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Dramatic advances in the fields of biochemistry, cell and molecular biology, genetics, biomedical engineering and materials science have given rise to the remarkable new cross-disciplinary field of tissue engineering. Tissue engineering uses synthetic or naturally derived, engineered biomaterials to replace damaged or defective tissues, such as bone, skin, and even organs.
Simple blood test can predict evidence of TBI on radiographic imaging, injury severity

Simple blood test can predict evidence of TBI on radiographic imaging, injury severity

New study results show that a simple blood test to measure brain-specific proteins released after a person suffers a traumatic brain injury (TBI) can reliably predict both evidence of TBI on radiographic imaging and injury severity. [More]
MIT researchers find way to develop implantable devices that can avoid scar-tissue buildup

MIT researchers find way to develop implantable devices that can avoid scar-tissue buildup

Biomedical devices that can be implanted in the body for drug delivery, tissue engineering, or sensing can help improve treatment for many diseases. However, such devices are often susceptible to attack by the immune system, which can render them useless. [More]
Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Individuals with this altered gene have hereditary hypertension (high blood pressure) and at the same time a skeletal malformation called brachydactyly type E, which is characterized by unusually short fingers and toes. The effect on blood pressure is so serious that -- if left untreated -- it most often leads to death before age fifty. [More]
Researchers create tiny, complex scaffolds that can replace severely damaged eardrums

Researchers create tiny, complex scaffolds that can replace severely damaged eardrums

An international team of researchers has created tiny, complex scaffolds that mimic the intricate network of collagen fibres that form the human eardrum. [More]
Discovery offers simpler, more cost-effective way to grow stem cells

Discovery offers simpler, more cost-effective way to grow stem cells

Stem cells naturally cling to feeder cells as they grow in petri dishes. Scientists have thought for years that this attachment occurs because feeder cells serve as a support system, providing stems cells with essential nutrients. [More]
WPI researchers receive NIH grant to develop new class of tissue-engineered heart valves

WPI researchers receive NIH grant to develop new class of tissue-engineered heart valves

With a $450,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health, researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute will analyze how mechanical forces and cellular growth factors affect the growth and development of human heart valves to advance the long-term goal of using tissue engineering to develop replacement valves that are more natural and longer-lasting than current replacement valves. [More]
Spanish scientists find apatite bioceramics from shark teeth for implants

Spanish scientists find apatite bioceramics from shark teeth for implants

Researchers from the BIOCAPS Area of 'Biomaterials, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine' have managed to obtain bioceramics from shark teeth, which have already tested applications in the regeneration of bone tissue, particularly in the fields of traumatology and odontology. [More]
Springer releases new international journal in partnership with Regenerative Engineering Society

Springer releases new international journal in partnership with Regenerative Engineering Society

Springer has launched Regenerative Engineering and Translational Medicine in partnership with the newly formed Regenerative Engineering Society. The new international journal will cover the convergence of multiple fields, including tissue generation, advanced materials science, stem cell research, the physical sciences and developmental biology, and is actively seeking submissions. [More]
Researchers cultivate fully functional cardiac tissues from cobweb protein

Researchers cultivate fully functional cardiac tissues from cobweb protein

Genetically engineered fibers of the protein spidroin, which is the construction material for spider webs, has proven to be a perfect substrate for cultivating heart tissue cells, MIPT researchers found. They discuss their findings in an article that has recently come out in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
Fujifilm enters into definitive agreement to acquire Cellular Dynamics International

Fujifilm enters into definitive agreement to acquire Cellular Dynamics International

FUJIFILM Holdings Corporation (President: Shigehiro Nakajima) and Cellular Dynamics International, Inc. (CEO: Robert J. Palay), a leading developer and manufacturer of fully functioning human cells in industrial quantities to precise specifications, today announced that the two companies have entered into a definitive agreement whereby Fujifilm will acquire CDI via an all-cash tender offer to be followed by a second step merger. [More]
Researchers team up to study stomach flu

Researchers team up to study stomach flu

Rice University bioengineers are teaming with colleagues from Baylor College of Medicine and MD Anderson Cancer Center to apply the latest techniques in tissue engineering toward the study of one of the most common and deadly human illnesses -- the stomach flu. [More]
The Brain Prize awarded to four scientists for development of two-photon microscopy

The Brain Prize awarded to four scientists for development of two-photon microscopy

The world's most valuable (€1m) neuroscience prize, The Brain Prize has been awarded, to four scientists, Winfried Denk and Arthur Konnerth (Germany), and Karel Svoboda and David Tank (USA), for the invention and development of two-photon microscopy, a transformative tool in brain research. [More]

Researchers generate mature, functional skeletal muscles using new approach

A team of researchers from Italy, Israel and the United Kingdom has succeeded in generating mature, functional skeletal muscles in mice using a new approach for tissue engineering. The scientists grew a leg muscle starting from engineered cells cultured in a dish to produce a graft. [More]
New Endoscopic Technique

New Endoscopic Technique

A flexible wide-field endoscope utilising blue excitation light provides label-free contrast of tissue based on fluorescence lifetime imaging of tissue autofluorescence. [More]
New NIH grant to help restore function after spinal cord injury

New NIH grant to help restore function after spinal cord injury

Restoring function after spinal cord injury, which damages the connections that carry messages from the brain to the body and back, depends on forming new connections between the surviving nerve cells. While there are some delicate surgical techniques that reconnect the nerves, researchers are also looking at ways to restore the connections themselves at a cellular level. [More]
New stent for treating cardiovascular disease successfully implanted in patients

New stent for treating cardiovascular disease successfully implanted in patients

A new stent for treating cardiovascular disease that incorporates a polymer invented at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, has been implanted in patients for the first time. [More]
Duke University researchers devise new method to activate genes with light

Duke University researchers devise new method to activate genes with light

Duke University researchers have devised a method to activate genes in any specific location or pattern in a lab dish with the flip of a light switch by crossing a bacterium's viral defense system with a flower's response to sunlight. [More]
Lintec to commercialize carbon nanotubes developed at UTD

Lintec to commercialize carbon nanotubes developed at UTD

Lintec of America recently announced an exclusive license to commercialize novel fabrication methods for carbon nanotube (CNT) macrostructures, including sheets, yarns and ribbons, developed at the University of Texas at Dallas. [More]
Two researchers receive Pioneer Award from Human Gene Therapy

Two researchers receive Pioneer Award from Human Gene Therapy

Recognized for their pioneering work in the development of gene transfer technology using retroviral vectors to deliver therapeutic genes into cells, Richard C. Mulligan, PhD, Director of the Harvard Gene Therapy Initiative, Harvard Institutes of Medicine, Boston, MA, and A. Dusty Miller, PhD, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, received the Pioneer Award from Human Gene Therapy, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
UM SOM launches ‘Program in Lung Healing’ to develop treatments for acute respiratory failure

UM SOM launches ‘Program in Lung Healing’ to develop treatments for acute respiratory failure

University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, and Jeffrey A. Rivest, MS, President and Chief Executive Officer of University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC), today announced the official launch of a new "Program in Lung Healing," that will further the School's position as a national leader in research, education and clinical innovation for acute ailments of the lung and respiratory system. [More]
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