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Twitter 'big data' could provide important details about health, social needs of transgender people

Twitter 'big data' could provide important details about health, social needs of transgender people

Transgender and gender nonconforming people are at high risk for diseases such as AIDS and are vulnerable to depression and other mental health issues, but may be reluctant to disclose their identities to researchers due to stigma. As a result, very little is known about their health and social needs. [More]
HIV infections continue to rise among YMSM despite prevention efforts

HIV infections continue to rise among YMSM despite prevention efforts

HIV infections continue to rise in a new generation of young, gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (YMSM) despite three decades of HIV prevention as well as recent availability of biomedical technologies to prevent infection. [More]
Buckeye Health Plan receives Dorland Health Case in Point Award

Buckeye Health Plan receives Dorland Health Case in Point Award

Buckeye Health Plan announced today that it's been awarded a Dorland Health Case in Point Award for its Pregnancy Specialty Care Management Program. The Case in Point Platinum Awards recognizes successful case management programs that focus on the continuum of care coordination. [More]
Hallucinations, delusions associated with psychiatric disorders seldom trigger violent crimes

Hallucinations, delusions associated with psychiatric disorders seldom trigger violent crimes

Mass shootings at the hands of unhinged loners - such as those in Aurora, Colorado; Santa Barbara, California, and Newtown, Connecticut - perpetuate a commonly held belief that mental illness triggers violent crimes. [More]
Secondhand exposure to cannabis smoke under extreme conditions impairs cognitive performance

Secondhand exposure to cannabis smoke under extreme conditions impairs cognitive performance

Secondhand exposure to cannabis smoke under "extreme conditions," such as an unventilated room or enclosed vehicle, can cause nonsmokers to feel the effects of the drug, have minor problems with memory and coordination, and in some cases test positive for the drug in a urinalysis. [More]
Study finds link between PTSD and accelerated aging

Study finds link between PTSD and accelerated aging

In recent years, public health concerns about post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have risen significantly, driven in part by affected military veterans returning from conflicts in the Middle East and elsewhere. PTSD is associated with number of psychological maladies, among them chronic depression, anger, insomnia, eating disorders and substance abuse. [More]
Holistic approach to preventing sexual assault among college students

Holistic approach to preventing sexual assault among college students

One in five college students experiences sexual assault during their college career, and a New York-based health and wellness company is working to help change that. National Health Promotion Associates has been awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop and evaluate an effective approach to preventing sexual violence. [More]
New CU-Boulder study finds that hazardous drinking behaviors increase mortality rates

New CU-Boulder study finds that hazardous drinking behaviors increase mortality rates

A new University of Colorado Boulder study involving some 40,000 people indicates that social and psychological problems caused by drinking generally trump physically hazardous drinking behaviors when it comes to overall mortality rates. [More]
Only few sexually assaulted servicewomen seek post-assault health care, study finds

Only few sexually assaulted servicewomen seek post-assault health care, study finds

Despite growing public awareness of sexual assault of women during their military service and increased efforts by the Department of Defense to deter sexual crimes and encourage reporting and help-seeking, a Veterans Affairs study suggests most female service members who experience sexual assault are still unlikely to seek post-assault health care, at least in the short term. [More]

New study reveals that psychiatric disorders don't predict future violent behavior

Most psychiatric disorders - including depression -- do not predict future violent behavior, according to new Northwestern Medicine longitudinal study of delinquent youth. The only exception is substance abuse and dependence. [More]
Children exposed to adverse childhood experience more likely to develop asthma

Children exposed to adverse childhood experience more likely to develop asthma

Robyn Wing, M.D., an emergency medicine physician at Hasbro Children's Hospital, recently led a study that found children who were exposed to an adverse childhood experience (ACE) were 28 percent more likely to develop asthma. [More]
Elements Behavioral Health launches new app to help people keep their recovery on track

Elements Behavioral Health launches new app to help people keep their recovery on track

Elements Behavioral Health introduces the Cassava app, a free recovery app that features a variety of tools to help people keep their recovery on track. [More]
UC Irvine professor explores the link between autism and ADHD

UC Irvine professor explores the link between autism and ADHD

For the better part of the last decade, a growing body of research has been revealing more and more similarities between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism. [More]
Tonix expert examines ways to improve sleep problems and provide relief to people with PTSD

Tonix expert examines ways to improve sleep problems and provide relief to people with PTSD

Sleep problems—a common condition among military personnel—may increase the risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other mental health conditions. So concludes a team of researchers at the RAND Corporation, whose study—published on RAND's website—was recently described in national media outlets. [More]
Children who experience multiple traumatic events face risk of being hypertensive adults

Children who experience multiple traumatic events face risk of being hypertensive adults

Children who experience multiple traumatic events, from emotional and sexual abuse to neglect, have higher blood pressures as young adults than their peers, researchers report. [More]
Most people visit health care settings before attempting suicide, study finds

Most people visit health care settings before attempting suicide, study finds

Most people who attempt suicide make some type of healthcare visit in the weeks or months before the attempt, reports a study in the May issue of Medical Care, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Computer model provides policy prescription to optimize early HIV treatment

Computer model provides policy prescription to optimize early HIV treatment

When a whole country's public health is at stake, making the wrong policy choices can cost lives and money. That's why researchers have worked to develop computer simulations of epidemics that can model individual behaviors and interactions to predict the spread of disease and the efficacy of interventions. [More]
Study: 9% of U.S. adults have impulsive, angry behavior and have access to guns

Study: 9% of U.S. adults have impulsive, angry behavior and have access to guns

An estimated 9 percent of adults in the U.S. have a history of impulsive, angry behavior and have access to guns, according to a study published this month in Behavioral Sciences and the Law. The study also found that an estimated 1.5 percent of adults report impulsive anger and carry firearms outside their homes. [More]
Moffitt study highlights that LGBTQI populations face health care disparities

Moffitt study highlights that LGBTQI populations face health care disparities

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/transsexual, queer/questioning and intersex (LGBTQI) population has been largely understudied by the medical community. Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center found that the LGBTQI community experience health disparities due to reduced access to health care and health insurance, coupled with being at an elevated risk for multiple types of cancer when compared to non-LGBTQI populations. [More]
New work flow system may improve patient appointments, reduce time-consuming work

New work flow system may improve patient appointments, reduce time-consuming work

Both patients and physicians may benefit from a "work flow" system developed at military medical facilities and tested at a Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center clinic, according to results of an efficiency study. [More]
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