Tissue Engineering News and Research RSS Feed - Tissue Engineering News and Research

Dramatic advances in the fields of biochemistry, cell and molecular biology, genetics, biomedical engineering and materials science have given rise to the remarkable new cross-disciplinary field of tissue engineering. Tissue engineering uses synthetic or naturally derived, engineered biomaterials to replace damaged or defective tissues, such as bone, skin, and even organs.
Researchers use silk fibers to grow stem cells into salivary gland cells

Researchers use silk fibers to grow stem cells into salivary gland cells

The silkworm, which produces the essential ingredient for fine silk fabric, also plays a critical role in a new process designed to provide relief for millions of individuals with dry mouth, a devastating oral and systemic health issue. [More]
Leading scientists to meet in Southampton to discuss new technologies to create living tissues

Leading scientists to meet in Southampton to discuss new technologies to create living tissues

Leading scientists from the UK and around the world will meet at the University of Southampton next week (20 and 21 July) to discuss new technologies to create new, living tissues in the lab and to help our bodies regenerate themselves. [More]
New study reveals highly promising approach to coating tissue engineered constructs

New study reveals highly promising approach to coating tissue engineered constructs

A new study showing the ability to apply a thin coating of viable respiratory epithelial cells to tissue engineered constructs using a commercially available spray device is especially promising for therapeutic approaches in development to repair or replace challenging structures such as trachea or bronchi. [More]
Ultrasound treatment speeds up skin healing among diabetics and the elderly

Ultrasound treatment speeds up skin healing among diabetics and the elderly

Healing times for skin ulcers and bedsores can be reduced by a third with the use of low-intensity ultrasound, scientists from the University of Sheffield and University of Bristol have found. [More]
R-Japan receives license for cell processing facility

R-Japan receives license for cell processing facility

R-Japan Co.,Ltd. obtained the license of cell processing facility under the Act on the Safety of Regenerative Medicine from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare Kinki Bureau of Health and Welfare on June 29, 2015. [More]
Case report published on first use of 3D printed scaffold for periodontal tissue engineering

Case report published on first use of 3D printed scaffold for periodontal tissue engineering

Today, the International and American Associations for Dental Research published a case report on the first application of a 3D printed scaffold for periodontal tissue engineering in a human patient, along with a review of 3D printing for oral and craniofacial tissue engineering. [More]
Ontario announces $25 million investment to support new treatments for people with chronic diseases

Ontario announces $25 million investment to support new treatments for people with chronic diseases

Ontario is investing $25 million over five years to support new treatments and therapies for people living with chronic diseases, such as cancer, multiple sclerosis and diabetes. [More]
New tissue 'scaffold' technology could one day help produce large organs

New tissue 'scaffold' technology could one day help produce large organs

Scientists have developed a new tissue 'scaffold' technology that could one day enable the engineering of large organs. Research led by the Universities of Bristol and Liverpool has shown that it is possible to combine cells with a special scaffold to produce living tissue in the laboratory. It is hoped this can then be implanted into patients as a way of replacing diseased parts of the body. [More]
‘VascuBone Toolbox’ provides components required for customised vascularised bone implant

‘VascuBone Toolbox’ provides components required for customised vascularised bone implant

The EU project VascuBone was coordinated by the Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB and has reached the end of a 5-year funding period. [More]
Simple blood test can predict evidence of TBI on radiographic imaging, injury severity

Simple blood test can predict evidence of TBI on radiographic imaging, injury severity

New study results show that a simple blood test to measure brain-specific proteins released after a person suffers a traumatic brain injury (TBI) can reliably predict both evidence of TBI on radiographic imaging and injury severity. [More]
MIT researchers find way to develop implantable devices that can avoid scar-tissue buildup

MIT researchers find way to develop implantable devices that can avoid scar-tissue buildup

Biomedical devices that can be implanted in the body for drug delivery, tissue engineering, or sensing can help improve treatment for many diseases. However, such devices are often susceptible to attack by the immune system, which can render them useless. [More]
Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Individuals with this altered gene have hereditary hypertension (high blood pressure) and at the same time a skeletal malformation called brachydactyly type E, which is characterized by unusually short fingers and toes. The effect on blood pressure is so serious that -- if left untreated -- it most often leads to death before age fifty. [More]
Researchers create tiny, complex scaffolds that can replace severely damaged eardrums

Researchers create tiny, complex scaffolds that can replace severely damaged eardrums

An international team of researchers has created tiny, complex scaffolds that mimic the intricate network of collagen fibres that form the human eardrum. [More]
Discovery offers simpler, more cost-effective way to grow stem cells

Discovery offers simpler, more cost-effective way to grow stem cells

Stem cells naturally cling to feeder cells as they grow in petri dishes. Scientists have thought for years that this attachment occurs because feeder cells serve as a support system, providing stems cells with essential nutrients. [More]
WPI researchers receive NIH grant to develop new class of tissue-engineered heart valves

WPI researchers receive NIH grant to develop new class of tissue-engineered heart valves

With a $450,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health, researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute will analyze how mechanical forces and cellular growth factors affect the growth and development of human heart valves to advance the long-term goal of using tissue engineering to develop replacement valves that are more natural and longer-lasting than current replacement valves. [More]
Spanish scientists find apatite bioceramics from shark teeth for implants

Spanish scientists find apatite bioceramics from shark teeth for implants

Researchers from the BIOCAPS Area of 'Biomaterials, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine' have managed to obtain bioceramics from shark teeth, which have already tested applications in the regeneration of bone tissue, particularly in the fields of traumatology and odontology. [More]

Springer releases new international journal in partnership with Regenerative Engineering Society

Springer has launched Regenerative Engineering and Translational Medicine in partnership with the newly formed Regenerative Engineering Society. The new international journal will cover the convergence of multiple fields, including tissue generation, advanced materials science, stem cell research, the physical sciences and developmental biology, and is actively seeking submissions. [More]
Researchers cultivate fully functional cardiac tissues from cobweb protein

Researchers cultivate fully functional cardiac tissues from cobweb protein

Genetically engineered fibers of the protein spidroin, which is the construction material for spider webs, has proven to be a perfect substrate for cultivating heart tissue cells, MIPT researchers found. They discuss their findings in an article that has recently come out in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
Fujifilm enters into definitive agreement to acquire Cellular Dynamics International

Fujifilm enters into definitive agreement to acquire Cellular Dynamics International

FUJIFILM Holdings Corporation (President: Shigehiro Nakajima) and Cellular Dynamics International, Inc. (CEO: Robert J. Palay), a leading developer and manufacturer of fully functioning human cells in industrial quantities to precise specifications, today announced that the two companies have entered into a definitive agreement whereby Fujifilm will acquire CDI via an all-cash tender offer to be followed by a second step merger. [More]
Researchers team up to study stomach flu

Researchers team up to study stomach flu

Rice University bioengineers are teaming with colleagues from Baylor College of Medicine and MD Anderson Cancer Center to apply the latest techniques in tissue engineering toward the study of one of the most common and deadly human illnesses -- the stomach flu. [More]
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