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Human stem cells can be reset to their native undifferentiated state

Human stem cells can be reset to their native undifferentiated state

Scientists at the Babraham Institute, in collaboration with colleagues at the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute and the European Bioinformatics Institute, have made a breakthrough in stem cell research. Their paper, published today in Cell, describes how human stem cells can be reverted back to non-specialised cells. [More]
Study finds that ambivalence is common among liver donor candidates

Study finds that ambivalence is common among liver donor candidates

Living donors are important to increasing the number of viable grafts for liver transplantation. A new study published in Liver Transplantation, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society, found that ambivalence is common among donor candidates. [More]

Feds allege spinal surgery kickback scheme

During a secretly recorded meeting, McClatchy News reports that a salesman for Reliance Medical Systems promised spinal surgeons that within a month or two of joining the company's program, they could collect enough money to pay for their kids' college educations. [More]
Unusual kind of immune cell in tongue appears to play pivotal role in prevention of thrush

Unusual kind of immune cell in tongue appears to play pivotal role in prevention of thrush

An unusual kind of immune cell in the tongue appears to play a pivotal role in the prevention of thrush, according to the researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine who discovered them. [More]
Viewpoints: Health spending on the rise; GOP's new 'passion for the pill'

Viewpoints: Health spending on the rise; GOP's new 'passion for the pill'

The latest federal estimates of health care spending offer some good news: The growth rate for spending in 2013 will remain at a low level for the fifth straight year. [More]
Transplantation of B10 cells helps inhibit development of bladder fibrosis post SCI

Transplantation of B10 cells helps inhibit development of bladder fibrosis post SCI

A team of researchers from Korea and Canada have found that transplantation of B10 cells (a stable immortalized human bone marrow derived -mesenchymal stem cell line; B10 hMSC) directly into the bladder wall of mice modeled with spinal cord injury (SCI) helped inhibit the development of bladder fibrosis and improved bladder function by promoting the growth of smooth muscle cells in the bladder. [More]
Viewpoints: Medicaid expansion spreading; 'GOP's woman problem;' praising Medicare

Viewpoints: Medicaid expansion spreading; 'GOP's woman problem;' praising Medicare

The latest jerry-built effort to destroy health care reform could be defeated in the full federal appeals court in the District of Columbia. In July, a three-judge panel of that court -; taking a ridiculously crabbed view of a section in the law -; ruled 2-to-1 that tax-credit subsidies are allowed only for those buying insurance on a health exchange "established by the state." [More]
Researchers create new drug to reduce inflammation of donor organ after transplantation

Researchers create new drug to reduce inflammation of donor organ after transplantation

To reduce the number of discards and thus make more kidneys available, researchers and medical scientists from the European consortium MABSOT have created a new drug called OPN-305 to reduce inflammation of the donor organ after transplantation. [More]
Organizations across U.S. participating in Go Gold for Childhood Cancer Awareness campaign

Organizations across U.S. participating in Go Gold for Childhood Cancer Awareness campaign

Organizations in Atlanta – and across the country – are participating in the Go Gold for Childhood Cancer Awareness campaign this September. Coordinating this effort is the Aflac Cancer Center of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta along with the Stop Childhood Cancer Alliance that was created to be the driving force in increasing awareness of childhood cancer and enhancing support for the young people fighting this disease, as well as the clinicians and researchers helping them. [More]
BloodCenter's Erythroid Chimerism test available to monitor transplanted SCD patients

BloodCenter's Erythroid Chimerism test available to monitor transplanted SCD patients

BloodCenter of Wisconsin's Diagnostic Laboratories today announced the availability of an innovative Erythroid Chimerism test to monitor erythroid lineage chimerism in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. [More]
HICCC receives $18 million grant from the National Cancer Institute

HICCC receives $18 million grant from the National Cancer Institute

Outstanding basic research, a growing focus on translating discoveries into treatments, and a dedication to patient care have earned the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center (HICCC) of Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital an $18 million, five-year Cancer Center Support Grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). [More]
Scientists grow fully functional organ in animal from transplanted laboratory-created cells

Scientists grow fully functional organ in animal from transplanted laboratory-created cells

Laboratory-grown replacement organs have moved a step closer with the completion of a new study. Scientists have grown a fully functional organ from transplanted laboratory-created cells in a living animal for the first time. [More]
Research to determine breath test's effectivness in patient with COPD

Research to determine breath test's effectivness in patient with COPD

NYU Langone Medical Center will lead a new clinical initiative -- funded by a $225,000 grant from The National Institutes of Health -- to determine a breath test's effectivness to identify volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in human breath that are biomarkers of chronic obstrutive pulmonary disease (COPD). [More]
Heart-lung support technology increases number of kidneys, livers, pancreases for transplant

Heart-lung support technology increases number of kidneys, livers, pancreases for transplant

Using heart-lung support technology, the University of Michigan's Transplant Center was able to increase the number of kidneys, livers and pancreases available for transplant by about 20 percent. [More]
New BioInformant report finds 21-fold increase in companies involved in cord blood banking industry

New BioInformant report finds 21-fold increase in companies involved in cord blood banking industry

As a leading provider of market research, MarketResearch.com is pleased to announce the distribution of a new BioInformant Worldwide, L.L.C. report that found a 21-fold increase (2,100%) in the companies involved in the cord blood banking industry in the past 10 years. [More]
Houston Methodist researchers receive $1.6M from NIH to study pathological antibodies

Houston Methodist researchers receive $1.6M from NIH to study pathological antibodies

Transplant immunologists at the Houston Methodist Research Institute will receive about $1.6 million over four years from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to study pathological antibodies produced from activated memory B cells during the chronic rejection of organ transplants. [More]
Study confirms close link between immune system and adult neurogenesis

Study confirms close link between immune system and adult neurogenesis

A new study by Barbara Beltz, the Allene Lummis Russell Professor of Neuroscience at Wellesley College, and Irene Soderhall of Uppsala University, Sweden, published in the August 11 issue of the journal Developmental Cell, demonstrates that the immune system can produce cells with stem cell properties, using crayfish as a model system. These cells can, in turn, create neurons in the adult animal. [More]
New contact lens microbiology workshop aims at preventing Acanthamoeba keratitis

New contact lens microbiology workshop aims at preventing Acanthamoeba keratitis

The American Academy of Ophthalmology today announced a contact lens microbiology workshop on Sept. 12 aimed at preventing Acanthamoeba keratitis, a rare infection among contact lens wearers that causes severe eye pain, redness, light sensitivity and potential vision loss. [More]
Researchers compare benefits of bivalirudin and heparin for patients undergoing coronary stenting

Researchers compare benefits of bivalirudin and heparin for patients undergoing coronary stenting

Bivalirudin and heparin are two anticoagulant options for patients undergoing coronary stenting for ischemic heart disease. Bivalirudin, a newer anticoagulant, has been touted as being as effective as generic heparin, but with nearly half the rate of bleeding. [More]
High-intensity exercise can help stable heart transplant patients

High-intensity exercise can help stable heart transplant patients

High-intensity exercise can help stable heart transplant patients reach higher levels of exercise capacity, and gain better control of their blood pressure than moderate intensity exercise, investigators report in a new study published in the American Journal of Transplantation. [More]