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Department of Defense funds cardiac cell therapy trial for heart failure patients

Department of Defense funds cardiac cell therapy trial for heart failure patients

Building on the results of a recent Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute study published just six months ago, the Department of Defense has awarded a $10 million grant to fund a cardiac cell therapy trial for patients diagnosed with a common but difficult-to-treat form of heart failure. [More]
Association for Molecular Pathology announces winners of 2016 awards

Association for Molecular Pathology announces winners of 2016 awards

The Association for Molecular Pathology, the premier global, non-profit organization serving molecular diagnostics professionals, today announced the recipients of the Jeffrey A. Kant Leadership Award and the AMP Meritorious Service Award. Together with the AMP Award for Excellence in Molecular Diagnostics, these awards will be presented at the AMP 2016 Annual Meeting. [More]
High levels of dietary zinc increases susceptibility to Clostridium difficile infections

High levels of dietary zinc increases susceptibility to Clostridium difficile infections

Too much dietary zinc increases susceptibility to infection by Clostridium difficile - "C. diff" - the most common cause of hospital-acquired infections. [More]
Higher proportion of CKD patients receive renal replacement therapy in the U.S. than other countries

Higher proportion of CKD patients receive renal replacement therapy in the U.S. than other countries

A new study indicates that a much higher proportion of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD)—even those ≥85 years of age—receive renal replacement therapy (RRT) such as maintenance dialysis or kidney transplantation in the United States than in other developed countries. [More]
Memory and language deeply linked via the hippocampus, new experiment shows

Memory and language deeply linked via the hippocampus, new experiment shows

A new study shows that when you finish your spouse's sentences or answer a fill-in-the-blank question, you're engaging the brain's relay station for memories, the hippocampus. [More]
Researchers identify and treat new variant of antibiotic-resistant E. coli

Researchers identify and treat new variant of antibiotic-resistant E. coli

Researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear have discovered a new mutation in a highly antibiotic-resistant strain of E. coli that resists clearance by the body's own immune system by inhibiting white blood cells that ordinarily kill and remove bacteria. [More]
Short talk with knowledgeable nurse could help smokers quit cigarettes

Short talk with knowledgeable nurse could help smokers quit cigarettes

A short talk with a knowledgeable nurse could be the difference between a smoker stopping for cigarettes or stopping for nicotine gum on her way home from the hospital. [More]
Research findings hold promise for new therapies using proliferating cells to treat patients with FECD

Research findings hold promise for new therapies using proliferating cells to treat patients with FECD

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear have, for the first time, identified rapidly proliferating cells (known as "neural crest-derived progenitor cells") in the corneal endothelium of specimens from normal corneas and from corneas with Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy (FECD), a condition in which the cells responsible for keeping the cornea clear die prematurely — often leading to blindness. [More]
Trial of high-dose flu vaccine aims to better protect heart failure patients

Trial of high-dose flu vaccine aims to better protect heart failure patients

A network of researchers in the United States and Canada will try to spare thousands of patients the dangers of heart attacks and hospitalizations over the next five years in a trial of a high-dose flu vaccine. [More]
New mice study identifies trick to enhance memories

New mice study identifies trick to enhance memories

Imagine if playing a new video game or riding a rollercoaster could help you prepare for an exam or remember other critical information. [More]
Edible ginger-derived nano-lipids could effectively deliver drugs for treating colon cancer

Edible ginger-derived nano-lipids could effectively deliver drugs for treating colon cancer

Edible ginger-derived nano-lipids created from a specific population of ginger nanoparticles show promise for effectively targeting and delivering chemotherapeutic drugs used to treat colon cancer, according to a study by researchers at the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University, the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Wenzhou Medical University and Southwest University in China. [More]
Study sheds new light on why colon cancers are more aggressive in African Americans

Study sheds new light on why colon cancers are more aggressive in African Americans

Case Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers, a research collaboration which includes University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University, who last year identified new gene mutations unique to colon cancers in African Americans, have found that tumors with these mutations are highly aggressive and more likely to recur and metastasize. [More]
Epigenetic changes from stress exposure can be passed from traumatized parent to offspring

Epigenetic changes from stress exposure can be passed from traumatized parent to offspring

The children of traumatized people have long been known to be at increased risk for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and mood and anxiety disorders. [More]
Study shows link between RYGB surgery in obese patients and sustained long-term weight loss

Study shows link between RYGB surgery in obese patients and sustained long-term weight loss

Obese patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) lost much more weight than those who did not and were able to sustain most of this weight loss 10 years after surgery, according to a study published online by JAMA Surgery. [More]
New study finds link between PTSD and metabolic syndrome, cortical thickness

New study finds link between PTSD and metabolic syndrome, cortical thickness

Metabolic syndrome, a cluster of cardiometabolic conditions, may be a biological mechanism linking posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to structural brain abnormalities, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry. [More]
Gentle combination of FDA-approved drugs could combat photoreceptor degeneration in mice

Gentle combination of FDA-approved drugs could combat photoreceptor degeneration in mice

In microseconds, every light ray that enters the eye triggers an explosion of coordinated cellular events. [More]
Novel drug-dispensing contact lens effective in providing better pressure reduction in glaucoma model

Novel drug-dispensing contact lens effective in providing better pressure reduction in glaucoma model

A contact lens designed to deliver medication gradually to the eye could improve outcomes for patients with conditions requiring treatment with eye drops, which are often imprecise and difficult to self-administer. [More]
Telemedicine could be more convenient to provide monitoring for diabetic eye care

Telemedicine could be more convenient to provide monitoring for diabetic eye care

Electronic eye exams could become popular in the U.S. among patients who see them as an easy way to visit the eye doctor. [More]
Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Human noroviruses - the leading viral cause of acute diarrhea around the world - have been difficult to study because scientists had not found a way to grow them in the lab. [More]
HIV-infected adults with MDD more likely to experience heart attack, study shows

HIV-infected adults with MDD more likely to experience heart attack, study shows

Among more than 26,000 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, those with major depressive disorder (MDD) were more likely to experience a heart attack than those without MDD, according to a study published online by JAMA Cardiology. [More]
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