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Scientists uncover role of HTRA3 protease in Cockayne syndrome

Scientists uncover role of HTRA3 protease in Cockayne syndrome

Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and CNRS, in collaboration with scientists from the Institut Gustave Roussy and CEA, have succeeded in restoring normal activity in cells isolated from patients with the premature aging disease Cockayne syndrome. They have uncovered the role played in these cells by an enzyme, the HTRA3 protease. [More]
Bacterium can use cell-content sharing to repair damaged siblings

Bacterium can use cell-content sharing to repair damaged siblings

A University of Wyoming faculty member led a research team that discovered a certain type of soil bacteria can use their social behavior of outer membrane exchange (OME) to repair damaged cells and improve the fitness of the bacteria population as a whole. [More]
Lafora rare disease could be aggravated by oxidative stress

Lafora rare disease could be aggravated by oxidative stress

Neurodegenerative Lafora disease usually becomes apparent through seizures during adolescence and puberty and occurs as a consequence of defects in glycogen metabolism and in the cellular mechanisms that are responsible for its disposal. Researchers at the University of Valencia have led a study in which they propose that Lafora rare disease could be aggravated by oxidative stress. [More]
Avalere Health study finds that even largest home healthcare providers face very low overall margins

Avalere Health study finds that even largest home healthcare providers face very low overall margins

Reflecting the impact of deep reimbursement cuts that have been implemented in recent years, a new study by Avalere Health finds that even the largest home healthcare providers are facing very low overall margins. [More]
Heavy metallic elements influence AMD progression

Heavy metallic elements influence AMD progression

Researchers report associations between age-related macular degeneration and five heavy metallic elements, in findings that highlight the detrimental effects of pollution but the possible benefits of essential elements supplementation. [More]
Teens with slower cognitive processing speed experience depression, anxiety symptoms as adults

Teens with slower cognitive processing speed experience depression, anxiety symptoms as adults

Teens with slower performance on a test of "cognitive processing speed" are more likely to have depression and anxiety symptoms as adults, reports a paper in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. [More]
Vitamin E helps build strong muscles

Vitamin E helps build strong muscles

Body builders have it right: vitamin E does help build strong muscles, and scientists appear to have figured out one important way it does it. [More]
Study: Air pollution, impaired lung function independently affect cognition

Study: Air pollution, impaired lung function independently affect cognition

Studies have shown that both air pollution and impaired lung function can cause cognitive deficits, but it was unclear whether air pollution diminishes cognition by reducing breathing ability first or whether air pollution represents an independent risk factor for cognitive deficit. [More]
Fibromyalgia now considered as a lifelong central nervous system disorder

Fibromyalgia now considered as a lifelong central nervous system disorder

Fibromyalgia is the second most common rheumatic disorder behind osteoarthritis and, though still widely misunderstood, is now considered to be a lifelong central nervous system disorder, which is responsible for amplified pain that shoots through the body in those who suffer from it. [More]
Discovery has clear implications in the quest for new epilepsy treatments

Discovery has clear implications in the quest for new epilepsy treatments

The mission of neural stem cells located in the hippocampus, one of the main regions of the brain, is to generate new neurons during the adult life of mammals, including human beings, of course, and their function is to participate in certain types of learning and responses to anxiety and stress. [More]
Results from four major studies on cancer treatments to be presented at ASCO Annual Meeting

Results from four major studies on cancer treatments to be presented at ASCO Annual Meeting

The American Society of Clinical Oncology today announced results from four major studies to be presented at ASCO's 51st Annual Meeting, May 29-June 2, in Chicago. Findings showed that use of a widely available vitamin pill reduces the risk of non-melanoma skin cancers; that early chemotherapy extends the lives of men with advanced prostate cancers; and that new therapies can improve outcomes for children with a rare form of kidney cancer and adults with relapsed multiple myeloma. [More]
Mifepristone-eribulin combination clinically active in triple-negative breast cancer patients

Mifepristone-eribulin combination clinically active in triple-negative breast cancer patients

Corcept Therapeutics Incorporated, a pharmaceutical company engaged in the discovery, development and commercialization of drugs that treat severe metabolic, oncologic and psychiatric disorders by modulating the effects of cortisol, today announced results of a multi-center Phase 1/2 dose-escalation study of mifepristone and chemotherapy drug eribulin (Halaven) that show it is well tolerated and clinically active in patients with triple-negative breast cancer. [More]
Simple blood tests diagnose irritable bowel syndrome quickly and accurately

Simple blood tests diagnose irritable bowel syndrome quickly and accurately

Millions of people afflicted by irritable bowel syndrome can now be diagnosed quickly and accurately with two simple blood tests developed by a Cedars-Sinai gastroenterologist. [More]
Brain & Behavior Research Foundation to award grants to 40 scientists for research into mental illness

Brain & Behavior Research Foundation to award grants to 40 scientists for research into mental illness

The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation today announced its 2015 Independent Investigator Grants which will award $3.9 million in funding to 40 mid-career scientists from 30 institutions in 16 countries. [More]
Gadusol compound can provide a systemic sunscreen to humans

Gadusol compound can provide a systemic sunscreen to humans

Researchers have discovered why many animal species can spend their whole lives outdoors with no apparent concern about high levels of solar exposure: they make their own sunscreen. [More]
Workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduces stress levels of employees

Workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduces stress levels of employees

A study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center found that a workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduced stress levels of employees exposed to a highly stressful occupational environment. [More]
Major breakthrough provides new insights into how tinnitus develops

Major breakthrough provides new insights into how tinnitus develops

Tinnitus is the most common service-related disability for veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Often described as a ringing in the ears, more than 1.5 million former service members, one out of every two combat veterans, report having this sometimes debilitating condition, resulting in more than $2 billion dollars in annual disability payments by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. [More]
Repetitive head injuries may accelerate aging process, increase dementia risk

Repetitive head injuries may accelerate aging process, increase dementia risk

Repetitive head injuries that occur during contact sports and military service may accelerate the aging process by increasing the build-up of beta-amyloid in the brain, leading to worse disease and an increased likelihood of developing dementia. In particular, boxers fared the worst among athletes and military veterans with a history of head injuries. [More]
Misperceptions about miscarriage are widespread, survey finds

Misperceptions about miscarriage are widespread, survey finds

A survey of more than 1,000 U.S. adults has found that misperceptions about miscarriage and its causes are widespread. Results of the survey, conducted by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Health System, show that feelings of guilt and shame are common after a miscarriage and that most people erroneously believe that miscarriages are rare. [More]
New method may help determine potential indicator of stress, neurological disorders

New method may help determine potential indicator of stress, neurological disorders

A research collaboration between the universities of Oslo and Aarhus has resulted in the development of a new method with diagnostic potential. The new method that combines phase extraction with an enzymatic reaction may eventually be used for an improved and faster screening analysis of isatin as a potential indicator of stress and neurological disorders. [More]
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