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New eye-tracking device measures severity of concussion and brain injury

New eye-tracking device measures severity of concussion and brain injury

New research out of NYU Langone Medical Center could move the medical community one step closer toward effectively detecting concussion and quantifying its severity. [More]
Clear and concise communication essential to quality patient care in ED

Clear and concise communication essential to quality patient care in ED

The high-risk, rapidly changing nature of hospital Emergency Departments creates an environment where stress levels and staff burnout rates are high, but researchers at St. Michael's Hospital have identified the secret sauce that helps many emergency clinicians flourish - communication. [More]
Investigators make medical breakthrough in repairing tracheal damage

Investigators make medical breakthrough in repairing tracheal damage

Investigators at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have made a medical breakthrough using 3D printing on a MakerBot Replicator 2X Experimental 3D Printer to create cartilage designed for tracheal repair or replacement. [More]
Common treatment not effective in reducing risk of death for patients with TBI

Common treatment not effective in reducing risk of death for patients with TBI

More than 1.7 million people in the U.S. alone suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) every year, often resulting in permanent disabilities or death. Up to half of these patients will experience progression of bleeding inside or around the brain, the occurrence of which is associated with an increased risk of death. [More]
Majority of Canada's homeless adults with mental illness show evidence of cognitive deficits

Majority of Canada's homeless adults with mental illness show evidence of cognitive deficits

Nearly three-quarters of homeless adults with mental illness in Canada show evidence of cognitive deficits, such as difficulties with problem solving, learning and memory, new research has found. [More]
Study explores economic outcomes of hospital-based violence intervention

Study explores economic outcomes of hospital-based violence intervention

At more than 25 hospitals across the U.S., health care professionals have embraced a public health approach to their work--taking action to prevent violent injuries, not just treat them. In programs known as hospital-based violence intervention programs (HVIPs), teams of medical professionals, social workers and researchers step in at a critical moment in a patient's life--the period following a violent injury such as a gunshot or stab wound--with case management, counseling and other services that help these victims break free from the cycle of violence. [More]
Morphine after tonsillectomy may be life threatening for children

Morphine after tonsillectomy may be life threatening for children

Treating post-operative pain with morphine can cause life-threatening respiratory problems in some children who have had their tonsils and/or adenoids removed, new research has found. [More]
New discovery may help doctors develop better treatments for brain, spinal cord injuries

New discovery may help doctors develop better treatments for brain, spinal cord injuries

In a discovery that could dramatically affect the treatment of brain and spinal cord injuries, researchers have identified a previously unknown, beneficial immune response that occurs after injury to the central nervous system. [More]
New study finds link between dyspareunia and mode of delivery

New study finds link between dyspareunia and mode of delivery

Operative birth is associated with persisting pain during or after sexual intercourse, known as dyspareunia, suggests a new study published today (21 January) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. [More]
Tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may trigger age-related macular degeneration

Tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may trigger age-related macular degeneration

New research from scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine has found that tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may be an important triggering factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a degenerative eye disease that can cause severe vision loss and blindness. [More]
Neurobiologists find paradoxical effect of abuse-related cues in infants, adults

Neurobiologists find paradoxical effect of abuse-related cues in infants, adults

Neurobiologists at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere have found a surprising and paradoxical effect of abuse-related cues in rat pups: those cues also can lower depressive-like behavior when the rat pups are fully grown. [More]
Valorem Surgical reports FDA approval and first utilization of MaxiMIS Spinal Fixation System

Valorem Surgical reports FDA approval and first utilization of MaxiMIS Spinal Fixation System

Valorem Surgical, an early stage medical device company with a platform on surgically treating spinal pathologies through a minimally invasive (MIS) approach, today announced that the Company has received FDA clearance and its first case utilizing its minimally invasive MaxiMIS Spinal Fixation System, performed by board-certified, neurosurgeon, Dr. Jae Lim in Reston, VA. [More]
Circumcised boys more likely to develop autism spectrum disorder

Circumcised boys more likely to develop autism spectrum disorder

Research published today by the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine suggests that circumcised boys are more likely than intact boys to develop autism spectrum disorder (ASD) before the age of 10. [More]
New UCLA study sheds light on why some people develop PTSD

New UCLA study sheds light on why some people develop PTSD

Why do some people develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) while others who suffered the same ordeal do not? A new UCLA discovery may shed light on the answer. [More]
Orlando Regional Medical Center opens new patient tower

Orlando Regional Medical Center opens new patient tower

As the new year begins, Orlando Health turns the page to a new chapter in patient, guest and team member experience, when Orlando Regional Medical Center opens its new patient tower. [More]
StrongestMom.com releases free video to help prevent accidental injuries to children

StrongestMom.com releases free video to help prevent accidental injuries to children

To help prevent accidental injuries to children, StrongestMom.com has released a free video in which one of the country's top emergency room physicians and one of the country's top child trauma surgeons talk about their daily experience in the prevention and causes of accidental injury to children. [More]
Improving headache treatment could reduce health care spending, new study suggests

Improving headache treatment could reduce health care spending, new study suggests

Each year more than 12 million Americans visit their doctors complaining of headaches, which result in lost productivity and costs of upward of $31 billion annually. A new study by researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center suggests some of that cost could be offset by physicians ordering fewer tests and an increased focus on counseling about lifestyle changes. [More]
Protecting children in advance from head injuries helps reduce brain trauma

Protecting children in advance from head injuries helps reduce brain trauma

An exhaustive analysis of data from more than 40,000 cases of brain trauma in children - published by the authoritative New England Journal of Medicine - provides convincing evidence that protecting children in advance from head injuries is the key to reducing their severity. [More]

Personal traits may help protect police officers from PTSD symptoms

Personal traits such as resilience, satisfaction with life and a grateful disposition may help shield police officers from symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the aftermath of a natural disaster. [More]
Clementia secures additional $10 million to support development of palovarotene for treatment of FOP

Clementia secures additional $10 million to support development of palovarotene for treatment of FOP

Clementia Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that it has secured an additional $10 million from current investors to support development of the company's lead compound palovarotene for the treatment of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressive (FOP). [More]