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Parental non-involvement, weight-related teasing in family linked to childhood binge eating

Parental non-involvement, weight-related teasing in family linked to childhood binge eating

Binge eating is the most prevalent type of eating disorder across races, ethnic groups, ages, and genders. Surprisingly, binge eating has even been reported in children as young as 5 years old. [More]
Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Appetite, as a word, come from the Latin appetitus, meaning "desire for.” Therefore, appetite can be defined as a pleasurable sensation or the desire to eat. This sensation is coordinated by several brain areas associated with reward processing such amygdala, hippocampus, ventral pallidum, nucleus accumbens and striatum, and others. [More]
High levels of zinc may lead to kidney stone formation

High levels of zinc may lead to kidney stone formation

David Killilea, PhD, a staff scientist at Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute- the research arm of UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland - co-authored a study into the causes of kidney stones. [More]
LGB adults experience higher rates of distress, impaired physical health than heterosexuals

LGB adults experience higher rates of distress, impaired physical health than heterosexuals

In one of the largest, most representative health surveys conducted to date, lesbian, gay and bisexual adults reported substantially higher rates of severe psychological distress, heavy drinking and smoking, and impaired physical health than did heterosexuals. [More]
Pain reliever appears to help preserve vision in animal model of retinal degeneration

Pain reliever appears to help preserve vision in animal model of retinal degeneration

A pain medicine that potently activates a receptor vital to a healthy retina appears to help preserve vision in a model of severe retinal degeneration, scientists report. [More]
Anti-anxiety medication dampens helping behavior in rats

Anti-anxiety medication dampens helping behavior in rats

Rats given midazolam, an anti-anxiety medication, were less likely to free trapped companions because the drug lessened their empathy, according to a new study by University of Chicago neuroscientists. [More]
Study shows one in five individuals from U.S. military sample have obesity

Study shows one in five individuals from U.S. military sample have obesity

Despite being held to stringent weight and body fat standards, newly published research shows that one in five individuals from a sample of U.S. military personnel from 2001 - 2008 have obesity. [More]
Federal government continues to ban valid scientific research on medicinal use of Cannabis sativa

Federal government continues to ban valid scientific research on medicinal use of Cannabis sativa

The use of medical marijuana for millions of patients suffering from a wide range of health conditions and the subsequent therapeutic benefits has long been documented. [More]
Study highlights lack of guidance on deintensifying diabetic regimens

Study highlights lack of guidance on deintensifying diabetic regimens

Patients with Type 2 diabetes often receive unnecessarily intensive treatment for long durations, increasing their risk of severe hypoglycaemia, research shows. [More]
NIH funds novel substance abuse treatment program that targets marginalized populations

NIH funds novel substance abuse treatment program that targets marginalized populations

The creators of a novel substance abuse treatment program have received an infusion of funding from a federal agency for an expanded study of their intervention, which targets marginalized populations who struggle with problems such as racism, sexism, poverty and histories of incarceration. [More]
Study links racial discrimination to thoughts of death among African-American youth

Study links racial discrimination to thoughts of death among African-American youth

Racial discrimination, whether it's derogatory language or unequal treatment, impacts communities and individuals in different ways. For children, the effects are sometimes emotional scars, and as a University of Houston researcher discovered, even thoughts of death. [More]
Mutant fruit flies provide insight into origins of Parkinson's disease

Mutant fruit flies provide insight into origins of Parkinson's disease

The neurodegeneration that occurs in Parkinson’s disease is a result of stress on the endoplasmic reticulum in the cell rather than failure of the mitochondria as previously thought, according to a study in fruit flies. [More]
Study to assess effects of early dementia screening on families of older adults

Study to assess effects of early dementia screening on families of older adults

A new grant to the Indiana University Center for Aging Research from the National Institute on Aging funds the first study to assess the potential benefits and harms to family members of early dementia screening of older adults. [More]
CD Laboratory at MedUni Vienna explores new therapeutic approaches to enhance peritoneal dialysis

CD Laboratory at MedUni Vienna explores new therapeutic approaches to enhance peritoneal dialysis

One of the main functions of the kidneys is to filter metabolic products out of the blood. If the kidneys are no longer able to do this, the blood has to be artificially purified and drained of excess fluid. [More]
Positive environment can reverse trauma-related behavioral alterations in mice

Positive environment can reverse trauma-related behavioral alterations in mice

Traumatic experiences in childhood increase the risk of developing behavioral and psychiatric disorders later in life. It is also known that the consequences of a trauma can likewise be observed in the children of people affected even if those children have themselves not experienced any trauma. [More]
Centrally assisted collaborative telecare model improves PTSD/depression symptoms in soldiers

Centrally assisted collaborative telecare model improves PTSD/depression symptoms in soldiers

Military members who visited a primary care clinic while suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and depression reported fewer symptoms and better mental health functioning a year after enrolling in a treatment program that included specially trained care managers and telephone therapy options, according to a new study conducted by RTI International, RAND and the Department of Defense Deployment Health Clinical Center. [More]
Regular park visits for 30 minutes may help prevent high blood pressure and mental health problems

Regular park visits for 30 minutes may help prevent high blood pressure and mental health problems

People who visit parks for 30 minutes or more each week are much less likely to have high blood pressure or poor mental health than those who don't, according to new research by Australian and UK environmental scientists. [More]
Researchers use sensitive technique to reveal high levels of genetic heterogeneity in schizophrenia

Researchers use sensitive technique to reveal high levels of genetic heterogeneity in schizophrenia

International researchers centered at Nagoya University use a highly sensitive technique to identify significantly more DNA sequence repeats in patients with schizophrenia than in control individuals, and outline a possible link between genome instability and disease. [More]
Smartphone app may increase discharge preparedness for parents of VLBW infants

Smartphone app may increase discharge preparedness for parents of VLBW infants

A smartphone app specifically designed to support parents of very low birth weight (VLBW) premature infants as they transition home from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) may increase parenting self-efficacy and discharge preparedness, according to a pilot randomized controlled trial at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago that was published in the journal Internet Interventions. [More]
Study reveals surprising diversity in single neuronal transcriptomes of the brain

Study reveals surprising diversity in single neuronal transcriptomes of the brain

A team of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, University of California, San Diego and Illumina, Inc., has completed the first large-scale assessment of single neuronal "transcriptomes." [More]
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