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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Stroke-injured rat brain forms functioning connections with transplanted neurons, study shows

Stroke-injured rat brain forms functioning connections with transplanted neurons, study shows

Today, a stroke usually leads to permanent disability - but in the future, the stroke-injured brain could be reparable by replacing dead cells with new, healthy neurons, using transplantation. [More]
Vagus nerve stimulation may hold potential to reduce drug cravings, study shows

Vagus nerve stimulation may hold potential to reduce drug cravings, study shows

A new preclinical study led by a University of Texas at Dallas researcher shows that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy might have the potential to help people overcome drug addiction by helping them learn new behaviors to replace those associated with seeking drugs. [More]
Hypertensive disease of pregnancy linked to higher risk for early mortality

Hypertensive disease of pregnancy linked to higher risk for early mortality

In a study to be presented Friday, Jan. 27, in the oral plenary session at 8 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, researchers with University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Intermountain Healthcare and the Huntsman Cancer Institute (all in Salt Lake City, Utah), will present the study, Long-term mortality risk and life expectancy following recurrent hypertensive disease of pregnancy. [More]
Study identifies early signs of heart changes for women with preeclampsia

Study identifies early signs of heart changes for women with preeclampsia

In a study to be presented Friday, Jan. 27, in the oral concurrent session at 1:15 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, researchers with the Maternal and Child Health Research Center and the Department of Cardiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, will present findings of a study titled Cardiac Dysfunction in Preeclampsia is Present at Diagnosis and Persists Postpartum. [More]
Advances in imaging technology help diagnose more trauma patients with blunt cerebrovascular injuries

Advances in imaging technology help diagnose more trauma patients with blunt cerebrovascular injuries

Advances in diagnostic imaging technology have meant that more trauma patients are being diagnosed with blunt cerebrovascular injuries, and as a result, stroke and related death rates in these patients have declined significantly over the past 30 years. [More]
Research shows how memory can be improved using noninvasive brain stimulation

Research shows how memory can be improved using noninvasive brain stimulation

Northwestern Medicine scientists showed for the first time that non-invasive brain stimulation can be used like a scalpel, rather than like a hammer, to cause a specific improvement in precise memory. [More]
More than half of AF patients who undergo catheter ablation become asymptomatic, study reports

More than half of AF patients who undergo catheter ablation become asymptomatic, study reports

More than half of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) become asymptomatic after catheter ablation, reports the largest study of the procedure published today in European Heart Journal. [More]
High-donor-volume hospitals more likely to have improved OTPD rate than low-volume medical centers

High-donor-volume hospitals more likely to have improved OTPD rate than low-volume medical centers

Hospitals that manage the highest volume of deceased organ donors are 52 percent more likely to recover an above-average number of transplantable organs per donor compared with low-volume hospitals, according to results from a new study conducted across three U.S. donation regions. [More]
Soft robotic sleeve that mimics healthy cardiac muscles could aid failing hearts

Soft robotic sleeve that mimics healthy cardiac muscles could aid failing hearts

Every year about 2,100 people receive heart transplants in the United States, while 5.7 million suffer from heart failure. Given the scarcity of available donor hearts, clinicians and biomedical engineers from Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard University have spent several years developing a mechanical alternative. [More]
Disadvantaged women more likely to suffer heart attack than men, new study finds

Disadvantaged women more likely to suffer heart attack than men, new study finds

Women from low socioeconomic backgrounds are 25 per cent more likely to suffer a heart attack than disadvantaged men, a major new study has found. [More]
Scientists developing painless ‘smart’ patch that releases insulin in response to rising glucose levels

Scientists developing painless ‘smart’ patch that releases insulin in response to rising glucose levels

Treatment for certain diabetes cases involves constant monitoring of blood-glucose levels and daily insulin shots. [More]
Mapping premature infant's brain after birth may help better predict developmental problems

Mapping premature infant's brain after birth may help better predict developmental problems

Scanning a premature infant's brain shortly after birth to map the location and volume of lesions, small areas of injury in the brain's white matter, may help doctors better predict whether the baby will have disabilities later, according to a new study published in the January 18, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Chronic kidney disease patients have high out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures, study finds

Chronic kidney disease patients have high out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures, study finds

Patients who have chronic kidney disease but are not on dialysis have higher out-of-pocket healthcare expenses than even stroke and cancer patients, according to a study by researchers at Loyola University Chicago and Loyola Medicine. [More]
Researchers discover role of neuron protein in learning abilities and AIDS-related dementia

Researchers discover role of neuron protein in learning abilities and AIDS-related dementia

Researchers from the University of California and Cardiff University have made a breakthrough in the understanding of AIDS-related dementia, discovering the role of a neuron protein which was also found to affect learning abilities in healthy subjects. [More]
Chemotherapy-induced senescent cells promote side effects and cancer relapse

Chemotherapy-induced senescent cells promote side effects and cancer relapse

Standard chemotherapy is a blunt force instrument against cancer - and it's a rare cancer patient who escapes debilitating side effects from systemic treatments that mostly affect dividing cells, both malignant and healthy, throughout the body. [More]
Heart CT scans can help personalize treatment for patients with mild high blood pressure

Heart CT scans can help personalize treatment for patients with mild high blood pressure

Using data from a national study, Johns Hopkins researchers determined that using heart CT scans can help personalize treatment in patients whose blood pressure falls in the gray zone of just above normal or mild high blood pressure. [More]
Functional deficits caused by mini-strokes can last longer than previously thought

Functional deficits caused by mini-strokes can last longer than previously thought

Evidence overwhelmingly supports a link between cognitive decline and cerebrovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, arteriolosclerosis, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Not only do individuals with cerebrovascular diseases have a much higher incidence of cortical microinfarcts (mini-strokes), but post-mortem histological and in vivo radiological studies also find that the burden of microinfarcts is significantly greater among people with vascular cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) than in age-matched, non-demented individuals. [More]
Prevalence of atrial fibrillation in haemodialysis patients higher than previously thought

Prevalence of atrial fibrillation in haemodialysis patients higher than previously thought

Atrial fibrillation, which is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, is an important risk factor for strokes. [More]
Benzodiazepine-like drugs linked to increased stroke risk among Alzheimer's disease patients

Benzodiazepine-like drugs linked to increased stroke risk among Alzheimer's disease patients

The use of benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-like drugs was associated with a 20 per cent increased risk of stroke among persons with Alzheimer's disease, shows a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland. [More]
People with schizophrenia more likely to have diabetes than general population

People with schizophrenia more likely to have diabetes than general population

People with early schizophrenia are at an increased risk of developing diabetes, even when the effects of antipsychotic drugs, diet and exercise are taken out of the equation, according to an analysis by researchers from King's College London. [More]
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