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Twenty-five million Americans suffer from ulcers. An ulcer is a sore or hole in the lining of the stomach or duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). People of any age can get an ulcer and women are affected just as often as men.

Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a bacterium that lives on the lining of the stomach. Although we used to think that spicy food, acid, and stress were the major causes of ulcers, we now know that nine out of ten ulcers are caused by H. pylori. Medicines that reduce stomach acid may make you feel better, but your ulcer may come back. Here's the good news: Since most ulcers are caused by this bacterial infection, they can be cured with the right antibiotics.
Minnesota hospitals prevent patient harms, save $93 million in health spending

Minnesota hospitals prevent patient harms, save $93 million in health spending

Minnesota hospitals and health systems have prevented more than 12,000 patients from being harmed and saved more than $93 million as a result of a reduction in hospital-acquired conditions from 2010-13. Nationwide, hospitals prevented 1.3 million patient harms and saved more than $12 billion in health spending, according to a report issued today by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [More]
University of Melbourne researcher explores impact of living with chronic wounds

University of Melbourne researcher explores impact of living with chronic wounds

People who live with chronic wounds are often disadvantaged financially and emotionally and remain a hidden aspect of our healthcare system. [More]
Regenerative medicine may offer new standard of advanced treatment for foot and leg ulcers

Regenerative medicine may offer new standard of advanced treatment for foot and leg ulcers

These are exciting times for regenerative medicine. Unlike conventional medicines, the regenerative approach can potentially work to restore the lost functionality of tissues or organs—the major reason for intensive focus on research and development in the field. [More]
Dual intragastric balloon procedure shows promise for people with obesity

Dual intragastric balloon procedure shows promise for people with obesity

After six months, people with intragastric balloons in their stomachs lost more than twice their excess weight, compared to people who tried to lose weight under a medically supervised diet and exercise program alone, according to new research from a randomized clinical trial presented here at ObesityWeek 2014, the largest international event focused on the basic science, clinical application and prevention and treatment of obesity. [More]
Study highlights connections between climate change and new outbreak of diseases

Study highlights connections between climate change and new outbreak of diseases

Climate change may affect human health directly or indirectly. In addition to increased threats of storms, flooding, droughts, and heat waves, other health risks are being identified. In particular, new diseases are appearing, caused by infectious agents (viruses, bacteria, parasites) heretofore unknown or that are changing, especially under the effect of changes in the climate (change of host, vector, pathogenicity, or strain). [More]
Glenmark gets final approval from FDA for Omeprazole DR Capsules ANDA

Glenmark gets final approval from FDA for Omeprazole DR Capsules ANDA

Glenmark Generics Inc. USA, the subsidiary of Glenmark Generics Limited, has been granted final approval for its abbreviated new drug application (ANDA) from the United States Food and Drug Administration for Omeprazole Delayed Release Capsules, their generic version of Prilosec by AstraZeneca. [More]
Infection with herpes simplex virus increases Alzheimer's risk

Infection with herpes simplex virus increases Alzheimer's risk

Infection with herpes simplex virus increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Researchers at Umeå University, Sweden, claim this in two studies in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia. [More]
Ebola outbreak emphasizes the importance of monitoring disease burden in developing countries

Ebola outbreak emphasizes the importance of monitoring disease burden in developing countries

A study recently published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology shows that for Ebola, measles, syphilis and many other conditions with skin manifestations the mortality rates are hundreds of times higher in developing countries than they are in developed countries. [More]
Preoperative IV ibuprofen improves quality of recovery after laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery

Preoperative IV ibuprofen improves quality of recovery after laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery

Cumberland Pharmaceuticals Inc. today announced that preoperative intravenous ibuprofen improved overall quality of recovery in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery. These results will be presented at the American Anesthesiology 2014 Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana. [More]
Chronic contact allergy from metal orthopedic implant linked to aggressive form of skin cancer

Chronic contact allergy from metal orthopedic implant linked to aggressive form of skin cancer

In rare cases, patients with allergies to metals develop persistent skin rashes after metal devices are implanted near the skin. New research suggests these patients may be at increased risk of an unusual and aggressive form of skin cancer. [More]
Now, women experiencing morning sickness can benefit from Diclegis drug

Now, women experiencing morning sickness can benefit from Diclegis drug

Up to 85 percent of pregnant women are affected by nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP), more commonly known as morning sickness. [More]
Actavis reports positive results from ceftazidime-avibactam Phase III studies in cIAI patients

Actavis reports positive results from ceftazidime-avibactam Phase III studies in cIAI patients

Actavis plc today confirmed positive topline results from RECLAIM-1 and -2, pivotal Phase III studies evaluating the potential for the investigational antibiotic, ceftazidime-avibactam as a treatment for adult hospitalized patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections. [More]
Biomedical engineering professor wins prestigious 2014 Early Career Achievement Award

Biomedical engineering professor wins prestigious 2014 Early Career Achievement Award

Qi Wang, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, recently won the prestigious 2014 Early Career Achievement Award from the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS). [More]
Study finds that outbreaks of Buruli ulcer can be triggered by climate change

Study finds that outbreaks of Buruli ulcer can be triggered by climate change

A disease prevalent in developing countries could be spread by the changes in rainfall patterns according to a new study. [More]
Leg ulcer treatment to be studied by sport scientists at Sheffield Hallam University

Leg ulcer treatment to be studied by sport scientists at Sheffield Hallam University

Sport and exercise scientists at Sheffield Hallam University have started a new study into the treatment of Chronic Venous Insufficiency (CVI), which affects patients' legs, often causing painful leg ulcers. [More]
Embolisation of abnormal neovessels relieves osteoarthritic knee pain

Embolisation of abnormal neovessels relieves osteoarthritic knee pain

Transcatheter arterial embolisation relieves knee pain in patients with moderate osteoarthritis who are resistant to pharmacological pain management, research suggests. [More]
Pain control in osteoarthritis patients: an interview with Dr. Clarence Young, Chief Medical Officer and John Vavricka, President and CEO, Iroko Pharmaceuticals

Pain control in osteoarthritis patients: an interview with Dr. Clarence Young, Chief Medical Officer and John Vavricka, President and CEO, Iroko Pharmaceuticals

Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common causes of disability, and inadequate pain control can lead to joint stiffness that may impair mobility for patients. [More]
Treating ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease: an interview with Dr. Stephen Hanauer, Medical Director, Digestive Health Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Treating ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease: an interview with Dr. Stephen Hanauer, Medical Director, Digestive Health Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are idiopathic (we don’t know the cause) inflammatory diseases (IBD) of the colon and/or small bowel. They are chronic in that we do not have a medical cure and are differentiated from IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) by inflammation that causes ulcerations of the GI tract. [More]
Researchers discover analgesic mechanism that prevents pain in Buruli ulcer patients

Researchers discover analgesic mechanism that prevents pain in Buruli ulcer patients

When the body receives an injury to the skin, a signal is sent to the brain, which generates a sensation of pain. [More]
EHOB announces release of Position Perfect System

EHOB announces release of Position Perfect System

EHOB, Inc., a leading provider of affordable products effective in the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers, is announcing today the release of the Position Perfect System. Designed as a unique turning, transferring and positioning system, it not only complies with facility turning protocols but also protects patients from added pressure and shearing forces. [More]