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Clinical observations: replacing paper with mobiles? An interview with Eran David

Clinical observations: replacing paper with mobiles? An interview with Eran David

Replacing paper with technology has significant safety ramifications. Using a mobile device for electronic observations increases the accuracy of documentation and score calculations. [More]
Strong link found between incarceration of family members during childhood and heart attacks in men

Strong link found between incarceration of family members during childhood and heart attacks in men

A parent's incarceration has immediate, devastating effects on a family. Now, Virginia Tech and University of Toronto researchers say there may be a longer term risk: Men who as children experienced a family member's incarceration are approximately twice as likely to have a heart attack in later adulthood in comparison with men who were not exposed to such a childhood trauma. [More]
People with traumatic brain injuries may have buildup of plaques related to Alzheimer's disease

People with traumatic brain injuries may have buildup of plaques related to Alzheimer's disease

A new study suggests that people with brain injuries following head trauma may have buildup of the plaques related to Alzheimer's disease in their brains. The research is published in the February 3, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Prenatal stress affects babies' health in war-torn areas

Prenatal stress affects babies' health in war-torn areas

Children from war-torn areas of the globe are affected by trauma even before they are born, according to a new University of Florida study. [More]
Pullman Regional Hospital implements new incident management and patient safety system

Pullman Regional Hospital implements new incident management and patient safety system

Pullman Regional Hospital and RGP Healthcare, a division of Resources Global Professionals, today jointly announced that Pullman Regional is implementing Pavisse™, a new, state-of-the-art incident management and patient safety system. [More]
New study finds steep decline in basic science publications

New study finds steep decline in basic science publications

A new study has found a steep decline in the number of scholarly papers about basic science published in leading medical journals in the last 20 years. [More]
Rochester scientists identify stem cells capable of skull formation, craniofacial bone repair in mice

Rochester scientists identify stem cells capable of skull formation, craniofacial bone repair in mice

A team of Rochester scientists has, for the first time, identified and isolated a stem cell population capable of skull formation and craniofacial bone repair in mice--achieving an important step toward using stem cells for bone reconstruction of the face and head in the future, according to a new paper in Nature Communications. [More]
New partnership aims to study underlying neurobiology and genetics of PTSD, TBI

New partnership aims to study underlying neurobiology and genetics of PTSD, TBI

Cohen Veterans Bioscience today announced two new collaborative partnership efforts that will provide critical research tools for understanding the underlying neurobiology and genetics of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) with the goal of accelerating the development of first generation diagnostics and treatments. [More]
Sphingosine kinase inhibitor slows castration-resistant prostate cancer cell growth

Sphingosine kinase inhibitor slows castration-resistant prostate cancer cell growth

A first-in-class sphingosine kinase 2 inhibitor slowed the growth of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells, in part by inhibiting the enzyme dihydroceramide desaturase (DEGS), but did not kill them, according to the results of preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies published in the December 2015 issue of Molecular Cancer Therapeutics by researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina and others. [More]
Family members affected by sudden cardiac death need better psychological support

Family members affected by sudden cardiac death need better psychological support

In a world-first survey study, researchers from the Centenary Institute and the University of Sydney have highlighted the need for better psychological support for families affected by sudden cardiac death due to a genetic heart disease. [More]
Refugee women have higher risk of giving birth too early than non-refugee immigrants

Refugee women have higher risk of giving birth too early than non-refugee immigrants

Refugee women who come to Canada have greater risk of giving birth prematurely than non-refugee immigrants, a study by a St. Michael's Hospital researcher has found. Those risks are fueled by the fact that the preterm birth rate was 7.1 per cent among secondary refugees - those who spent more than six months in a transit country before arriving in Canada -compared to five per cent among secondary, non-refugee immigrants. [More]
Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: an interview with Dr. Michael Dudley

Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: an interview with Dr. Michael Dudley

Enterobacteriaceae refer to the family of bacteria such as E. coli and Klebsiella that are bacterial pathogens most frequently associated with hospital-acquired infections [More]
New €5.6 million project aims to develop cell-based haemophilia A therapy

New €5.6 million project aims to develop cell-based haemophilia A therapy

Loughborough University is working with a team of international partners on a new €5.6 million project to develop a cell based haemophilia A therapy. [More]
Centinel Spine reports FDA clearance and first surgical implantation of ALTOS system

Centinel Spine reports FDA clearance and first surgical implantation of ALTOS system

Centinel Spine, Inc., announces the U.S. Food and Drug Administration clearance of ALTOS, a posterior cervical thoracic stabilization system indicated for use in either the lateral masses of the cervical spine or the pedicles of the cervical-thoracic spine. The first surgical implantation of the ALTOS system was performed by Gery Hsu, MD, CRMC Medical Associates, Coffeyville, KS on January 4, 2016. [More]
Childhood abuse and neglect associated with worse executive function in adulthood

Childhood abuse and neglect associated with worse executive function in adulthood

The scars of childhood abuse and neglect affect adults' brains for decades to come - including their ability to process and act on information both quickly and accurately, new research suggests. [More]
UM SOM study leads to FDA approval of Neulasta drug for treatment of radiation injury

UM SOM study leads to FDA approval of Neulasta drug for treatment of radiation injury

As a result of research performed by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of a drug to treat the deleterious effects of radiation exposure following a nuclear incident. The drug, Neulasta, is one of a very small number that have been approved for the treatment of acute radiation injury. [More]
NSSA offers tips to avoid winter sports injuries

NSSA offers tips to avoid winter sports injuries

If you're suited up and ready to ski or snowboard, you're not alone. These popular sports draw more than 9.5 million participants a year, according to the National Ski Areas Association, and they accounted for 53.6 million total skier and snowboarder visits to ski areas in the 2014-15 season. [More]
Scientists reveal why non-alcoholic steatohepatitis worsens in obese people

Scientists reveal why non-alcoholic steatohepatitis worsens in obese people

In results published on October 19, 2015 in the Journal of Lipid Research, a team of translational scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina report a new reason why non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) worsens in people who are obese. [More]
UCSF-led study shows increase in use of CT scans in patients with non-serious injuries

UCSF-led study shows increase in use of CT scans in patients with non-serious injuries

Twice as many patients with non-serious injuries, such as fractures or neck strain, are undergoing CT scans in emergency departments at California hospitals, according to a UCSF-led study, which tracked the use of the imaging from 2005 to 2013. [More]
Dartmouth investigators show how vestibular system's horizontal canals influence navigation

Dartmouth investigators show how vestibular system's horizontal canals influence navigation

Dartmouth researchers have found the first direct evidence showing how the vestibular system's horizontal canals play a key role in sensing our direction in the environment. [More]
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