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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Groundbreaking research opens door for prevention of cardiac fibrosis

Groundbreaking research opens door for prevention of cardiac fibrosis

Groundbreaking research from the University of Alberta and McGill University has opened the door towards the future prevention of cardiac fibrosis—a condition leading to heart failure for which there is currently no treatment. [More]
Online behavioural intervention provides long-term, sustainable ways to lose weight

Online behavioural intervention provides long-term, sustainable ways to lose weight

New research, led by the University of Southampton, has found that an online behavioural counselling tool is effective at helping people lose weight. [More]
Novel noninvasive scoring system can help predict strength and health of vascular network in the brain

Novel noninvasive scoring system can help predict strength and health of vascular network in the brain

A new study presented at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's 13th Annual Meeting in Boston found that the Opercular Score Index (OIS) is a practical, noninvasive scoring system that can be used to predict the strength and health of the vascular network in the brain (known as collateral robustness) and good clinical outcome among stroke patients undergoing endovascular recanalization. [More]
Exposure to infections in early life not linked to higher mortality risk during adulthood

Exposure to infections in early life not linked to higher mortality risk during adulthood

A new biological study by the University of Stirling has found that exposure to infections in early life does not have long-lasting consequences for later-life survival and reproduction. [More]
NewYork-Presbyterian launches new suite of telehealth services to improve, expand patient care

NewYork-Presbyterian launches new suite of telehealth services to improve, expand patient care

NewYork-Presbyterian has announced the rollout of NYP OnDemand, a new suite of digital health services designed to improve and expand patient care, while also extending access to the clinical expertise of NewYork-Presbyterian's physicians to their peers throughout the Hospital's vast healthcare network. [More]
New study uncovers way to characterize black box of malignant melanoma

New study uncovers way to characterize black box of malignant melanoma

When malignant melanoma metastasizes to the brain, it is a death sentence for most patients. Metastatic melanoma is the deadliest of the skin cancers and the mechanisms that govern early metastatic growth and interactions of metastatic cells with the brain microenvironment remain shrouded in mystery. [More]
Improved access to Primary Stroke Centers may lead to better outcomes in stroke patients

Improved access to Primary Stroke Centers may lead to better outcomes in stroke patients

Physicians and families of stroke victims often have to make quick decisions about whether to treat patients locally or refer them to a more distant Primary Stroke Center. [More]
Duke to lead early-stage clinical trials for promising new neurological therapies

Duke to lead early-stage clinical trials for promising new neurological therapies

Duke University could receive up to $19 million to lead early-stage clinical trials for new drugs to treat neurological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and neuropathy. [More]
New neuroprotective compounds may prevent development of epilepsy

New neuroprotective compounds may prevent development of epilepsy

A team led by Nicolas Bazan, MD, PhD, Boyd Professor and Director of LSU Health New Orleans' Neuroscience Center of Excellence, has developed neuroprotective compounds that may prevent the development of epilepsy. [More]
Study finds older adults who sustain wrist fractures more likely to have poor balance

Study finds older adults who sustain wrist fractures more likely to have poor balance

Elderly patients suffering a low energy wrist (distal radius) fracture are more likely to have difficulties with balance, placing them at risk for future injuries, according to a new study appearing in the July 20, 2016 issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. [More]
Advances in NIRS technologies offer reduced health-care costs, better patient comfort

Advances in NIRS technologies offer reduced health-care costs, better patient comfort

The latest advances in near-infrared spectroscopy technologies are enabling development of new capabilities in diagnosis and treatment of disease, offering reduced health-care costs, portability, increased sensitivity, higher patient comfort, and better quality of life. [More]
Andy Murray becomes brand ambassador for Scotland’s DHI

Andy Murray becomes brand ambassador for Scotland’s DHI

International tennis superstar Andy Murray has teamed up with one of Scotland’s leading innovation centres to highlight the potential of technology to provide more efficient and effective health and care services in the UK and across the world. [More]
Shared lifestyle and environment may contribute to risk of common diseases in families, study shows

Shared lifestyle and environment may contribute to risk of common diseases in families, study shows

Family history of disease may be as much the result of shared lifestyle and surroundings as inherited genes, research has shown. [More]
Scientists develop new optical fiber-based probe for brain temperature measurements

Scientists develop new optical fiber-based probe for brain temperature measurements

The brain is the most temperature-sensitive organ in the body. Even small deviations in brain temperature are capable of producing profound effects--including behavioral changes, cell toxicity, and neuronal cell death. The problem faced by researchers and clinicians is how to measure and understand the [More]
Researchers explore effectiveness of neurorehabilitation for individuals with brain injury or stroke

Researchers explore effectiveness of neurorehabilitation for individuals with brain injury or stroke

In the current issue of NeuroRehabilitation leading researchers explore the effectiveness of several neurorehabilitation treatments for individuals with brain injury or stroke. A number of published articles have covered the issue of efficacy of neurorehabilitation, but only a few have discussed the issue of effectiveness. [More]
Researchers identify how sensory nerve receptors work together to transmit itch signals

Researchers identify how sensory nerve receptors work together to transmit itch signals

Researchers have found how sensory nerve cells work together to transmit itch signals from the skin to the spinal cord, where neurons then carry those signals to the brain. Their discovery may help scientists find more effective ways to make itching stop. [More]
Study provides more insight into effects of DBS in treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Study provides more insight into effects of DBS in treatment of Alzheimer's disease

New findings published today by a team of researchers led by Dr. Andres Lozano at the Krembil Neuroscience Centre of Toronto Western Hospital have provided further insight into the effects of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Researchers develop antibody with potential therapeutic effects against multiple sclerosis

Researchers develop antibody with potential therapeutic effects against multiple sclerosis

Inserm Unit U919, directed by Prof. Denis Vivien has developed an antibody with potential therapeutic effects against multiple sclerosis. [More]
Study identifies ten potentially modifiable risk factors for stroke

Study identifies ten potentially modifiable risk factors for stroke

Hypertension remains the single most important modifiable risk factor for stroke, and the impact of hypertension and nine other risk factors together account for 90% of all strokes, according to an analysis of nearly 27000 people from every continent in the world, published in The Lancet. [More]
Sleep apnea patients with resistant hypertension may have increased risk for cardiovascular outcomes

Sleep apnea patients with resistant hypertension may have increased risk for cardiovascular outcomes

In a study of patients with hypertension, those with resistant hypertension--meaning that their blood pressure remained elevated despite concurrent use of three antihypertensive agents of different classes--had a higher rate of sleep apnea (9.6%) than those without resistant hypertension (7.2%). [More]
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