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Ultrasound is a procedure in which high-energy sound waves are bounced off internal tissues or organs and make echoes. The echo patterns are shown on the screen of an ultrasound machine, forming a picture of body tissues called a sonogram. Also called ultrasonography.
ALPINION launches new E-CUBE Series ultrasound system

ALPINION launches new E-CUBE Series ultrasound system

ALPINION MEDICAL SYSTEMS Co., Ltd., announced today the launch of a new E-CUBE Series ultrasound system. Developed to enhance user experience and patient care in a range of clinical areas, the E-CUBE 15 EX produces superb image quality. With advanced imaging technologies, this system delivers outstanding clinical performance in women's health, general imaging, and shared service applications. [More]
Two migraine surgery techniques equally effective in reducing severity of migraine headaches

Two migraine surgery techniques equally effective in reducing severity of migraine headaches

Two migraine surgery techniques targeting a specific "trigger site" are both highly effective in reducing the frequency and severity of migraine headaches, according to a randomized trial in the July issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
First participant enrolled in RepliCel's RCT-01 Phase 1/2 clinical trial for treatment of chronic tendinosis

First participant enrolled in RepliCel's RCT-01 Phase 1/2 clinical trial for treatment of chronic tendinosis

RepliCel Life Sciences Inc., a clinical stage regenerative medicine company focused on the development of autologous cell therapies, announced today that the first participant in its Phase 1/2 clinical trial of RCT-01, being tested for the treatment of chronic unilateral Achilles tendinosis, has been enrolled and their tissue biopsy sent for processing prior to intra-tendon ultrasound-guided injections. [More]
High breast density can impact cancer screening methods

High breast density can impact cancer screening methods

When it comes to breast cancer screening, the density of your breasts affects how well a mammogram can detect cancerous tissues. That's why Pennsylvania and 20 other states have adopted laws requiring radiologists to include information about breast density in every woman's mammogram report. [More]
Animal study highlights major safety concern regarding use of MRI contrast agents in patients

Animal study highlights major safety concern regarding use of MRI contrast agents in patients

New results in animals highlight a major safety concern regarding a class of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents used in millions of patients each year, according to a paper published online by the journal Investigative Radiology. [More]
Preclinical Magnetic Particle Imaging: an interview with Professor Jeff Bulte, Johns Hopkins

Preclinical Magnetic Particle Imaging: an interview with Professor Jeff Bulte, Johns Hopkins

I'm Jeff Bulte, professor of Radiology and Director of Cellular Imaging at the Institute for Cell Engineering at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland in the United States. I lead a group of about 20 to 25 people who focus their research on imaging cells. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists use experimental therapy to reverse progression of atherosclerosis in rodents

Johns Hopkins scientists use experimental therapy to reverse progression of atherosclerosis in rodents

In what may be a major leap forward in the quest for new treatments of the most common form of cardiovascular disease, scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have found a way to halt and reverse the progression of atherosclerosis in rodents by loading microscopic nanoparticles with a chemical that restores the animals’ ability to properly handle cholesterol. [More]
Study reveals benefit of early screening for vascular disorder patent ductus arteriosus among preterm infants

Study reveals benefit of early screening for vascular disorder patent ductus arteriosus among preterm infants

Among extremely preterm infants, early screening for the vascular disorder patent ductus arteriosus before day 3 of life was associated with a lower risk of in-hospital death and pulmonary hemorrhage, but not with differences in other severe complications, according to a study in the June 23/30 issue of JAMA. [More]
Study: High-normal BP in young adults spells heart failure risk in later life

Study: High-normal BP in young adults spells heart failure risk in later life

Mild elevations in blood pressure considered to be in the upper range of normal during young adulthood can lead to subclinical heart damage by middle age -- a condition that sets the stage for full-blown heart failure, according to findings of a federally funded study led by scientists at Johns Hopkins. [More]
Targeted molecular-imaging method could help identify early stages of prostate cancer

Targeted molecular-imaging method could help identify early stages of prostate cancer

A targeted molecular-imaging method under development at Rochester Institute of Technology could help detect early stages of prostate cancer and improve image-directed biopsies. [More]
New Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging opens at MedUni Vienna

New Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging opens at MedUni Vienna

Today the new Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging (MOLIMA) was opened at the University Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at MedUni Vienna. Its aim is to bring about a significant improvement in the prognosis or course of a disease. The research institute, which is funded by the Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, develops high-resolution, quantitative imaging techniques to allow disease to be identified at an even earlier stage. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers develop new imaging technology to help remove brain tumors safely

Johns Hopkins researchers develop new imaging technology to help remove brain tumors safely

Brain surgery is famously difficult for good reason: When removing a tumor, for example, neurosurgeons walk a tightrope as they try to take out as much of the cancer as possible while keeping crucial brain tissue intact — and visually distinguishing the two is often impossible. [More]
MGH researchers develop new approach to skin rejuvenation

MGH researchers develop new approach to skin rejuvenation

A new approach to skin rejuvenation developed at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) may be less likely to have unintended side effects such as scarring and altered pigmentation. [More]
Study shows that women with endometriosis at increased risk of miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy

Study shows that women with endometriosis at increased risk of miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy

Women with endometriosis are at an increased risk of miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy, according to results of a huge nationwide study presented today. Moreover, women with a history of endometriosis whose pregnancies progressed beyond 24 weeks were found to be at a higher than average risk of complications, including haemorrhage (ante- and postpartum) and preterm birth. [More]

Philips introduces new Anatomically Intelligent Ultrasound tool

Royal Philips today announced the introduction of HeartModelA.I., a new Anatomically Intelligent Ultrasound (AIUS) tool that brings advanced quantification, automated 3D views and robust reproducibility to cardiac ultrasound imaging. [More]
Men benefit from ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms

Men benefit from ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms

Men benefit from one-time screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms via ultrasound. Studies provide proof that their risk of dying is reduced, the abdominal aorta ruptures less often, and emergency surgery can be avoided more often. Far fewer data are available for women and they show no relevant differences between the groups investigated. [More]
Researchers develop device to diagnose bacterial meningitis in babies

Researchers develop device to diagnose bacterial meningitis in babies

Currently the only test to diagnose bacterial meningitis in babies is through a lumbar puncture, a painful and difficult procedure to perform. For this reason, a group of biomedical engineers decided to search for an alternative and developed a portable device that can detect this illness with a simple ultrasound scan of the fontanelle. [More]
HEALTH-TECH project approved by European Commission to establish centre of excellence for healthy ageing

HEALTH-TECH project approved by European Commission to establish centre of excellence for healthy ageing

2015 June 4-5 the kick-off meeting of the project HEALTH-TECH is taking place at Kaunas University of Technology (KTU) Santaka Valley. The project is aimed at founding a centre of excellence for healthy ageing. [More]
Ultrasound becoming the most widely used imaging tool in medicine today

Ultrasound becoming the most widely used imaging tool in medicine today

Mention "ultrasound" and most people likely will think of an image of a fetus in a mother's womb. But while providing peeks at the not-yet-born is one of ultrasound's most common applications, that's only a small part of the picture. [More]
Migraine surgery found effective among adolescent patients

Migraine surgery found effective among adolescent patients

As in adults, migraine surgery is effective for selected adolescent patients with severe migraine headaches that don't respond to standard treatments, reports a study in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
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