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Allergen chip helps early detection of allergies

Allergen chip helps early detection of allergies

People can become allergically sensitized straight from birth. "Early screening is therefore important to detect allergies early so that steps can be taken to prevent serious forms of illness developing," say the MedUni Vienna allergy researchers, speaking on the occasion of World Immunology Day on 29 April and the current WHO World Immunization Week. [More]
Researchers observe worrisome increase in anaphylaxis rate

Researchers observe worrisome increase in anaphylaxis rate

Anaphylaxis, known to be a sudden and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction, seems to be increasing among children, according to a new study led by a team at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre. [More]
Hot packs or hot-water immersion may be effective in treating jellyfish stings

Hot packs or hot-water immersion may be effective in treating jellyfish stings

A recent study by researchers at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, published this month in the journal Toxins, may finally put to rest the ongoing debate about whether to use cold or heat to treat jellyfish stings. Their systematic and critical review provides overwhelming evidence that clinical outcomes from all kinds of jellyfish stings are improved following treatment with hot packs or hot-water immersion. [More]
UA researchers developing new treatment to delay serious consequences of venomous snakebites

UA researchers developing new treatment to delay serious consequences of venomous snakebites

Time is of the essence for treating venomous snakebites, and a product being developed by researchers at the University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson may extend that window for treatment. [More]
Study highlights new approach to produce coral snake antivenom from synthetically designed DNA

Study highlights new approach to produce coral snake antivenom from synthetically designed DNA

Coral snake venom carries significant neurotoxicity and human injuries can be severe or even lethal. Despite this, antivenom treatments are scarce due to challenges collecting adequate amounts of venom needed to produce anti-elapidic serum. PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases highlights exciting new research from the Butantan Institute in Brazil using synthetically designed DNA to produce coral-snake antivenom. [More]
Drugs designed to curb Rac1 signaling pathway may help relieve inflammatory pain in sufferers

Drugs designed to curb Rac1 signaling pathway may help relieve inflammatory pain in sufferers

New research uncovers a cascade of reactions within nerve cells that relay sensations of pain associated with inflammation. The findings, which are published in the British Journal of Pharmacology, indicate that drugs designed to curb this pathway may help relieve inflammatory pain in sufferers. [More]
TSRI scientists use new drug discovery technique to identify anti-diabetes compound

TSRI scientists use new drug discovery technique to identify anti-diabetes compound

Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute have deployed a powerful new drug discovery technique to identify an anti-diabetes compound with a novel mechanism of action. [More]
Columbia University data scientists create world's first catalog of therapeutic venom

Columbia University data scientists create world's first catalog of therapeutic venom

What doesn't kill you could cure you. A growing interest in the therapeutic value of animal venom has led a pair of Columbia University data scientists to create the first catalog of known animal toxins and their physiological effects on humans. [More]
Snakebite claims thousands of lives every year but remains a 'forgotten killer'

Snakebite claims thousands of lives every year but remains a 'forgotten killer'

Snakebite claims thousands of lives in the world's poorest communities every year but remains a 'forgotten killer,' according to a new editorial published in the British Medical Journal. [More]
Nanofiber hydrogel infused with snake venom may stop bleeding, protect wounds

Nanofiber hydrogel infused with snake venom may stop bleeding, protect wounds

A nanofiber hydrogel infused with snake venom may be the best material to stop bleeding quickly, according to Rice University scientists. [More]
Physicists use diamonds to detect early-stage cancerous tumours

Physicists use diamonds to detect early-stage cancerous tumours

Physicists from the University of Sydney have devised a way to use diamonds to identify cancerous tumours before they become life threatening. [More]
Molecular evolution in separate species predicts convergence of toxin resistance

Molecular evolution in separate species predicts convergence of toxin resistance

Researchers at LSTM have shown that under certain circumstances evolution can be highly predictable, especially in terms of how creatures become resistant to dangerous toxins. [More]
Researchers one step closer to developing synthetic and cheaper antivenoms

Researchers one step closer to developing synthetic and cheaper antivenoms

Researchers involved in an international collaboration across six institutions, including the University of Copenhagen and the National Aquarium of Denmark (Den Blå Planet), have successfully identified the exact composition of sea snake venom, which makes the future development of synthetic antivenoms more realistic. [More]
Pennsylvania physicians urge residents to take precautions against bug bites, bee stings

Pennsylvania physicians urge residents to take precautions against bug bites, bee stings

For many people, bug bites and bee stings aren't a big deal beyond a small irritation. But for some, it could mean the start of a painful - possibly long-term or even deadly - experience. [More]
Scorpion venom could kill cancer cells

Scorpion venom could kill cancer cells

When the toxin invades channels in the cells with this disease produces cellular damage until killing them. [More]
NanoPass signs license agreement for supply of MicronJet600 device to Circassia

NanoPass signs license agreement for supply of MicronJet600 device to Circassia

NanoPass Technologies Ltd., a pioneer in intradermal delivery solutions for vaccines, announced today that it has entered into a license agreement for the supply of MicronJet600, its microneedle delivery device, to Circassia Pharmaceuticals plc. (Oxford, UK), a specialty biopharmaceutical company focused on the allergy market. [More]
Study on spider venom may lead to new class of potent painkillers

Study on spider venom may lead to new class of potent painkillers

New research shows that seven compounds of the countless found in spider venom block a key step in the body's ability to pass pain signals to the brain. The hunt for a medicine based on just one of these compounds, which would open up a new class of potent painkillers, is now a step closer according to new research published in the British Journal of Pharmacology. [More]
Venom of cone snails provides leads for possible treatment of cancer, addiction

Venom of cone snails provides leads for possible treatment of cancer, addiction

While considered a delicacy in some parts of the world, snails have found a more intriguing use to scientists and the medical profession offering a plethora of research possibilities. Cone snails are marine mollusks, just as conch, octopi and squid, but they capture their prey using venom. [More]
Bee, snake, scorpion venom could form basis of new generation of cancer-fighting drugs

Bee, snake, scorpion venom could form basis of new generation of cancer-fighting drugs

Bee, snake or scorpion venom could form the basis of a new generation of cancer-fighting drugs, scientists will report here today. [More]
New way to protect crops from insect plagues in safe and environmentally responsible way

New way to protect crops from insect plagues in safe and environmentally responsible way

Using spider toxins to study the proteins that let nerve cells send out electrical signals, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have stumbled upon a biological tactic that may offer a new way to protect crops from insect plagues in a safe and environmentally responsible way. [More]
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