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Individuals having high blood levels of two closely related proteins experience few adverse health events

Individuals having high blood levels of two closely related proteins experience few adverse health events

Individuals previously diagnosed with heart disease may be less likely to experience heart failure, heart attacks, or stroke, or to die from these events, if they have higher blood levels of two very closely related proteins, according to a new study led by a UC San Francisco research team. [More]
Commonly used heart attack blood test may identify people at risk for hypertension

Commonly used heart attack blood test may identify people at risk for hypertension

Analysis of blood samples from more than 5,000 people suggests that a more sensitive version of a blood test long used to verify heart muscle damage from heart attacks could also identify people on their way to developing hypertension well before the so-called silent killer shows up on a blood pressure machine. [More]
Longer-lasting colonoscopies associated with lower cancer rates

Longer-lasting colonoscopies associated with lower cancer rates

If a colonoscopy seems like the type of thing you'd like to get done with quickly, think again. Research by a Veterans Affairs team has confirmed that longer-lasting colonoscopies are associated with lower cancer rates. [More]
High dietary iron intake suppresses hormone that regulates appetite

High dietary iron intake suppresses hormone that regulates appetite

Here's one more reason to cut down on the amount of red meat you eat. Using an animal model, researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have found that dietary iron intake, equivalent to heavy red meat consumption, suppresses leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite. [More]
Electronic triggers can help identify, reduce follow-up delays in evaluation for cancer diagnosis

Electronic triggers can help identify, reduce follow-up delays in evaluation for cancer diagnosis

Electronic triggers designed to search for key data, developed by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, were able to identify and reduce follow-up delays for patients being evaluated for a diagnosis of colon or prostate cancer. [More]
Poor sleep may impact treatment and recovery in veterans with PTSD, TBI

Poor sleep may impact treatment and recovery in veterans with PTSD, TBI

Poor sleep may impact treatment and recovery in veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). A review of extensive research on sleep in TBI and PTSD has found that sleep-focused interventions can improve treatment outcomes in veterans. [More]
Study: Women warriors at no greater risk than men for developing PTSD

Study: Women warriors at no greater risk than men for developing PTSD

While past research on the question has been mixed, a new study by Defense and Veterans Affairs researchers suggests that women in the military are at no greater risk than men for developing posttraumatic stress disorder, given similar experiences--including combat. [More]
Two proteins that help cells eliminate trash may contribute to development of Parkinson's disease

Two proteins that help cells eliminate trash may contribute to development of Parkinson's disease

Two proteins that share the ability to help cells deal with their trash appear to need each other to do their jobs and when they don't connect, it appears to contribute to development of Parkinson's disease, scientists report. [More]
Researchers find effectiveness of ramelteon for treatment of sleep disturbances after TBI

Researchers find effectiveness of ramelteon for treatment of sleep disturbances after TBI

Kessler researchers found preliminary evidence for the effectiveness of ramelteon for the treatment of sleep disturbances after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The article, "Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation on May 28, 2015. Authors are Anthony Lequerica, PhD, and Nancy Chiaravalloti, PhD, of Kessler Foundation, Neil Jasey, MD, of Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation, and Jaclyn Portelli Tremont, MA, of Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University. [More]
Physicians may now have tools to predict people at greater risk of attempting suicide

Physicians may now have tools to predict people at greater risk of attempting suicide

People being treated for bipolar disorder and other psychiatric illnesses are at greater risk of attempting suicide, but physicians may now have tools to predict which of those individuals will attempt it and intervene early to prevent such tragedies from occurring. [More]
VA study examines use of medicinal maggots to heal diabetic foot ulcers

VA study examines use of medicinal maggots to heal diabetic foot ulcers

Maggot, or larval, therapy has been around since ancient times as a way to heal wounds. Now, the method has gone high-tech--in some ways--and it's being tested in a rigorous clinical trial at the Malcom Randall Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center in Gainesville, Fla. Recruitment is now underway. [More]

TriWest achieves full healthcare network accreditation from URAC

TriWest Healthcare Alliance announced that it has been awarded full healthcare network accreditation from URAC, a Washington, D.C.-based healthcare accrediting organization that establishes quality standards for the healthcare industry. [More]
Researchers identify novel brain network that plays wide role in memory and learning processes

Researchers identify novel brain network that plays wide role in memory and learning processes

One of the more heartbreaking realities of Alzheimer's is the moment when a loved one struggling with the disease no longer fully recognizes a family member or close friend who is caring for them. [More]
New VA study demonstrates cardiovascular benefits of testosterone replacement therapy

New VA study demonstrates cardiovascular benefits of testosterone replacement therapy

A Veterans Affairs database study of more than 83,000 patients found that men whose low testosterone was restored to normal through gels, patches, or injections had a lower risk of heart attack, stroke, or death from any cause, versus similar men who were not treated. [More]
Case Western Reserve awarded federal grant for nutritious food access study

Case Western Reserve awarded federal grant for nutritious food access study

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded $2.3 million to Case Western Reserve to lead a collaborative study of how changes in food options affect residents' nutritional choices and health over time. [More]
New technology that tracks patients' eye movements may accurately measure brain injury

New technology that tracks patients' eye movements may accurately measure brain injury

New technology that tracks the eye movements of patients may be a more accurate measure of brain injury than any other diagnostic measurements currently in use, according to a study recently published in the journal Concussion. [More]
Study may lead to effective antimicrobial treatment strategies for people with uncontrolled diabetes

Study may lead to effective antimicrobial treatment strategies for people with uncontrolled diabetes

Case Western Reserve scientists may have uncovered a molecular mechanism that sets into motion dangerous infection in the feet and hands often occurring with uncontrolled diabetes. It appears that high blood sugar unleashes destructive molecules that interfere with the body's natural infection-control defenses. [More]
Coordinated, two-part approach could help reduce hospital-acquired infections

Coordinated, two-part approach could help reduce hospital-acquired infections

By coordinating with state health departments and communicating with each other about patients with C. difficile and antibiotic-resistant infections, hospitals, long-term acute-care facilities and nursing homes could reduce the number of such hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) by an estimated 619,000 cases in the next five years, a new Centers for Disease Control 9 (CDC)-led report has found. [More]
Combining chemotherapy and birinapant effective against high-grade serous ovarian cancer

Combining chemotherapy and birinapant effective against high-grade serous ovarian cancer

High-grade serous ovarian cancer often responds well to the chemotherapy drug carboplatin, but why it so frequently comes back after treatment has been a medical mystery. [More]
15th Annual Geriatric Health Care Symposium now open for registration

15th Annual Geriatric Health Care Symposium now open for registration

Registration is now open for the 15th Annual Geriatric Health Care Symposium, "Maximizing Independence for Optimal Aging," presented by the University of Louisville Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging. [More]
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