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New noninvasive treatment option improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

New noninvasive treatment option improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

Treatment with MRI-guided focused ultrasound significantly improves tremors and quality of life in patients with essential tremor (ET), the most common movement disorder, according to a study published in the August 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Tulane professor receives three-year grant to improve survival of mesenchymal stem cells

Tulane professor receives three-year grant to improve survival of mesenchymal stem cells

Kim O'Connor, a professor in Tulane University's Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, received a three-year $599,638 grant from the National Science Foundation to study ways to improve the survival of mesenchymal stem cells once they are implanted in patients. [More]
Trauma Innovation unites healthcare professionals across Europe to discuss future of patient care

Trauma Innovation unites healthcare professionals across Europe to discuss future of patient care

Across the globe, the threat level for international terrorism is high. The unpredictable timings and locations of the recent atrocities in Belgium, France and Germany have highlighted how important it is for medical professionals to be prepared for mass casualty incidents. [More]
Wearable device for sleep quality enhancement could reduce risk of PTSD in military personnel

Wearable device for sleep quality enhancement could reduce risk of PTSD in military personnel

Brain State Technologies announces the presentation of a study that describes how use of a wearable neurotechnology device by military personnel could improve sleep and thereby lower the risk of developing post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). [More]
Many medical specialists accept shaken baby syndrome as valid medical diagnosis

Many medical specialists accept shaken baby syndrome as valid medical diagnosis

A University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues have conducted the first-ever survey of physicians on the validity of "abusive head trauma" as a medical diagnosis. [More]
New guidance provides effective practices for prehospital use of TXA in injured patients

New guidance provides effective practices for prehospital use of TXA in injured patients

Tranexamic acid (TXA) is currently being administered to injured patients by many prehospital air and ground systems, despite a lack of evidence supporting or refuting its efficacy in preventing hemorrhage. [More]
Virtual reality training helps paralyzed patients regain movement

Virtual reality training helps paralyzed patients regain movement

Eight people with long-term paralysis from spinal cord injuries have regained some motor control after learning to control their own brain activity. [More]
CARRS-Q study shows caffeine combined with bright light can improve driver alertness

CARRS-Q study shows caffeine combined with bright light can improve driver alertness

Bright light combined with caffeine can improve driving performance and alertness of chronically sleep deprived young drivers, according to a Queensland University of Technology road safety study. [More]
Manganese-based antioxidant complex of Deinococcus protects mice from gamma radiation

Manganese-based antioxidant complex of Deinococcus protects mice from gamma radiation

They call it "Conan the Bacterium," and now it may be used to help save lives in the event of a nuclear disaster or terrorist attack. [More]
Researchers develop new non-invasive technique to prevent burn scars

Researchers develop new non-invasive technique to prevent burn scars

A group of researchers from Tel Aviv University and Harvard University has devised a new non-invasive method to prevent burn scarring caused by the proliferation of collagen cells. [More]
Neuropathic pain could be significantly reduced by targeting brain cells

Neuropathic pain could be significantly reduced by targeting brain cells

Neuropathic pain - which affects more than 1 million Americans - could be reduced or even eliminated by targeting brain cells that are supposed to provide immunity but, in some instances, do the opposite, causing chronic pain that could last a lifetime. [More]
UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

As world leaders increasingly recognize the Zika virus as an international public health threat, the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine's Institute for Global Health has been chosen as one of three study sites in a human safety trial of a new Zika vaccine. [More]
Experts provide safety tips for children and parents to help prevent child-pedestrian injuries

Experts provide safety tips for children and parents to help prevent child-pedestrian injuries

The start of the school year is the most dangerous time on neighborhood streets and in school zones for child-pedestrians and bus riders. [More]
Vigilant monitoring by parents, caregivers could help prevent drowning among children

Vigilant monitoring by parents, caregivers could help prevent drowning among children

More children are coming to hospital emergency departments this summer for drownings or near-drownings, including at Penn State Children's Hospital, where staff members say they have seen more cases recently than they can recall in several years. [More]
Sickle cell trait linked to increased risk of rhabdomyolysis among African American Soldiers

Sickle cell trait linked to increased risk of rhabdomyolysis among African American Soldiers

A new study published Aug. 4 in the New England Journal of Medicine indicates that among African American U.S. Army Soldiers, sickle cell trait is not associated with an increase in mortality, but is associated with a modest increase in the risk of exertional rhabdomyolysis. [More]
Shock Doctor announces partnership with AAO to promote mouthguard use among youth athletes

Shock Doctor announces partnership with AAO to promote mouthguard use among youth athletes

Leading athletic protection and performance brand Shock Doctor announced today an official relationship with the American Association of Orthodontists. [More]
AOFAS volunteers travel to Vietnam for treating people with lower extremity deformities

AOFAS volunteers travel to Vietnam for treating people with lower extremity deformities

Volunteers from the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society returned to Vietnam this year to provide corrective surgery for children and adults with lower extremity deformities and disabilities. [More]
Study clarifies role of KLF12 in CRC tumor growth

Study clarifies role of KLF12 in CRC tumor growth

Results of preclinical studies by MUSC investigators reported in the July 2016 issue of PLOS One, demonstrate for the first time that the transcription factor KLF12 promotes CRC cell growth, in part, by activating EGR1. Furthermore, data demonstrate that KLF12 and EGR1 levels synergistically correlate with poor CRC prognoses. [More]
Robotic and open surgeries for prostate cancer achieve similar quality of life outcomes at 3 months

Robotic and open surgeries for prostate cancer achieve similar quality of life outcomes at 3 months

The first randomised controlled trial to directly compare robotic surgery with open surgery for patients with localised prostate cancer finds that robotic and open surgery achieve similar results in terms of key quality of life indicators at 3 months. [More]
Scarring can have negative impact on patients' quality of life

Scarring can have negative impact on patients' quality of life

Whether it's from sudden trauma, scheduled surgery or serious acne, scarring can have a profound impact on patients. [More]
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