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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Despite efforts to improve stroke treatment, delays in emergency transport still prevalent

Despite efforts to improve stroke treatment, delays in emergency transport still prevalent

Despite efforts to close the time gap between symptom onset and stroke treatment - including improvements in public education, 911 dispatch operations, pre-hospital detection and triage, hospital stroke system development, and stroke unit management - a new study presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery (SNIS) 12th Annual Meeting suggests that delays in emergency transport are still prevalent and that improvements are needed to ensure patients can be treated within the optimal time window. [More]
Lidocaine benefits breast cancer survivors who experience pain during intercourse

Lidocaine benefits breast cancer survivors who experience pain during intercourse

Scientists at Oregon Health & Science University report that breast cancer survivors who experience pain during sexual intercourse, a common side effect of breast cancer treatment, may achieve comfort when liquid lidocaine is applied strategically to prevent pain. [More]
Innovative new devices that facilitate IA treatment improve outcomes, decrease mortality rates

Innovative new devices that facilitate IA treatment improve outcomes, decrease mortality rates

In the last decade, Intra-Arterial (IA) stroke therapy (a technique in which thrombolytic agents and devices are passed through the arteries directly to the clot site) has gained notable momentum as an effective and safe treatment option for patients. [More]
Mobile Stroke Treatment Units can improve survival rates and enhance patient's chance of recovery

Mobile Stroke Treatment Units can improve survival rates and enhance patient's chance of recovery

Two new studies presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery 12th Annual Meeting in San Francisco, report that Mobile Stroke Treatment Units (MSTUs) can significantly reduce the time it takes to diagnose and treat patients for stroke, greatly improving survival rates and enhancing a patient's chance of recovery. [More]
Low-dose lithium lowers involuntary motor movements in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

Low-dose lithium lowers involuntary motor movements in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

Low-dose lithium reduced involuntary motor movements - the troubling side effect of the medication most commonly used to treat Parkinson's disease (PD) - in a mouse model of the condition that is diagnosed in about 60,000 Americans each year. The third in a series of studies from the Andersen lab involving PD and low-dose lithium, the results add to mounting evidence that low-doses of the psychotropic drug could benefit patients suffering from the incurable, degenerative condition. [More]
UMass Amherst toxicologist hopes US regulatory agency may acknowledge hormesis hypothesis soon

UMass Amherst toxicologist hopes US regulatory agency may acknowledge hormesis hypothesis soon

When environmental toxicologist Edward Calabrese in the School of Public Health and Health Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst heard recently that the U.S. National Regulatory Commission has opened a new docket on proposed rule changes and standards for radiation protection, he felt it as "a vindication of my 30-year career, in many ways." [More]
Rutgers physicians use new treatments to restore teenager’s life

Rutgers physicians use new treatments to restore teenager’s life

At first, 13-year-old Christina Blumstein thought she had an ordinary headache. She and her parents were returning from a visit to Long Island in July 2014 when the pain struck. Was it a bout of carsickness? Too much screen time on her iPad? But a few hours later, back home in Old Bridge, New Jersey, her mother MaryAnn says, "Christina started screaming that somebody was stabbing her in the head with a knife." Soon afterward Christina was comatose and in an ambulance - and her life was in grave danger. [More]
New research shows concussion may affect men and women differently

New research shows concussion may affect men and women differently

New research suggests concussion may not significantly impair symptoms or cognitive skills for one gender over another, however, women may still experience greater symptoms and poorer cognitive performance at preseason testing. [More]
FDA approves Praluent (alirocumab) Injection for treatment of patients with high LDL cholesterol

FDA approves Praluent (alirocumab) Injection for treatment of patients with high LDL cholesterol

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Praluent (alirocumab) Injection, the first FDA-approved treatment in a new class of drugs known as PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) inhibitors. [More]
Extremes of stroke symptoms attract misdiagnoses

Extremes of stroke symptoms attract misdiagnoses

Patients with very mild or very severe stroke symptoms are at the greatest risk of being misdiagnosed in the emergency department, research suggests. [More]
Migraines may increase risk of stroke among smokers

Migraines may increase risk of stroke among smokers

New research suggests older people who experience migraines may have an increased risk of stroke, but only if they are smokers. The study is published in the July 22, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Six hot line sessions set to reveal latest research in cardiovascular disease at ESC Congress 2015

Six hot line sessions set to reveal latest research in cardiovascular disease at ESC Congress 2015

Six hot line sessions at ESC Congress 2015 are set to reveal the latest in cardiovascular disease research across a range of conditions and comorbidities. Hot topics include atrial fibrillation, pacing, acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, pharmacology and coronary artery disease. [More]
Experts to highlight new diagnostic products, tools to identify heart attacks at 2015 AACC Annual Meeting

Experts to highlight new diagnostic products, tools to identify heart attacks at 2015 AACC Annual Meeting

The 2015 AACC Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo, the leading annual event for laboratory medicine, will open on Sunday, July 26, in Atlanta, Georgia. This year's meeting will host more than 400 educational sessions on topics ranging from personalized medicine and infectious diseases to point-of-care and laboratory-developed tests, and will feature more than 200 new cutting edge diagnostic products. [More]
Researchers discover experimental drug that treats hot flashes, other menopausal symptoms without side effects

Researchers discover experimental drug that treats hot flashes, other menopausal symptoms without side effects

Researchers have discovered an experimental medication that treats hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms without the life-threatening risks of hormone replacement therapy, according to a team led by a UNT Health Science Center scientist. [More]
UT Southwestern named one of 'Most Wired' hospitals in nation for fifth consecutive year

UT Southwestern named one of 'Most Wired' hospitals in nation for fifth consecutive year

UT Southwestern Medical Center is on the national "Most Wired" hospitals list for a fifth consecutive year, thanks to its use of such technologies as databases to help physicians better identify high-risk patients and tools that keep physicians, nurses, and patients communicating effectively. [More]
More people turn to popular new blood thinners for atrial fibrillation treatment

More people turn to popular new blood thinners for atrial fibrillation treatment

More adults than ever are visiting their doctors' offices for a prescription to treat atrial fibrillation, according to a study led by the University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center. [More]
Multi-year project aims to develop, improve clinical research tools for studying ASD

Multi-year project aims to develop, improve clinical research tools for studying ASD

Government, non-profit, and other private partners will fund a multi-year project to develop and improve clinical research tools for studying autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The project will receive a total of $28 million over the next four years to test and refine clinical measures of social impairment in ASD in order to better evaluate potential behavioral and drug therapies. [More]
Early antiretroviral treatment prevents AIDS- and non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people

Early antiretroviral treatment prevents AIDS- and non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people

Starting antiretroviral therapy early not only prevents serious AIDS-related diseases, but also prevents the onset of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people, according to a new analysis of data from the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study, the first large-scale randomized clinical trial to establish that earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits all HIV-infected individuals. [More]
MU researcher receives $2.2 million grant to develop system to display clear blood pressure information

MU researcher receives $2.2 million grant to develop system to display clear blood pressure information

Physicians receive lots of information about patients in a short amount of time, and sometimes that information is scattered, disorganized or difficult to comprehend. Now, a researcher at the University of Missouri School of Medicine has received funding to develop a simpler and clearer system to display blood pressure information. [More]
Scott & White Healthcare - Round Rock now offers fully integrative medicine services to Central Texans

Scott & White Healthcare - Round Rock now offers fully integrative medicine services to Central Texans

Scott & White Healthcare - Round Rock is now offering integrative medicine services to Central Texans that include massage therapy and acupuncture at two of its regional clinics: Scott & White Clinic - Avery Ranch and Baylor Scott & White Clinic - Round Rock South. [More]
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