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FDA warns several tobacco manufacturers for marketing their products with health-related claims

FDA warns several tobacco manufacturers for marketing their products with health-related claims

The Food and Drug Administration today has taken a critically important action to protect the American public from tobacco industry deception by warning several manufacturers – most prominently Reynolds American's subsidiary, Santa Fe Natural Tobacco Company, and its Natural American Spirit cigarette brand – that they are violating the law by marketing their products with health-related claims, including "additive-free" and "natural." If these products continue to make these claims, the FDA can and should order them removed from the market. [More]
Study shows licensed tobacco retailers sell illegal cigarettes throughout NYC

Study shows licensed tobacco retailers sell illegal cigarettes throughout NYC

Licensed tobacco retailers throughout New York City are selling a substantial number of cigarette packs carrying either counterfeit or out-of-state tax stamps, finds an investigation by NYU public health researchers. [More]
Researchers to design, test sensors to protect firefighters from respiratory damage and illnesses

Researchers to design, test sensors to protect firefighters from respiratory damage and illnesses

During the next three years, researchers at Case Western Reserve University will team with NASA Glenn Research Center and firefighters nationally, from Cleveland to Oregon, to design and test sensors aimed at protecting firefighters from respiratory damage and illnesses. [More]
New study reveals that many parents unaware of the dangers of e-cigarettes to children

New study reveals that many parents unaware of the dangers of e-cigarettes to children

As the use of e-cigarettes has risen dramatically in the United States in recent years, so have calls to poison centers about them. Yet many parents who use e-cigarettes - or "vape" - aren't aware of the dangers to children, according to a new study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Chrono obtains second Fast Track SBIR grant award from NCI to support development of smoking cessation therapy

Chrono obtains second Fast Track SBIR grant award from NCI to support development of smoking cessation therapy

Chrono Therapeutics, a pioneer in digital drug therapy, today announced it has received a second Phase 1 and Phase 2 Fast Track Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant award from the National Cancer Institute. [More]
Study reveals potential health risks associated with burning of incense in indoor environments

Study reveals potential health risks associated with burning of incense in indoor environments

The burning of incense might need to come with a health warning. This follows the first study evaluating the health risks associated with its indoor use. The effects of incense and cigarette smoke were also compared, and made for some surprising results. The research was led by Rong Zhou of the South China University of Technology and the China Tobacco Guangdong Industrial Company in China, and is published in Springer's journal Environmental Chemistry Letters. [More]

Young adults under 25 more likely to rate hookah, e-cigarettes as safer than cigarettes

Many college students are making their way back to campus this month, and back to the habits - good or bad - that dorm-life promotes. A new study finds that young adults under 25, including high school grads and college students, are more likely to rate hookah and e-cigarettes as safer than cigarettes, when compared to 25 to 34-year-olds. [More]
Millions of people die every year from using smokeless tobacco

Millions of people die every year from using smokeless tobacco

More than a quarter of a million people die each year from using smokeless tobacco, researchers at the University of York have concluded. [More]
Adolescent e-cigarette users more likely to start smoking

Adolescent e-cigarette users more likely to start smoking

As e-cigarette usage among high school students continues to climb, a recent study from The Journal of the American Medical Association reveals an unsettling trend: that adolescent e-cigarette users are more likely than their non-vaping peers to initiate use of combustible tobacco products such as cigarettes, cigars and hookahs. The reason may lie in a common denominator between e-cigarettes and their combustible counterparts: nicotine. [More]
Teenage smokers experience guilt and shame

Teenage smokers experience guilt and shame

There are fewer smokers in the current generation of adolescents. Current figures show about 25 per cent of teens smoke, down dramatically from 40 per cent in 1987. [More]
Scientists reveal link between smaller hippocampal brain volume and marijuana use

Scientists reveal link between smaller hippocampal brain volume and marijuana use

How scientists study the effects of marijuana on the brain is changing. Until recently marijuana research largely excluded tobacco users from its participant pool, but scientists at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas have found reason to abandon this practice, uncovering significant differences in the brains of individuals who use both tobacco and marijuana and the brains of those who only use marijuana. [More]
E-cigarettes may trigger smoking in high school students, study reveals

E-cigarettes may trigger smoking in high school students, study reveals

Among high school students in Los Angeles, those who had ever used electronic cigarettes were more likely to report initiation of smokable ("combustible") tobacco (such as cigarettes, cigars, and hookah) use over the next year compared with nonusers, according to a study in the August 18 issue of JAMA. [More]
E-cigarettes becoming more widely available in developing countries

E-cigarettes becoming more widely available in developing countries

Most of the debate around e-cigarettes has focused on the developed world, but the devices are becoming more widely available in some low- and middle-income countries, where there is even greater potential for impact on public health, say two Stanford University School of Medicine researchers. [More]
New prescription smoking-cessation drug not helping smokers quit

New prescription smoking-cessation drug not helping smokers quit

The introduction of a new prescription smoking-cessation aid, varenicline, in 2006 has had no significant impact on the rate at which Americans age 18 and older successfully quit smoking, according to a study led by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. [More]
Anti-smoking laws lead to decrease in stillbirths

Anti-smoking laws lead to decrease in stillbirths

Stillbirths have dropped by almost eight per cent in England since the smoking ban was introduced, research shows. [More]
Sexting, Internet safety climb higher on list of major health concerns for children

Sexting, Internet safety climb higher on list of major health concerns for children

With more kids online and using cell phones at increasingly younger ages, two issues have quickly climbed higher on the public's list of major health concerns for children across the U.S: sexting and Internet safety. [More]

TSRI study explores bacterial enzyme that may help people to quit smoking

A new study from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute explores a bacterial enzyme that might be used as a drug candidate to help people quit smoking. [More]
Report: Florida falling short on policies to prevent, fight cancer

Report: Florida falling short on policies to prevent, fight cancer

Florida is falling short when it comes to supporting policies and passing legislation to prevent and reduce suffering and death from cancer. According to the latest edition of How Do You Measure Up?: A Progress Report on State Legislative Activity to Reduce Cancer Incidence and Mortality, Florida did not measure up to policy recommendations in any of the nine issue areas ranked. [More]
Oral contraceptives give long-term protection against endometrial cancer, shows study

Oral contraceptives give long-term protection against endometrial cancer, shows study

Use of oral contraceptives, even for just a few years, gives substantial long-term protection against endometrial cancer, and the longer the pill is used the greater the reduction in risk, according to a detailed re-analysis of all the available evidence, published in The Lancet Oncology journal. [More]

UK government's current alcohol guidelines have little relevance to people's drinking habits

The UK government's current alcohol guidelines are unrealistic and largely ignored because they have little relevance to people's drinking habits, according to a new report by the Sheffield Alcohol Research Group (SARG) in collaboration with the University of Stirling. [More]
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