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Scientists find way to create therapeutic heat to treat people suffering from chronic muscle pain

Scientists find way to create therapeutic heat to treat people suffering from chronic muscle pain

If you suffer from chronic muscle pain a doctor will likely recommend for you to apply heat to the injury. But how do you effectively wrap that heat around a joint? Korean Scientists at the Center for Nanoparticle Research, Institute for Basic Science in Seoul, along with an international team, have come up with an ingenious way of creating therapeutic heat in a light, flexible design. [More]
K2M announces the U.S. commercial launch of MESA 2 Deformity Spinal System

K2M announces the U.S. commercial launch of MESA 2 Deformity Spinal System

K2M Group Holdings, Inc., a global medical device company focused on designing, developing and commercializing innovative and proprietary complex spine technologies, techniques and minimally invasive procedures, today announced the U.S. commercial launch of the MESA 2 Deformity Spinal System, the Company's next-generation pedicle screw system designed to address the most complex spinal pathologies. [More]
Testosterone, cortisol hormones may destabilise financial markets by making traders take more risks

Testosterone, cortisol hormones may destabilise financial markets by making traders take more risks

The hormones testosterone and cortisol may destabilise financial markets by making traders take more risks, according to a study. Researchers simulated the trading floor in the lab by having volunteers buy and sell assets among themselves. They measured the volunteers' natural hormone levels in one experiment and artificially raised them in another. [More]
UF researchers develop smart mouth guard to detect teeth grinding

UF researchers develop smart mouth guard to detect teeth grinding

Researchers at the University of Florida have developed a smart mouth guard equipped with sensors that allow it to detect if you're grinding your teeth, tell your dentist and even help you stop doing it. [More]
DTC genetic testing has negative consequences in children

DTC genetic testing has negative consequences in children

A woman coping with the burden of familial breast cancer can't help but wonder if her young daughter will suffer the same fate. Has she inherited the same disease-causing mutation? Is it best to be prepared for the future, or to wait? During the last decade, genetic tests have been through a sea change, both in their availability and the technologies behind them. Today there are at least 34 companies that offer direct to consumer (DTC) DNA testing, some of which return health results. And now it is possible to sequence someone's entire genetic code for the price of a laptop. [More]
New NEI study shows that microglia can accelerate damage wrought by blinding eye disorders

New NEI study shows that microglia can accelerate damage wrought by blinding eye disorders

Spider-like cells inside the brain, spinal cord and eye hunt for invaders, capturing and then devouring them. These cells, called microglia, often play a beneficial role by helping to clear trash and protect the central nervous system against infection. But a new study by researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) shows that they also accelerate damage wrought by blinding eye disorders, such as retinitis pigmentosa. [More]
New UCL research reveals how past events are reconstructed in the brain

New UCL research reveals how past events are reconstructed in the brain

When remembering something from our past, we often vividly re-experience the whole episode in which it occurred. New UCL research funded by the Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust has now revealed how this might happen in the brain. [More]
Cortisol study may explain persistence of emotional memories occurring in anxiety, PTSD

Cortisol study may explain persistence of emotional memories occurring in anxiety, PTSD

The stress hormone cortisol strengthens memories of scary experiences. However, it is effective not only while the memory is being formed for the first time, but also later when people look back at an experience while the memory reconsolidates. This has been published by cognition psychologists from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum in the journal "Neuropsychopharmacology". [More]
ALPINION launches new E-CUBE Series ultrasound system

ALPINION launches new E-CUBE Series ultrasound system

ALPINION MEDICAL SYSTEMS Co., Ltd., announced today the launch of a new E-CUBE Series ultrasound system. Developed to enhance user experience and patient care in a range of clinical areas, the E-CUBE 15 EX produces superb image quality. With advanced imaging technologies, this system delivers outstanding clinical performance in women's health, general imaging, and shared service applications. [More]
BIDMC leaders urge hospitals to eliminate emotional harms that damage patients’ dignity

BIDMC leaders urge hospitals to eliminate emotional harms that damage patients’ dignity

Hospitals have made significant strides to reduce or eliminate physical harm to patients since the landmark 1999 Institute of Medicine Report "To Err is Human." [More]
UCSD researchers report that statins make women aggressive, but men calmer

UCSD researchers report that statins make women aggressive, but men calmer

Statins are a hugely popular drug class used to manage blood cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of heart disease. Previous studies had raised questions about adverse behavioral changes with statins, such as irritability or violence, but findings with statins have been inconsistent. In the first randomized trial to look at statin effects on behavior, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that aggressive behavior typically declined among men placed on statins (compared to placebo), but typically increased among women placed on statins. [More]
Wayne State University awarded grant to explore new MS pathology model

Wayne State University awarded grant to explore new MS pathology model

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society has provided a grant to a Wayne State University School of Medicine professor to explore a new model of MS pathology. [More]
Women with 'female athlete triad' at greater risk of bone stress injuries

Women with 'female athlete triad' at greater risk of bone stress injuries

Participation in sports by women and girls has increased from 310,000 individuals in 1971 to 3.37 million in 2010. At the same time, sports-related injuries among female athletes have skyrocketed. [More]
Premature babies who avoid eye contact in early infancy less likely to show symptoms of autism

Premature babies who avoid eye contact in early infancy less likely to show symptoms of autism

Premature babies are at an increased risk for developing autism spectrum disorder. But a small study indicates that preemies who avoid eye contact in early infancy are less likely to demonstrate symptoms of autism at age 2 than preemies who maintain eye contact during early interactions, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Brain-imaging studies may help predict promiscuity, problem drinking in young adults

Brain-imaging studies may help predict promiscuity, problem drinking in young adults

A pair of brain-imaging studies suggest researchers may be able to predict how likely young adults are to develop problem drinking or engage in risky sexual behavior in response to stress. [More]
Comorbid anxiety ‘a crucial target’ for treatment in bipolar disorder

Comorbid anxiety ‘a crucial target’ for treatment in bipolar disorder

Almost half of patients with bipolar disorder will have comorbid anxiety disorder in their lifetime, show the findings of a systematic review and meta-analysis. [More]
Virtual human helps veterans with PTSD, people with mental illness build job interview skills

Virtual human helps veterans with PTSD, people with mental illness build job interview skills

Finding a job is difficult for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and individuals with severe mental illness, who have high unemployment rates even though many want to work. [More]
New review may help women with stress urinary incontinence make more informed choices about treatment

New review may help women with stress urinary incontinence make more informed choices about treatment

A new Cochrane systematic review published today of surgery for stress urinary incontinence makes an important contribution to an ongoing debate and will help women to make more informed choices about treatment. [More]
Multiple courses of antibiotics may have significant impact on child development

Multiple courses of antibiotics may have significant impact on child development

A new animal study by NYU Langone Medical Center researchers adds to growing evidence that multiple courses of commonly used antibiotics may have a significant impact on children's development. [More]
Dietary fat intake could potentially ease mitochondrial disease, shows research

Dietary fat intake could potentially ease mitochondrial disease, shows research

Mice that have a genetic version of mitochondrial disease can easily be mistaken for much older animals by the time they are nine months old: they have thinning grey hair, osteoporosis, poor hearing, infertility, heart problems and have lost weight. Despite having this disease at birth, these mice have a "secret weapon" in their youth that staves off signs of aging for a time. [More]
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