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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Moberg receives CE Mark approval for CNS Monitor

Moberg receives CE Mark approval for CNS Monitor

Moberg has received CE Mark approval for the CNS Monitor, a medical device used for advanced monitoring of neurological intensive care patients. The CE Mark certifies that a product has met European Union requirements for commercial marketing in Europe. [More]
AAN releases new position statement on opioids for chronic non-cancer pain

AAN releases new position statement on opioids for chronic non-cancer pain

According to a new position statement from the American Academy of Neurology, the risk of death, overdose, addiction or serious side effects with prescription opioids outweigh the benefits in chronic, non-cancer conditions such as headache, fibromyalgia and chronic low back pain. [More]
Researchers explain how molecular structure of the heart muscle changes in heart failure

Researchers explain how molecular structure of the heart muscle changes in heart failure

In a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, researchers at the University of Alberta's Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry have explained how the function of a key protein in the heart changes in heart failure. [More]
State highlights: Calif. health insurers and contraception coverage; Alaska sues Xerox over Medicaid payment systems

State highlights: Calif. health insurers and contraception coverage; Alaska sues Xerox over Medicaid payment systems

Health insurance policies in California will have to cover all federally approved contraceptives for women by 2016 without charging co-payments under legislation signed this week by Gov. Jerry Brown, countering trends in other states and the U.S. Supreme Court. The bill, SB1053 by Sen. Holly Mitchell, D-Los Angeles, expands state laws that required coverage for most birth-control drugs and devices approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The new law mandates coverage for all FDA-approved contraception, prohibits co-payments and includes managed-care Medi-Cal plans, which are not expressly covered by current laws (Egelko, 9/27). [More]
First-in-kind study evaluates health outcomes of women sexual assault survivors

First-in-kind study evaluates health outcomes of women sexual assault survivors

One in 5 U.S. women experience sexual assault during their lifetime, yet little is known about the experiences and health outcomes of sexual assault survivors. A new study seeks to change that. [More]
Antibiotic exposure in infancy linked to childhood obesity

Antibiotic exposure in infancy linked to childhood obesity

Repeated exposure to broad-spectrum antibiotics in the first two years of life is associated with early childhood obesity, say researchers from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in a retrospective study based on data from electronic health records from the extensive CHOP Care Network. [More]
Increasing prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea threatens public health and safety

Increasing prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea threatens public health and safety

Public health and safety are threatened by the increasing prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea, which now afflicts at least 25 million adults in the U.S., according to the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project. Several new studies highlight the destructive nature of obstructive sleep apnea, a chronic disease that increases the risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, stroke and depression. [More]
HerKare opens new location in Mansfield, Texas

HerKare opens new location in Mansfield, Texas

HerKare opens a new location today in Mansfield, Texas. This marks HerKare's third center in Dallas-Fort Worth. HerKare recently expanded to Houston area and continues to accelerate their growth plans, making the treatment of hormonal imbalance in women more convenient. [More]
Raritan Bay Medical Center accepts customer service inquiries via Twitter

Raritan Bay Medical Center accepts customer service inquiries via Twitter

Raritan Bay Medical Center announces it will begin to accept customer service inquiries via Twitter, the social media website. [More]
Cancer specialist outlines 10 symptoms that should never be ignored

Cancer specialist outlines 10 symptoms that should never be ignored

Patients often ask, "Doc, is this something to worry about?" Patients fear the worst yet often choose to ignore potentially deadly warning signs. [More]
OSU engineers develop simple device to improve hand function after surgery

OSU engineers develop simple device to improve hand function after surgery

Engineers at Oregon State University have developed and successfully demonstrated the value of a simple pulley mechanism to improve hand function after surgery. [More]

New AliveECG app provides patients with free real-time AF detection in ECG recordings

AliveCor, Inc. announced today the launch of the latest version of the AliveECG app, which provides patients with free real-time atrial fibrillation (AF) detection in ECG recordings using its new FDA-cleared algorithm. [More]
Coffee consumption associated with increase in life years, reduction in healthcare costs

Coffee consumption associated with increase in life years, reduction in healthcare costs

Xcenda, the strategic consulting arm of AmerisourceBergen, one of the largest global pharmaceutical sourcing and distribution service companies, recently conducted the first-ever health economic analysis on coffee consumption. [More]
CVRx Barostim neo System receives CE Mark approval from NSAI for treatment of heart failure

CVRx Barostim neo System receives CE Mark approval from NSAI for treatment of heart failure

CVRx, Inc., a private medical device company, announced today it received CE Mark approval from the National Standards Authority of Ireland of the Barostim neo System for the treatment of heart failure. [More]
Dr. Nancy Chiaravalloti of Kessler Foundation receives Alumni Achievement in Science award

Dr. Nancy Chiaravalloti of Kessler Foundation receives Alumni Achievement in Science award

Nancy (Donofrio) Chiaravalloti, PhD, of Kessler Foundation received the Alumni Achievement in Science award from her alma mater, Muhlenberg College at the Alumni Association luncheon on September 13th. [More]
Health advocates call for the United Nations to support efforts to curb heart disease, stroke

Health advocates call for the United Nations to support efforts to curb heart disease, stroke

Heart disease and stroke contribute to 30 percent of global deaths, more than all infectious and parasitic diseases combined, and 11 cardiovascular organizations are calling for the United Nations to address prevention of heart disease and other non-communicable diseases. [More]
Dramatic videos of OSA patients increase CPAP usage

Dramatic videos of OSA patients increase CPAP usage

Like more than 20 million other Americans, John Brugger has been diagnosed with sleep apnea. He snored, tossed and turned and struggled to breathe during the night, which often left him not only exhausted the next day but also raised his risk of heart attack, stroke and car accidents. [More]

Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma, SanBio to jointly develop SB623 in the U.S. and Canada

Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Co., Ltd. and SanBio Co., Ltd., acting through its U.S. subsidiary SanBio, Inc., announced on September 26 that the two companies have entered into a joint development and license agreement for exclusive marketing rights in the U.S. and Canada ("Agreement") for SB623, a cell therapy for the treatment of patients with chronic stroke discovered and currently under development by SanBio. [More]
Longer looks: ACOs and job shifts; abortion's racial gap; having a stroke at 33

Longer looks: ACOs and job shifts; abortion's racial gap; having a stroke at 33

It is now nearly a year since the roll-out of Obamacare. The launch was a shambles, and Obamacare is a totem for every American who hates big government. Republicans will deride it, yet again, in the mid-term elections. Obamacare is indeed costly and overcomplicated. Yet it is not to blame for America's health mess, and it could just contain the beginnings of a partial solution to it. But that will only happen if politicians treat health care like a patient: first, diagnose the disease, then examine whether Barack Obama's treatment helped, and then ask what will make the patient better (9/20). [More]
Two genes that cause pediatric glaucoma increases risk of future stroke up to ten times

Two genes that cause pediatric glaucoma increases risk of future stroke up to ten times

Every year in Canada about 50,000 people suffer from a stroke, caused either by the interruption of blood flow or uncontrolled bleeding in the brain. While many environmental risk factors exist, including high blood pressure and smoking, stroke risk is also frequently inherited. Unfortunately, remarkably little is known regarding stroke's genetic basis. [More]