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Mark A. Lumley recognized by BSBS of MI for research on cognitive-behavioral coping skills training

Mark A. Lumley recognized by BSBS of MI for research on cognitive-behavioral coping skills training

Mark A. Lumley, Ph.D., professor and director of the clinical psychology Ph.D. program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Wayne State University, recently received the 2015 Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation McDevitt Excellence in Research Award in the area of clinical research. [More]
RegenScientific gets FDA approval for Renu Gel injectable implant

RegenScientific gets FDA approval for Renu Gel injectable implant

RegenScientific announced that it has received FDA-clearance for its Renu Gel injectable implant indicated for vocal fold injection augmentation and today the company commenced shipments of this new product to physicians and hospitals in the United States. [More]
ProMedica, UT partner to build one of nation’s top academic medical centers in northwest Ohio

ProMedica, UT partner to build one of nation’s top academic medical centers in northwest Ohio

In just 10 years, this nation could have a shortage of between 46,000 and 90,000 physicians. This is according to a recent report released by the Association of American Medical Colleges. Major contributing factors include a growing and aging population, plus one-third of practicing physicians with plans to retire in the next decade. These shortages are expected to be particularly challenging for communities the size of Toledo competing with larger metropolitan areas to attract future doctors and caregivers. [More]
West Tennessee Healthcare, HealthSouth partner to jointly operate inpatient rehabilitation hospital in Jackson

West Tennessee Healthcare, HealthSouth partner to jointly operate inpatient rehabilitation hospital in Jackson

West Tennessee Healthcare and HealthSouth Corporation have signed an agreement to form a joint venture to own and operate a 48-bed inpatient rehabilitation hospital in Jackson, Tennessee. [More]
Esophageal cancer patients treated with proton therapy experience less toxic side effects

Esophageal cancer patients treated with proton therapy experience less toxic side effects

New research by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine has found that esophageal cancer patients treated with proton therapy experienced significantly less toxic side effects than patients treated with older radiation therapies. [More]
New hope for patients suffering from most severe forms of anorexia nervosa

New hope for patients suffering from most severe forms of anorexia nervosa

Anorexia Nervosa has the highest mortality rate of any mental illness. In its most severe form, victims face a devastating 4,500% increased risk for death. In the wake of the recent national attention on the limited treatment options available for these extreme cases, it is important for sufferers to know that help is available. [More]
LSDF awards $2.9 million in funding to help commercialize major medical breakthroughs

LSDF awards $2.9 million in funding to help commercialize major medical breakthroughs

Celiac disease-safe wheat, premature infant pain detection, and new medicines to fight flu and cancer are among the ideas to receive $2.9 million in funding from Washington's Life Sciences Discovery Fund (LSDF). [More]
Researchers map out surgical anatomy, approaches for auditory brainstem implant placement

Researchers map out surgical anatomy, approaches for auditory brainstem implant placement

A technique called auditory brainstem implantation can restore hearing for patients who can't benefit from cochlear implants. A team of US and Japanese experts has mapped out the surgical anatomy and approaches for auditory brainstem implantation in the June issue of Operative Neurosurgery, published on behalf of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
OrthoSpace announces completion of financing transaction

OrthoSpace announces completion of financing transaction

OrthoSpace Ltd. announced today the completion of a financing transaction led by HealthpointCapital, LLC, which also includes existing investors Smith & Nephew and TriVentures. [More]
Study shows significant benefits of microclinics in rural Kenyan HIV patients

Study shows significant benefits of microclinics in rural Kenyan HIV patients

A team led by researchers from UC San Francisco, Organic Health Response, and Microclinic International is reporting results of a study that showed significant benefits of microclinics -- an innovative intervention that mobilized rural Kenyan HIV patients' informal social networks to support their staying in care. [More]
Post-operative atrial fibrillation can significantly increase risk of heart attack or stroke

Post-operative atrial fibrillation can significantly increase risk of heart attack or stroke

As many as 12 percent of patients undergoing major, non-cardiac surgery experience an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation. [More]
Simple blood test can predict evidence of TBI on radiographic imaging, injury severity

Simple blood test can predict evidence of TBI on radiographic imaging, injury severity

New study results show that a simple blood test to measure brain-specific proteins released after a person suffers a traumatic brain injury (TBI) can reliably predict both evidence of TBI on radiographic imaging and injury severity. [More]
Olympus becomes exclusive distributor of Terumo's GLIDEWIRE Urologic Guidewire in the U.S.

Olympus becomes exclusive distributor of Terumo's GLIDEWIRE Urologic Guidewire in the U.S.

Olympus, a global technology leader in designing and delivering innovative solutions for medical and surgical procedures, among other core businesses, announced today that it has partnered with Terumo Corporation to be the exclusive distributor of the GLIDEWIRE Urologic Hydrophilic Coated Guidewire, a device cleared by the FDA for urological use. [More]
Automated analysis of vital signs could help prevent trauma patients from life-threatening bleeding

Automated analysis of vital signs could help prevent trauma patients from life-threatening bleeding

Automated analysis of the vital signs commonly monitored in patients being transported to trauma centers could significantly improve the ability to diagnose those with life-threatening bleeding before they arrive at the hospital, potentially saving their lives. [More]
Workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduces stress levels of employees

Workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduces stress levels of employees

A study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center found that a workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduced stress levels of employees exposed to a highly stressful occupational environment. [More]
Bronchitis can cause pneumonia, says Loyola physician

Bronchitis can cause pneumonia, says Loyola physician

When a cold has lasted too long or a cough is especially bothersome, it's important to see a medical professional. [More]
Scientists discover way to regrow bone tissue using proteins produced by stem cells

Scientists discover way to regrow bone tissue using proteins produced by stem cells

Scientists have discovered a way to regrow bone tissue using the protein signals produced by stem cells. This technology could help treat victims who have experienced major trauma to a limb, like soldiers wounded in combat or casualties of a natural disaster. The new method improves on older therapies by providing a sustainable source for fresh tissue and reducing the risk of tumor formation that can arise with stem cell transplants. [More]
Scientists uncover mechanism behind 'tubulin code'

Scientists uncover mechanism behind 'tubulin code'

Driving down the highway, you encounter ever-changing signs -- speed limits, exits, food and gas options. Seeing these roadside markers may cause you to slow down, change lanes or start thinking about lunch. In a similar way, cellular structures called microtubules are tagged with a variety of chemical markers that can influence cell functions. [More]
Repetitive head injuries may accelerate aging process, increase dementia risk

Repetitive head injuries may accelerate aging process, increase dementia risk

Repetitive head injuries that occur during contact sports and military service may accelerate the aging process by increasing the build-up of beta-amyloid in the brain, leading to worse disease and an increased likelihood of developing dementia. In particular, boxers fared the worst among athletes and military veterans with a history of head injuries. [More]

Special JHTR issue highlights ongoing CDC efforts to reduce population impact of TBI

Ongoing efforts by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to reduce the population impact of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are documented in the May/June issue of The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, official journal of the Brain Injury Association of America. [More]
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