Twins News and Research RSS Feed - Twins News and Research

Anaesthesia editorial challenges placenta's role in pre-eclampsia

Anaesthesia editorial challenges placenta's role in pre-eclampsia

Pre-eclampsia, the potentially deadly condition that affects pregnant women, may be caused by problems meeting the oxygen demands of the growing fetus, according to an editorial in the November issue of Anaesthesia, the journal of the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland. [More]
Colorado University to limit student work hours -- partly to ease health law coverage requirements

Colorado University to limit student work hours -- partly to ease health law coverage requirements

The University of Colorado at Boulder is limiting student employee hours to 25 a week during spring and fall semesters in response to Affordable Care Act provisions, and other CU campuses are doing the same. In a newsletter to students, CU-Boulder said the act -; which requires employers to provide health insurance to employees working 30 or more hours per week, or pay fines -; was the catalyst for the policy change but not the sole reason. "Not only does the policy support degree attainment as the student's primary focus, it will help assist the campus in achieving chancellor (Phil) DiStefano's initiative of increasing the six-year graduation rate," the newsletter said. [More]
Lund University researchers identify mechanisms that play vital role in development of type 2 diabetes

Lund University researchers identify mechanisms that play vital role in development of type 2 diabetes

By studying identical twins, researchers from Lund University in Sweden have identified mechanisms that could be behind the development of type 2 diabetes. This may explain cases where one identical twin develops type 2 diabetes while the other remains healthy. [More]
Women better informed about prenatal genetic testing choose fewer tests

Women better informed about prenatal genetic testing choose fewer tests

A clinical trial led by UC San Francisco has found that when pregnant women are educated about their choices on prenatal genetic testing, the number of tests actually drops, even when the tests are offered with no out-of-pocket costs. [More]
Researchers say that environment plays much stronger role than genetics in eosinophilic esophagitis

Researchers say that environment plays much stronger role than genetics in eosinophilic esophagitis

Researchers have found that environment has a much stronger role than genetics in eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), a severe, often painful food allergy that renders children unable to eat a wide variety of foods. [More]
Risk of preterm birth could be halved for specific group of "super high-risk" twin pregnancies

Risk of preterm birth could be halved for specific group of "super high-risk" twin pregnancies

International research involving the University of Adelaide has found that the risk of preterm birth could be halved for a specific group of "super high-risk" twin pregnancies. [More]
Extraordinary Conceptions hosts free upcoming educational reception in Europe

Extraordinary Conceptions hosts free upcoming educational reception in Europe

Extraordinary Conceptions, a leading international egg donor and surrogacy agency based in San Diego County, will be hosting its free upcoming educational reception in Europe. [More]
Scientists identify genetic mutations in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma

Scientists identify genetic mutations in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma

Parents of twins often tell them apart through subtle differences such as facial expression, moles, voice tone and gait. Similarly, physicians treating women with endometrial cancer must be able to distinguish between different versions of this disease form that, on the surface, appear the same. [More]
Around 9.6% of women diagnosed with dry eye disease, treated with artificial tear eye drops

Around 9.6% of women diagnosed with dry eye disease, treated with artificial tear eye drops

The symptoms of dry eye disease include the sensation of grit in the eye, frequently accompanied by itching, burning and visual disturbance. The causes are poorly understood. [More]
Fitness-related traits in bipolar disorder relatives may explain disease persistence

Fitness-related traits in bipolar disorder relatives may explain disease persistence

Unaffected twins of patients with bipolar disorder show enhanced neurocognitive function and positive temperament traits, research shows. [More]
Twin study supports psychosis continuum

Twin study supports psychosis continuum

A study of adolescent twins suggests that similar factors influence psychotic experiences regardless of their severity, consistent with a psychosis continuum. [More]
Epigenetic control of serotonin transporter predicts human brain function

Epigenetic control of serotonin transporter predicts human brain function

The tiny addition of a chemical mark atop a gene that is well known for its involvement in clinical depression and posttraumatic stress disorder can affect the way a person's brain responds to threats, according to a new study by Duke University researchers. [More]
Viewpoints: GOP lawsuit against Obama on health law is not a 'stunt'; 'wisdom' lacking in the House; the danger of cyberattacks on hospitals

Viewpoints: GOP lawsuit against Obama on health law is not a 'stunt'; 'wisdom' lacking in the House; the danger of cyberattacks on hospitals

"So sue me" is President Obama's message to Congress. And on Wednesday the House of Representatives took up his taunt, authorizing a lawsuit to challenge the president's failure to faithfully execute provisions of the Affordable Care Act as passed by Congress. The House lawsuit is no "stunt," as Mr. Obama has characterized it. [More]
New electrical pattern in brains predicts how well individual animals fare in stressful situations

New electrical pattern in brains predicts how well individual animals fare in stressful situations

Some people can handle stressful situations better than others, and it's not all in their genes: Even identical twins show differences in how they respond. [More]
Researchers collaborate to tackle rare diseases

Researchers collaborate to tackle rare diseases

Support from a network of leading researchers across Europe specialised in a rare auto-immune disease with unmet medical needs could help test several novel treatments [More]
Viewpoints: Problems in training docs; impact of HHS' territory decision; what Halbig decision might mean

Viewpoints: Problems in training docs; impact of HHS' territory decision; what Halbig decision might mean

ast week's burst of world disorder was ideal for a news dump, and the White House didn't disappoint: On no legal basis, all 4.5 million residents of the five U.S. territories were quietly released from ObamaCare. [More]
Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

A team of scientists from around the world led by Baylor College of Medicine and Washington University in St. Louis has completed the genome sequence of the common marmoset - the first sequence of a New World Monkey - providing new information about the marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system, physiology and growth, shedding new light on primate biology and evolution. [More]
Study: Genetics plays major role in development of autism

Study: Genetics plays major role in development of autism

Using new statistical tools, Carnegie Mellon University's Kathryn Roeder has led an international team of researchers to discover that most of the genetic risk for autism comes from versions of genes that are common in the population rather than from rare variants or spontaneous glitches. [More]
Cannabis use and schizophrenia ‘share genetic risk’

Cannabis use and schizophrenia ‘share genetic risk’

Variants of genes that predispose people to developing schizophrenia also predispose them to using cannabis, a study of more than 2000 people has found. [More]
Research findings provide promising news for couples considering in-vitro fertilization

Research findings provide promising news for couples considering in-vitro fertilization

Using computer-automated, time‐lapse photography of embryos in the laboratory during in-vitro fertilization may improve embryo selection, potentially increasing the chances of pregnancy among women undergoing the procedure, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and five other fertility centers. [More]