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E-cigarette users less likely to quit smoking, shows study

E-cigarette users less likely to quit smoking, shows study

The rapid increase in use of e-cigarettes has led to heated debates between opponents who question the safety of these devices and proponents who claim the battery-operated products are a useful cessation tool. [More]
Latest findings regarding nitric oxide offer new avenues to save lives

Latest findings regarding nitric oxide offer new avenues to save lives

Professor Jonathan Stamler's latest findings regarding nitric oxide have the potential to reshape fundamentally the way we think about the respiratory system - and offer new avenues to save lives. It may be time to rewrite the textbooks. [More]
fMRI can predict language development outcomes in ASD toddlers

fMRI can predict language development outcomes in ASD toddlers

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers say it may be possible to predict future language development outcomes in toddlers with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), even before they've been formally diagnosed with the condition. [More]
Indoor UV tanning causes skin cancer

Indoor UV tanning causes skin cancer

The U.S. Surgeon General should declare that indoor ultraviolet radiation tanning causes skin cancer, according to an article published today by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. [More]
Understanding emotional processing deficit

Understanding emotional processing deficit

Kessler Foundation researchers have linked the inability to recognize facial affect (emotion) with white matter damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI), an important first step toward understanding this emotional processing deficit. Their findings indicate a pattern of white matter damage and gray matter atrophy associated with this specific impairment of social cognition after TBI. [More]
Case Western Reserve researchers explore ways to treat, cure TB

Case Western Reserve researchers explore ways to treat, cure TB

After discovering a unique group of people resistant to tuberculosis (TB) infection, Case Western Reserve researchers are leading an international team dedicated to understanding exactly how they fight off a disease that claims 1.5 million lives each year. [More]
Adolescent binge-drinking alters genes needed for normal brain maturation

Adolescent binge-drinking alters genes needed for normal brain maturation

Binge-drinking during adolescence may perturb brain development at a critical time and leave lasting effects on genes and behavior that persist into adulthood. [More]
Research shows that hippocampus is dedicated to memory formation, not to spatial skills

Research shows that hippocampus is dedicated to memory formation, not to spatial skills

In work that reconciles two competing views of brain structures involved in memory and spatial perception, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have conducted experiments that suggest the hippocampus - a small region in the brain's limbic system - is dedicated largely to memory formation and not to spatial skills, such as navigation. [More]

Government of Canada implements recently announced changes to support veterans, families

The Honourable Erin O'Toole, Minister of Veterans Affairs, today advised that two recent announcements to help Veterans and their families are now in effect. [More]
MRSA bacteria exposed to cigarette smoke become more resistant to antimicrobial peptides

MRSA bacteria exposed to cigarette smoke become more resistant to antimicrobial peptides

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), an antibiotic-resistant superbug, can cause life-threatening skin, bloodstream and surgical site infections or pneumonia. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine now report that cigarette smoke may make matters worse. [More]
Patient with severe Alzheimer's shows promising benefits during treatment with Bryostatin drug

Patient with severe Alzheimer's shows promising benefits during treatment with Bryostatin drug

Researchers at the Blanchette Rockefeller Neurosciences Institute and the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine announced their findings from a new study entitled, "PSEN1 Variant in a Family with Atypical AD." An Alzheimer patient with very severe disease, genetically confirmed to have a known variant of PSEN1, showed promising benefits during treatment with the drug Bryostatin 1. [More]
Veterans with PTSD at higher risk of developing heart failure

Veterans with PTSD at higher risk of developing heart failure

In a study of more than 8,000 veterans living in Hawaii and the Pacific Islands, those with posttraumatic stress disorder had a nearly 50 percent greater risk of developing heart failure over about a seven-year follow-up period, compared with their non-PTSD peers. [More]
Study finds gaps in information-sharing strategies between hospitalists and PCPs

Study finds gaps in information-sharing strategies between hospitalists and PCPs

Coordinating patient care between hospital clinicians and primary-care physicians is a significant challenge due to poor communication and gaps in information-sharing strategies, according to a study led by physicians at the School of Medicine of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. [More]
Claritas to present data on Pediatric Neurological Exome Assay and new sequencing approach at ACMG 2015

Claritas to present data on Pediatric Neurological Exome Assay and new sequencing approach at ACMG 2015

Claritas Genomics will present data on the quality of parallel multi-technology sequencing, a comparison of the company’s phenotypically driven Pediatric Neurology Exome Assay to whole exome and panel-based approaches, three-part reports for rapid results reporting, and the clinical utility of the Neurology Exome’s tailored approach compared to other tests currently on the market. [More]
Implementation of video-based decision aids influences care decisions in urology

Implementation of video-based decision aids influences care decisions in urology

After Group Health Cooperative implemented video-based decision aids for men with two common prostate conditions, rates of elective surgery for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and rates of active treatment for localized prostate cancer declined over six months. [More]
Discontinuation of statin therapy may benefit patients with terminal illness

Discontinuation of statin therapy may benefit patients with terminal illness

Discontinuing statin use in patients with late-stage cancer and other terminal illnesses may help improve patients' quality of life without causing other adverse health effects, according to a new study by led by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Duke University and funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR). [More]
Vitamin D3 and metformin show promising results in preventing colorectal cancer

Vitamin D3 and metformin show promising results in preventing colorectal cancer

The concept was simple: If two compounds each individually show promise in preventing colon cancer, surely it's worth trying the two together to see if even greater impact is possible. [More]
New study pinpoints major increase in subdural hematoma surgery by 2030

New study pinpoints major increase in subdural hematoma surgery by 2030

By 2030, chronic subdural hemorrhage (SDH) will be the most common adult brain condition requiring neurosurgical intervention in the U.S., according to a new study conducted by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
RNA molecule can be manipulated to generate more neurons from neural stem cells

RNA molecule can be manipulated to generate more neurons from neural stem cells

A research team at UC San Francisco has discovered an RNA molecule called Pnky that can be manipulated to increase the production of neurons from neural stem cells. [More]
Case Western Reserve professor urges action to eliminate yaws

Case Western Reserve professor urges action to eliminate yaws

Half a century ago, a concentrated global effort nearly wiped a disfiguring tropical disease from the face of the earth. Now, says Case Western Reserve's James W. Kazura, MD, it's time to complete the work. [More]
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