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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Study urges caution when using BP-lowering treatment in patients with coronary artery disease

Study urges caution when using BP-lowering treatment in patients with coronary artery disease

Caution has been urged in the use of blood pressure lowering treatment for heart disease patients after a study in more than 22 000 patients with coronary artery disease found that too low blood pressure was associated with worse outcomes. The analysis from the CLARIFY registry is presented today at ESC Congress and published in The Lancet. [More]
New anticoagulant treatment safe and effective for AF patients before cardioversion

New anticoagulant treatment safe and effective for AF patients before cardioversion

Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who need anticoagulation before undergoing electrical correction of their abnormal heartbeat (cardioversion) may benefit from treatment with edoxoban - a non-vitamin K antagonist (VKA) oral anticoagulant (NOAC), according to results of the ENSURE-AF trial. [More]
CPAP treatment offers no cardiovascular benefit in OSA patients with heart disease risk

CPAP treatment offers no cardiovascular benefit in OSA patients with heart disease risk

More than 3 years of nightly treatment with a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine did not reduce cardiovascular risk more than usual care among patients with cardiovascular disease and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). [More]
Study finds tight glycemic control provides no impact on patient-important microvascular outcomes

Study finds tight glycemic control provides no impact on patient-important microvascular outcomes

The glucocentric focus on lowering blood sugar in Type 2 diabetes may have short-circuited development of new diabetes therapies, according to a new paper published by Mayo Clinic researchers in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. [More]
NCATS scientists identify promising compounds effective in inhibiting Zika virus replication

NCATS scientists identify promising compounds effective in inhibiting Zika virus replication

Researchers at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences recently identified compounds that potentially can be used to inhibit Zika virus replication and reduce its ability to kill brain cells. [More]
Platelet function testing in elderly patients after heart attack shows no improved outcomes

Platelet function testing in elderly patients after heart attack shows no improved outcomes

Monitoring platelet function in order to individualize antiplatelet therapy did not improve outcomes for elderly patients after a heart attack compared to a standard, unmonitored approach, results of the ANTARCTIC trial show. [More]
Active strategy of detecting and treating asymptomatic MSAD results in no clinical benefit

Active strategy of detecting and treating asymptomatic MSAD results in no clinical benefit

In patients with high-risk coronary artery disease (CAD), an active strategy of detecting and treating asymptomatic multisite artery disease (MSAD) combined with intensive medical therapy did not improve 2-year outcomes compared to a more traditional approach of managing only symptomatic coronary and extracoronary lesions, new research shows. [More]
Long-term exposure to combination of lower LDL-C and SBP can reduce cardiovascular risk

Long-term exposure to combination of lower LDL-C and SBP can reduce cardiovascular risk

Long-term exposure to the combination of even modestly lower LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) has the potential to "dramatically reduce" a person's lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease, according to new findings reported at ESC Congress 2016. [More]
HIJ-PROPER trial: Intensive cholesterol-lowering regimen in ACS patients shows no better outcomes

HIJ-PROPER trial: Intensive cholesterol-lowering regimen in ACS patients shows no better outcomes

Survival and other cardiovascular outcomes were not significantly reduced with intensive treatment using a second-line cholesterol-lowering medication on top of a standard statin, compared to statin treatment alone in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and dyslipidemia, investigators reported here. [More]
Mediterranean Diet linked to mortality risk reduction in patients with cardiovascular disease

Mediterranean Diet linked to mortality risk reduction in patients with cardiovascular disease

The Mediterranean diet is associated with a reduced risk of death in patients with a history of cardiovascular disease, according to results from the observational Moli-sani study presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. [More]
Alcohol-related hospitalisation linked to increased risk of ischaemic stroke in atrial fibrillation patients

Alcohol-related hospitalisation linked to increased risk of ischaemic stroke in atrial fibrillation patients

Alcohol related hospitalisation is associated with a doubled risk of ischaemic stroke risk in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, according to a study presented at ESC Congress 2016 today by Dr Faris Al-Khalili, cardiologist, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. [More]
Direct catheter-based thrombectomy equally effective to bridging thrombolysis in acute ischaemic stroke

Direct catheter-based thrombectomy equally effective to bridging thrombolysis in acute ischaemic stroke

Direct catheter-based thrombectomy is equally effective to bridging thrombolysis in the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke, according to results from the observational PRAGUE-16 registry study presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. [More]
New oral anticoagulants offer same stroke prevention, but cause less intracranial bleeding than warfarin

New oral anticoagulants offer same stroke prevention, but cause less intracranial bleeding than warfarin

The new oral anticoagulants provide the same stroke prevention as warfarin but cause less intracranial bleeding, reports an observational study in more than 43 000 patients presented at ESC Congress 2016 today by Dr Laila Staerk, a research fellow at Herlev and Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark. [More]
Smartphones can be used to identify atrial fibrillation with existing hardware

Smartphones can be used to identify atrial fibrillation with existing hardware

Smartphones can be used to detect atrial fibrillation with existing hardware, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today.1 A low-cost application (app) has been developed that uses the phone's own accelerometer and gyroscope to check for atrial fibrillation. [More]
Skin cells derived from autistic donors grow faster than those from control subjects

Skin cells derived from autistic donors grow faster than those from control subjects

Brain cells grow faster in children with some forms of autism due to distinct changes in core cell signaling patterns, according to research from the laboratory of Anthony Wynshaw-Boris, MD, PhD, chair of the department of genetics and genome sciences at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. [More]
ESC releases novel position paper on tackling cardiotoxicity of anticancer treatments

ESC releases novel position paper on tackling cardiotoxicity of anticancer treatments

The European Society of Cardiology has launched a novel position paper, under the auspices of its Committee for Practice Guidelines, on tackling the cardiac toxicity of anticancer therapies. The cardio-oncology paper is published online today in European Heart Journal and on the ESC Website. [More]
Moderate physical activity reduces risk of acute cardiovascular event in older people

Moderate physical activity reduces risk of acute cardiovascular event in older people

Moderate physical activity is associated with a greater than 50% reduction in cardiovascular death in over-65s, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. The 12 year study in nearly 2500 adults aged 65 to 74 years found that moderate physical activity reduced the risk of an acute cardiovascular event by more than 30%. High levels of physical activity led to greater risk reductions. [More]
Study: Low socioeconomic status linked to higher risk of second heart attack or stroke

Study: Low socioeconomic status linked to higher risk of second heart attack or stroke

Low socioeconomic status is associated with a higher risk of a second heart attack or stroke, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. The study in nearly 30 000 patients with a prior heart attack found that the risk of a second event was 36% lower for those in the highest income quintile compared to the lowest and increased by 14% in divorced compared to married patients. [More]
First ESC Guidelines on Atrial Fibrillation published online

First ESC Guidelines on Atrial Fibrillation published online

The first European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Guidelines on Atrial Fibrillation developed in collaboration with the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) are published online today in European Heart Journal and the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, and on the ESC Website. [More]
Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation awards Quality of Life grants to 79 nonprofit organizations

Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation awards Quality of Life grants to 79 nonprofit organizations

The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a national nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for individuals living with paralysis, announced it has awarded $575,704 in Quality of Life grants to 79 nonprofit organizations nationwide. [More]
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