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Study: CPR usually saves lives on TV, but not in real life

Study: CPR usually saves lives on TV, but not in real life

If you think that performing CPR on a person whose heart has stopped is a surefire way to save their life, you may be watching too much TV. [More]

Doc Wayne Youth Services selected as winner of 2015 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Sports Award

Doc Wayne Youth Services, a Mass.-based nonprofit that fuses sport and therapy to heal and strengthen youth, has been selected as a 2015 winner of the inaugural Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Sports Award. Other winners in this elite group include Tony Hawk Foundation and Chicago Fire Foundation. Doc Wayne Youth Services and the other winners will each receive a $5,000 award and will be honored at a Sept. 10, 2015 ceremony at RWJF headquarters in Princeton, N.J. [More]
Arthrosurface inlay implant dramatically reduces progression of osteoarthritis

Arthrosurface inlay implant dramatically reduces progression of osteoarthritis

A recent study by Feucht et al, published in the KSSTA Knee Journal, compared the Arthrosurface HemiCAP Wave implant, which is based on an "inlay" Arthroplasty design, versus an "onlay" design implant for isolated patellofemoral disease. While both implant groups showed similar improvements in function and pain scores, none of the patients in the "inlay" group showed progression of osteoarthritis (OA). [More]
SLU study finds that length of stay in ED makes no real difference in mortality of trauma patient

SLU study finds that length of stay in ED makes no real difference in mortality of trauma patient

The amount of time a trauma patient stays in the emergency department (ED) makes no real difference in the patient's mortality, researchers at Saint Louis University found in a recent study. [More]
NTNU researchers find link between aggression and gene variant in children

NTNU researchers find link between aggression and gene variant in children

Some children react more strongly to negative experiences than others. Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology have found a link between aggression and variants of a particular gene. [More]
Individuals having high blood levels of two closely related proteins experience few adverse health events

Individuals having high blood levels of two closely related proteins experience few adverse health events

Individuals previously diagnosed with heart disease may be less likely to experience heart failure, heart attacks, or stroke, or to die from these events, if they have higher blood levels of two very closely related proteins, according to a new study led by a UC San Francisco research team. [More]
Variations in opioid receptor genes linked to neonatal abstinence syndrome severity in newborn babies

Variations in opioid receptor genes linked to neonatal abstinence syndrome severity in newborn babies

A new study led by researchers at Boston Medical Center indicates that variations in opioid receptor genes are associated with more severe neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in newborn babies. The findings, published online in Drug & Alcohol Dependence, could help lead to the development of individualized treatment plans tailored to each infants' risk of requiring medication to curb their NAS symptoms, which could help improve these patients' outcomes and reduce how long some stay in the hospital. [More]
Elite CBD Remedy Tincture now available through Mary's Nutritionals

Elite CBD Remedy Tincture now available through Mary's Nutritionals

Elite Botanicals, the leading cultivator of CBD-rich hemp in Colorado, today announced that it's Elite CBD Remedy Tincture is now available through medical and recreational dispensaries in Colorado, as well as online through Mary's Nutritionals. [More]
Clementia expands enrollment to include children with FOP in ongoing Phase 2 clinical trial

Clementia expands enrollment to include children with FOP in ongoing Phase 2 clinical trial

Clementia Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the initiation of enrollment of children as young as 6 years old in the company's ongoing Phase 2 study of palovarotene for the treatment of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP). [More]
Study looks at patterns of emotion regulation in the brains of abused children

Study looks at patterns of emotion regulation in the brains of abused children

Children who have been abused typically experience more intense emotions than their peers who have not been abused. This is often considered a byproduct of living in volatile, dangerous environments. A recent study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP) set to find out what happens when these children are taught how to regulate their emotions. [More]

UO survey on sexual victimization issues highlights need to increase awareness of available services

A new survey on sexual victimization issues at the University of Oregon reaffirms previous findings that there is a need to increase awareness about available services, while decreasing negative perceptions of institutional support. [More]
Some head impact sensors too slow and miss most serious, angular hits

Some head impact sensors too slow and miss most serious, angular hits

With increasing concern about concussions from sports, some players have started wearing electronic sensors to measure head impacts. [More]
Researchers evaluate use of pharmacy-based naloxone education and distribution to fight opioid overdoses

Researchers evaluate use of pharmacy-based naloxone education and distribution to fight opioid overdoses

In response to the growing opioid crisis, several states, including Massachusetts and Rhode Island, have granted pharmacists the authority to provide naloxone rescue kits without a prescription to at-risk patients. This model of pharmacy-based naloxone (PBN) education and distribution is one of the public health strategies currently being evaluated at hundreds of pharmacies in both states to determine the impact on opioid overdose death rates. [More]
Researchers awarded $6.4 million grant to identify causes of neurodevelopmental disorders in children with CHDs

Researchers awarded $6.4 million grant to identify causes of neurodevelopmental disorders in children with CHDs

As advances in medicine are giving rise to growing numbers of children who are surviving severe heart defects, a phenomenon is emerging that is catching parents and healthcare providers off-guard. Over half of these children also have a seemingly unrelated disability: neurodevelopmental disorders. Some have severe cognitive and motor deficits that arise early. [More]
WHO provides emergency health access to internally displaced persons, host communities in Taiz and Hodeida governorates

WHO provides emergency health access to internally displaced persons, host communities in Taiz and Hodeida governorates

In response to the growing humanitarian crisis in Tiaz and Hodeida governorates, and the rising number of civilian injuries in the southern governorates of Yemen, WHO is coordinating a rapid response to provide emergency health access to the injured, internally displaced persons and host communities. [More]
Brief exposure to sudden sounds or mild trauma can form long-term memories

Brief exposure to sudden sounds or mild trauma can form long-term memories

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have found how even brief exposure to sudden sounds or mild trauma can form permanent, long-term brain connections, or memories, in a specific region of the brain. Moreover, the research team, working with rats, says it was able to chemically stimulate those biological pathways in the locus coeruleus -- the area of the brain best known for releasing the "fight or flight" hormone noradrenaline -- to heighten and improve the animals' hearing. [More]
Study finds significant decline in CT usage at children's hospitals for common childhood diagnoses

Study finds significant decline in CT usage at children's hospitals for common childhood diagnoses

A study published online Aug. 24 by the journal Pediatrics finds a significant decrease in the use of computed tomography (CT) scans at children's hospitals for 10 common childhood diagnoses including seizure, concussion, appendectomy and upper respiratory tract infection. [More]
Few U.S. hospitals comply with CDC infection prevention guidelines for arterial catheter insertions

Few U.S. hospitals comply with CDC infection prevention guidelines for arterial catheter insertions

According to a survey conducted by Rhode Island Hospital researchers, there is significant variability regarding how clinicians manage catheters placed in the arteries of patients in intensive care units. Some practices may increase risk of infection associated with these catheters. Fewer than half of those surveyed complied with current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) infection prevention guidelines for arterial catheter insertions. [More]
Maltreated children experience more intense emotions than their peers

Maltreated children experience more intense emotions than their peers

Children who have been abused or exposed to other types of trauma typically experience more intense emotions than their peers, a byproduct of living in volatile, dangerous environments. [More]
Caring for young children with eczema

Caring for young children with eczema

The excitement of a newborn baby turned to worry when a few weeks after Lorenzo Torres-Ramirez was born his parents started to notice red spots on his face. [More]
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