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Study reveals link between genomic instability, aneuploidy and cancer

Study reveals link between genomic instability, aneuploidy and cancer

A recent analysis of 43,205 human tumours unveiled that 68% of solid tumours are aneuploid, that is to say, they have an altered number of chromosomes. In recent years, scientists have attempted to clarify whether this aneuploidy contributes to tumour development or whether it is a co-lateral effect of the genomic instability of cancer cells, which increase the rate of mutations and the likelihood of cancer. [More]
Certain genes could lead to stress fracture injuries

Certain genes could lead to stress fracture injuries

In a paper published in The Official Journal of the International Purine Club University of Liverpool researchers have successfully identified how certain genes can contribute towards a person's susceptibility to stress fracture injuries. This research provides a platform for further research into providing a personalised health approach to this common sports injury. [More]
Simple strategies may help people stave off neurodegenerative condition

Simple strategies may help people stave off neurodegenerative condition

Diet, exercise, a good night's sleep -- all sound recommendations for mitigating one's risk for everything from heart disease to diabetes and, as it turns out, Alzheimer's. [More]
New technique allows better understanding of cellular stress reaction

New technique allows better understanding of cellular stress reaction

Stress in the body's cells is both the cause and consequence of inflammatory diseases or cancer. The cells react to stress to protect themselves. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now developed a new technique that allows studying a fundamental response to stress in much more detail than previously possible: the ADP-ribosylation of chromatin. [More]
Wayne State inks exclusive license agreement with TRImaran Pharma for novel class of drugs

Wayne State inks exclusive license agreement with TRImaran Pharma for novel class of drugs

Wayne State University recently entered into an exclusive license agreement with TRImaran Pharma Inc. for a class of novel drugs developed at Wayne State University that aims to offer hope in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD), depression, ADHD and other neurological disorders. [More]
New evidence highlights benefits and harms of using artificial mesh for surgical repair of vaginal prolapse

New evidence highlights benefits and harms of using artificial mesh for surgical repair of vaginal prolapse

New evidence published today highlights benefits and harms of using artificial mesh when compared with tissue repair in the surgical treatment of vaginal prolapse. Slightly better repair with mesh needs to be weighed carefully against increased risk of harms. [More]
Vacations may lead to extra weight

Vacations may lead to extra weight

A week's vacation may leave many adults with a heavier midsection--extra weight that can hang around even six weeks post-vacation. [More]
Scientists develop potential treatment to prevent hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Scientists develop potential treatment to prevent hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

More than 15 years ago, David Warshaw, Ph.D., and coworkers discovered the precise malfunction of a specific protein in the heart that leads to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a common culprit in cases of sudden death in young athletes. [More]

Lack of sleep leads to more social media browsing

If you find yourself toggling over to look at Facebook several dozen times a day, it's not necessarily because the experience of being on social media is so wonderful. It may be a sign that you're not getting enough sleep. [More]
Study provides window into the brain changes that link mindfulness meditation with health-related benefits

Study provides window into the brain changes that link mindfulness meditation with health-related benefits

Over the past decade, mindfulness meditation has been shown to improve a broad range of health and disease outcomes, such as slowing HIV progression and improving healthy aging. Yet, little is known about the brain changes that produce these beneficial health effects. [More]
Strong link found between incarceration of family members during childhood and heart attacks in men

Strong link found between incarceration of family members during childhood and heart attacks in men

A parent's incarceration has immediate, devastating effects on a family. Now, Virginia Tech and University of Toronto researchers say there may be a longer term risk: Men who as children experienced a family member's incarceration are approximately twice as likely to have a heart attack in later adulthood in comparison with men who were not exposed to such a childhood trauma. [More]
Using BMI to measure health incorrectly labels over 54 million Americans as 'unhealthy', study finds

Using BMI to measure health incorrectly labels over 54 million Americans as 'unhealthy', study finds

Over the past few years, body mass index, a ratio of a person's height and weight, has effectively become a proxy for whether a person is considered healthy. Many U.S. companies use their employees' BMIs as a factor in determining workers' health care costs. And people with higher BMIs could soon have to pay higher health insurance premiums, if a rule proposed in April by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is adopted. [More]
Meditation reduces anxiety, pain and fatigue in women undergoing breast cancer biopsies

Meditation reduces anxiety, pain and fatigue in women undergoing breast cancer biopsies

Meditation eases anxiety, fatigue and pain for women undergoing breast cancer biopsies, according to researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute. They also found that music is effective, but to a lesser extent. [More]
Oncofertility complications reviewed for US patients

Oncofertility complications reviewed for US patients

Three articles published in JAMA Oncology highlight the legal and clinical care issues surrounding fertility preservation in US patients with cancer. [More]
Prenatal stress affects babies' health in war-torn areas

Prenatal stress affects babies' health in war-torn areas

Children from war-torn areas of the globe are affected by trauma even before they are born, according to a new University of Florida study. [More]
New Brown School study examines health-related quality of life for breast cancer survivors

New Brown School study examines health-related quality of life for breast cancer survivors

Breast cancer takes a daunting toll on all women, but it hits younger women especially hard, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. [More]
Study reveals increased mortality risk following hypertensive disease of pregnancy

Study reveals increased mortality risk following hypertensive disease of pregnancy

In a study to be presented on Feb. 5 at 8 a.m. EST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in Atlanta, researchers will present findings from a study titled, Long-term mortality risk following hypertensive disease of pregnancy (HDP). [More]
Block copolymer hydrogels facilitate cryoprotection of red blood cells and increase tissue engineering

Block copolymer hydrogels facilitate cryoprotection of red blood cells and increase tissue engineering

Freezing of medical tissue and cells usually requires the addition of cryopreservatives, although the added compounds can have undesired effects in subsequent applications. [More]
Aflac's total revenues decrease 3.5% to $5.3 billion in fourth quarter 2015

Aflac's total revenues decrease 3.5% to $5.3 billion in fourth quarter 2015

Aflac Incorporated today reported its fourth quarter results. Reflecting the weaker yen/dollar exchange rate, total revenues decreased 3.5% to $5.3 billion during the fourth quarter of 2015, compared with $5.5 billion in the fourth quarter of 2014. Net earnings were $730 million, or $1.71 per diluted share, compared with $703 million, or $1.57 per share, a year ago. [More]
Vanderbilt study offers a glimmer of hope to alcoholics suffering from depression

Vanderbilt study offers a glimmer of hope to alcoholics suffering from depression

A study by researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center is offering a glimmer of hope to alcoholics who find it hard to remain sober because their abstinence is hounded by stubborn, difficult-to-treat depression. [More]
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