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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Scientists identify molecule in liver cells that regulates release of fats into the bloodstream

Scientists identify molecule in liver cells that regulates release of fats into the bloodstream

ETH researchers have discovered a molecule in liver cells that controls the release of fat into the bloodstream. This "lock keeper" is present in large quantities in overweight people and leads indirectly to vascular narrowing. [More]
Experimental PET tracer can diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration in living person

Experimental PET tracer can diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration in living person

An experimental positron emission tomography (PET) tracer can effectively diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration while a person is still alive, according to a proof-of-concept study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published September 27 in the journal Translational Psychiatry. [More]
Clinical study to test efficacy of different formulations of flu vaccine in heart failure patients

Clinical study to test efficacy of different formulations of flu vaccine in heart failure patients

Heart disease patients enrolled in a clinical trial - designed to test whether a stronger dose of the influenza vaccine can prevent death or hospitalization due to a heart attack, heart failure, stroke or pneumonia - have begun receiving their first flu shots in Toronto and Boston. [More]
Study evaluates link between lowering LDL-C and CV risk reduction across statin and nonstatin therapies

Study evaluates link between lowering LDL-C and CV risk reduction across statin and nonstatin therapies

In a study appearing in the September 27 issue of JAMA, Marc S. Sabatine, M.D., M.P.H., of Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, and colleagues evaluated the association between lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and relative cardiovascular risk reduction across different statin and nonstatin therapies. [More]
Early endovascular thrombectomy plus medical therapy linked to less disability after stroke

Early endovascular thrombectomy plus medical therapy linked to less disability after stroke

In an analysis that included nearly 1,300 patients with large-vessel ischemic stroke, earlier treatment with endovascular thrombectomy (intra-arterial use of a micro-catheter or other device to remove a blood clot) plus medical therapy (use of a clot dissolving agent) compared with medical therapy alone was associated with less disability at 3 months, according to a study appearing in the September 27 issue of JAMA. [More]
Review highlights urgent demand for tool to identify stroke survivors with visual impairments

Review highlights urgent demand for tool to identify stroke survivors with visual impairments

A University of Liverpool led review of the methods available to screen for post-stroke visual impairments has found there is an urgent demand for the development of a tool. [More]
Hyaluronidase enzyme may be effective treatment option for spasticity caused by neurological injury

Hyaluronidase enzyme may be effective treatment option for spasticity caused by neurological injury

A naturally occurring enzyme called hyaluronidase may be an effective alternative treatment for spasticity, or muscle stiffness, a disabling condition in people who have had a stroke or other brain injury. [More]
Are migraines genetic? An interview with Nick Furlotte

Are migraines genetic? An interview with Nick Furlotte

There's a big debate right now in the migraine community around the underlying cause of the disease. The question is whether it is vascular, and has something to do with our vessels, or whether it has to do with our neurons not functioning correctly or misfiring. [More]
Experimental drug may prevent development of multiple sclerosis in mice

Experimental drug may prevent development of multiple sclerosis in mice

The experimental drug laquinimod may prevent the development or reduce the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS) in mice, according to research published in the September 21, 2016, online issue of Neurology Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Research re-opens door to possibility of stopping ongoing brain damage

Research re-opens door to possibility of stopping ongoing brain damage

A breakthrough in understanding how brain damage spreads - and how it could potentially be limited - has been made through a collaboration between neuroscientists and engineers at the Universities of Dundee and Strathclyde. [More]
Memory and language deeply linked via the hippocampus, new experiment shows

Memory and language deeply linked via the hippocampus, new experiment shows

A new study shows that when you finish your spouse's sentences or answer a fill-in-the-blank question, you're engaging the brain's relay station for memories, the hippocampus. [More]
MR Solutions receives order for cryogen-free 7T simultaneous PET-MR preclinical imaging system

MR Solutions receives order for cryogen-free 7T simultaneous PET-MR preclinical imaging system

MR Solutions has received an order for a high-powered 7T, cryogen-free, preclinical PET-MRI multi-modality imaging system from the newly formed pre-clinical imaging resource at the Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute (ZNI) at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC). [More]
Inhealthcare introduces first self-testing mobile app for warfarin users

Inhealthcare introduces first self-testing mobile app for warfarin users

Digital health specialist Inhealthcare is bringing to market the first self-testing mobile app for warfarin users that connects directly to doctors. [More]
SINAPSE network enhances strengths to develop world-class future in medical imaging for Scotland

SINAPSE network enhances strengths to develop world-class future in medical imaging for Scotland

Scotland has a strong legacy as one of the pioneers of medical imaging. In the late 70s, Aberdeen University became the first institution to develop a full body MRI scanner; the system named the Mark I prototype was an enormous step forward for healthcare. [More]
Scientists begin research work at new £650 million Francis Crick Institute building

Scientists begin research work at new £650 million Francis Crick Institute building

The first scientists have moved into the new £650 million Francis Crick Institute building in London and are starting work in their purpose-built labs. [More]
Improving muscle health could enhance response to insulin in Type 1 diabetes patients

Improving muscle health could enhance response to insulin in Type 1 diabetes patients

Loss of physical strength due to muscle deterioration is a complication for people living with Type 1 diabetes that's often overlooked. New research from McMaster University shows it shouldn't be. [More]
Free, student-run CPPT clinic at Rutgers helps improve physical function among patients

Free, student-run CPPT clinic at Rutgers helps improve physical function among patients

Ulises Mantilla was a 21-year-old college student when he suffered a stroke at his home in Newark in 2012. The last thing he remembers about that day is dialing 911. He awoke from a coma a month later in the hospital, unable to walk or perform simple tasks. [More]
Study shows clot-busting drug safe in treating people with wake-up stroke

Study shows clot-busting drug safe in treating people with wake-up stroke

Using a clot-busting medication to treat people who wake up with symptoms of stroke was safe and should be studied further to see how effective it might be for a population that otherwise has few treatment options, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Benefits of cardioprotective drugs may extend beyond preventing acute coronary syndromes

Benefits of cardioprotective drugs may extend beyond preventing acute coronary syndromes

Medications prescribed to prevent heart attacks such as statins and aspirin are also associated with reduced heart attack severity, according to research published in PLOS ONE. [More]
ACCA annual congress shines lights on managing risk in acute cardiovascular care

ACCA annual congress shines lights on managing risk in acute cardiovascular care

Acute Cardiovascular Care 2016 will put a spotlight on managing high risk patients. The annual congress of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association, a registered branch of the European Society of Cardiology, is held 15 to 17 October at the Centro de Congressos de Lisboa in Lisbon, Portugal. [More]
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