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Changes in volume of patients in trauma centers can influence patient outcomes

Changes in volume of patients in trauma centers can influence patient outcomes

University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine researchers have demonstrated for the first time that changes over time in the volume of patients seen by trauma centers influence the likelihood of seriously injured patients living or dying. [More]
Researchers identify specific pathways involved in development of mucormycosis

Researchers identify specific pathways involved in development of mucormycosis

Research published today in the journal, Nature Communications, provides new insights into the evolution of Mucorales fungi, which cause a fatal infection in ever-increasing segments of patient population, and several molecular pathways that might be exploited as potential therapeutic or diagnostic targets. [More]
AJCC article outlines role of LTAC hospitals in health care continuum

AJCC article outlines role of LTAC hospitals in health care continuum

Advances in technology have helped more patients survive acute illness and trauma, and these patients are increasingly transferred to long-term acute care hospitals. [More]
Study shows physicians accept shaken baby syndrome, abusive head trauma as valid diagnoses

Study shows physicians accept shaken baby syndrome, abusive head trauma as valid diagnoses

Survey data reveals a high degree of medical consensus that shaking a young child is capable of producing subdural hematoma (a life-threatening pooling of blood outside the brain), severe retinal hemorrhage, coma or death, according to a study published in The Journal of Pediatrics. [More]
Early initiation of prophylaxis linked to lower rates of PE and DVT in patients with severe brain injuries

Early initiation of prophylaxis linked to lower rates of PE and DVT in patients with severe brain injuries

People who sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are at high risk for developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). PE is a leading cause of death in these patients. [More]

DePuy Synthes Trauma launches new system to treat hand fractures and correct deformities

Today DePuy Synthes Trauma announced the launch of the Variable Angle Locking Hand System, a comprehensive and versatile system of anatomically contoured and low-profile plates to treat hand fractures and correct deformities. The system features the company’s proprietary Variable Angle Locking technology. [More]
Patient characteristics, outcomes differ for indoor and outdoor fallers, study shows

Patient characteristics, outcomes differ for indoor and outdoor fallers, study shows

Falling can have serious consequences for older adults, including a loss of function and increased risk of institutionalization. [More]
Scientists detect gut bacteria in deepest reaches of failing lungs

Scientists detect gut bacteria in deepest reaches of failing lungs

No one knows for sure how they got there. But the discovery that bacteria that normally live in the gut can be detected in the lungs of critically ill people and animals could mean a lot for intensive care patients. [More]
Novel device for mitral valve repair shows success in human study

Novel device for mitral valve repair shows success in human study

Researchers investigating a novel device to repair the mitral heart valve report 100 percent procedural success in a safety and performance study, the first such study done in humans. [More]
Tecnis Symfony Extended Range of Vision IOL approved for cataract patients

Tecnis Symfony Extended Range of Vision IOL approved for cataract patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first intraocular lens (IOL) that provides cataract patients with an extended depth-of-focus, which helps improve their sharpness of vision (visual acuity) at near, intermediate and far distances. [More]
Study shows parvalbumin-interneurons in the amygdala influence fear memory encoding

Study shows parvalbumin-interneurons in the amygdala influence fear memory encoding

Fear memory encoding, the process responsible for persistent reactions to trauma-associated cues, is influenced by a sparse but potent population of inhibitory cells called parvalbumin-interneurons (PV-INs) in the amygdala, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online July 14 in the journal Neuron. [More]
Expert outlines five key reasons to examine relationship between childbirth and media

Expert outlines five key reasons to examine relationship between childbirth and media

An academic from the University of Leicester has discussed ways in which the media shapes society’s perceptions, anxieties and emotions arising out of birth. [More]
New opioid use among older adults with COPD linked to increased risk for respiratory-related death

New opioid use among older adults with COPD linked to increased risk for respiratory-related death

Older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who start using opioids have a more than two-fold higher risk of dying from a respiratory-related complication compared to non-opioid users, St. Michael's Hospital researchers have found. [More]
Review highlights lack of consistent assessment tool to assess driving ability in people with Alzheimer's

Review highlights lack of consistent assessment tool to assess driving ability in people with Alzheimer's

No single assessment tool is able to consistently determine driving ability in people with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment, a St. Michael's Hospital research review has found. [More]
Study provides more insights into abusive head injury in small children

Study provides more insights into abusive head injury in small children

Abusive head injury, sometimes referred to as shaken baby syndrome or non-accidental trauma, is the third leading cause of head injuries in small children in the US. For children under the age of 1 year, it is the cause of the majority of serious head injuries. [More]
New study identifies four subtypes of human insulin producing beta cells involved in diabetes

New study identifies four subtypes of human insulin producing beta cells involved in diabetes

A new study led by nationally prominent stem cell scientist Markus Grompe, M.D., has determined the existence of at least four separate subtypes of human insulin producing beta cells that may be important in the understanding and treatment of diabetes. The findings were published online today in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
Connectome imaging could help predict severity of language deficits after stoke

Connectome imaging could help predict severity of language deficits after stoke

Loss or impairment of the ability to speak is one of the most feared complications of stroke--one faced by about 20% of stroke patients. Language, as one of the most complex functions of the brain, is not seated in a single brain region but involves connections between many regions. [More]
Single dose of new molecule could protect the brain from cognitive impairments after mTBI

Single dose of new molecule could protect the brain from cognitive impairments after mTBI

A new molecule could protect the brain from cognitive impairments after a mild traumatic brain injury, according to Hebrew University of Jerusalem scientists. [More]
Five-year NIH grant awarded to four NYC medical centers for PMI Cohort Program

Five-year NIH grant awarded to four NYC medical centers for PMI Cohort Program

Columbia University Medical Center and Weill Cornell Medicine, in collaboration with NewYork-Presbyterian and NYC Health + Hospitals/Harlem, have been awarded a grant from the NIH for approximately $4 million in fiscal year 2016 to enroll participants in the Cohort Program of President Barack Obama's Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI)—a large-scale research effort to improve our ability to prevent and treat disease based on individual differences in lifestyle, environment and genetics. [More]
Study shows how infill weight of artificial turf surfaces can affect incidence of football injuries

Study shows how infill weight of artificial turf surfaces can affect incidence of football injuries

As artificial turf systems are increasingly used at all levels, new research is needed to understand how these surfaces can impact athlete safety. [More]
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