Twins News and Research RSS Feed - Twins News and Research

UMass Amherst cognitive neuroscientist receives NSF CAREER award to study brain functions

Cognitive neuroscientist Rosie Cowell at the University of Massachusetts Amherst recently received a five-year, $599,619 CAREER award from the National Science Foundation to develop and test a theory of how memory interacts with fine-grained visual perception and how both brain functions depend on the medial temporal lobe (MTL), which once was thought to be critical for memory but not for visual perception. [More]
Scientists discover epigenetic switch linked to obesity

Scientists discover epigenetic switch linked to obesity

It is well known that a predisposition to adiposity lies in our genes. A new study by researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics in Freiburg now shows that it is also crucial how these genes are regulated. The scientists led by Andrew Pospisilik discovered a novel regulatory, epigenetic switch, which causes individuals with identical genetic material, such as monozygotic twins, to either be lean or obese. [More]
Study explores role of genetic and environmental factors in development of social anxiety

Study explores role of genetic and environmental factors in development of social anxiety

Genes play a crucial role over time although environmental factors matter most in the short term, according to a major study into social anxiety and avoidant personality disorders from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. [More]
Study provides evidence for use of inherited genetic markers to improve melanoma prognostication

Study provides evidence for use of inherited genetic markers to improve melanoma prognostication

Melanoma is the most dangerous and lethal form of skin cancer. But just how long will a patient survive following the removal of a melanoma tumor? A more definitive answer to that question could come from new studies at NYU Langone Medical Center and its Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center. Researchers there have discovered an inherited genetic marker that might provide clinicians with a personalized tool to gauge an individual's survival and determine which patients require closer monitoring in the years following surgery. [More]
Scientists find genetic link to unexplained heart failure affecting pregnant women

Scientists find genetic link to unexplained heart failure affecting pregnant women

Scientists have found that women who suffer unexplained heart failure towards the end of pregnancy or shortly after giving birth share certain genetic changes. [More]
Study shows that twins may share cancer risk

Study shows that twins may share cancer risk

In a long-term follow-up study among approximately 200,000 Nordic twin individuals, there was an increased cancer risk in twins whose co-twin was diagnosed with cancer, with an increased risk for cancer overall and for specific types of cancer, including prostate, melanoma, breast, ovary, and uterus, according to a study in the January 5 issue of JAMA. [More]
New study finds familial risk and heritability of cancer among twins

New study finds familial risk and heritability of cancer among twins

A large new study of twins has found that having a twin sibling diagnosed with cancer poses an excess risk for the other twin to develop any form of cancer. Among the 23 different types of cancer studied, an excess familial risk was seen for almost all of the cancers, including common cancers such as breast and prostate cancer, but also more rare cancers such as testicular cancer, head and neck cancer, melanoma, ovarian and stomach cancer. [More]
Children conceived through infertility treatments no more likely to have developmental delays

Children conceived through infertility treatments no more likely to have developmental delays

Children conceived via infertility treatments are no more likely to have a developmental delay than children conceived without such treatments, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health, the New York State Department of Health and other institutions. [More]
New Penn study shows that social behavior in carpenter ants can be reprogrammed

New Penn study shows that social behavior in carpenter ants can be reprogrammed

In Florida carpenter ant colonies, distinct worker castes called minors and majors exhibit pronounced differences in social behavior throughout their lives. In a new study published today in Science, a multi-institution team anchored at University of Pennsylvania found that these caste-specific behaviors are not set in stone. [More]
New study outlines risk for in-hospital and out-of-hospital births in Oregon

New study outlines risk for in-hospital and out-of-hospital births in Oregon

The out-of-hospital birth setting in Oregon was associated with a higher risk of perinatal death, while the in-hospital birth setting was associated with a higher risk for cesarean delivery and other obstetric interventions (e.g., induction or augmentation of labor), according a study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University. [More]
Novel antibody improves glucose regulation and reduces fatty liver in obese mice

Novel antibody improves glucose regulation and reduces fatty liver in obese mice

A new study by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and colleagues describes the pre-clinical development of a therapeutic that could potentially be used to treat type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease, and other metabolic diseases. [More]
Study on how immune systems of astronauts respond to seasonal flu vaccine

Study on how immune systems of astronauts respond to seasonal flu vaccine

Every year, as influenza season - and flu shot season--rolls around, medical experts weigh in on just how effective it will be against that year's particular strain. What if that equation could take into account a person's own immune response? [More]
USC-led study finds link between anxiety and dementia

USC-led study finds link between anxiety and dementia

People who experienced high anxiety any time in their lives had a 48 percent higher risk of developing dementia compared to those who had not, according to a new study led by USC researchers. [More]
Study examines links between genetic background, physical activity level and lifespan

Study examines links between genetic background, physical activity level and lifespan

Animal studies have already shown that a strong link exists between genetic background and physical activity level. The purpose of our study was to investigate the associations between genetic background, physical activity level, and lifespan. [More]
Study explores effectiveness of frontline treatments for couples with unexplained infertility

Study explores effectiveness of frontline treatments for couples with unexplained infertility

A breast cancer drug with promise for improving the chance that couples with unexplained infertility can have a baby without increasing their risk of multiple births apparently does not deliver, according to a comparative study. [More]
Study: Cervical pessary does not reduce preterm births, neonatal complications in twin pregnancies

Study: Cervical pessary does not reduce preterm births, neonatal complications in twin pregnancies

Having twins accounts for only 1.5% of all births but 25% of preterm births, the leading cause of infant mortality worldwide. Successful strategies for reducing singleton preterm births include prophylactic use of progesterone and cervical cerclage in patients with a prior history of preterm birth. [More]
People who eat high protein foods have lower blood pressure and arterial stiffness

People who eat high protein foods have lower blood pressure and arterial stiffness

Eating foods rich in amino acids could be as good for your heart as stopping smoking or getting more exercise - according to new research from the University of East Anglia. [More]
Women who conceive babies through IVF at increased risk of experiencing GORD

Women who conceive babies through IVF at increased risk of experiencing GORD

Women who give birth to babies conceived by in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) are at increased risk of experiencing long-term symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), according to the results of a study published in the UEG Journal. [More]
Researchers explore key factors to improve astronauts’ nutrition needs during space missions

Researchers explore key factors to improve astronauts’ nutrition needs during space missions

Centuries ago, ships often sailed with crews numbering in the hundreds returning with tens. Cause of death: Scurvy - a severe depletion of Vitamin C. [More]
IDIBELL licenses a tool to Oxford Immunotec to improve efficiency of kidney transplants, prevent graft rejection

IDIBELL licenses a tool to Oxford Immunotec to improve efficiency of kidney transplants, prevent graft rejection

The Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute has licensed to the company Oxford Immunotec, a technology to measure the secretion of anti-HLA antibodies from memory B cells to improve the efficiency of kidney transplants and prevent rejection of graft. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement