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Sylvester researchers test new KTE-C19 therapy for patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

Sylvester researchers test new KTE-C19 therapy for patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

Researchers at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine are testing a novel cellular immunotherapy approach to treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma who have failed standard therapy. [More]
New technique to grow blood vessels could accelerate growth of regenerative medicine

New technique to grow blood vessels could accelerate growth of regenerative medicine

In addition the technique to grow the blood vessels in a 3D scaffold cuts down on the risk of transplant rejection because it uses cells from the patient. It was developed by researchers from the University of Bath's Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, working with colleagues at Bristol Heart Institute. [More]
Study finds link between sodium intake and clinical CVD events in CKD patients

Study finds link between sodium intake and clinical CVD events in CKD patients

In a study appearing in the May 24/31 issue of JAMA, Jiang He, M.D., Ph.D., of the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, and colleagues evaluated more than 3,500 participants with chronic kidney disease (CKD), examining the association between urinary sodium excretion and clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. [More]
Small lipid nanocarrier may deliver chemotherapeutic drug more efficiently to brain tumor cells

Small lipid nanocarrier may deliver chemotherapeutic drug more efficiently to brain tumor cells

Great discoveries do come in small packages. Few know that better than Ann-Marie Broome, Ph.D., who feels nanotechnology holds the future of medicine with its ability to deliver powerful drugs in tiny, designer packages. [More]
Phase I study of triple drug combination shows promise in multiple myeloma patients

Phase I study of triple drug combination shows promise in multiple myeloma patients

PharmaMar announces the positive results from a Phase I study of plitidepsin in combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone in patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma. [More]
New experimental model may predict eventual cardiac phenotype in pediatric patients

New experimental model may predict eventual cardiac phenotype in pediatric patients

An experimental model uses genetics-guided biomechanics and patient-derived stem cells to predict what type of inherited heart defect a child will develop, according to authors of a new study in the journal Cell. [More]
New frozen faecal bank increases chances of curing a chronic health condition

New frozen faecal bank increases chances of curing a chronic health condition

A new frozen faecal bank that could save hundreds of lives and dramatically improve the quality of life of many more has been established at a Portsmouth hospital. [More]
Penn State researchers link mutation in common virus to fatal brain disease

Penn State researchers link mutation in common virus to fatal brain disease

Why people on immunosuppressant drugs for autoimmune conditions have a higher incidence of an often-fatal brain disease may be linked to a mutation in a common virus, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. [More]
Allogeneic HSCT offers good survival for select TKI-refractory CML patients

Allogeneic HSCT offers good survival for select TKI-refractory CML patients

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is associated with a high rate of survival for carefully chosen chronic myeloid leukaemia patients who do not respond well to tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, research suggests. [More]
CGT, University of Aberdeen announce creation of new company to develop novel technology for diabetes treatment

CGT, University of Aberdeen announce creation of new company to develop novel technology for diabetes treatment

The Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult and University of Aberdeen, UK, today announce the creation of Islexa, a new company developing a novel technology to produce laboratory grown islets, the organoids responsible for insulin production. [More]
New E-Vac therapy may be promising treatment option for GI leaks

New E-Vac therapy may be promising treatment option for GI leaks

Gastroenterologists on the medical staff at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas are evaluating a new procedure for patients with gastrointestinal (GI) leaks and perforations, a complication that can result from laparoscopic surgery on the esophagus, stomach and small intestines—and outcomes have been promising. [More]
'Weekend effect’ may contribute to worsening availability of donor kidneys in the U.S

'Weekend effect’ may contribute to worsening availability of donor kidneys in the U.S

Investigators have uncovered a "weekend effect" contributing to the worsening availability of donor kidneys in the United States. They found that kidneys that would normally be made available for transplantation were less likely to be procured from donors over the weekend (89.5% on the weekend vs. 90.2% during the week). [More]
Simple, cheap chemical sensors may detect developing cancers in future

Simple, cheap chemical sensors may detect developing cancers in future

Many cancers could be successfully treated if the patient consulted the doctor sufficiently early. But how can a developing cancer be detected if it doesn't give rise to any symptoms? In the near future, suitably early diagnosis could be provided by simple and cheap chemical sensors - thanks to special recognizing polymer films developed at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. [More]
New IsoPSA test identifies molecular structural changes in protein biomarkers to detect prostate cancer

New IsoPSA test identifies molecular structural changes in protein biomarkers to detect prostate cancer

A promising new test is detecting prostate cancer more precisely than current tests, by identifying molecular changes in the prostate specific antigen (PSA) protein, according to Cleveland Clinic research presented today at the American Urological Association annual meeting. [More]
Researchers agree to test new stem cell gene therapy for Sanfilippo disease in human trial

Researchers agree to test new stem cell gene therapy for Sanfilippo disease in human trial

Scientists in Manchester, who have developed a stem cell gene therapy to reverse a fatal childhood illness, have agreed to work with a new therapeutics company to test it in a human trial. [More]
New light-based technique may offer improved treatment for eye problems

New light-based technique may offer improved treatment for eye problems

Researchers have developed a new light-based technique that selectively stiffens tissue in the cornea and might one day offer improved treatment for eye problems caused by weakened corneal tissue. [More]
Sheffield Hallam University receives new engineering equipment to develop coatings for eye-transplants

Sheffield Hallam University receives new engineering equipment to develop coatings for eye-transplants

Sheffield Hallam University has taken delivery of engineering equipment worth £1million allowing the University to develop coatings which can be used on eye-transplants or during spinal-cord surgery. [More]
Lund study shows transplanted nerve cells can survive for many years in diseased human brain

Lund study shows transplanted nerve cells can survive for many years in diseased human brain

In the late 1980s and over the 1990s, researchers at Lund University in Sweden pioneered the transplantation of new nerve cells into the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease. The outcomes proved for the first time that transplanted nerve cells can survive and function in the diseased human brain. Some patients showed marked improvement after the transplantation while others showed moderate or no relief of symptoms. [More]
Researchers safely transplant stem cells from patient's skin to the eye to restore vision

Researchers safely transplant stem cells from patient's skin to the eye to restore vision

Researchers have safely transplanted stem cells derived from a patient's skin to the back of the eye in an effort to restore vision. The research is being presented at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology this week in Seattle, Wash. [More]
Transplanted human islets provide excellent glycemic control for Type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Transplanted human islets provide excellent glycemic control for Type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Northwestern Medicine researchers are co-investigators in a breakthrough clinical trial that found transplanted human islets prevent hypoglycemic events and provide excellent glycemic control for patients with Type 1 diabetes with severe hypoglycemia. The results of the multi-center, single arm, phase III study are published in Diabetes Care on Monday, April 18. The research was funded by National Institute of Health grants through the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease. [More]
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