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Novel approach may help detect invasive aspergillosis

Novel approach may help detect invasive aspergillosis

Many different microbes can cause pneumonia, and treatment may be delayed or off target if doctors cannot tell which bug is the culprit. A novel approach—analyzing a patient's breath for key chemical compounds made by the infecting microbe—may help detect invasive aspergillosis, a fungal infection that is a leading cause of mortality in patients with compromised immune systems, according to a proof-of-concept study now online in Clinical Infectious Diseases. [More]
Couple renews multi-million dollar commitment to screen newborn babies for SCID disorders

Couple renews multi-million dollar commitment to screen newborn babies for SCID disorders

Frustrated with the slow pace of implementation of Newborn Screening for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (SCID), Vicki and Fred Modell renewed a multi-million dollar commitment to screen every baby born in every state for this life threatening condition, often referred to as "Bubble Boy" disease. [More]
CHLA physician discusses urological issues in children

CHLA physician discusses urological issues in children

Children's Hospital Los Angeles physician-scientist Roger E. De Filippo, MD, an associate professor of urology and director of Pediatric Urology Stem Cell Research at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California discusses how science, technology and parental care can lead to improved pediatric urological health. [More]
Lactobacillus-containing probiotics can improve lupus symptoms

Lactobacillus-containing probiotics can improve lupus symptoms

Lactobacillus species, commonly seen in yogurt cultures, correlate, in the guts of mouse models, with mitigation of lupus symptoms, while Lachnospiraceae, a type of Clostridia, correlate with worsening, according to research published ahead of print in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. [More]
Cell transplantation treatment may benefit people with spinal cord injury

Cell transplantation treatment may benefit people with spinal cord injury

Two studies recently published in Cell Transplantation reveal that cell transplantation may be an effective treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI), a major cause of disability and paralysis with no current restorative therapies. [More]
Noninvasive measure has prognostic value in PAH

Noninvasive measure has prognostic value in PAH

Estimated right atrial pressure, measured using echocardiography, may be a useful prognostic indicator in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, a study suggests. [More]
SynCardia Systems wins 2014 New Economy Award for Best Medical Device Company

SynCardia Systems wins 2014 New Economy Award for Best Medical Device Company

SynCardia Systems, Inc., which manufactures the world's only FDA (United States), Health Canada and CE (Europe)-approved Total Artificial Heart, has won the 2014 New Economy Award for Best Medical Device Company. [More]
Improper splinting can lead to swelling and other skin complications

Improper splinting can lead to swelling and other skin complications

More than 90 percent of potential pediatric fractures are splinted improperly in emergency rooms and urgent care centers, which can lead to swelling and skin injuries, according to a study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. [More]
Study shows potential of treating recurrent CDI with frozen fecal matter

Study shows potential of treating recurrent CDI with frozen fecal matter

A preliminary study has shown the potential of treating recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (a bacterium that is one of the most common causes of infection of the colon) with oral administration of frozen encapsulated fecal material from unrelated donors, which resulted in an overall rate of resolution of diarrhea of 90 percent, according to a study published in JAMA. [More]
RBX2660 drug candidate highly effective against recurrent Clostridium difficile infection

RBX2660 drug candidate highly effective against recurrent Clostridium difficile infection

Rebiotix Inc. announced today that results of the Phase 2 PUNCH CD Study found that the overall efficacy of RBX2660 in the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection was 87.1%. The study also found that administration of RBX2660 was well-tolerated and demonstrated satisfactory safety in the 60-day interim analysis. [More]
Neovasc gets conditional IDE approval from FDA to initiate trial for Tiara mitral valve system

Neovasc gets conditional IDE approval from FDA to initiate trial for Tiara mitral valve system

Neovasc Inc. today announced that it has received conditional Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to initiate the U.S. arm of its TIARA-I Early Feasibility Trial for the Company's Tiara™ transcatheter mitral valve. [More]
Scientists say fundamental theory about how thymus educates immune police appears to be wrong

Scientists say fundamental theory about how thymus educates immune police appears to be wrong

A fundamental theory about how our thymus educates our immune police appears to be wrong, scientists say. [More]
Hospital patients may be at significant risk of infection due to poor hand hygiene

Hospital patients may be at significant risk of infection due to poor hand hygiene

Health technology company Infonaut, a MaRS client, has released a study showing that hospital patients may be at significant risk of infection due to their own poor hand hygiene. [More]
Arizona resident receives donor heart transplant after living with SynCardia Total Artificial Heart

Arizona resident receives donor heart transplant after living with SynCardia Total Artificial Heart

Randy Shepherd, an Arizona resident nicknamed the "tin man," has received a donor heart transplant after 15 months of support from the SynCardia temporary Total Artificial Heart. [More]
MedCure offers Pulsatile Anatomical Trainer service to advance medical research and training

MedCure offers Pulsatile Anatomical Trainer service to advance medical research and training

After three years in development, MedCure, Inc. has perfected a technique that mimics functioning circulatory system processes in cadaveric specimens. [More]
New version of Belmont Rapid Infuser to be introduced at ASA 2014

New version of Belmont Rapid Infuser to be introduced at ASA 2014

Belmont Instrument Corporation, the widely recognized provider of blood and fluid infusers, will be introducing the new version of The Belmont Rapid Infuser, the RI-2 at the American Society of Anesthesiologists Meeting this week in New Orleans, LA. [More]
Cyclophosphamide drug can eliminate life-threatening immune response after bone marrow transplants

Cyclophosphamide drug can eliminate life-threatening immune response after bone marrow transplants

Johns Hopkins and other cancer researchers report that a very short course of a chemotherapy drug, called cyclophosphamide, not only can prevent a life-threatening immune response in some bone marrow transplant recipients, but also can eliminate such patients' need for the usual six months of immune suppression medicines commonly prescribed to prevent severe forms of this immune response. [More]
Swedish woman gives birth to world's first womb-transplant baby

Swedish woman gives birth to world's first womb-transplant baby

In a ground-breaking research project at the University of Gothenburg, seven Swedish women have had embryos reintroduced after receiving wombs from living donors. Now the first transplanted woman has delivered a baby – a healthy and normally developed boy. The world-unique birth was acknowledged in The Lancet on 5 October. [More]
Pitt researchers awarded $1.25 million DOD grant to establish whole-eye transplantation program

Pitt researchers awarded $1.25 million DOD grant to establish whole-eye transplantation program

University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine researchers have been awarded $1.25 million from the U.S. Department of Defense to fund two projects that aim to establish the groundwork for the nation's first whole-eye transplantation program. [More]
Study finds that hospitalized patients wash their hands infrequently

Study finds that hospitalized patients wash their hands infrequently

Hospital visitors and staff are greeted with hand sanitizer dispensers in the lobby, by the elevators and outside rooms as reminders to wash their hands to stop infections, but just how clean are patients' hands? [More]