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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
1 in 3 people in the US could not access a stroke centre within an hour

1 in 3 people in the US could not access a stroke centre within an hour

A new study published today reports that a large proportion of the United States would be unable to access primary a stroke centre within one hour by ambulance. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability and rapid treatment is essential to minimise damage to the brain and reduce the risk of prolonged disability. [More]
Researchers present new findings about 'key players' involved in brain inflammation

Researchers present new findings about 'key players' involved in brain inflammation

Inflammatory processes occur in the brain in conjunction with stroke and neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Researchers from Lund University and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, in close cooperation with a group led by Professor José L. Venero at the University of Seville, have presented new findings about some of the 'key players' in inflammation. [More]
ULB researchers test therapeutic potential of cortical neurons developed in laboratory

ULB researchers test therapeutic potential of cortical neurons developed in laboratory

Researchers at the ULB - IRIBHM and ULB Neuroscience Institute - have tested the therapeutic potential of cortical neurons generated at the laboratory, by transplantation in the brains of adult mice. [More]
AAPMD announces "The Silent Airway Problem: Connecting the Dots" conference

AAPMD announces "The Silent Airway Problem: Connecting the Dots" conference

The American Academy of Physiological Medicine and Dentistry (AAPMD) is leading the charge for an interdisciplinary medical approach to the diagnosis and treatment of sleep and breathing disorders, which research indicates contribute to a range of serious physiological, cognitive, behavioral and performance conditions in children and adults. [More]
Screening for and treating depression could help reduce risk of heart disease

Screening for and treating depression could help reduce risk of heart disease

A new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute has found that screening for and treating depression could help to reduce the risk of heart disease in patients with moderate to severe depression. [More]
Obesity drug under clinical trials could help treat anxiety

Obesity drug under clinical trials could help treat anxiety

Did you know that our body produces its own marijuana-like compound to protect us against anxiety? A study led by Ottawa researchers, published today in Neuron, reveals a new biological pathway that regulates this system and suggests that a drug currently in clinical trials to treat obesity might also provide an attractive way to combat anxiety disorders. [More]
One-third of US population can't be transported by ambulance to stroke center within one hour

One-third of US population can't be transported by ambulance to stroke center within one hour

One-third of the US population does not have access to a primary stroke center within one hour by ambulance, and even under optimal conditions, a large proportion of the US would be unable to access a stroke center within this window, according to a new study published in the March 4, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Valley Hospital becomes first hospital in New Jersey to use minimally-invasive approach to treat PAD

Valley Hospital becomes first hospital in New Jersey to use minimally-invasive approach to treat PAD

The Valley Hospital today announced it was the first hospital in New Jersey to use a recently approved device to offer a minimally-invasive approach to the treatment of peripheral artery disease (PAD) in the upper leg, a serious and common condition associated with an increased risk for heart attack and stroke. [More]
Study shows how mutations that cause Alzheimer's disease lead to neurodegeneration, dementia

Study shows how mutations that cause Alzheimer's disease lead to neurodegeneration, dementia

A study from researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital reveals for the first time exactly how mutations associated with the most common form of inherited Alzheimer's disease produce the disorder's devastating effects. [More]
Study highlights how obesity is linked to brain-level molecular changes

Study highlights how obesity is linked to brain-level molecular changes

Researchers at Aalto University and University of Turku have revealed how obesity is associated with altered opioid neurotransmission in the brain. [More]
New study shows who benefits most from statin therapy

New study shows who benefits most from statin therapy

Research has demonstrated that the risk for developing coronary heart disease depends on a host of risk factors that are related both to lifestyle and genetics. In a new study from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and Massachusetts General Hospital, researchers tested whether a composite of genetic variants could identify the risk of cardiovascular death and heart attacks as well as identify individuals who derived greater clinical benefit from statin therapy. [More]
Study on spider venom may lead to new class of potent painkillers

Study on spider venom may lead to new class of potent painkillers

New research shows that seven compounds of the countless found in spider venom block a key step in the body's ability to pass pain signals to the brain. The hunt for a medicine based on just one of these compounds, which would open up a new class of potent painkillers, is now a step closer according to new research published in the British Journal of Pharmacology. [More]
TSRI scientists find mechanism that causes long-term memory loss due to age

TSRI scientists find mechanism that causes long-term memory loss due to age

Everyone worries about losing their memory as they grow older--memory loss remains one of the most common complaints of the elderly. But the molecular reasons behind the processes remain unclear, particularly those associated with advancing age. [More]
Brain scientists map changes in communication between nerve cells in rats

Brain scientists map changes in communication between nerve cells in rats

Lights, sound, action: we are constantly learning how to incorporate outside sensations into our reactions in specific situations. In a new study, brain scientists have mapped changes in communication between nerve cells as rats learned to make specific decisions in response to particular sounds. The team then used this map to accurately predict the rats' reactions. These results add to our understanding of how the brain processes sensations and forms memories to inform behavior. [More]
NeuroPerspective features comprehensive reviews of schizophrenia, spinal cord injury

NeuroPerspective features comprehensive reviews of schizophrenia, spinal cord injury

NI Research has released the March/April issue of NeuroPerspective, which features comprehensive reviews of two major areas: Schizophrenia and Spinal cord injury. [More]
Study finds that BMI in healthy adolescents has significant association with blood pressures

Study finds that BMI in healthy adolescents has significant association with blood pressures

A recent study published in the American Journal of Hypertension has found that body mass index (BMI) in healthy adolescents has a statistically significant association with both systolic blood pressures (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP), and highlights the significance of the global trend of rapidly increasing adolescent obesity. [More]
New guidelines advise nearly all women, people with AFib to take blood thinners

New guidelines advise nearly all women, people with AFib to take blood thinners

Nearly all women and people over 65 in the U.S. with atrial fibrillation are advised to take blood thinners under new guidelines based on an analysis from the Duke Clinical Research Institute. [More]
Swiss teenager with classic sudden symptoms of stroke diagnosed with Lyme disease

Swiss teenager with classic sudden symptoms of stroke diagnosed with Lyme disease

A Swiss teenager, recently returned home from a discotheque, came to the emergency department with classic sudden symptoms of stroke, only to be diagnosed with Lyme disease. [More]
Henry Ford researchers propose new treatment strategy for stroke, other neurological disorders

Henry Ford researchers propose new treatment strategy for stroke, other neurological disorders

Medicine should reconsider how it treats stroke and other neurological disorders, focusing on the intrinsic abilities of the brain and nervous system to heal themselves rather than the "modest" benefits of clot-busting drugs and other neuroprotective treatments. [More]
New genetic discovery may lead to effective treatments for Huntington's disease

New genetic discovery may lead to effective treatments for Huntington's disease

A new genetic discovery in the field of Huntington's disease (HD) could mean a more effective way in determining severity of this neurological disease when using specific treatments. This study may provide insight for treatments that would be effective in slowing down or postponing the death of neurons for people who carry the HD gene mutation, but who do not yet show symptoms of the disease. [More]