Veterans Affairs News and Research RSS Feed - Veterans Affairs News and Research

New initiative aims to improve access to PTSD research

New initiative aims to improve access to PTSD research

Fraunhofer Institute for Algorithms and Scientific Computing (SCAI), Cohen Veterans Bioscience and Exaptive Inc. today announced a new initiative to improve access to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) research. The creation of a PTSD KnowledgeMap 
will systematize the current PTSD research space and provide interactive tools for scientists and others studying PTSD. [More]
Alcohol appears to impair the body's ability to keep gut bacteria in check

Alcohol appears to impair the body's ability to keep gut bacteria in check

Alcohol itself can directly damage liver cells. Now researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report evidence that alcohol is also harmful to the liver for a second reason — it allows gut bacteria to migrate to the liver, promoting alcohol-induced liver disease. [More]
Computerized cognitive rehabilitation can improve outcomes in brain injury survivors

Computerized cognitive rehabilitation can improve outcomes in brain injury survivors

For the first time, researchers have shown that computerized cognitive rehabilitation (a program to help brain-injured or otherwise cognitively impaired individuals to restore normal functioning) can improve attention and executive functioning in brain injury survivors including traumatic brain injury (TBI) and stroke. [More]

New reports discuss future demands facing VA health services

Three reports that discuss the future demands facing the VA Health Care System, the current resources in the system and how care is provided to veterans outside the federal system have been released by the RAND Corporation. [More]
Study provides new insight into complex interchange that can raise blood levels of fat in type 1 diabetes

Study provides new insight into complex interchange that can raise blood levels of fat in type 1 diabetes

Researchers have new insight into the complex interchange that can raise blood levels of unhealthy lipids, or fat, in type 1 diabetes, and early evidence that a drug under study to block cancer cell growth can restore healthier levels. [More]
UIC researchers discover molecular switch that allows salmonella bacteria to fight immune system

UIC researchers discover molecular switch that allows salmonella bacteria to fight immune system

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have discovered a molecular regulator that allows salmonella bacteria to switch from actively causing disease to lurking in a chronic but asymptomatic state called a biofilm. [More]
Better quality of care may reduce mortality risk in patients treated with opioid therapy for pain

Better quality of care may reduce mortality risk in patients treated with opioid therapy for pain

Better quality of care may reduce the risk of death for patients who are prescribed opioid painkillers for chronic pain, say Yale researchers. Their study, published Feb. 4 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, offers evidence that supports recommendations from clinical practice guidelines encouraging physicians to engage patients with mental health services and substance abuse treatment, as well as to avoid co-prescriptions for sedatives. [More]
Study reveals fetal origin for social and repetitive behavior deficits

Study reveals fetal origin for social and repetitive behavior deficits

Fetal development has been known to play an important role in social interaction, a fundamental behavior found in nearly all organisms, and later adult social behaviors. Autism, a highly heritable neurodevelopment disorder that causes difficulties with social interactions, has been postulated to be caused by neuron overgrowth in the prenatal period, although the precise timing and cause of this overgrowth has been unknown. [More]
Understanding military's culture could help health care providers improve care for veterans

Understanding military's culture could help health care providers improve care for veterans

Health care systems and providers need to understand the unique realities of military culture in order to work effectively with veterans and military families, according to the findings of a study by a University at Buffalo research team. [More]
Allergan's investigational medication rapastinel granted FDA Breakthrough Therapy designation

Allergan's investigational medication rapastinel granted FDA Breakthrough Therapy designation

Allergan plc., a leading global pharmaceutical company today announced that its Phase III ready investigational medication rapastinel (GLYX-13) received Breakthrough Therapy designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for adjunctive treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). [More]
New breakthrough drug shows promise to fight antibiotic-resistant infections

New breakthrough drug shows promise to fight antibiotic-resistant infections

A New York pharmaceutical company, TGV-Laboratories, has developed a groundbreaking drug that shows promise in treating a wide variety of antibiotic-resistant fungal and bacterial infections. [More]
E-cigarettes suppress immune defenses, alter inflammation and boost bacterial virulence

E-cigarettes suppress immune defenses, alter inflammation and boost bacterial virulence

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System report data suggesting that e-cigarettes are toxic to human airway cells, suppress immune defenses and alter inflammation, while at the same time boosting bacterial virulence. [More]
Duke researchers closer to developing rapid blood test for bacterial and viral infections

Duke researchers closer to developing rapid blood test for bacterial and viral infections

Researchers at Duke Health are fine-tuning a test that can determine whether a respiratory illness is caused by infection from a virus or bacteria so that antibiotics can be more precisely prescribed. [More]
UCLA research finds wide variations in post-acute care across different parts of the U.S.

UCLA research finds wide variations in post-acute care across different parts of the U.S.

To ensure that they receive proper care after surgery, patients are frequently referred by hospitals to inpatient facilities such as skilled nursing homes or inpatient rehabilitation centers or to receive home health care and other outpatient services. This type of care, called post-acute care, now accounts for some $62 billion in annual Medicare spending. [More]
Scientists reveal why non-alcoholic steatohepatitis worsens in obese people

Scientists reveal why non-alcoholic steatohepatitis worsens in obese people

In results published on October 19, 2015 in the Journal of Lipid Research, a team of translational scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina report a new reason why non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) worsens in people who are obese. [More]
Researchers suggest ways to make TB drugs more efficacious against mutations

Researchers suggest ways to make TB drugs more efficacious against mutations

Biophysicists have discovered why the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB) are naturally somewhat resistant to antibiotics known as fluoroquinolones. Their findings, based on mapping the detailed three-dimensional structure of the drugs interacting with an essential enzyme in the TB germ, also reveal why some TB drugs are more potent than others and suggest how drug developers can make fluoroquinolones more efficacious against mutations that make the lung disease drug resistant. [More]
New recommendations to reduce radiation-induced breast cancer risk from digital mammography

New recommendations to reduce radiation-induced breast cancer risk from digital mammography

Radiation-induced breast cancer risk from digital mammography is low for the majority of women, but risk is higher in women with large breasts, who received 2.3 times more radiation and required more views per examination to image as much of the breast as possible compared to those with small or average-sized breasts. [More]
Better coordination could help reduce hospital readmissions, mortality rates

Better coordination could help reduce hospital readmissions, mortality rates

Better coordination between hospitals and post-acute care facilities could reduce patient readmission to hospitals and mortality rates, according to a new study of risk factors by researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine. [More]
New nursing competencies may help improve veterans' health care needs

New nursing competencies may help improve veterans' health care needs

As the daughter of a 27-year veteran of the U.S. Air Force, and herself an intensive care nurse for more than 20 years, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing Professor Jacqueline Moss, Ph.D., is familiar with the U.S. military and caring for its veterans. [More]
Three new genetic associations identified for primary open angle glaucoma

Three new genetic associations identified for primary open angle glaucoma

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have led an international effort to identify three genetic associations that influence susceptibility to primary open angle glaucoma -- the most common form of adult onset glaucoma and the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement