Tissue Engineering News and Research RSS Feed - Tissue Engineering News and Research

Dramatic advances in the fields of biochemistry, cell and molecular biology, genetics, biomedical engineering and materials science have given rise to the remarkable new cross-disciplinary field of tissue engineering. Tissue engineering uses synthetic or naturally derived, engineered biomaterials to replace damaged or defective tissues, such as bone, skin, and even organs.
Scientists receive NSF funding to develop, commercialize artificial cell manufacturing for education

Scientists receive NSF funding to develop, commercialize artificial cell manufacturing for education

National Science Foundation funding to develop and commercialize artificially-manufactured cells and cell platforms for educational, research and industry application has been awarded to a team of scientists led by Dr. Mark DeCoster, the James E. Wyche III Professor in Biomedical Engineering at Louisiana Tech University. [More]
New study compares usefulness of two biomarkers released into the blood after TBI

New study compares usefulness of two biomarkers released into the blood after TBI

In cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI), predicting the likelihood of a cranial lesion and determining the need for head computed tomography (CT) can be aided by measuring markers of bone injury in the blood. [More]
CUMC researchers devise way to replace torn knee meniscus

CUMC researchers devise way to replace torn knee meniscus

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have devised a way to replace the knee's protective lining, called the meniscus, using a personalized 3D-printed implant, or scaffold, infused with human growth factors that prompt the body to regenerate the lining on its own. [More]

Researchers figure out how to reverse characteristics of polyurea materials

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have figured out how to reverse the characteristics of a key bonding material--polyurea--providing an inexpensive alternative for a broad number of applications, such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, and packaging. [More]
Organovo, Yale collaborate to develop bioprinted tissues for surgical transplantation research

Organovo, Yale collaborate to develop bioprinted tissues for surgical transplantation research

Organovo Holdings, Inc., a three-dimensional biology company focused on delivering breakthrough 3D bioprinting technology, and Yale School of Medicine, Department of Surgery have formed a collaboration to develop bioprinted tissues for surgical transplantation research, made possible by a generous gift from the Methuselah Foundation. [More]
Instron collaborates with BRTI Life Sciences on unique biomimetic hydrogel for the tissue engineering market

Instron collaborates with BRTI Life Sciences on unique biomimetic hydrogel for the tissue engineering market

Instron, a leading provider of testing equipment designed to evaluate mechanical properties of materials and components, is collaborating with Dr. John Brekke at BRTI Life Sciences in Duluth, Minnesota. [More]
Authors review current progress in developing transgenic pig models for human diseases

Authors review current progress in developing transgenic pig models for human diseases

Genetically engineered pigs, minipigs, and microminipigs are valuable tools for biomedical research, as their lifespan, anatomy, physiology, genetic make-up, and disease mechanisms are more similar to humans than the rodent models typically used in drug discovery research. [More]

Ultra-low temperature rack for tissue tube storage launched by Micronic

Drawing upon over 30 year’s experience of supplying traceable sample storage solutions to research centres and laboratory facilities around the world, Micronic has launched a new ultra-low temperature rack for tissue tube storage. [More]
Researchers make significant breakthrough for sufferers of bone disease

Researchers make significant breakthrough for sufferers of bone disease

Researchers in bone tissue regeneration believe they have made a significant breakthrough for sufferers of bone trauma, disease or defects such as osteoporosis. [More]
NJIT, Drexel and Rowan join forces to tackle water problems in the region

NJIT, Drexel and Rowan join forces to tackle water problems in the region

Water experts at NJIT, Drexel University and Rowan University are joining forces to tackle the increasingly complex challenges affecting water resources in the region, from shrinking supplies, to industrial contamination, to climate change. [More]
3D brain-like tissue: an interview with Professor David Kaplan, Tufts University

3D brain-like tissue: an interview with Professor David Kaplan, Tufts University

In 2D, neurons tend to form limited connectivity reflective of the 3D complexity in the brain and have more limited cultivation time before reduction in functions. [More]
Researchers develop new technique to create cellular scaffolding for tissue engineering

Researchers develop new technique to create cellular scaffolding for tissue engineering

Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a way to use sound to create cellular scaffolding for tissue engineering, a unique approach that could help overcome one of regenerative medicine's significant obstacles. [More]
Lab-grown tissues may provide new treatments for injuries, damage to the joints

Lab-grown tissues may provide new treatments for injuries, damage to the joints

Lab-grown tissues could one day provide new treatments for injuries and damage to the joints, including articular cartilage, tendons and ligaments. [More]
New material advances tissue engineering, drug delivery

New material advances tissue engineering, drug delivery

Researchers at the New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering have broken new ground in the development of proteins that form specialized fibers used in medicine and nanotechnology. For as long as scientists have been able to create new proteins that are capable of self-assembling into fibers, their work has taken place on the nanoscale. For the first time, this achievement has been realized on the microscale—a leap of magnitude in size that presents significant new opportunities for using engineered protein fibers. [More]
Esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from human and mouse cells, say researchers

Esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from human and mouse cells, say researchers

In a first step toward future human therapies, researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have shown that esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from both human and mouse cells. The study has been published online in the journal Tissue Engineering, Part A. [More]

Research: Skin cells from pediatric patients can be used in tissue-engineered pulmonary valves

Researchers have found a way to take a pediatric patient's skin cells, reprogram the skin cells to function as heart valvular cells, and then use the cells as part of a tissue-engineered pulmonary valve. [More]

Researchers find way to take pediatric patient's skin cells

Researchers have found a way to take a pediatric patient's skin cells, reprogram the skin cells to function as heart valvular cells, and then use the cells as part of a tissue-engineered pulmonary valve. A proof of concept study in the September 2014 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery provides more detail on this scientific development. [More]
Nasal septum cells can repair human articular cartilage defects

Nasal septum cells can repair human articular cartilage defects

Human articular cartilage defects can be treated with nasal septum cells. Researchers at the University and the University Hospital of Basel report that cells taken from the nasal septum are able to adapt to the environment of the knee joint and can thus repair articular cartilage defects. [More]
New method could help doctors better understand how drug abuse affects the brain

New method could help doctors better understand how drug abuse affects the brain

A new method for measuring and imaging how quickly blood flows in the brain could help doctors and researchers better understand how drug abuse affects the brain, which may aid in improving brain-cancer surgery and tissue engineering, and lead to better treatment options for recovering drug addicts. [More]
Researchers help to gain greater insight into biological clock that sets pace for daily life

Researchers help to gain greater insight into biological clock that sets pace for daily life

Casey Diekman, assistant professor of mathematical sciences at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), is helping to gain greater insight into the biological clock that sets the pace for daily life. [More]