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Long-term T therapy in hypogonadal men is safe, does not increase PCa risk, study finds

Long-term T therapy in hypogonadal men is safe, does not increase PCa risk, study finds

Testosterone (T) therapy is routinely used in men with hypogonadism, a condition in which diminished function of the gonads occurs. Although there is no evidence that T therapy increases the risk of prostate cancer (PCa), there are still concerns and a paucity of long-term data. [More]
Research findings could provide insight into how doctors could restore human memory

Research findings could provide insight into how doctors could restore human memory

UCLA neurophysicists have found that space-mapping neurons in the brain react differently to virtual reality than they do to real-world environments. Their findings could be significant for people who use virtual reality for gaming, military, commercial, scientific or other purposes. [More]
Study shows that abuse of anti-anxiety, sleep drugs becomes a growing issue among teens

Study shows that abuse of anti-anxiety, sleep drugs becomes a growing issue among teens

The medical community may be inadvertently creating a new generation of illegal, recreational drug users by prescribing anti-anxiety or sleep medications to teenagers, say University of Michigan researchers. [More]
Researchers make significant breakthrough for sufferers of bone disease

Researchers make significant breakthrough for sufferers of bone disease

Researchers in bone tissue regeneration believe they have made a significant breakthrough for sufferers of bone trauma, disease or defects such as osteoporosis. [More]
Researchers identify way to improve memory by manipulating molecule linked to Alzheimer's

Researchers identify way to improve memory by manipulating molecule linked to Alzheimer's

In a new study conducted by the Sagol Department of Neurobiology at the University of Haifa and published recently in the Journal of Neuroscience, researchers report that they've found a way to improve memory by manipulating a specific molecule that is known to function poorly in old age and is closely linked to Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Researchers examine genomic landscapes of humans and mice

Researchers examine genomic landscapes of humans and mice

Looking across evolutionary time and the genomic landscapes of humans and mice, an international group of researchers has found powerful clues to why certain processes and systems in the mouse - such as the immune system, metabolism and stress response - are so different from those in people. Building on years of mouse and gene regulation studies, they have developed a resource that can help scientists better understand how similarities and differences between mice and humans are written in their genomes. [More]
Early support and education program has positive impact on people with rheumatoid arthritis

Early support and education program has positive impact on people with rheumatoid arthritis

A study at Hospital for Special Surgery finds that a support group addressing the psychological and educational needs of people recently diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has a strong positive impact on their lives. [More]
New app directly connects single ventricle heart defect patients to doctors

New app directly connects single ventricle heart defect patients to doctors

A powerful new app is directly connecting single ventricle heart defect patients to their doctors, dramatically improving their monitoring while they recover from heart surgery at home. Girish Shirali, MBBS, FACC, FASE, Co-Director of the Ward Family Heart Center at Children's Mercy Kansas City, will report today on how the technology is changing patient care at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2014. [More]
MGH investigators develop system to accurately track the process of falling asleep

MGH investigators develop system to accurately track the process of falling asleep

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have developed a system to accurately track the dynamic process of falling asleep, something has not been possible with existing techniques. In their report in the October issue of the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology, the research team describes how combining key physiologic measurements with a behavioral task that does not interfere with sleep onset gives a better picture of the gradual process of falling asleep. [More]
UH professor receives NIH grant for breast cancer research

UH professor receives NIH grant for breast cancer research

After earning her medical degree in China, Qian Lu, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Houston, felt she could help patients more by treating the mind as well as the body. She then decided to pursue a doctorate in psychology in the U.S. [More]
Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Pulmonary fibrosis has no cure. It's caused by scarring that seems to feed on itself, with the tougher, less elastic tissue replacing the ever moving and stretching lung, making it increasingly difficult for patients to breathe. [More]
Job authority increases symptoms of depression among women

Job authority increases symptoms of depression among women

Job authority increases symptoms of depression among women, but decreases them among men, according to a new study from University of Texas at Austin sociologist Tetyana Pudrovska. [More]

Stress can be helpful when it comes to emotionally relevant information

Retrieving memory content under stress does not work very well. However, stress can be helpful when it comes to saving new information -- especially those that are emotionally relevant in stressful situations. [More]
CHOP presents new findings on pediatric cardiovascular disease at AHA Scientific Sessions

CHOP presents new findings on pediatric cardiovascular disease at AHA Scientific Sessions

Physician-researchers from the Cardiac Center at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia presented new findings on pediatric cardiovascular disease at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago. [More]
Blocking key brain receptor cell could neutralize biological consequences of Alzheimer's

Blocking key brain receptor cell could neutralize biological consequences of Alzheimer's

Blocking a key receptor in brain cells that is used by oxygen free radicals could play a major role in neutralizing the biological consequences of Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers at Temple University. [More]
Poor young people with positive perceptions report better health than people with worse perceptions

Poor young people with positive perceptions report better health than people with worse perceptions

Young people growing up in impoverished neighborhoods who perceive their poor communities in a positive light report better health and well-being than those with worse perceptions of where they live, new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. [More]
Lifestyle of young people could pose risk for developing diabetes mellitus

Lifestyle of young people could pose risk for developing diabetes mellitus

Research performed by the University of Veracruz, in the east coast of Mexico, called Lifestyles Nutrition Students and Risk of Type II Diabetes, showed that the lifestyle of young people between 17 and 24 years of age, like lack of physical activity, mild psychological stress, and the omission of breakfast could pose a risk for developing diseases such as diabetes mellitus. [More]
Investigational treatment shows promise against Marfan syndrome

Investigational treatment shows promise against Marfan syndrome

An investigational treatment for Marfan syndrome is as effective as the standard therapy at slowing enlargement of the aorta, the large artery of the heart that delivers blood to the body, new research shows. The findings indicate a second treatment option for Marfan patients, who are at high risk of sudden death from tears in the aorta. [More]
Zytiga is commonly prescribed for second-line treatment of mCRPC patients

Zytiga is commonly prescribed for second-line treatment of mCRPC patients

Decision Resources Group finds that Johnson & Johnson/Janssen Biotech/Janssen Cilag/AstraZeneca's Zytiga is the clear agent of choice for second-line treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients, according to surveyed oncologists from France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom (EU5). [More]
New oral medication shows promise in treating fibromyalgia

New oral medication shows promise in treating fibromyalgia

A new oral medication known as IMC-1, developed by Innovative Med Concepts, proved highly effective at reducing pain and other symptoms of fibromyalgia (FM) in patients in a recent clinical trial. [More]