Traumatic Brain Injury News and Research RSS Feed - Traumatic Brain Injury News and Research

Traumatic brain injury (TBI), a form of acquired brain injury, occurs when a sudden trauma causes damage to the brain. TBI can result when the head suddenly and violently hits an object, or when an object pierces the skull and enters brain tissue. Symptoms of a TBI can be mild, moderate, or severe, depending on the extent of the damage to the brain. A person with a mild TBI may remain conscious or may experience a loss of consciousness for a few seconds or minutes. Other symptoms of mild TBI include headache, confusion, lightheadedness, dizziness, blurred vision or tired eyes, ringing in the ears, bad taste in the mouth, fatigue or lethargy, a change in sleep patterns, behavioral or mood changes, and trouble with memory, concentration, attention, or thinking. A person with a moderate or severe TBI may show these same symptoms, but may also have a headache that gets worse or does not go away, repeated vomiting or nausea, convulsions or seizures, an inability to awaken from sleep, dilation of one or both pupils of the eyes, slurred speech, weakness or numbness in the extremities, loss of coordination, and increased confusion, restlessness, or agitation.
New blood test could help diagnose severity of traumatic brain injury

New blood test could help diagnose severity of traumatic brain injury

A new blood test could help emergency room doctors quickly diagnose traumatic brain injury and determine its severity. [More]
Compliance with guidelines for treating traumatic brain injury doesn't necessarily translate into better results

Compliance with guidelines for treating traumatic brain injury doesn't necessarily translate into better results

Two decades ago, the Brain Trauma Foundation published its first set of guidelines for treating traumatic brain injury. [More]
Natural protein fragment produced in the brain can inhibit enzyme implicated in Alzheimer's disease

Natural protein fragment produced in the brain can inhibit enzyme implicated in Alzheimer's disease

For the first time, UCLA researchers have shown that a natural protein fragment produced in the brain can act as an inhibitor of a key enzyme implicated in the onset of Alzheimer's disease, a finding that could lead to the development of new drugs to treat the disease. [More]
Changes in UCH-L1 and GFAP proteins linked to trauma-related brain damage

Changes in UCH-L1 and GFAP proteins linked to trauma-related brain damage

Researchers have shown that the levels of two proteins present in blood and cerebrospinal fluid increase significantly at different time points following traumatic brain injury (TBI), confirming their potential value as biomarkers of trauma-related brain damage. [More]
Two UM researchers receive $500,000 to improve treatment for mild traumatic brain injury

Two UM researchers receive $500,000 to improve treatment for mild traumatic brain injury

Two University of Montana researchers were among six final winners nationally to receive $500,000 from the Head Health Challenge I, an up-to-$10 million program sponsored by General Electric Co. and the National Football League. [More]
Researchers examine brain networks involved in PTSD and TBI

Researchers examine brain networks involved in PTSD and TBI

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have devastating consequences. Both are associated with high rates of disability and suicide, and although they are separate conditions, they commonly co-occur. For example, a soldier who has developed PTSD as a result of a traumatic experience may have also sustained a brain injury during that experience. [More]
C2N-8E12 (ABBV-8E12) gets orphan drug designation from FDA for PSP treatment

C2N-8E12 (ABBV-8E12) gets orphan drug designation from FDA for PSP treatment

C2N Diagnostics and AbbVie today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted their investigational recombinant humanized anti-tau antibody, C2N-8E12 (ABBV-8E12), an orphan drug designation for the treatment of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). [More]
Neuroscientists interpret code the brain uses to make noisy neuronal circuits

Neuroscientists interpret code the brain uses to make noisy neuronal circuits

By analyzing the signals of individual neurons in animals undergoing behavioral tests, neuroscientists at Rice University, Baylor College of Medicine, the University of Geneva and the University of Rochester have deciphered the code the brain uses to make the most of its inherently "noisy" neuronal circuits. [More]
Kessler Foundation, University of Bordeaux team up to study emotional processing deficits in MS people

Kessler Foundation, University of Bordeaux team up to study emotional processing deficits in MS people

Kessler Foundation received $65,500 as part of a two-year $140,000 grant from the ARSEP Foundation of France to the University of Bordeaux, to launch a collaborative study of emotional processing deficits in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Helen Genova, Ph.D., and Jean Lengenfelder, Ph.D., of Kessler Foundation and Bruno Brochet, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Bordeaux are the principal investigators. [More]
New research offers potential for early intervention to prevent neurodegenerative diseases

New research offers potential for early intervention to prevent neurodegenerative diseases

New research led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center provides the first direct evidence linking traumatic brain injury to Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) -- and offers the potential for early intervention to prevent the development of these debilitating neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
New research may explain why youngsters' recovery times vary widely after traumatic brain injury

New research may explain why youngsters' recovery times vary widely after traumatic brain injury

Why do some youngsters bounce back quickly from a traumatic brain injury, while others suffer devastating side effects for years? New UCLA/USC research suggests that damage to the fatty sheaths around the brain's nerve fibers--not injury severity-- may explain the difference. Published in the July 15 edition of the Journal of Neuroscience, the finding identifies possible biomarkers that physicians could use to predict higher-risk patients who require closer monitoring. [More]
Hyperbaric oxygen treatment effective for fibromyalgia

Hyperbaric oxygen treatment effective for fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is almost impossible to diagnose. The chronic pain syndrome strikes an estimated 1 in 70 Americans, most of them women. The disorder is often triggered by head trauma, a neurological infection, or severe emotional stress, and is characterized by symptoms such as musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, memory loss and mood swings. Fibromyalgia is often mistaken for other culprits and most patients suffer months, even years, of unrelenting pain before being properly diagnosed. And once diagnosed, patients enjoy little respite because few therapies have been found to be effective in assuaging its symptoms. [More]
Study: Brain activity changes after memory retraining in TBI patients

Study: Brain activity changes after memory retraining in TBI patients

Kessler Foundation researchers published results of their TBI-MEM trial, the first study to demonstrate significant changes in cerebral activation after memory retraining in individuals with traumatic brain injury. [More]
Kessler Foundation receives $3 million to improve cognition and mobility of people with TBI

Kessler Foundation receives $3 million to improve cognition and mobility of people with TBI

The New Jersey Commission on Brain Injury Research awarded $3 million in grants to Kessler Foundation, half of its total grant distribution in 2015, to improve cognition and mobility of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). [More]
ZEISS and University of California Berkeley launch public-private partnership to support brain microscopy Innovation Center

ZEISS and University of California Berkeley launch public-private partnership to support brain microscopy Innovation Center

ZEISS announces that it is participating in a new public-private partnership with UC Berkeley as part of the Brain Microscopy Innovation Center (BrainMIC), a component of the Berkeley BRAIN Initiative. [More]
TSRI chemists invent scalable method for synthesizing brain-protecting compound

TSRI chemists invent scalable method for synthesizing brain-protecting compound

Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute have invented the first practical, scalable method for synthesizing jiadifenolide, a plant-derived molecule that may have powerful brain-protecting properties. [More]

Brain Injury Services of SWVA receives WWP grant to provide tele-health program for veterans with TBI

Brain Injury Services of SWVA has received a grant from Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) to provide a unique tele-health program, the Community Living Connection (CLiC) for veterans with traumatic brain injury (TBI), to overcome the diverse challenges of the complex condition. WWP's Grant Program, now in its fourth year, is expanding the availability of programs and services that provide support to this generation of injured service members. [More]
Rapid cooling procedures prior to catheterization reduce extent of myocardial infarction

Rapid cooling procedures prior to catheterization reduce extent of myocardial infarction

After an acute myocardial infarction, patients treated with rapid lowering of body temperature by combined cold saline infusion and endovascular cooling had less heart muscle damage and reduced incidence of heart failure. Therapeutic hypothermia was especially protective against heart muscle damage in patients with a large area of myocardium at risk according to an analysis of two clinical trials published in Therapeutic Hypothermia and Temperature Management, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
NYU Langone Medical Center celebrates 65th anniversary of Rusk Rehabilitation

NYU Langone Medical Center celebrates 65th anniversary of Rusk Rehabilitation

Howard A. Rusk, MD (1901-1989), a tall, soft-spoken physician from NYU Langone Medical Center and widely considered "the father of rehabilitation medicine," set about to establish a facility founded on the belief that care should focus on the whole person—not just on their physical illness or disability, but also on their emotional, psychological, and social needs as well. [More]

Study examines how improvised explosive devices can lead to traumatic brain injury

By accounting for a rush of blood to the head, University of Nebraska-Lincoln engineers have found that blast waves from concussive explosions may put far greater strain on the brain than previously thought. [More]
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