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New app directly connects single ventricle heart defect patients to doctors

New app directly connects single ventricle heart defect patients to doctors

A powerful new app is directly connecting single ventricle heart defect patients to their doctors, dramatically improving their monitoring while they recover from heart surgery at home. Girish Shirali, MBBS, FACC, FASE, Co-Director of the Ward Family Heart Center at Children's Mercy Kansas City, will report today on how the technology is changing patient care at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2014. [More]
MGH investigators develop system to accurately track the process of falling asleep

MGH investigators develop system to accurately track the process of falling asleep

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have developed a system to accurately track the dynamic process of falling asleep, something has not been possible with existing techniques. In their report in the October issue of the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology, the research team describes how combining key physiologic measurements with a behavioral task that does not interfere with sleep onset gives a better picture of the gradual process of falling asleep. [More]
UH professor receives NIH grant for breast cancer research

UH professor receives NIH grant for breast cancer research

After earning her medical degree in China, Qian Lu, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Houston, felt she could help patients more by treating the mind as well as the body. She then decided to pursue a doctorate in psychology in the U.S. [More]
Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Pulmonary fibrosis has no cure. It's caused by scarring that seems to feed on itself, with the tougher, less elastic tissue replacing the ever moving and stretching lung, making it increasingly difficult for patients to breathe. [More]
Job authority increases symptoms of depression among women

Job authority increases symptoms of depression among women

Job authority increases symptoms of depression among women, but decreases them among men, according to a new study from University of Texas at Austin sociologist Tetyana Pudrovska. [More]
Stress can be helpful when it comes to emotionally relevant information

Stress can be helpful when it comes to emotionally relevant information

Retrieving memory content under stress does not work very well. However, stress can be helpful when it comes to saving new information -- especially those that are emotionally relevant in stressful situations. [More]
CHOP presents new findings on pediatric cardiovascular disease at AHA Scientific Sessions

CHOP presents new findings on pediatric cardiovascular disease at AHA Scientific Sessions

Physician-researchers from the Cardiac Center at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia presented new findings on pediatric cardiovascular disease at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago. [More]
Blocking key brain receptor cell could neutralize biological consequences of Alzheimer's

Blocking key brain receptor cell could neutralize biological consequences of Alzheimer's

Blocking a key receptor in brain cells that is used by oxygen free radicals could play a major role in neutralizing the biological consequences of Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers at Temple University. [More]
Poor young people with positive perceptions report better health than people with worse perceptions

Poor young people with positive perceptions report better health than people with worse perceptions

Young people growing up in impoverished neighborhoods who perceive their poor communities in a positive light report better health and well-being than those with worse perceptions of where they live, new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. [More]
Lifestyle of young people could pose risk for developing diabetes mellitus

Lifestyle of young people could pose risk for developing diabetes mellitus

Research performed by the University of Veracruz, in the east coast of Mexico, called Lifestyles Nutrition Students and Risk of Type II Diabetes, showed that the lifestyle of young people between 17 and 24 years of age, like lack of physical activity, mild psychological stress, and the omission of breakfast could pose a risk for developing diseases such as diabetes mellitus. [More]
Investigational treatment shows promise against Marfan syndrome

Investigational treatment shows promise against Marfan syndrome

An investigational treatment for Marfan syndrome is as effective as the standard therapy at slowing enlargement of the aorta, the large artery of the heart that delivers blood to the body, new research shows. The findings indicate a second treatment option for Marfan patients, who are at high risk of sudden death from tears in the aorta. [More]
Zytiga is commonly prescribed for second-line treatment of mCRPC patients

Zytiga is commonly prescribed for second-line treatment of mCRPC patients

Decision Resources Group finds that Johnson & Johnson/Janssen Biotech/Janssen Cilag/AstraZeneca's Zytiga is the clear agent of choice for second-line treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients, according to surveyed oncologists from France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom (EU5). [More]
New oral medication shows promise in treating fibromyalgia

New oral medication shows promise in treating fibromyalgia

A new oral medication known as IMC-1, developed by Innovative Med Concepts, proved highly effective at reducing pain and other symptoms of fibromyalgia (FM) in patients in a recent clinical trial. [More]
Common antimicrobial in household items causes liver fibrosis, cancer in mice

Common antimicrobial in household items causes liver fibrosis, cancer in mice

Triclosan is an antimicrobial commonly found in soaps, shampoos, toothpastes and many other household items. Despite its widespread use, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report potentially serious consequences of long-term exposure to the chemical. [More]
Study shows how phthalates linked with complications of pregnancy

Study shows how phthalates linked with complications of pregnancy

In recent years, scientists have linked chemicals known as phthalates with complications of pregnancy and fetal development. [More]
Study suggests that beta blockers may benefit patients suffering from HFPEF

Study suggests that beta blockers may benefit patients suffering from HFPEF

A novel registry study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden suggests that beta blockers may benefit also patients suffering from a relatively unknown form of heart failure called HFPEF, which today lacks well-established treatment. [More]
Preterm birth becomes world's number one killer of young children

Preterm birth becomes world's number one killer of young children

For the first time in history, the complications of preterm birth outrank all other causes as the world's number one killer of young children. [More]
Chaetocin synergistic with TKIs against CML cells

Chaetocin synergistic with TKIs against CML cells

Chaetocin, a mycotoxin that increases oxidative stress, can complement the activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic myeloid leukaemia by overcoming innate resistance mediated by secreted bone marrow stromal cytokines and growth factors, researchers report. [More]
University at Buffalo researchers receive $500,000 grant to study IED-induced vision loss

University at Buffalo researchers receive $500,000 grant to study IED-induced vision loss

It's well known that battlefield explosions can cause hearing loss, but veterans may be surprised to learn that their vision may also suffer — sometimes weeks or months after combat exposure. [More]
New study shows that brain’s ability to manage stress depends on brain protein

New study shows that brain’s ability to manage stress depends on brain protein

The brain's ability to effectively deal with stress or to lack that ability and be more susceptible to depression, depends on a single protein type in each person's brain, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published November 12 in the journal Nature. [More]