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New genetic markers linked to fast rate of nicotine metabolism in smokers may raise risk for lung cancer

New genetic markers linked to fast rate of nicotine metabolism in smokers may raise risk for lung cancer

University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researchers discovered new genetic markers associated with a fast rate of nicotine metabolism, which potentially leads smokers to smoke more, thereby, increasing their risk for lung cancer. [More]
Regular family meals create positive outcomes in children

Regular family meals create positive outcomes in children

Juggling jobs, kids and the demands of a busy, modern life often comes at the expense of family mealtime at home. [More]
Moffitt research underscores importance of continued lung cancer screening in high-risk patients

Moffitt research underscores importance of continued lung cancer screening in high-risk patients

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for men and women. It is also one of the most complex cancers, both at the molecular level and through its clinical behavior. [More]
Financial incentives increase abstinence rates among low-income smokers, research shows

Financial incentives increase abstinence rates among low-income smokers, research shows

Paying smokers to quit with payments that increased with the length of abstinence led one third of participants in a study to stop smoking for six months, according to research published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
FDA issues revised draft guidance to improve premarket safety notifications for new dietary ingredients

FDA issues revised draft guidance to improve premarket safety notifications for new dietary ingredients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today issued a revised draft guidance to improve dietary supplement companies' new dietary ingredient (NDI) premarket safety notifications to the agency. These notifications help the agency identify safety concerns before products reach consumers. [More]
Tips to help older adults maintain lifelong oral health

Tips to help older adults maintain lifelong oral health

Seventy million people in this country - 20 percent of the US population -- will be 65 or older by 2030. If you're one of them, you probably think often about how to stay as fit and healthy as possible. But, you may not be giving as much thought to the health of your teeth. [More]
Appealing new flavors contribute to alarming trends in youth consumption of e-cigarettes

Appealing new flavors contribute to alarming trends in youth consumption of e-cigarettes

Currently, we are experiencing a new phenomenon with youth consumption of e-cigarettes all around the United States. For the second consecutive year, e-cigarettes were the most popular product among youth. [More]
Text message program improves diabetes risk behaviors among people in India

Text message program improves diabetes risk behaviors among people in India

A study that sent twice-weekly text messages to a million people in India advising them to exercise, eat less fat, and eat more fruits and vegetables increased these health behaviors known to prevent diabetes, reports new research from Northwestern Medicine and Arogya World, a global health non-profit organization. [More]
RTI researchers available to discuss impact of new FDA regulations on e-cigarettes

RTI researchers available to discuss impact of new FDA regulations on e-cigarettes

On August 8, e-cigarette regulations set by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will go into effect. Under the new rules, vendors are banned from selling e-cigarettes to minors. [More]
FDA issues updated draft recommendations on submitting new 510(k) for modified devices

FDA issues updated draft recommendations on submitting new 510(k) for modified devices

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today issued draft updated recommendations to help manufacturers determine when they are required to notify the FDA about modifications made to certain medical devices already on the market, including a separate guidance applicable to software devices. [More]
Sickle cell trait linked to increased risk of rhabdomyolysis among African American Soldiers

Sickle cell trait linked to increased risk of rhabdomyolysis among African American Soldiers

A new study published Aug. 4 in the New England Journal of Medicine indicates that among African American U.S. Army Soldiers, sickle cell trait is not associated with an increase in mortality, but is associated with a modest increase in the risk of exertional rhabdomyolysis. [More]
Study finds high rate of misuse of seizure and pain drug

Study finds high rate of misuse of seizure and pain drug

With increasing public attention to overdose deaths and misuse of prescription medications in the United States, researchers today presented the results of a new study looking at abuse and misuse of gabapentin, a medication used to treat seizures and relieve nerve pain often associated with shingles. [More]
New biochip test helps identify individuals at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease

New biochip test helps identify individuals at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers today unveiled results from a new blood test to help identify which patients are at an elevated risk of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Study shows link between psychiatric symptoms and substance use among high school students

Study shows link between psychiatric symptoms and substance use among high school students

Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health with collaborators at the Federal University of Sao Paulo studied the relationship between psychiatric symptoms and patterns of substance use among high school students in Brazil and found that respondents with clinically significant scores on a behavioral screening questionnaire were more likely to use alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana in the past month compared to those without symptoms. [More]
Cell-free DNA test could help identify liver transplant patients with acute rejection

Cell-free DNA test could help identify liver transplant patients with acute rejection

Today, researchers presented findings at the 68th AACC Annual Scientific Meeting that DNA found circulating in the bloodstream—known as cell-free DNA—can be used to identify liver transplant patients with acute rejection with greater accuracy than conventional liver function tests. [More]
AACC introduces new journal to deliver advancements in translational laboratory medicine research

AACC introduces new journal to deliver advancements in translational laboratory medicine research

AACC, a global scientific and medical professional organization dedicated to better health through laboratory medicine, is pleased to announce the launch of its new journal, The Journal of Applied Laboratory Medicine: An AACC Publication. [More]
Teenagers who smoke daily report higher levels of health complaints

Teenagers who smoke daily report higher levels of health complaints

As fewer teens overall take up smoking, those who do smoke daily are reporting more health complaints than in years past, a new study indicates. [More]
FDA approves new injection to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes

FDA approves new injection to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Adlyxin (lixisenatide), a once-daily injection to improve glycemic control (blood sugar levels), along with diet and exercise, in adults with type 2 diabetes. [More]
Scientists identify factors that affect levels of toxic compounds in e-cigarette vapor

Scientists identify factors that affect levels of toxic compounds in e-cigarette vapor

Electronic cigarettes, or e-cigs, have grown in popularity as an alternative to traditional cigarette smoking. [More]
FDA approves safety labeling changes for fluoroquinolone antibiotics

FDA approves safety labeling changes for fluoroquinolone antibiotics

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved safety labeling changes for a class of antibiotics, called fluoroquinolones, to enhance warnings about their association with disabling and potentially permanent side effects and to limit their use in patients with less serious bacterial infections. [More]
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