Tissue Engineering News and Research RSS Feed - Tissue Engineering News and Research

Dramatic advances in the fields of biochemistry, cell and molecular biology, genetics, biomedical engineering and materials science have given rise to the remarkable new cross-disciplinary field of tissue engineering. Tissue engineering uses synthetic or naturally derived, engineered biomaterials to replace damaged or defective tissues, such as bone, skin, and even organs.
New textbook on tissue engineering and artificial organ development

New textbook on tissue engineering and artificial organ development

Ravi Birla, associate professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Houston, has written a new textbook on tissue engineering and artificial organ development. [More]
Antioxidant biomaterial helps vascular grafts heal

Antioxidant biomaterial helps vascular grafts heal

When a foreign material like a medical device or surgical implant is put inside the human body, the body always responds. According to Northwestern University's Guillermo Ameer, most of the time, that response can be negative and affect the device's function. [More]
Splice-switching oligonucleotide drugs alter editing of gene transcript

Splice-switching oligonucleotide drugs alter editing of gene transcript

In splice-switching, an innovative therapeutic approach, targeted oligonucleotide drugs alter the editing of a gene transcript to produce the desired form of a protein. [More]
Citalopram can increase efficacy of BMSCs differentiating into neuronal-like cells

Citalopram can increase efficacy of BMSCs differentiating into neuronal-like cells

There is evidence that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants can promote neuronal cell proliferation and enhance neuroplasticity both in vitro and in vivo. [More]
Researchers make giant leap towards goal of 'bio-printing' transplantable tissues, organs

Researchers make giant leap towards goal of 'bio-printing' transplantable tissues, organs

Researchers have made a giant leap towards the goal of 'bio-printing' transplantable tissues and organs for people affected by major diseases and trauma injuries, a new study reports. [More]
NIH receives award to design biomaterial that can regenerate damaged skeletal muscle

NIH receives award to design biomaterial that can regenerate damaged skeletal muscle

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a three-year, $437,248 grant to a University of Arkansas biomedical engineering researcher to design and test a biomaterial that can regenerate damaged skeletal muscle. [More]
Researchers develop tissue engineered bone grafts for healing large bone defects

Researchers develop tissue engineered bone grafts for healing large bone defects

Bone is one of the most frequently transplanted tissues. And the demand is rising. Transplants treat large defects like those caused by trauma, complicated fractures, tumour resection or osteoporosis. [More]

Scientists create bone material from human stem cells to improve patient's welfare

Bone defects, like a damaged femoral head, are usually replaced by metal implants. This has many disadvantages, but now scientists in Germany have created bone material from human stem cells that could bring significant improvement to the patient's welfare. [More]
Tissue-engineered medical devices: an interview with Anna Wynn, Business Development Manager, Instron

Tissue-engineered medical devices: an interview with Anna Wynn, Business Development Manager, Instron

Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (TERM) are dedicated to creating new tissue-engineered medical devices that replace and/or enhance tissue function that has been impaired by disease, injury, or age. [More]
Cornell researchers take new approach to screening aggressive cancer cells

Cornell researchers take new approach to screening aggressive cancer cells

Not all cancer cells are created equal - some stay put in the primary tumor, while others move and invade elsewhere. A major goal for cancer research is predicting which cells will metastasize, and why. [More]
Ultrasound beam 'tweezers' can grip and manipulate tiny clusters of cells

Ultrasound beam 'tweezers' can grip and manipulate tiny clusters of cells

Pioneering 'tweezers' that use ultrasound beams to grip and manipulate tiny clusters of cells under electronic, push-button control could lead to life-changing medical advances, such as better cartilage implants that reduce the need for knee replacement operations. [More]
Morphogenesis announces publication of new book, Cancer Vaccines: Methods and Protocols

Morphogenesis announces publication of new book, Cancer Vaccines: Methods and Protocols

Drs. Michael J.P. Lawman and Patricia D. Lawman, founders of the Tampa-based biotech firm Morphogenesis Inc., announce the publication of "Cancer Vaccines: Methods and Protocols," the most definitive work to date in the promising field of cancer vaccines. [More]
Researchers make headway in fabricating blood vessels using 3D bioprinting technique

Researchers make headway in fabricating blood vessels using 3D bioprinting technique

The tangled highway of blood vessels that twists and turns inside our bodies, delivering essential nutrients and disposing of hazardous waste to keep our organs working properly has been a conundrum for scientists trying to make artificial vessels from scratch. [More]
BioTime receives ISO 13485:2003 certification for development of BioTime HyStem hydrogels

BioTime receives ISO 13485:2003 certification for development of BioTime HyStem hydrogels

BioTime, Inc. today announced that it has received ISO 13485:2003 certification from BSI (British Standards Institution) for design, development, manufacture, and distribution of BioTime HyStem® hydrogels for cell delivery applications. [More]
Study: Sufficient copies of SMN1 gene extend survival in animals with spinal muscular atrophy

Study: Sufficient copies of SMN1 gene extend survival in animals with spinal muscular atrophy

To make up for insufficient amounts of SMN protein, the cause of the inherited neuromuscular disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), researchers have successfully delivered a replacement SMN1 gene directly to the spinal cords of animal models of SMA. [More]
New breakthrough offers easier way of detecting pathogenic bacteria outside clinical setting

New breakthrough offers easier way of detecting pathogenic bacteria outside clinical setting

The breakthrough, published in the journal Nature Materials, could offer an easier way of detecting pathogenic bacteria outside of a clinical setting and could be particularly important for the developing world, where access to more sophisticated laboratory techniques is often limited. [More]
Study: Anti-inflammatory compound interleukin-10 plays crucial role in regenerative, scarless healing

Study: Anti-inflammatory compound interleukin-10 plays crucial role in regenerative, scarless healing

The powerful anti-inflammatory compound interleukin-10 (IL-10) plays a crucial role in regenerative, scarless healing of fetal skin. [More]
New hydrogel instantly turns from liquid to semisolid at close to body temperature

New hydrogel instantly turns from liquid to semisolid at close to body temperature

Rice University bioengineers have created a hydrogel that instantly turns from liquid to semisolid at close to body temperature - and then degrades at precisely the right pace. [More]
New model mimics structure of cornea to enable transplant of healthy corneal stem cells

New model mimics structure of cornea to enable transplant of healthy corneal stem cells

Scientists have developed a model that mimics the complex structure of the cornea to enable the transplant of healthy corneal stem cells. [More]
Research grants could improve patients' recovery from athletic and nonathletic injuries

Research grants could improve patients' recovery from athletic and nonathletic injuries

Two orthopedic organizations have presented Beaumont Health System with prestigious, competitive research grants that could improve patients' recovery from both athletic and nonathletic injuries. [More]