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Researchers develop new method that can target drug delivery to the lung

Researchers develop new method that can target drug delivery to the lung

Researchers from Columbia Engineering and Columbia University Medical Center have developed a new method that can target delivery of very small volumes of drugs into the lung. [More]
University of Maryland Medicine offers MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment to Parkinson's patients

University of Maryland Medicine offers MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment to Parkinson's patients

University of Maryland Medicine (the University of Maryland Medical Center and the University of Maryland School of Medicine) and its Center for Metabolic Imaging and Image-Guided Therapeutics (CMIT) has begun to use MRI-guided focused ultrasound on a deep structure within the brain related to Parkinson's disease - the globus pallidus. [More]
Mouse study shows active ingredient in marijuana may delay rejection of incompatible organs

Mouse study shows active ingredient in marijuana may delay rejection of incompatible organs

Here's another discovery to bolster the case for medical marijuana: New research in mice suggests that THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, may delay the rejection of incompatible organs. [More]
Gene transfer therapy not beneficial for heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction

Gene transfer therapy not beneficial for heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction

Gene transfer therapy aimed at correcting an enzyme abnormality involved in myocardial contraction and relaxation did not improve outcomes in heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction, results of the CUPID 2 study show. [More]
MACC1 gene can help predict better treatment options for patients with Klatskin carcinoma

MACC1 gene can help predict better treatment options for patients with Klatskin carcinoma

Bile duct cancer is rare and is usually detected too late. Often only extensive liver surgery can help or, in rare cases, liver transplantation. But which patients will benefit from surgery and which will not, because their risk of cancer recurrence is too high? With the oncogene MACC1 as a biomarker, physicians for the first time have a tool to decide which treatment option is best for patients with Klatskin carcinoma, one type of bile duct cancer. [More]
Findings reveal a new way to prevent meningitis

Findings reveal a new way to prevent meningitis

The fungus Cryptococcus causes meningitis, a brain disease that kills about 1 million people each year — mainly those with impaired immune systems due to AIDS, cancer treatment or an organ transplant. [More]
Transplanting multi-layered sheet of liver cells into damaged liver improves function in test animals

Transplanting multi-layered sheet of liver cells into damaged liver improves function in test animals

Liver transplantation is currently the only established treatment for patients with end stage liver failure. However, this treatment is limited by the shortage of donors and the conditional integrity and suitability of the available organs. Transplanting donor hepatocytes (liver cells) into the liver as an alternative to liver transplantation also has drawbacks as the rate of survival of primary hepatocytes is limited and often severe complications can result from the transplantation procedure. [More]
Centenary Institute develops new therapeutic approach to prevent GVHD in blood cancer patients

Centenary Institute develops new therapeutic approach to prevent GVHD in blood cancer patients

Sydney’s Centenary Institute has developed a new therapeutic approach that could help to improve outcomes for patients undertaking treatment for blood cancer. [More]
Lingering cancer-related mutations linked to increased risk of relapse, poor survival in leukemia patients

Lingering cancer-related mutations linked to increased risk of relapse, poor survival in leukemia patients

For patients with an often-deadly form of leukemia, new research suggests that lingering cancer-related mutations - detected after initial treatment with chemotherapy - are associated with an increased risk of relapse and poor survival. [More]
UT System Board of Regents approves new UT Southwestern Monty and Tex Moncrief Medical Center

UT System Board of Regents approves new UT Southwestern Monty and Tex Moncrief Medical Center

The University of Texas System Board of Regents has approved establishment of the UT Southwestern Monty and Tex Moncrief Medical Center at Fort Worth, made possible by an extraordinary $25 million commitment from W.A. "Tex" Moncrief Jr. The Center is UT Southwestern's first named campus outside of Dallas. [More]
Researchers evaluate use of human fetal progenitor tenocyte to repair tendon injuries

Researchers evaluate use of human fetal progenitor tenocyte to repair tendon injuries

Tendon injuries, especially those acquired while engaging in sports, are not easily healed due to the fibrous nature of tendon tissues which transmit forces from muscle to bone and protect surrounding tissues against tension and compression. Tendon injuries to wrists, knees, elbows and rotator cuffs, often from over use when playing golf or tennis, are increasingly common for both professional and amateur athletes ("weekend warriors") alike. [More]
Researchers identify strategy to prevent adenoviruses from multiplying and causing sickness in humans

Researchers identify strategy to prevent adenoviruses from multiplying and causing sickness in humans

Using an animal model they developed, Saint Louis University and Utah State university researchers have identified a strategy that could keep a common group of viruses called adenoviruses from replicating and causing sickness in humans. [More]
NYBC, UC Davis Health System partner to manufacture potential stem cell therapies

NYBC, UC Davis Health System partner to manufacture potential stem cell therapies

New York Blood Center today announced a new collaboration with the University of California, Davis, Health System to manufacture specialized lines of stem cells as potential therapies for repair and regeneration of retina, kidney, lung and liver tissue, as well as for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. [More]
UT Southwestern, NASA to study zero-gravity effects on the human brain in cancer patients

UT Southwestern, NASA to study zero-gravity effects on the human brain in cancer patients

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers, in conjunction with NASA, will take four volunteer cancer patients on a zero-gravity ride into the upper atmosphere to study why zero-gravity conditions on the International Space Station sometimes affect the vision of astronauts staying there for extended periods. [More]
New study uses donor sample to evaluate how self-identification measures intersect with genetics

New study uses donor sample to evaluate how self-identification measures intersect with genetics

For years, medicine has relied on self-reported race/ethnicity as the basis of an array of decisions, from risk for disease to matching organ donors. Now, a study led by researchers at UC San Francisco has found that when that information matters most - in connecting bone marrow donors to patients - the format of the questions may determine how well the answers actually correspond to their genes. [More]
Transplanting mesenchymal stromal cells derived from amniotic membranes can benefit eye diseases

Transplanting mesenchymal stromal cells derived from amniotic membranes can benefit eye diseases

A team of researchers in South Korea has successfully transplanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) derived from human amniotic membranes of the placenta (AMSCs) into laboratory mice modeled with oxygen-induced retinopathy (a murine model used to mimic eye disease). [More]
MCRI announces winners of cancer crowdsourcing initiative

MCRI announces winners of cancer crowdsourcing initiative

The Myeloma Crowd Research Initiative (MCRI), an unprecedented collaboration of cancer researchers and patient advocates, today announced the two winners of its first-ever crowdsourcing and patient-led initiative to fund research in high-risk multiple myeloma, a rare malignancy of plasma cells. [More]
New partnering scholarship launched to inspire and develop potential oncology nurses

New partnering scholarship launched to inspire and develop potential oncology nurses

As experienced oncology nurses know, a cancer diagnosis is only the first step on a long and challenging road ahead—for patients and providers alike. For both, a wide range of procedures becomes part and parcel of every day. [More]
Early exposure to inflammatory cytokines can paralyze CD4 T cells

Early exposure to inflammatory cytokines can paralyze CD4 T cells

In a discovery that is likely to rewrite immunology text books, researchers at UC Davis have found that early exposure to inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 2, can "paralyze" CD4 T cells, immune components that help orchestrate the body's response to pathogens and other invaders. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists develop novel fish embryo technique to identify potential new treatments for diabetes

Johns Hopkins scientists develop novel fish embryo technique to identify potential new treatments for diabetes

In experiments with 500,000 genetically engineered zebrafish embryos, Johns Hopkins scientists report they have developed a potentially better and more accurate way to screen for useful drugs, and they have used it to identify 24 drug candidates that increase the number of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. [More]
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