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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Trial adds piece to stroke rehabilitation puzzle

Trial adds piece to stroke rehabilitation puzzle

High-intensity, repetitive, task-focused upper extremity training does not offer benefits beyond standard rehabilitation for patients within the first few months after a stroke, shows a trial in JAMA. [More]
Dementia decline heralds hope of reduced burden

Dementia decline heralds hope of reduced burden

Analysis of participants in the Framingham Heart Study has shown a decline in dementia over a period of 3 decades. [More]
TSRI scientists receive $1.7 million NIH grant to find new target for treating Huntington's disease

TSRI scientists receive $1.7 million NIH grant to find new target for treating Huntington's disease

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have won nearly $1.7 million from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to investigate the mechanisms that contribute to Huntington's disease, a fatal inherited disease that some have described as having ALS, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's--at the same time. [More]
Cardiac rehabilitation program at Bayshore Community Hospital receives AACVPR certification

Cardiac rehabilitation program at Bayshore Community Hospital receives AACVPR certification

The cardiac rehabilitation program at Bayshore Community Hospital is pleased to announced that it has received certification from the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR) for its strict standards of practice. [More]
Poor physical fitness in middle age linked to smaller brain size 20 years later

Poor physical fitness in middle age linked to smaller brain size 20 years later

Poor physical fitness in middle age may be linked to a smaller brain size 20 years later, according to a study published in the February 10, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
People who feel older may end up in hospital as they age

People who feel older may end up in hospital as they age

People who feel older than their peers are more likely to be hospitalized as they age, regardless of their actual age or other demographic factors, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. [More]
University of Louisville researcher reveals potentially harmful effects of e-cigarettes

University of Louisville researcher reveals potentially harmful effects of e-cigarettes

While e-cigarette use is increasing worldwide, little is known about the health effects e-cigarettes pose for users. A University of Louisville researcher is working to change that status. [More]
GEMS project to explore events leading to MS in at-risk individuals

GEMS project to explore events leading to MS in at-risk individuals

A team of investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has launched a study of individuals at risk for multiple sclerosis (MS). By focusing on first-degree family members of MS patients, the research team seeks to better understand the sequence of events that leads some people to develop the disease. [More]
Review of EAS cases among patients with psychiatric conditions in the Netherlands

Review of EAS cases among patients with psychiatric conditions in the Netherlands

A review of euthanasia or assisted suicide (EAS) cases among patients with psychiatric disorders in the Netherlands found that most had chronic, severe conditions, with histories of attempted suicides and hospitalizations, and were described as socially isolated or lonely, according to an article published online by JAMA Psychiatry. [More]
Vanderbilt physicians examine risk factors for cardiovascular disease in prostate cancer survivors

Vanderbilt physicians examine risk factors for cardiovascular disease in prostate cancer survivors

The 3 million prostate cancer survivors in the United States are likely to die from something other than cancer, thanks to early detection, effective treatment and the disease's slow progression. [More]
Computerized cognitive rehabilitation can improve outcomes in brain injury survivors

Computerized cognitive rehabilitation can improve outcomes in brain injury survivors

For the first time, researchers have shown that computerized cognitive rehabilitation (a program to help brain-injured or otherwise cognitively impaired individuals to restore normal functioning) can improve attention and executive functioning in brain injury survivors including traumatic brain injury (TBI) and stroke. [More]
LMU researchers identify new drug target for atherosclerosis

LMU researchers identify new drug target for atherosclerosis

The enzyme Dicer processes RNA transcripts, cutting them into short segments that regulate the synthesis of specific proteins. An Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich team has shown that Dicer promotes the development of atherosclerosis, thus identifying a new drug target. [More]

Doc Halo's new clinical communication platform a game-changer for healthcare

The newest feature for Doc Halo's clinical communication platform is a game-changer for healthcare. Say goodbye to out-of-date paper schedules and unreliable pagers. [More]
Scientists set to develop new wearable technology to help stroke patients

Scientists set to develop new wearable technology to help stroke patients

Scientists at the University of Southampton are to develop and trial a new wearable technology to help people who have had a stroke recover use of their arm and hand. [More]
Aging brains work differently than younger brains, say cognitive scientists

Aging brains work differently than younger brains, say cognitive scientists

Cognitive scientists have found more evidence that aging brains work differently than younger brains when performing the same memory task, pointing to a potentially new direction for age-related cognitive care and exploration. [More]
Researchers seek to better understand sequence of events that leads people to develop MS

Researchers seek to better understand sequence of events that leads people to develop MS

A team of investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has launched a study of individuals at risk for multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Study reveals association between DNA methylation and type 2 diabetes

Study reveals association between DNA methylation and type 2 diabetes

Researchers from the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute have found an epigenetic mechanism implicated in the regulation of blood sugar. The study, published in the journal Molecular Human Genetics, reveals that the methylation of the TXNIP gene is associated with diabetes mellitus type 2 and, in particular, average blood glucose levels. [More]
African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

A study based on medical records from more than a quarter million adult patients found that African-American patients with connective tissue diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis were twice as likely as white patients to suffer from narrowed or atherosclerotic blood vessels, which increase the risk of a heart attack, stroke or death. [More]
People with traumatic brain injuries may have buildup of plaques related to Alzheimer's disease

People with traumatic brain injuries may have buildup of plaques related to Alzheimer's disease

A new study suggests that people with brain injuries following head trauma may have buildup of the plaques related to Alzheimer's disease in their brains. The research is published in the February 3, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
One million serious medical complications could be avoided with improvements in blood glucose levels in diabetics

One million serious medical complications could be avoided with improvements in blood glucose levels in diabetics

Sanofi, Diabetes UK and JDRF today announce the publication of IMPACT 2 in the journal Diabetic Medicine. This new study shows that, if sustained, even modest improvement in blood glucose levels can provide significantly improved outcomes for the 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK. [More]
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