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Purdue researchers find potential way to overcome limitations posed by CAR T-cell therapy

Purdue researchers find potential way to overcome limitations posed by CAR T-cell therapy

Purdue University researchers may have figured out a way to call off a cancer cell assassin that sometimes goes rogue and assign it a larger tumor-specific "hit list." [More]
Vitamin D and androgen receptor-targeted therapy may help treat TNBC

Vitamin D and androgen receptor-targeted therapy may help treat TNBC

A recent study by researchers at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine revealed that triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which has generally been unresponsive to hormone receptor-targeted treatments, can indeed be treated using vitamin D and androgen receptor-targeted therapy. [More]
BUSM researchers uncover genetic, epigenetic alteration overlaps in breast and ovarian cancer

BUSM researchers uncover genetic, epigenetic alteration overlaps in breast and ovarian cancer

While breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide, ovarian cancer also is a significant source of mortality as the fifth leading cause of cancer death among women. [More]
Could whole-mount scanning of breast tissue lead to better clinical outcomes? An interview with Dr Martin Yaffe

Could whole-mount scanning of breast tissue lead to better clinical outcomes? An interview with Dr Martin Yaffe

We actually normally refer to this as whole-specimen imaging of breast tissue. What we mean is that when tissue is removed from the breast, which could be in the form of a lumpectomy – a breast-conserving surgery – or a mastectomy, the piece of tissue removed is relatively large. [More]
Antimicrobial agent triclosan can rapidly disrupt gut bacterial communities

Antimicrobial agent triclosan can rapidly disrupt gut bacterial communities

A new study suggests that triclosan, an antimicrobial and antifungal agent found in many consumer products ranging from hand soaps to toys and even toothpaste, can rapidly disrupt bacterial communities found in the gut. [More]
Ongoing treatment with nivolumab shows benefit in advanced kidney cancer patients

Ongoing treatment with nivolumab shows benefit in advanced kidney cancer patients

Only 12% of kidney cancer patients with advanced disease survive five years after their initial treatment. In a Roswell Park Cancer Institute-led study, scientists report that some patients with advanced kidney cancer who continued to receive a novel immunotherapy drug after their disease progressed saw clinical benefit. [More]
Studies explore possible link between pediatric cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice

Studies explore possible link between pediatric cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice

Two new studies raise enough questions about a possible link between childhood cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice that clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing the treatment for infants whose jaundice is likely to resolve on its own, a pediatric oncologist from Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center argues in an editorial published today by the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Cornell researchers develop nanoparticle-based drug delivery mechanism for combination cancer therapy

Cornell researchers develop nanoparticle-based drug delivery mechanism for combination cancer therapy

A team of researchers from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York demonstrated a drug delivery mechanism that utilizes two independent vehicles, allowing for delivery of chemically and physically dis-tinct agents. [More]
Small lipid nanocarrier may deliver chemotherapeutic drug more efficiently to brain tumor cells

Small lipid nanocarrier may deliver chemotherapeutic drug more efficiently to brain tumor cells

Great discoveries do come in small packages. Few know that better than Ann-Marie Broome, Ph.D., who feels nanotechnology holds the future of medicine with its ability to deliver powerful drugs in tiny, designer packages. [More]
Combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy may be effective against ovarian cancer

Combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy may be effective against ovarian cancer

Inside each ovarian tumor, there are good cells and bad cells: The bad cells are fibroblasts. They work to block chemotherapy, which is why nearly every woman with ovarian cancer becomes resistant to treatment. [More]
New microfluidic device helps extract rare target cells from background cells

New microfluidic device helps extract rare target cells from background cells

A team of researchers from University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, OH have developed a novel microfluidic device, which combines the inertial effect of fluid and microscale vortices generated in microchambers, to achieve simultaneous double sorting of rare target cells and removal of background cells. [More]
Phase I study of triple drug combination shows promise in multiple myeloma patients

Phase I study of triple drug combination shows promise in multiple myeloma patients

PharmaMar announces the positive results from a Phase I study of plitidepsin in combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone in patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma. [More]
Wresting back control of CHI3L1 protein could stave off cancer spread in mice

Wresting back control of CHI3L1 protein could stave off cancer spread in mice

For cancer to spread, the cells that take off into the bloodstream must find a tissue that will permit them to thrive. They don't just go looking, though. Instead, they actively prepare the tissue, in one case by co-opting a protein that suppresses defenses the body would otherwise mount. [More]
Two-way communication between cancer cells may be key to tumor metastasis

Two-way communication between cancer cells may be key to tumor metastasis

Two-way communication between cancer cells appears to be key to their becoming motile, clustering and spreading through metastasis, according to Rice University scientists. [More]
Malicious form of ATF2 protein drives formation of melanoma

Malicious form of ATF2 protein drives formation of melanoma

An international collaborative study led by scientists at the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute has identified a malicious form of a protein that drives the formation of melanoma. [More]
High levels of p62 protein in liver linked to cancer recurrence

High levels of p62 protein in liver linked to cancer recurrence

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have discovered that high levels of the protein p62 in human liver samples are strongly associated with cancer recurrence and reduced patient survival. [More]
EAD therapy can shrink size of triple-negative breast cancer tumors in mice

EAD therapy can shrink size of triple-negative breast cancer tumors in mice

In a new study using mice and lab-grown human cells, a scientific team led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers show how a triple-drug cocktail can shrink triple-negative breast cancers by killing off cancer cells and halting new tumor growth. [More]
Study assesses utility of tumor cfDNA as predictor of therapeutic response to immunotherapy

Study assesses utility of tumor cfDNA as predictor of therapeutic response to immunotherapy

Chronix Biomedical, Inc., a developer of blood-based molecular diagnostics, today announces positive data from a blinded proof of concept clinical study, assessing the utility of tumor cell-free DNA as a predictor of therapeutic response to immunotherapy after the first cycle of treatment in eight different types of cancer. [More]

Researchers identify low MCJ expression as marker of poor response to chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a key part of the standard treatment regimen for triple-negative breast cancer patients whose cancer lacks expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). [More]
Loss of HOXA5 protein may allow breast cancer cells to thrive

Loss of HOXA5 protein may allow breast cancer cells to thrive

Many breast cancers are marked by a lack of HOXA5 protein, a gene product known to control cell differentiation and death, and lower levels of the protein correspond to poorer outcomes for patients. [More]
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