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New study reveals how cancer becomes drug resistant over time

New study reveals how cancer becomes drug resistant over time

Like a colony of bacteria or species of animals, cancer cells within a tumor must evolve to survive. A dose of chemotherapy may kill hundreds of thousands of cancer cells, for example, but a single cell with a unique mutation can survive and quickly generate a new batch of drug-resistant cells, making cancer hard to combat. [More]
Janssen announces submission of IMBRUVICA sNDA to FDA for WM treatment

Janssen announces submission of IMBRUVICA sNDA to FDA for WM treatment

Janssen Research & Development, LLC today announced the submission of a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by its strategic partner Pharmacyclics, Inc. [More]
Genetic changes in blood cells of older people linked to lymphoma, leukemia

Genetic changes in blood cells of older people linked to lymphoma, leukemia

At least 2 percent of people over age 40 and 5 percent of people over 70 have mutations linked to leukemia and lymphoma in their blood cells, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Anti-cancer nanomedicines with smaller sizes exhibit enhanced performance in vivo, show studies

Anti-cancer nanomedicines with smaller sizes exhibit enhanced performance in vivo, show studies

Nanomedicines consisting of nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to specific tissues and cells offer new solutions for cancer diagnosis and therapy. [More]
CMS publishes draft coverage decision for Decipher Prostate Cancer Classifier

CMS publishes draft coverage decision for Decipher Prostate Cancer Classifier

GenomeDx Biosciences today announced that a draft local coverage determination (LCD) for its Decipher® Prostate Cancer Classifier has been published by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) describing a coverage and payment policy for use of the Decipher test in men who have undergone radical prostatectomy. [More]
Virtual ultrasound elastography can improve breast cancer detection

Virtual ultrasound elastography can improve breast cancer detection

Next to lung cancer, breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women, according to the American Cancer Society. [More]
New automaton model simulates various scenarios of tumor growth

New automaton model simulates various scenarios of tumor growth

Cancer constantly wages war on the human body. Battles are won, lost or sometimes end in a stalemate. In pancreatic cancer, this stalemate—known as tumor dormancy—can last up to 25 years before becoming aggressively malignant, a phenomena that is poorly understood. [More]
Transcutaneous oximetry test may help predict surgical wound-healing complications

Transcutaneous oximetry test may help predict surgical wound-healing complications

As many as 35 percent of patients who undergo surgery to remove soft tissue sarcomas experience wound-healing complications, due to radiation they receive before surgery. [More]
Discovery offers insight on early stages of cancer

Discovery offers insight on early stages of cancer

The discovery of a cellular snooze button has allowed a team of Michigan State University scientists to potentially improve biofuel production and offer insight on the early stages of cancer. [More]
New combination therapy shows promise in treating prostate cancer

New combination therapy shows promise in treating prostate cancer

Like discriminating thieves, prostate cancer tumors scavenge and hoard copper that is an essential element in the body. But such avarice may be a fatal weakness. [More]
New study reviews modern treatment modalities for early-stage lung cancer

New study reviews modern treatment modalities for early-stage lung cancer

Removal of the entire lobe of lung may offer patients with early-stage lung cancer better overall survival when compared with a partial resection, and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) may offer the same survival benefit as a lobectomy for some patients, according to a study from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Scientists combine new type of nanoparticle with photodynamic therapy to kill cancer cells

Scientists combine new type of nanoparticle with photodynamic therapy to kill cancer cells

An international group of scientists led by Gang Han, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, has combined a new type of nanoparticle with an FDA-approved photodynamic therapy to effectively kill deep-set cancer cells in vivo with minimal damage to surrounding tissue and fewer side effects than chemotherapy. This promising new treatment strategy could expand the current use of photodynamic therapies to access deep-set cancer tumors. [More]
SIRT6 protein inhibits liver and colon cancers, but promotes skin cancer caused by ultraviolet light

SIRT6 protein inhibits liver and colon cancers, but promotes skin cancer caused by ultraviolet light

A new study published in Cancer Research shows SIRT6—a protein known to inhibit the growth of liver and colon cancers—can promote the development of skin cancers by turning on an enzyme that increases inflammation, proliferation and survival of sun-damaged skin cells. [More]
Research findings point toward new therapeutic target for aggressive breast cancer

Research findings point toward new therapeutic target for aggressive breast cancer

One of the first-known oncogenes has a protein partner that helps breast cancer proliferate and when it's blocked, so is the cancer, scientists report. [More]
Inflammation in tissue creates a niche for cancer cells

Inflammation in tissue creates a niche for cancer cells

In order to invade healthy tissue, tumor cells must leave the actual tumor and enter the bloodstream or lymphatic system. For this purpose, they use certain enzymes, proteases that break down the tissue surrounding the tumor, thus opening the way for tumor cells to reach blood or lymphatic vessels. To keep the proteases in check, the body produces inhibitors such as the protein TIMP-1, which thwart the proteases in their work. [More]
New technique for treating eye cancer retinoblastoma

New technique for treating eye cancer retinoblastoma

Doctors at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have developed a new technique for treating the eye cancer retinoblastoma to improve the odds for preventing eye loss, blindness or death in children with advanced forms of the disease. [More]
Gene in soil-dwelling amoeba may hold key to isolating cancerous tumors

Gene in soil-dwelling amoeba may hold key to isolating cancerous tumors

The dirt in your backyard may hold the key to isolating cancerous tumors and to potential new treatments for a host of cancers. [More]
Research finding offers new insights into the cause of glioblastoma

Research finding offers new insights into the cause of glioblastoma

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a new fusion protein found in approximately 15 percent of secondary glioblastomas or brain tumors. The finding offers new insights into the cause of this cancer and provides a therapeutic target for personalized oncologic care. [More]
Eisai, Helsinn Group announce FDA approval of AKYNZEO for prevention of CINV

Eisai, Helsinn Group announce FDA approval of AKYNZEO for prevention of CINV

Helsinn Group and Eisai Inc. announced today that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved AKYNZEO® for the prevention of acute and delayed nausea and vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of cancer chemotherapy, including, but not limited to, highly emetogenic chemotherapy. [More]
Hormone loss may cause colon cancer, say Thomas Jefferson University researchers

Hormone loss may cause colon cancer, say Thomas Jefferson University researchers

Some cancers, like breast and prostate cancer, are driven by hormones such as estrogen and testosterone, but to date, there are none that are driven by the lack of a hormone. New evidence suggests that human colon cells may become cancerous when they lose the ability to produce a hormone that helps the cells maintain normal biology. If verified by further studies, it suggests that treating patients at high risk for colon cancer by replacing the hormone guanylin could prevent the development of cancer. [More]