer risk? An interview with Dr David Hughes

Food provides us with a variety of substances we need to maintain life. These substances are essential nutrients and are classified as macronutrients (water, protein, fats, and carbohydrates) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals). [More]
Regular family meals create positive outcomes in children

Regular family meals create positive outcomes in children

Juggling jobs, kids and the demands of a busy, modern life often comes at the expense of family mealtime at home. [More]
Cells may need some reactive forms of oxygen to maintain health

Cells may need some reactive forms of oxygen to maintain health

Within our bodies, high levels of reactive forms of oxygen can damage proteins and contribute to diabetic complications and many other diseases. [More]
Females working in forensic science labs report high stress levels than male counterparts

Females working in forensic science labs report high stress levels than male counterparts

Women may be at the forefront of the fast-growing forensic science field, but they're also more stressed than their male counterparts, indicates new research led by a Michigan State University criminologist. [More]
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