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Envy Medical launches world-class patented Advanced Dermalinfusion Technology

Envy Medical, Inc. launches SilkPeel3, the next generation of its world class patented Advanced Dermalinfusion Technology. Unveiled originally in 2005, SilkPeel is celebrating its 10th birthday in style with fresh features, enhanced functionality and a sleek new design. [More]
New database on healthy immune system may help design future studies on autoimmune disorders

New database on healthy immune system may help design future studies on autoimmune disorders

An extensive database identifying immune traits, such as how immune cell function is regulated at the genetic level in healthy people, is reported by researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and their collaborators in the journal Cell. [More]
BU study explores birth outcomes for women who receive fertility treatment

BU study explores birth outcomes for women who receive fertility treatment

Birth outcomes for babies whose mothers used assisted reproductive technology (ART) are better in some cases, and worse in others, than for subfertile women who did not use ART, according to a first-of-its-kind study led by Boston University School of Public Health researchers. [More]
UIC researchers identify genetic variation that increases MS risk in women

UIC researchers identify genetic variation that increases MS risk in women

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have identified a genetic variation that in women significantly increases their risk of developing multiple sclerosis. [More]
Environmental conditions play significant role in determining growth, height

Environmental conditions play significant role in determining growth, height

If you've ever wondered why you aren't a little taller, it turns out it's not all about genetics. In findings published in the Journal of Pediatrics (January 2015), an Israeli research team shows that the environment in which one lives from the womb to about age one largely determines an adult's height. [More]
Study explores association between back pain and depression

Study explores association between back pain and depression

Genetic factors help to explain the commonly found association between low back pain and depression, suggests a large study of twins in the March issue of PAIN, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Southern Regional Education Board honors UTSA professor as Mentor of the Year

Southern Regional Education Board honors UTSA professor as Mentor of the Year

Edwin Barea-Rodriguez, professor and chair of the UTSA Department of Biology, was recently honored as the Mentor of the Year by the Southern Regional Education Board at a conference in Atlanta. More than 1,300 attended the conference, where the nation's largest gathering of minority doctoral scholars discussed issues facing new and aspiring faculty members. [More]
New study finds link between birth weights and academic performance in school

New study finds link between birth weights and academic performance in school

It's no secret that low-birth-weight babies face significantly greater risks for certain health problems early on, such as respiratory distress or infection. Now, a new study from researchers at the University of Florida and Northwestern University shows that lower weights at birth also have an adverse effect on children's performance in school, which is likely due to the early health struggles small babies often face. [More]
Study: Heavier newborns do better in school

Study: Heavier newborns do better in school

Birth weight makes a difference to a child's future academic performance, according to new Northwestern University research that found heavier newborns do better in elementary and middle school than infants with lower birth weights. [More]
Variants of ASIC1a gene appear to be associated with panic disorder

Variants of ASIC1a gene appear to be associated with panic disorder

Panic disorder is a severe form of anxiety in which the affected individual feels an abrupt onset of fear, often accompanied by profound physical symptoms of discomfort. Scientists have known from studying twins that genes contribute to the risk of panic disorder, but very little is known about which specific genes are involved. [More]
Different forms of ASIC1a gene associated with panic disorder

Different forms of ASIC1a gene associated with panic disorder

Panic disorder is a severe form of anxiety in which the affected individual feels an abrupt onset of fear, often accompanied by profound physical symptoms of discomfort. [More]
Cognitive test battery developed to measure impact of spaceflight stressors on cognitive performance

Cognitive test battery developed to measure impact of spaceflight stressors on cognitive performance

Space is one of the most demanding and unforgiving environments. Human exploration of space requires astronauts to maintain consistently high levels of cognitive performance to ensure mission safety and success, and prevent potential errors and accidents. Despite the importance of cognitive performance for mission success, little is known about how cognition is affected by prolonged spaceflight, and what aspects of cognition are primarily affected. [More]
Preterm birth becomes world's number one killer of young children

Preterm birth becomes world's number one killer of young children

For the first time in history, the complications of preterm birth outrank all other causes as the world's number one killer of young children. [More]
Findings pave way for personalized probiotic therapies for obesity-related diseases

Findings pave way for personalized probiotic therapies for obesity-related diseases

Our genetic makeup influences whether we are fat or thin by shaping which types of microbes thrive in our body, according to a Cornell-led study published today in the journal Cell. [More]
Scientists develop human stem cell disease model of Parkinson's disease in a dish

Scientists develop human stem cell disease model of Parkinson's disease in a dish

A team of scientists led by The New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute successfully created a human stem cell disease model of Parkinson's disease in a dish. Studying a pair of identical (monozygotic) twins, one affected and one unaffected with Parkinson's disease, another unrelated Parkinson's patient, and four healthy control subjects, the scientists were able to observe key features of the disease in the laboratory, specifically differences in the patients' neurons' ability to produce dopamine, the molecule that is deficient in Parkinson's disease. [More]
People with lactose intolerance at lower risk of suffering from certain cancers

People with lactose intolerance at lower risk of suffering from certain cancers

People with lactose intolerance are at lower risk of suffering from lung, breast and ovarian cancers, according to a new study by researchers at Lund University and Region Skåne in Sweden. [More]
Genetics underpin bullying victimisation influence on paranoia

Genetics underpin bullying victimisation influence on paranoia

Bullying victimisation in childhood may indicate genetic risk for later psychosis, rather than being an environmental trigger, say UK researchers. [More]
NIH announces 11 awards to improve public health outcomes related to substance use, addiction

NIH announces 11 awards to improve public health outcomes related to substance use, addiction

More than $11 million over three years will be used to support research exploring the use of social media to advance the scientific understanding, prevention, and treatment of substance use and addiction. [More]
Anaesthesia editorial challenges placenta's role in pre-eclampsia

Anaesthesia editorial challenges placenta's role in pre-eclampsia

Pre-eclampsia, the potentially deadly condition that affects pregnant women, may be caused by problems meeting the oxygen demands of the growing fetus, according to an editorial in the November issue of Anaesthesia, the journal of the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland. [More]
Colorado University to limit student work hours -- partly to ease health law coverage requirements

Colorado University to limit student work hours -- partly to ease health law coverage requirements

The University of Colorado at Boulder is limiting student employee hours to 25 a week during spring and fall semesters in response to Affordable Care Act provisions, and other CU campuses are doing the same. In a newsletter to students, CU-Boulder said the act -; which requires employers to provide health insurance to employees working 30 or more hours per week, or pay fines -; was the catalyst for the policy change but not the sole reason. "Not only does the policy support degree attainment as the student's primary focus, it will help assist the campus in achieving chancellor (Phil) DiStefano's initiative of increasing the six-year graduation rate," the newsletter said. [More]
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