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Health food stores promote adult-only dietary supplements to minors

Health food stores promote adult-only dietary supplements to minors

Fifteen year olds are not only able to buy over-the-counter dietary supplements from a sampling of health food stores across the country, the staff at those stores actually went so far as to recommend certain products, despite labels reading "for adult use only." [More]
Students with standing desks more attentive than seated counterparts, Texas A&M study finds

Students with standing desks more attentive than seated counterparts, Texas A&M study finds

A study from the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health finds students with standing desks are more attentive than their seated counterparts. In fact, preliminary results show 12 percent greater on-task engagement in classrooms with standing desks, which equates to an extra seven minutes per hour of engaged instruction time. [More]
New research shows that serious life events in childhood can increase type 1 diabetes risk

New research shows that serious life events in childhood can increase type 1 diabetes risk

New research from Sweden published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) shows that serious life events (SLEs) in childhood, such as death or illness in the family, divorce/separation, a new child or adult in the family, and conflicts in the family, can triple the risk of subsequently developing type 1 diabetes (T1D). [More]
Remogliflozin etabonate: A potential treatment option for management of NASH and NAFLD

Remogliflozin etabonate: A potential treatment option for management of NASH and NAFLD

Data presented today at The International Liver Congress 2015 demonstrates that remogliflozin etabonate, an investigational drug in type 2 diabetes, is a potential treatment option for the management of patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). [More]
Physical forces can affect development of limbs in embryos

Physical forces can affect development of limbs in embryos

University of Toronto engineers and a pediatric surgeon have joined forces to discover that physical forces like pressure and tension affect the development of limbs in embryos--research that could someday be used to help prevent birth defects. [More]
Children exposed to adverse childhood experience more likely to develop asthma

Children exposed to adverse childhood experience more likely to develop asthma

Robyn Wing, M.D., an emergency medicine physician at Hasbro Children's Hospital, recently led a study that found children who were exposed to an adverse childhood experience (ACE) were 28 percent more likely to develop asthma. [More]
Gulf Coast residents continue to struggle with the aftermath of Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Gulf Coast residents continue to struggle with the aftermath of Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Five years ago, on April 20, 2010, the BP Deepwater Horizon oil platform exploded; over the next five months, more than 206 million gallons of oil gushed into the Gulf of Mexico, affecting more than 950 miles of shoreline. [More]
Study shows that Hodgkin lymphoma patients can remain disease-free with just chemotherapy alone

Study shows that Hodgkin lymphoma patients can remain disease-free with just chemotherapy alone

In a paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the scientists show that a positron-emission tomography (PET) scan immediately after treatment with chemotherapy can identify patients who have a very good outcome without additional radiotherapy. [More]
Scientists reveal how breast milk prevents necrotizing enterocolitis in premature babies

Scientists reveal how breast milk prevents necrotizing enterocolitis in premature babies

The immune-boosting properties of breast milk have long been known. Now a team of scientists led by Johns Hopkins pediatric surgeon-in-chief David Hackam, M.D., Ph.D., says experiments in mice reveal how breast milk works to ward off the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a devastating intestinal disorder that affects 12 percent of premature babies and claims the lives of one in four of those who have it. [More]
Universal prevention programs can help prevent mental health problems in higher education students

Universal prevention programs can help prevent mental health problems in higher education students

Is it possible to prevent mental health problems in higher education students? The answer is "yes" according to a team of psychologists from Loyola University Chicago who conducted a careful, systematic review of 103 universal interventions involving over 10,000 students enrolled in 2- and 4-year colleges and universities and graduate programs. [More]
World Veterans Federation supports approved technology for tinnitus relief among veterans

World Veterans Federation supports approved technology for tinnitus relief among veterans

TINNITUS, a debilitating "ringing in the ears", has become the No. 1 service- connected disability among veterans, surpassing post-traumatic stress disorder. [More]
Neuroscientists identify novel brain circuitry that increases anxiety during nicotine withdrawal

Neuroscientists identify novel brain circuitry that increases anxiety during nicotine withdrawal

In a promising breakthrough for smokers who are trying to quit, neuroscientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and The Scripps Research Institute have identified circuitry in the brain responsible for the increased anxiety commonly experienced during withdrawal from nicotine addiction. [More]
Montefiore and Einstein researchers to present new findings on neurological disorders at AAN 2015

Montefiore and Einstein researchers to present new findings on neurological disorders at AAN 2015

Researchers from Montefiore Health System and Albert Einstein College of Medicine will present new findings on how to effectively treat migraine, and forecast the onset of pain in a number of neurological conditions including dementia in older adults. [More]
Smoking and genetics can increase women's likelihood of giving birth to twins

Smoking and genetics can increase women's likelihood of giving birth to twins

African American mothers who smoke and have a genetic profile that includes a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the TP53 gene have an increased likelihood of having twins, concluded a team of researchers from the University of South Florida and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. [More]
Prenatal antidepressant exposure increases anxiety symptoms

Prenatal antidepressant exposure increases anxiety symptoms

Three-year-old siblings exposed to antidepressants in pregnancy show increased anxiety symptoms compared to their unexposed siblings. [More]
Study attributes mild cognitive defects in women to post-traumatic stress induced by cancer diagnosis

Study attributes mild cognitive defects in women to post-traumatic stress induced by cancer diagnosis

Breast cancer patients often display mild cognitive defects even before the initiation of chemotherapy. A new study by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich researchers now attributes the syndrome to post-traumatic stress induced by diagnosis of the disease. [More]
Extreme morning sickness during pregnancy linked to developmental problems in children

Extreme morning sickness during pregnancy linked to developmental problems in children

Women who experience extreme morning sickness during pregnancy are three times more likely to have children with developmental issues, including attention disorders and language and speech delays, than woman who have normal nausea and vomiting, a UCLA study has found. [More]
Nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors experience PTSD

Nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors experience PTSD

Post-traumatic stress disorder is often thought of as a symptom of warfare, major catastrophes and assault. It's rarely considered in patients who survive a critical illness and stay in the intensive care unit (ICU). [More]
Latest genome sequencing techniques help identify new autoimmune syndrome in children

Latest genome sequencing techniques help identify new autoimmune syndrome in children

Using the latest genome sequencing techniques, a research team led by scientists from UC San Francisco, Baylor College of Medicine, and Texas Children's Hospital has identified a new autoimmune syndrome characterized by a combination of severe lung disease and arthritis that currently has no therapy. [More]
Tonix expert examines ways to improve sleep problems and provide relief to people with PTSD

Tonix expert examines ways to improve sleep problems and provide relief to people with PTSD

Sleep problems—a common condition among military personnel—may increase the risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other mental health conditions. So concludes a team of researchers at the RAND Corporation, whose study—published on RAND's website—was recently described in national media outlets. [More]
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