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New research estimates unmet surgical needs of forcibly displaced persons

New research estimates unmet surgical needs of forcibly displaced persons

New research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that the world's estimated 60 million refugees, displaced from their homes due to conflict, persecution or human rights violations, may need at least 2.78 million surgeries a year, something thought to be very difficult to arrange in the midst of their upheaval. [More]
Early-life stress may lead to functional dyspepsia in adulthood

Early-life stress may lead to functional dyspepsia in adulthood

Traumatic events early in life can increase levels of norepinephrine—the primary hormone responsible for preparing the body to react to stressful situations—in the gut, increasing the risk of developing chronic indigestion and anxiety during adulthood, a new study in American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology reports. [More]
Fasting-mimicking diet may help decrease multiple sclerosis symptoms

Fasting-mimicking diet may help decrease multiple sclerosis symptoms

Evidence is mounting that a diet mimicking the effects of fasting has health benefits beyond weight loss, with a new USC-led study indicating that it may reduce symptoms of multiple sclerosis. [More]
New, screen-printed, flexible MRI coils could lead to shorter scan time periods

New, screen-printed, flexible MRI coils could lead to shorter scan time periods

New, screen-printed, flexible MRI coils may be able to reduce the amount of time it takes to get an MRI scan. [More]
Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Cooking meat, including beef, pork, fish, or poultry, with high-temperature methods such as pan frying or grilling directly over an open flame can increase exposure to chemicals that can cause changes in DNA that may increase the risk of cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute. [More]
UTHealth to launch clinical study of patients who require abdominal laparotomy

UTHealth to launch clinical study of patients who require abdominal laparotomy

Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston plan to launch a clinical study looking at complication rates in patients who have experienced severe trauma to the abdominal area and require immediate surgery to diagnose and treat the injuries at Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center. [More]
Study highlights need of better diagnostic criteria for people suffering from debilitating grief

Study highlights need of better diagnostic criteria for people suffering from debilitating grief

To better identify and diagnose those suffering from debilitating grief after the death of a loved one, proposed diagnostic criteria need significant modifications, according to research published today in the American Journal of Psychiatry - the first study of its kind to study the performance of newly proposed criteria. [More]
National Cancer Moonshot initiative needs to target proteins that drive cancer

National Cancer Moonshot initiative needs to target proteins that drive cancer

The National Cancer Moonshot initiative needs to move beyond genomics to target the proteins that are driving cancer, according to an Inova Health System and George Mason University collaborative paper published Thursday in the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
Purdue researchers find potential way to overcome limitations posed by CAR T-cell therapy

Purdue researchers find potential way to overcome limitations posed by CAR T-cell therapy

Purdue University researchers may have figured out a way to call off a cancer cell assassin that sometimes goes rogue and assign it a larger tumor-specific "hit list." [More]
Researchers find genetic mutations linked to increased risk factor for PTSD

Researchers find genetic mutations linked to increased risk factor for PTSD

In the largest study of DNA samples from service members with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), researchers have identified genetic mutations that may be associated with an increased risk factor for PTSD. [More]
Researchers explore phenomenon that causes late mortality in sepsis patients

Researchers explore phenomenon that causes late mortality in sepsis patients

It's known that many patients die in the months and years after sepsis. But no one has known if this increased risk of death (in the 30 days to 2 years after sepsis) is because of sepsis itself, or because of the pre-existing health conditions the patient had before acquiring the complication. [More]
New study aims to identify biomarkers linked to cartilage degradation in OA patients

New study aims to identify biomarkers linked to cartilage degradation in OA patients

Joint injury can lead to post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). In fact, about half of all people who rupture the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in their knee will develop PTOA within 10-20 years of the injury. [More]
Children treated at stand-alone Level I PTC have better outcomes following motor vehicle accident

Children treated at stand-alone Level I PTC have better outcomes following motor vehicle accident

Children and adolescents injured in motor vehicle accidents have better outcomes when treated at a stand-alone Level I pediatric trauma center (PTC) than at general adult trauma centers (ATC) or adult trauma centers with added Level I pediatric qualifications (ATC+PTC), according to a new study to be published in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery by researchers from Children's Minnesota. [More]
Researchers use high-power prisms to design new eyeglasses to expand visual fields of hemianopia patients

Researchers use high-power prisms to design new eyeglasses to expand visual fields of hemianopia patients

Researchers from the Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School have designed three new eyeglasses using high-power prisms to optimally expand the visual fields of patients with hemianopia, a condition in which the visual fields of both eyes are cut by half. [More]
Overnight extubations in ICU patients linked to higher mortality

Overnight extubations in ICU patients linked to higher mortality

Adult patients who were admitted to U.S. intensive care units had higher mortality if they were extubated overnight. The results reported at the ATS 2016 International Conference may discourage hospital administrators from expanding the practice of overnight extubations in ICUs, which the lead author noted are rapidly being transformed to provide continuity of care. [More]
Teddy Bear Clinic invites children and their friends to explore HCMC’s pediatric emergency department

Teddy Bear Clinic invites children and their friends to explore HCMC’s pediatric emergency department

Visiting an emergency department for the first time can be scary – but not on Saturday, May 21 from 8-10 AM when kids are invited to bring their Teddy Bears to Hennepin County Medical Center’s (HCMC) Emergency Department for a special Teddy Bear Clinic. [More]
UTHealth awarded $1.55 million grant to evaluate, validate assessment tools for grieving children

UTHealth awarded $1.55 million grant to evaluate, validate assessment tools for grieving children

The New York Life Foundation has awarded a three-year, $1.55 million grant to The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Trauma and Grief Center for Youth to establish the GIFT (Grief-Informed Foundations of Treatment) network, a multi-site practice-research network that will refine, evaluate and validate assessment tools for grieving children to identify the appropriate support or intervention needed. [More]
Motor protein Myo1c uses actin cytoskeleton as 'track' for Neph1 transport

Motor protein Myo1c uses actin cytoskeleton as 'track' for Neph1 transport

The motor protein Myo1c binds to Neph1, a protein crucial for ensuring effective filtration by the kidney, and serves as one mode of its cellular transport, according to findings by investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina and their collaborators reported in the May 16, 2016 issue of Molecular and Cellular Biology. [More]
Diets rich in fruits and vegetables can help prevent chronic inflammation

Diets rich in fruits and vegetables can help prevent chronic inflammation

A new study by the University of Liverpool's Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease has identified food stuffs that can help prevent chronic inflammation that contributes to many leading causes of death. [More]
Altered coagulation caused by HIV virus linked to increased risk of non-AIDS diseases

Altered coagulation caused by HIV virus linked to increased risk of non-AIDS diseases

With more than 36.9 million people infected globally, HIV continues to be a major public health issue. Those living with the virus are at an increased risk for other non-AIDS diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, and though it's not entirely clear why, this has been associated with inflammation and abnormal blood clotting. [More]
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