Tissue Engineering News and Research RSS Feed - Tissue Engineering News and Research

Dramatic advances in the fields of biochemistry, cell and molecular biology, genetics, biomedical engineering and materials science have given rise to the remarkable new cross-disciplinary field of tissue engineering. Tissue engineering uses synthetic or naturally derived, engineered biomaterials to replace damaged or defective tissues, such as bone, skin, and even organs.
Researchers discover new marker derived from human umbilical cord blood

Researchers discover new marker derived from human umbilical cord blood

The development of stem cell therapies to cure a variety of diseases depends on the ability to characterize stem cell populations based on cell surface markers. [More]
New technique of single-cell genomic analysis to reverse tissue engineering

New technique of single-cell genomic analysis to reverse tissue engineering

Consider the marvel of the embryo. It begins as a glob of identical cells that change shape and function as they multiply to become the cells of our lungs, muscles, nerves and all the other specialized tissues of the body. [More]

Tissue reconstruction using autologous engineered implants has been successfully achieved in humans

Reconstruction of damaged/absent tissue using engineered autologous (from the patients’ own cells) implants has been successfully achieved in humans for the first time. [More]

Scientists report first human recipients of laboratory-grown vaginal organs

Scientists reported today the first human recipients of laboratory-grown vaginal organs. A research team led by Anthony Atala, M.D., director of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center's Institute for Regenerative Medicine, describes in the Lancet long-term success in four teenage girls who received vaginal organs that were engineered with their own cells. [More]

New procedure helps curtail complication rate associated with bone grafting

UT Arlington and Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital are investigating whether bone grown from the body's own stem cells can replace traditional types of bone grafting. [More]

Researchers to develop cell-based approaches to minimize scarring in adult wounds

In early fetal development, skin wounds undergo regeneration and healing without scar formation. This mechanism of wound healing later disappears, but by studying the fetal stem cells capable of this scarless wound healing, researchers may be able to apply these mechanisms to develop cell-based approaches able to minimize scarring in adult wounds, as described in a Critical Review article published in Advances in Wound Care, a monthly publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers and an Official Journal of the Wound Healing Society. [More]

Scientists report successful nose reconstruction surgery using cartilage grown in laboratory

Scientists at the University of Basel report first ever successful nose reconstruction surgery using cartilage grown in the laboratory. Cartilage cells were extracted from the patient's nasal septum, multiplied and expanded onto a collagen membrane. [More]
Scientists develop new substance that could simplify manufacture of cell therapy

Scientists develop new substance that could simplify manufacture of cell therapy

Scientists at The University of Nottingham have developed a new substance which could simplify the manufacture of cell therapy in the pioneering world of regenerative medicine. [More]

Massachusetts Life Sciences Center provides $1.65M in capital grant to North Shore InnoVentures

North Shore InnoVentures, one of New England's leading technology incubators and business accelerators, announced today that it has received a capital grant of $1.65 million from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center. [More]
'Mini heart' invented to aid blood flow through venous segments

'Mini heart' invented to aid blood flow through venous segments

George Washington University researcher Narine Sarvazyan, Ph.D., has invented a new organ to help return blood flow from veins lacking functional valves. A rhythmically contracting cuff made of cardiac muscle cells surrounds the vein acting as a 'mini heart' to aid blood flow through venous segments. The cuff can be made of a patient's own adult stem cells, eliminating the chance of implant rejection. [More]
Endogenous tissue growth: an interview with Laurent Grandidier, CEO, Xeltis

Endogenous tissue growth: an interview with Laurent Grandidier, CEO, Xeltis

ETG or Endogenous Tissue Growth is a new therapeutic category in which surgeons use implants designed to allow the body to repair itself by spontaneously growing natural, healthy tissue from the inside without the use of stem cells or animal-derived products. [More]

Marina Cavazzana, Adrian J. Thrasher honored with Pioneer Award for gene therapy

Marina Cavazzana, MD, PhD, Paris Descartes University, France and Adrian J. Thrasher, MD, PhD, University College London Institute of Child Health, UK, have been honored with the Pioneer Award for basic and clinical gene therapy for immunodeficiency disorders. [More]

Scientists develop unique cells to repair patient's defective and diseased bladder

For the first time, scientists have succeeded in coaxing laboratory cultures of human stem cells to develop into the specialized, unique cells needed to repair a patient's defective or diseased bladder. [More]

Research could lead to 'smart bandages' to help heal wounds

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, found that an electrical current can be used to orchestrate the flow of a group of cells, an achievement that could establish the basis for more controlled forms of tissue engineering and for potential applications such as "smart bandages" that use electrical stimulation to help heal wounds. [More]

Biodegradable scaffolds promote tissue growth during the healing process

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering and McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine (MIRM) are proposing that if 3-D printers, or additive manufacturing, can produce custom replacement parts for machines, why couldn't the same process create biodegradable tissue repair structures for the human body? [More]
New hydrogel actuator has potential to interact safely with living tissues

New hydrogel actuator has potential to interact safely with living tissues

Protein from a small, tasty mollusk inspired Michigan Technological University's Bruce P. Lee to invent a new type of hydrogel actuator. [More]
New tool may hold key to personalized medicine applications in the future

New tool may hold key to personalized medicine applications in the future

ather than your average bowl of Lucky Charms, these are three-dimensional cell cultures generated by an exciting new digital microfluidics platform, the results of which have been published in Nature Communications this week by researchers at the University of Toronto. [More]

European Commission invests nearly $475 million in gene transfer and gene therapy projects

Over the past three funding stages, the European Commission has invested nearly $475 million in 100 projects in the gene transfer and gene therapy field. [More]

Rapid advances and potential in 3D printing and additive manufacturing technologies

​A new era of manufacturing is upon us. Recent developments in 3D printing and additive manufacturing technologies are set to usher in the next generation of industrial competitiveness. [More]
Researcher receives Pioneer Award for engineering herpes simplex virus gene delivery systems

Researcher receives Pioneer Award for engineering herpes simplex virus gene delivery systems

​Joseph C. Glorioso, III, PhD (University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA) devoted much of his research career to developing herpes viruses as efficient vectors for delivering therapeutic genes into cells. [More]