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New web-based program helps to determine deadly form of brain cancer

New web-based program helps to determine deadly form of brain cancer

A new web-based program developed by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers will provide a simple, free way for healthcare providers to determine which brain tumor cases require testing for a genetic mutation. [More]
Research validates Myc inhibition as effective therapeutic strategy for glioma

Research validates Myc inhibition as effective therapeutic strategy for glioma

Research led by the Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO) evidence the most conclusive preclinical results to-date validating Myc inhibition as a therapeutic strategy in glioma - a highly agressive tumor type that notoriously outsmarts current anti-cancer therapies. [More]
Viewpoints: Va. GOP's 'Medicaid charade'; Paul Ryan's health Rx for poverty; giving the sick unapproved drugs

Viewpoints: Va. GOP's 'Medicaid charade'; Paul Ryan's health Rx for poverty; giving the sick unapproved drugs

Virginia lawmakers will convene in a special session next month to address the question of expanding Medicaid and, more broadly, the fact that hundreds of thousands of poor and disabled people in the state have no health insurance coverage. Democrats and some moderate Republicans have advanced a variety of ideas to tackle that problem. Conservative Republicans, who control the legislature in Richmond, have rejected those solutions while proposing no alternative. Does the GOP intend for the special session to be anything more than a charade at taxpayers' expense? (8/15). [More]
Research findings call for clinical testing of relevant drugs to prevent NASH

Research findings call for clinical testing of relevant drugs to prevent NASH

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common affliction, affecting almost 30 percent of Americans, with a significant number suffering from its most severe form, called non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH, which can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. In recent years, NASH has become the leading cause of liver transplantation. [More]
MGH-developed microfluidic device may help study key steps involved in development of tumor metastasis

MGH-developed microfluidic device may help study key steps involved in development of tumor metastasis

A microfluidic device developed at Massachusetts General Hospital may help study key steps in the process by which cancer cells break off from a primary tumor to invade other tissues and form metastases. [More]
UC Santa Cruz cancer researcher receives $350,000 to develop novel drugs for breast cancer

UC Santa Cruz cancer researcher receives $350,000 to develop novel drugs for breast cancer

UC Santa Cruz cancer researcher Seth Rubin has received a $350,000 grant to fund his work toward the development of a new class of drugs for treating breast cancer. The grant is a Breast Cancer Research Program Breakthrough Award from the congressionally directed medical research programs of the U.S. Department of Defense. [More]
Researchers use microengineered device to show how EMT cancer cells migrate

Researchers use microengineered device to show how EMT cancer cells migrate

Using a microengineered device that acts as an obstacle course for cells, researchers have shed new light on a cellular metamorphosis thought to play a role in tumor cell invasion throughout the body. [More]
Microbes influence human eating behavior, dietary choices

Microbes influence human eating behavior, dietary choices

It sounds like science fiction, but it seems that bacteria within us — which outnumber our own cells about 100-fold — may very well be affecting both our cravings and moods to get us to eat what they want, and often are driving us toward obesity. [More]
Hippo pathway identifies and prevents progression of abnormal cells into cancer

Hippo pathway identifies and prevents progression of abnormal cells into cancer

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine report that a tumor suppressor pathway, called the Hippo pathway, is responsible for sensing abnormal chromosome numbers in cells and triggering cell cycle arrest, thus preventing progression into cancer. [More]
Enzyme therapy may prevent skeletal abnormalities associated with neurofibromatosis type-1

Enzyme therapy may prevent skeletal abnormalities associated with neurofibromatosis type-1

An enzyme therapy may prevent skeletal abnormalities associated with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type-1, Vanderbilt investigators have discovered. [More]
Research offers promise for personalized RNA combination therapies to treat lung cancer

Research offers promise for personalized RNA combination therapies to treat lung cancer

Small RNA molecules, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), offer tremendous potential for new therapeutic agents to inhibit cancer cell growth. However, delivering these small RNAs to solid tumors remains a significant challenge, as the RNAs must target the correct cells and avoid being broken down by enzymes in the body. [More]
Caris Life Sciences collaborates with GenoSpace to advance cancer care through research

Caris Life Sciences collaborates with GenoSpace to advance cancer care through research

Caris Life Sciences, a leading biosciences company focused on fulfilling the promise of precision medicine, today announced a collaboration with GenoSpace, a Massachusetts-based technology company that develops robust software solutions for genomic and health data. [More]
Clinical trial tests COXEN model in bladder cancer to find promising treatment

Clinical trial tests COXEN model in bladder cancer to find promising treatment

Imagine being able to match a cancer's genes to the best treatment. That's the promise of COXEN (CO eXpression ExtrapolatioN) - a computer program that looks at a panel of cancer genes in a patient's tumor to predict whether it will respond to chemotherapy. [More]
AEG-1 protein blocks effects of retinoic acid in leukemia and liver cancer

AEG-1 protein blocks effects of retinoic acid in leukemia and liver cancer

Retinoic acid is a form of vitamin A that is used to treat and help prevent the recurrence of a variety of cancers, but for some patients the drug is not effective. [More]
Researchers find priority targets for ovarian cancer immunotherapy

Researchers find priority targets for ovarian cancer immunotherapy

Researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) have found that the expression pattern of a unique class of tumor-associated antigens, known as the MAGE cancer-testis antigens (CTAs), correlates with clinical outcome in epithelial ovarian cancer. [More]
Injections of anaerobic bacteria can shrink tumors in rats, dogs and human

Injections of anaerobic bacteria can shrink tumors in rats, dogs and human

Deep within most tumors lie areas that remain untouched by chemotherapy and radiation. These troublesome spots lack the blood and oxygen needed for traditional therapies to work, but provide the perfect target for a new cancer treatment using bacteria that thrive in oxygen-poor conditions. [More]
Recurrence of breast cancer cut by ½ in overweight women who regularly use NSAIDs

Recurrence of breast cancer cut by ½ in overweight women who regularly use NSAIDs

Recurrence of hormone-related breast cancer was cut by half in overweight and obese women who regularly used aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), according to data published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
Partial nephrectomy offers near equivalent lengths of cancer control compared to radical nephrectomy

Partial nephrectomy offers near equivalent lengths of cancer control compared to radical nephrectomy

Needle-guided tumor destruction procedures offer near equivalent lengths of local cancer control compared to surgery for patients with small kidney cancer tumors, according to the results of a large study published in the journal European Urology. [More]
"Self-fitting" material precisely fills bone defects and acts as scaffold for new bone growth

"Self-fitting" material precisely fills bone defects and acts as scaffold for new bone growth

Injuries, birth defects (such as cleft palates) or surgery to remove a tumor can create gaps in bone that are too large to heal naturally. And when they occur in the head, face or jaw, these bone defects can dramatically alter a person's appearance. [More]
MRI technology improves prostate cancer diagnosis

MRI technology improves prostate cancer diagnosis

Oncologists at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center are the first in San Diego to meld magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology with a traditional ultrasound prostate exam to create a three-dimensional map of the prostate that allows physicians to view growths that were previously undetectable. [More]