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Adults diagnosed with retinoblastoma as infants perform better on tasks, study finds

Adults diagnosed with retinoblastoma as infants perform better on tasks, study finds

Most long-term survivors of retinoblastoma, particularly those who had been diagnosed with tumors by their first birthdays, have normal cognitive function as adults, according to a St. Jude Children's Research Hospital study. The research, which appears in the current issue of the journal Cancer, found that the vast majority of survivors work full time, live independently and fulfill other milestones of adult life. [More]
Study identifies H3.3 protein as key regulator in cellular senescence

Study identifies H3.3 protein as key regulator in cellular senescence

Changes to the structure of the protein histone H3.3 may play a key role in silencing genes that regulate cancer cell growth, according to a study led by researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online this month in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
Researchers discover why only some patients respond to ipilimumab drug

Researchers discover why only some patients respond to ipilimumab drug

A collaborative team of leaders in the field of cancer immunology from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center has made a key discovery that advances the understanding of why some patients respond to ipilimumab, an immunotherapy drug, while others do not. MSK was at the forefront of the clinical research that brought this CTLA-4 blocking antibody to melanoma patients. [More]
EDDA Technology to introduce IQQA-BodyImaging, cloud-based OnDemand service at RSNA 2014

EDDA Technology to introduce IQQA-BodyImaging, cloud-based OnDemand service at RSNA 2014

EDDA Technology, a global leading provider in advanced real-time interactive quantitative imaging solutions, announced today that the company has received FDA clearance on IQQA-BodyImaging. [More]
MD Anderson study sheds light on little-known protein complex

MD Anderson study sheds light on little-known protein complex

A study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center led by Mong-Hong Lee, Ph.D., a professor of molecular and cellular oncology, has demonstrated the significance of CSN6 in regulating Myc which may very well open up a new pathway for treating and killing tumors. [More]
New course underlines the importance of early detection of lung cancer

New course underlines the importance of early detection of lung cancer

In Japan, 40 percent of lung cancer cases are detected on early stages and treated with a high probability of remission; in the US 20 percent of cases have that possibility, while in Mexico, in the National Cancer Institute (INCan), only 1.2 percent of patients are diagnosed at an early stage. [More]
Protein complex plays key role in detecting tumor cells, promotes anti-tumor response

Protein complex plays key role in detecting tumor cells, promotes anti-tumor response

A recently discovered protein complex known as STING plays a crucial role in detecting the presence of tumor cells and promoting an aggressive anti-tumor response by the body's innate immune system, according to two separate studies published in the Nov. 20 issue of the journal Immunity. [More]
New combination therapy improves survival in patients with advanced ovarian cancer

New combination therapy improves survival in patients with advanced ovarian cancer

Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal cancer of the female reproductive organs, with more than 200,000 new cases and more than 125,000 deaths each year worldwide. [More]
Researchers identify genetic signatures in melanoma tumors that predict response to immunotherapy

Researchers identify genetic signatures in melanoma tumors that predict response to immunotherapy

A team led by Ludwig and Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) researchers has published a landmark study on the genetic basis of response to a powerful cancer therapy known as immune checkpoint blockade. [More]
More breast cancer patients choosing to undergo mastectomy, finds Vanderbilt study

More breast cancer patients choosing to undergo mastectomy, finds Vanderbilt study

Far more breast cancer patients are choosing to undergo mastectomy, including removal of both breasts, instead of choosing breast conservation surgery even when they have early stage disease that is confined to one breast, a Vanderbilt study shows. In the past decade, there have also been marked trends toward higher proportions of women opting for breast reconstruction. [More]
Scientists unravel molecular mechanisms that drive ferroptosis signaling

Scientists unravel molecular mechanisms that drive ferroptosis signaling

Ferroptosis is a recently recognized form of regulated necrosis. Up until now, this form of cell death has only been thought to be a possible therapeutic approach to treat tumour cells. Yet, ferroptosis also occurs in non-transformed tissues as demonstrated by this study, thus implicating this cell death pathway in the development of a wide range of pathological conditions. More specifically, the deletion of the ferroptosis-regulating enzyme Gpx4 in a pre-clinical model results in high ferroptosis rates in kidney tubular epithelial cells causing acute renal failure. [More]
New nanoparticles can simultaneously perform MRI and fluorescent imaging in living animals

New nanoparticles can simultaneously perform MRI and fluorescent imaging in living animals

MIT chemists have developed new nanoparticles that can simultaneously perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescent imaging in living animals. Such particles could help scientists to track specific molecules produced in the body, monitor a tumor's environment, or determine whether drugs have successfully reached their targets. [More]
WSU researchers working on new system to reduce negative effects of cancer drugs

WSU researchers working on new system to reduce negative effects of cancer drugs

Wichita State University researchers are working on a new system that could decrease the negative effects of cancer drugs on patients. [More]
Moffitt announces development of innovative investigational biologic agent for MDS

Moffitt announces development of innovative investigational biologic agent for MDS

In a major step to treat patients living with Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS), a group of diseases that affect the bone marrow and blood, Moffitt Cancer Center today announced the development of an innovative investigational biologic agent that could improve patient response and outcomes for MDS and other diseases. [More]
3SBio enters into exclusive license agreement with PharmAbcine for Tanibirumab

3SBio enters into exclusive license agreement with PharmAbcine for Tanibirumab

3SBio Inc., a leading China-based biotechnology company focused on researching, developing, manufacturing and marketing biopharmaceutical products, today announced it has entered into an exclusive license with PharmAbcine, Inc. for the development, manufacturing and marketing of Tanibirumab, an anti-VEGFR2/KDR antibody for cancer in the territory of Greater China (including Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) and several emerging countries, including Thailand, Brazil and Russia. [More]
FDA grants Orphan Drug Designation to Juno's JCAR015 leukemia T cell product candidate

FDA grants Orphan Drug Designation to Juno's JCAR015 leukemia T cell product candidate

Juno Therapeutics, Inc. announced today that the FDA has granted Orphan Drug Designation to its JCAR015 chimeric antigen receptor product candidate. The designation was granted for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. JCAR015 Phase I trials are currently underway at Juno's collaboration partner, Memorial Sloane Kettering Cancer Center. [More]
Common antimicrobial in household items causes liver fibrosis, cancer in mice

Common antimicrobial in household items causes liver fibrosis, cancer in mice

Triclosan is an antimicrobial commonly found in soaps, shampoos, toothpastes and many other household items. Despite its widespread use, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report potentially serious consequences of long-term exposure to the chemical. [More]
Study: Chemotherapy following radiation therapy improves survival in adults with low-grade gliomas

Study: Chemotherapy following radiation therapy improves survival in adults with low-grade gliomas

A chemotherapy regimen consisting of procarbazine, CCNU, and vincristine (PCV) administered following radiation therapy improved progression-free survival and overall survival in adults with low-grade gliomas, a form of brain cancer, when compared to radiation therapy alone. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify new gene mutations involved in certain kidney cancers

UT Southwestern researchers identify new gene mutations involved in certain kidney cancers

Using next generation gene sequencing techniques, cancer researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified more than 3,000 new mutations involved in certain kidney cancers, findings that help explain the diversity of cancer behaviors. [More]
Cholesterol-fighting statins inhibit uterine fibroid tumors that account for 50% of hysterectomies

Cholesterol-fighting statins inhibit uterine fibroid tumors that account for 50% of hysterectomies

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, in collaboration with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), Baylor College of Medicine and the Georgia Regents University, report for the first time that the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin inhibits the growth of human uterine fibroid tumors. [More]