Triglyceride News and Research RSS Feed - Triglyceride News and Research

Triglycerides are a type of fat in the bloodstream and fat tissue. Too much of this type of fat can contribute to the hardening and narrowing of your arteries. This puts you at risk of having a heart attack or stroke. Diseases such as diabetes, obesity, kidney failure or alcoholism can cause high triglycerides. Often, high triglycerides occur along with high levels of cholesterol, another type of fat. Triglycerides are measured along with cholesterol as part of a blood test. Normal triglyceride levels are below 150. Levels above 200 are high.
Increased parental longevity linked to lower risk of cardiovascular conditions in offspring

Increased parental longevity linked to lower risk of cardiovascular conditions in offspring

In middle aged populations, the risks of cardiovascular conditions are progressively lower the longer a person's parents lived past 69 years old, according to a study of 186,000 participants using a voluntary database published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Researchers uncover how GWAS-implicated gene affects HDL-cholesterol levels

Researchers uncover how GWAS-implicated gene affects HDL-cholesterol levels

Researchers have uncovered how genes identified from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) affect high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), a biomarker of cardiovascular disease, after comparing several animal models with human patient data. [More]
Paternal over-nutrition may lead to generational obesity and metabolic dysfunction

Paternal over-nutrition may lead to generational obesity and metabolic dysfunction

Paternal intake of a high-fat diet (HFD) can cause genetic changes that lead to generational obesity and metabolic dysfunction—including body weight and fat mass increases and changes in blood pressure, triglyceride levels and fat metabolism—in mice, according to Japanese researchers at Okayama University. [More]
Researchers developing and validating model to predict risk for colon cancer in people under 50

Researchers developing and validating model to predict risk for colon cancer in people under 50

While the incidence of colon cancer has been declining in individuals 50 years old and older in the United States, it is steadily rising in those under age 50. With funding from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Thomas F. Imperiale, M.D., a VA and Regenstrief Institute clinician-researcher, is developing and validating a model to predict risk for colon cancer in those under 50 with no family history of the disease. [More]
New diagnostic model may become cheaper and easier alternative to screen for NAFLD

New diagnostic model may become cheaper and easier alternative to screen for NAFLD

Researchers have developed a diagnostic model that is highly predictive of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). [More]
Vigorous and moderate exercise have same effect on patients with NAFLD

Vigorous and moderate exercise have same effect on patients with NAFLD

A new study shows a brisk walk is just as good as a jog when it comes to reducing liver fatty content, important news for the more than 3 million people diagnosed each year in the U.S. with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). [More]
Experimental lipid-lowering drug improves glucose control in diabetic patients

Experimental lipid-lowering drug improves glucose control in diabetic patients

High triglycerides -- a type of fat, or lipid, in the blood -- increase the risk of heart disease and perhaps type 2 diabetes. For the first time, it has been shown that profoundly lowering triglycerides in diabetics improves their insulin sensitivity over time, which helps them maintain healthy glucose - blood sugar -- levels. [More]
Weight reduction surgery improves serum lipids in obese patients

Weight reduction surgery improves serum lipids in obese patients

Fifty years after the first reported partial-ileal bypass, metabolic surgery has an established role in achieving weight loss and reducing cardiovascular death in obese patients. [More]
McGill researchers discover role of folliculin protein in regulating activity of fat cells

McGill researchers discover role of folliculin protein in regulating activity of fat cells

Researchers have uncovered a new molecular pathway for stimulating the body to burn fat - a discovery that could help fight obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. [More]
New research suggests fasting not required before cholesterol, triglyceride measurement

New research suggests fasting not required before cholesterol, triglyceride measurement

New research from Denmark, Canada and the US involving more than 300,000 individuals suggests that patients do not need to check their cholesterol levels on an empty stomach. So far fasting has been required before cholesterol and triglyceride measurement in all countries except Denmark, where non-fasting blood sampling has been used since 2009. [More]
Low-carbohydrate diet helps reduce growth of glioblastoma tumor cells in mouse models

Low-carbohydrate diet helps reduce growth of glioblastoma tumor cells in mouse models

University of Florida Health researchers have slowed a notoriously aggressive type of brain tumor in mouse models by using a low-carbohydrate diet. [More]
Study demonstrates possibility of simultaneous improvement in all mental, physical functions

Study demonstrates possibility of simultaneous improvement in all mental, physical functions

Let's say you've decided to make some changes in your life. You're out of shape, your mind wanders, your self-esteem is wavering, and you have no idea what you just read. So you decide to focus on one thing -- losing weight, maybe -- and tackle the other issues later. You don't want to take on too much at once, right? [More]
Synthetic nanoparticle can light up and treat atherosclerotic plaques

Synthetic nanoparticle can light up and treat atherosclerotic plaques

Atherosclerosis, a disease in which plaque builds up inside arteries, is a prolific and invisible killer, but it may soon lose its ability to hide in the body and wreak havoc. Scientists have now developed a nanoparticle that functionally mimics nature's own high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The nanoparticle can simultaneously light up and treat atherosclerotic plaques that clog arteries. Therapy with this approach could someday help prevent deadly heart attacks and strokes. [More]
Specific gene mutation may significantly reduce risk of heart attack

Specific gene mutation may significantly reduce risk of heart attack

People with a specific gene mutation have a 50 percent lower risk of suffering a heart attack. This is what an international team of researchers headed by the cardiologist Prof. Heribert Schunkert, Medical Director of the German Heart Center at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), discovered in a broad comparative study. If this gene were switched off with medications it could reduce the risk of coronary disease significantly. [More]
Genetic errors may reduce heart attack risk, study finds

Genetic errors may reduce heart attack risk, study finds

To reduce risk of heart attack, the benefits of a healthy lifestyle are clear. But genetics can still stack the deck. Some people's genes bestow a natural advantage — or disadvantage — in protecting against heart disease, the leading cause of death worldwide. [More]
Vertical Pharmaceuticals launches breakthrough prenatal vitamin supplement: OB Complete Gold

Vertical Pharmaceuticals launches breakthrough prenatal vitamin supplement: OB Complete Gold

OB Complete Gold is a breakthrough innovation in prenatal vitamin supplements that contains the advanced technology OmEGGa DHA, providing a novel egg-based DHA that comes from cage-free hens. [More]
Tackling insulin resistance may reduce recurrence after stroke

Tackling insulin resistance may reduce recurrence after stroke

Giving pioglitazone to stroke survivors with insulin resistance but no overt diabetes reduces their risk of having a recurrent vascular event, shows the randomised Insulin Resistance Intervention after Stroke trial. [More]
Confirming nasogastric tube placement through an assay? An interview with Ian Fotheringham

Confirming nasogastric tube placement through an assay? An interview with Ian Fotheringham

Nasogastric tubes are placed directly into the stomach in order to feed or medicate patients. If an NG tube accidentally goes into the lung instead, which can happen, it can cause serious harm to the patient, with food, liquid or medication potentially entering the lung. [More]
Vanderbilt physicians examine risk factors for cardiovascular disease in prostate cancer survivors

Vanderbilt physicians examine risk factors for cardiovascular disease in prostate cancer survivors

The 3 million prostate cancer survivors in the United States are likely to die from something other than cancer, thanks to early detection, effective treatment and the disease's slow progression. [More]
Simple change in diet could boost vitamin D levels for people suffering from Type 2 diabetes

Simple change in diet could boost vitamin D levels for people suffering from Type 2 diabetes

A simple change in diet could boost vitamin D levels for millions of Americans suffering from Type 2 diabetes, according to new research from Iowa State University published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. [More]
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