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New 3-D printed biomaterial could be effective in treating children with bone defects

New 3-D printed biomaterial could be effective in treating children with bone defects

A Northwestern University research team has developed a 3-D printable ink that produces a synthetic bone implant that rapidly induces bone regeneration and growth. This hyperelastic "bone" material, whose shape can be easily customized, one day could be especially useful for the treatment of bone defects in children. [More]
High levels of dietary zinc increases susceptibility to Clostridium difficile infections

High levels of dietary zinc increases susceptibility to Clostridium difficile infections

Too much dietary zinc increases susceptibility to infection by Clostridium difficile - "C. diff" - the most common cause of hospital-acquired infections. [More]
Ancient remedy to treat severe diarrhea becomes effective therapy for multiple recurrent CDI

Ancient remedy to treat severe diarrhea becomes effective therapy for multiple recurrent CDI

Modern medicine is taking a new look at an ancient remedy for severe diarrhea as a novel approach to treat a serious gastrointestinal infection. [More]
Mayo Clinic article provides better understanding on potentially devastating liver disease

Mayo Clinic article provides better understanding on potentially devastating liver disease

An article published today in the New England Journal of Medicine updates the medical community on a potentially devastating liver disease that afflicts approximately 29,000 Americans. [More]
Virginia Tech researchers identify novel compound that blocks growth of deadly fungus

Virginia Tech researchers identify novel compound that blocks growth of deadly fungus

Researchers with the Virginia Tech Center for Drug Discovery have identified a compound that blocks the growth of a fungus that causes deadly lung infections and allergic reactions in people with compromised immune systems. [More]
CIRM approves $5.2 million for research on life-long treatment for rare childhood disease

CIRM approves $5.2 million for research on life-long treatment for rare childhood disease

Cystinosis is a rare disease that usually strikes children before they are two years old and can lead to end stage kidney failure before their tenth birthday. [More]
Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Drugs that interfere with bile acid recycling can prevent several aspects of NASH (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis) in mice fed a high-fat diet, scientists from Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta have shown. [More]
Three-dimensional heart patches may soon move closer to clinical application

Three-dimensional heart patches may soon move closer to clinical application

The promise of stem cells to treat cardiovascular disease may soon be a step closer to clinical application as scientists from three institutions seek to perfect and test three-dimensional "heart patches" in a large animal model — the last big hurdle before trials in human patients. [More]
New mobile health app may help manage hydroxyurea treatments in sickle cell patients

New mobile health app may help manage hydroxyurea treatments in sickle cell patients

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded a 6-year, $4.4 million grant to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and collaborators to improve the use of prescribed medication by sickle cell patients. [More]
Study finds nonwhite transplant recipients at risk for skin cancer

Study finds nonwhite transplant recipients at risk for skin cancer

A new study from Drexel University College of Medicine suggests all organ transplant recipients, regardless of race, should receive routine, total-body screenings for skin cancer. [More]
Lund University stem cell researcher awarded Fernström prize for study on repairing damaged brain

Lund University stem cell researcher awarded Fernström prize for study on repairing damaged brain

Is it possible to convert a patient’s own skin cells into functioning nerve cells? Or insert healthy genes to reprogram the cells of a damaged brain? Stem cell researcher Malin Parmar at Lund University in Sweden is studying these types of issues, in close collaboration with clinical researchers. [More]
NIHR HSRIC experts identify innovative and promising treatments for corneal disorders

NIHR HSRIC experts identify innovative and promising treatments for corneal disorders

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Horizon Scanning Research and Intelligence Centre (HSRIC), working with Fight for Sight, has identified 130 new and emerging technologies and procedures for treating corneal disorders. [More]

Study looks at positive link between high-volume transplant centers and improved patient outcomes

How many heart transplant programs do we really need? That was a question posed by a group of investigators, including Vanderbilt University Medical Center's Ashish Shah, M.D., in a novel study that used a computerized algorithm to highlight the value of high-volume transplant centers with corresponding improved outcomes. [More]
Small fraction of film and television productions provide complete, accurate information on brain death

Small fraction of film and television productions provide complete, accurate information on brain death

Neurologists who examined how brain death and organ donation are portrayed in film and television found that only a small fraction of productions provide the public with a complete and accurate understanding of brain death. [More]
Gender matching key for corneal transplants? An interview with Professor Kaye

Gender matching key for corneal transplants? An interview with Professor Kaye

The cornea is a transparent tissue lining the front of the eye, that is invisible tissue to the naked eye. It is a delicate tissue and disease or injury may lead to a loss of transparency or a change in the shape of the cornea, resulting in severe visual impairment. [More]
Hamilton researchers conduct ground-breaking new trial on pediatric fecal transplant for IBD

Hamilton researchers conduct ground-breaking new trial on pediatric fecal transplant for IBD

Hamilton researchers are conducting a ground-breaking new trial looking at fecal transplants to help treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children. [More]
First-ever 'Cast & Blast' event to support research into deadly congenital heart condition

First-ever 'Cast & Blast' event to support research into deadly congenital heart condition

Patients, physicians and attendees will throw their lines in for an important catch today at the Caledon Mountain Trout Club during the first 'Cast & Blast' event to support research into the often fatal heart disorder called arrythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). [More]

Computerized model illuminates need for standardized care in heart, lung transplantations

Using the results from a computerized mathematical model, Johns Hopkins researchers investigated whether they could improve heart and lung transplantation procedures by transferring patients from low-volume to high-volume transplant centers. [More]
New scoring system may help expand pool of available kidneys in two ways

New scoring system may help expand pool of available kidneys in two ways

With over 120,000 patients in the United States waiting for a kidney transplant, scientists and physicians are constantly looking to expand the pool of available organs through increasing donation and optimizing allocation. [More]
SLUCare cancer doctor offers advice to manage anxiety after cancer diagnosis

SLUCare cancer doctor offers advice to manage anxiety after cancer diagnosis

The first few days after a cancer diagnosis can feel overwhelming. At the very moment when you must make key decisions about your treatment and care, your brain may feel overloaded processing the distressing news you've just received. [More]
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