Substance Abuse News and Research RSS Feed - Substance Abuse News and Research

Health insurance coverage for transgender people is cost-effective, study finds

Health insurance coverage for transgender people is cost-effective, study finds

A new analysis led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that while most U.S. health insurance plans deny benefits to transgender men and women for medical care necessary to transition to the opposite sex, paying for sex reassignment surgery and hormones is actually cost-effective. [More]
Catasys to provide assistance to Humana members experiencing substance abuse challenges

Catasys to provide assistance to Humana members experiencing substance abuse challenges

Catasys, Inc., a provider of proprietary big-data based analytics and predictive modeling driven health management services for health plans, announced today that it has signed a national agreement with Humana Behavioral Health to combine its substance abuse care management with Humana clinical programs to address the needs of members experiencing substance abuse challenges. [More]
TSRI researchers awarded $1.6 million grant to advance preclinical studies of potential heroin vaccine

TSRI researchers awarded $1.6 million grant to advance preclinical studies of potential heroin vaccine

Now researchers at The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded a prestigious Translational Avant-Garde Award, which supports the development of medications for substance abuse disorders, from the National Institutes of Health National Institute on Drug Abuse. [More]
Loyola's Public Health Program receives accreditation from Council on Education for Public Health

Loyola's Public Health Program receives accreditation from Council on Education for Public Health

Loyola University Chicago's Public Health Program has received a five-year accreditation from the Council on Education for Public Health. [More]
Survivors of gunshot violence in high-crime urban area at risk of early death

Survivors of gunshot violence in high-crime urban area at risk of early death

One in 20 survivors of gunshot violence in an urban area with high crime died within five years, mainly by homicide, according to the results of a study that tracked patients after they had been discharged from the hospital that treated them. [More]
NIH-led collaboration details research strategy to address brain disorders

NIH-led collaboration details research strategy to address brain disorders

Infants are starved of oxygen during difficult births. Children's cognitive function is permanently damaged due to malnutrition or exposure to infections or toxins. Adults suffer from crippling depression or dementia. The breadth and complexity of these and other brain and nervous system disorders make them some of the most difficult conditions to diagnose and treat, especially in the developing world, where there are few resources. [More]
Women & Infants Hospital recognized as 2014 Top Performer on Key Quality Measures

Women & Infants Hospital recognized as 2014 Top Performer on Key Quality Measures

Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, a Care New England hospital, announced today that it has been recognized as a 2014 Top Performer on Key Quality Measures by The Joint Commission, the leading accreditor of health care organizations in the U.S. [More]
Montefiore and Einstein researchers awarded $14 million PCORI grant for hepatitis C research

Montefiore and Einstein researchers awarded $14 million PCORI grant for hepatitis C research

A research team at Montefiore Health System and Albert Einstein College of Medicine led by Alain Litwin, M.D., was awarded $14 million by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to determine how best to treat hepatitis C among people who inject drugs (PWID), a group with a high rate of infection. [More]
Group therapy helps improve healthy behavior in people with cardiovascular risk factors

Group therapy helps improve healthy behavior in people with cardiovascular risk factors

Peer group support, in the form of group therapy, was found to help improve healthy behavior in people with cardiovascular risk factors, according to a study released today by Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital. Mount Sinai Heart is ranked No. 7 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report in its 2015 "Best Hospitals" issue. [More]
Researchers explain why ADHD continues to affect many adults

Researchers explain why ADHD continues to affect many adults

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is growing up. Stephen Hinshaw and Katherine Ellison authors of the newly published book, ADHD: What Everyone Needs to Know, confirm that adults -- and particularly women -- are reporting to clinics in record numbers, becoming the fastest-growing part of the population receiving diagnoses and prescriptions for stimulant medications. [More]
Tobacco cessation program needs to be more widely used for teens with substance abuse issues: Study

Tobacco cessation program needs to be more widely used for teens with substance abuse issues: Study

Substance abuse treatments that target main issues such as serious drug and alcohol addiction are not frequently being used to also wean adolescents from tobacco, a University of Georgia study finds. [More]
Pitt Public Health launches study to promote health among aging gay and bisexual men with HIV

Pitt Public Health launches study to promote health among aging gay and bisexual men with HIV

As the U.S. reaches an important milestone this year in the fight against HIV with more than half the people living with the virus older than age 50, the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health is launching a study to determine ways to promote health among aging gay and bisexual men, who make up about two-thirds of the people aging with HIV. [More]
First sexual experiences involving alcohol increase risk for young women

First sexual experiences involving alcohol increase risk for young women

If a young woman's first sexual experience involves alcohol, she is more likely to be at risk for problems such as sexual assault, and this risk may persist in her future, new research finds. [More]
Nonmedical use of prescription opioids drops but overdose death rates rise in U.S.

Nonmedical use of prescription opioids drops but overdose death rates rise in U.S.

From 2003 to 2013, the percentage of nonmedical use of prescription opioids decreased among adults in the U.S., while the prevalence of prescription opioid use disorders, frequency of use, and related deaths increased, according to a study in the October 13 issue of JAMA. [More]
Research findings open up new avenues for treatment of people with anorexia nervosa

Research findings open up new avenues for treatment of people with anorexia nervosa

When people with anorexia nervosa decide what to eat, they engage a part of the brain associated with habitual behavior. This finding by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute, and New York University was published today in Nature Neuroscience. [More]
Pitt research team awarded NIH grant to study impact of substance abuse on adolescent brain development

Pitt research team awarded NIH grant to study impact of substance abuse on adolescent brain development

A research team in the department of psychiatry, at the University of Pittsburgh, has been awarded a $5 Million National Institutes of Health grant to participate in a multi-site study focusing on the impact of adolescent marijuana, alcohol and other drug use on the developing brain. [More]
Social dynamics, family history critical to identifying patients most likely to abuse pain medicines

Social dynamics, family history critical to identifying patients most likely to abuse pain medicines

Patients undergoing rehabilitation for physical injuries and their physicians can better understand who is most at risk of abusing opioids by reviewing their family history, lifestyle and environment for critical cues about susceptibility to addiction, according to physical medicine and rehabilitation experts. [More]
Depression and suicide risk screening can help healthcare providers prevent suicides in teens

Depression and suicide risk screening can help healthcare providers prevent suicides in teens

A new paper from nursing researchers with The University of Texas at Arlington and Texas Woman's University finds that depression and suicide risk screening can assist healthcare providers in preventing suicides in teens. [More]

Integrating addiction treatment into primary care lowers substance dependence in patients with HIV

A program developed at Boston Medical Center, which integrates addiction treatment into primary care for patients with or at risk for HIV, has been shown to lower patients' substance dependence and encourage their engagement in treatment. [More]
Johns Hopkins study highlights need for effective postpartum interventions for women with pregnancy complications

Johns Hopkins study highlights need for effective postpartum interventions for women with pregnancy complications

Citing an analysis of more than 26,000 Maryland Medicaid claims, Johns Hopkins researchers report evidence that poor women with recent complications during their pregnancies are using the emergency room at higher rates after delivery and may not be getting the postpartum care and follow-up they need to prevent further health problems. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement