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New eye-tracking device measures severity of concussion and brain injury

New eye-tracking device measures severity of concussion and brain injury

New research out of NYU Langone Medical Center could move the medical community one step closer toward effectively detecting concussion and quantifying its severity. [More]
Clear and concise communication essential to quality patient care in ED

Clear and concise communication essential to quality patient care in ED

The high-risk, rapidly changing nature of hospital Emergency Departments creates an environment where stress levels and staff burnout rates are high, but researchers at St. Michael's Hospital have identified the secret sauce that helps many emergency clinicians flourish - communication. [More]
Study: Green tea compound may activate a cycle that kills oral cancer cells

Study: Green tea compound may activate a cycle that kills oral cancer cells

A compound found in green tea may trigger a cycle that kills oral cancer cells while leaving healthy cells alone, according to Penn State food scientists. The research could lead to treatments for oral cancer, as well as other types of cancer. [More]
Rogers' regional medical director to address issue of childhood anxiety at NATSAP conference

Rogers' regional medical director to address issue of childhood anxiety at NATSAP conference

Stephanie C. Eken, M.D., F.A.A.P., a regional medical director with Rogers Behavioral Health System, will address the issue of childhood anxiety at the 2015 National Association of Therapeutic Schools and Programs (NATSAP) conference on February 6 in Nashville, TN. [More]
Researchers advance generalized concept for future studies of mental resilience

Researchers advance generalized concept for future studies of mental resilience

Researchers at the Research Center Translational Neurosciences of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany have advanced a generalized concept as the basis for future studies of mental resilience. Their new approach is based on a mechanistic theory which takes as its starting point the appraisals made by the brain in response to exposure to stressful or threatening situations. [More]
Scientists identify critical molecule that helps explain why diabetics suffer from non-healing wound

Scientists identify critical molecule that helps explain why diabetics suffer from non-healing wound

One of the most troubling complications of diabetes is its effect on wound healing. Roughly 15 percent of diabetics will suffer from a non-healing wound in their lifetime. In some cases, these open ulcers on the skin lead to amputations. [More]
Research explores effect of DBS treatments in animals with brain injuries

Research explores effect of DBS treatments in animals with brain injuries

The research, published in Behavioural Brain Research, was conducted by Pilar Segura and Ignacio Morgado (coordinators), Laura Aldavert and Marc Ramoneda, psychobiologists of the Institute of Neurosciences and the Department of Psychobiology and Health Sciences Methodology of the UAB and by Elisabet Kadar and Gemma Huguet, molecular biologists of the University of Girona, to explore the power of Deep Brain Stimulation treatments in the hypothalamus to recover the ability to learn and remember after a severe lesion of the amygdala. [More]

Doctoral thesis finds how parental time pressure leads to mental health problems among children

A doctor's thesis at Sahlgrenska Academy has found that children whose parents experience time pressure are more likely to have mental health problems. [More]
TSRI scientists find drug candidates that can prevent degeneration of brain cells in Parkinson's

TSRI scientists find drug candidates that can prevent degeneration of brain cells in Parkinson's

In a pair of related studies, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have shown their drug candidates can target biological pathways involved in the destruction of brain cells in Parkinson's disease. [More]
Low staff vaccination rates put vulnerable populations at risk of getting influenza

Low staff vaccination rates put vulnerable populations at risk of getting influenza

Influenza is associated with as many as 7,300 deaths annually in nursing home residents, but the vaccination rate for nursing home staff is only 54 percent, according to a study in the February issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
Purdue University researchers find promising way to treat late-stage prostate cancer

Purdue University researchers find promising way to treat late-stage prostate cancer

Low doses of metformin, a widely used diabetes medication, and a gene inhibitor known as BI2536 can successfully halt the growth of late-stage prostate cancer tumors, a Purdue University study finds. [More]
Study shows differences in play behavior, brain activation patterns and stress levels in autistic children

Study shows differences in play behavior, brain activation patterns and stress levels in autistic children

Brain scans confirm significant differences in play behavior, brain activation patterns and stress levels in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as compared with typically developing children. [More]
Study: Poor psychosocial work environment linked to cardiovascular problems

Study: Poor psychosocial work environment linked to cardiovascular problems

A psychosocially poor work environment means that employees experience highly demanding requirements but have little ability to control their work or not feel sufficiently appreciated for the contributions they make. [More]
Increased levels of stress hormones in mother can affect foetal development

Increased levels of stress hormones in mother can affect foetal development

Increased levels of stress hormones can lead pregnant mice to overeat, but affect growth of the foetus and, potentially, the long term health of her offspring, according to a study published today. [More]
Study explores economic outcomes of hospital-based violence intervention

Study explores economic outcomes of hospital-based violence intervention

At more than 25 hospitals across the U.S., health care professionals have embraced a public health approach to their work--taking action to prevent violent injuries, not just treat them. In programs known as hospital-based violence intervention programs (HVIPs), teams of medical professionals, social workers and researchers step in at a critical moment in a patient's life--the period following a violent injury such as a gunshot or stab wound--with case management, counseling and other services that help these victims break free from the cycle of violence. [More]
International scientists take new path in epilepsy research

International scientists take new path in epilepsy research

An international team of scientists together with the University of Bonn Hospital have taken a new path in the research into causes of epilepsy: The researchers determined the networks of the active genes and, like a dragnet, looked for the "main perpetrators" using a computer model. [More]
Study shows how gut bacteria can affect normal brain activity

Study shows how gut bacteria can affect normal brain activity

The hundred trillion bacteria living in an adult human--mostly in the intestines, making up the gut microbiome--have a significant impact on behavior and brain health. The many ways gut bacteria can impact normal brain activity and development, affect sleep and stress responses, play a role in a variety of diseases, and be modified through diet for therapeutic use are described in a comprehensive Review article in Journal of Medicinal Food, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Twitter can indicate community's psychological well being, predict rates of heart disease

Twitter can indicate community's psychological well being, predict rates of heart disease

Twitter has broken news stories, launched and ended careers, started social movements and toppled governments, all by being an easy, direct and immediate way for people to share what's on their minds. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have now shown that the social media platform has another use: Twitter can serve as a dashboard indicator of a community's psychological well being and can predict rates of heart disease. [More]
Genes that increase longevity may not increase healthy lifespan

Genes that increase longevity may not increase healthy lifespan

A study of long-lived mutant C. elegans by scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School shows that the genetically altered worms spend a greater portion of their life in a frail state and exhibit less activity as they age then typical nematodes. [More]
Daily use of Pycnogenol may help improve overall cognitive function

Daily use of Pycnogenol may help improve overall cognitive function

New research delivers exciting news for those seeking natural ways to boost memory and mental performance. A study recently published in the Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences shows daily use of Pycnogenol (pic-noj-en-all), a natural plant extract from French maritime pine tree bark, may help improve attention span, memory, decision-making – including executive-level performance – and overall cognitive function. [More]