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Mice study shows stem cell infusion could help treat glaucoma

Mice study shows stem cell infusion could help treat glaucoma

An infusion of stem cells could help restore proper drainage for fluid-clogged eyes at risk for glaucoma. That's the upshot of a study led by a Veterans Affairs and University of Iowa team. [More]
Retained metabolites may contribute to impaired cognitive function in kidney failure patients

Retained metabolites may contribute to impaired cognitive function in kidney failure patients

Retention of certain metabolites in the blood may contribute to cognitive impairment in patients with kidney failure, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
Cinnamon treatment turns poor-learning mice into good ones, research shows

Cinnamon treatment turns poor-learning mice into good ones, research shows

If Dr. Kalipada Pahan's research pans out, the standard advice for failing students might one day be: Study harder and eat your cinnamon! [More]
Researchers developing and validating model to predict risk for colon cancer in people under 50

Researchers developing and validating model to predict risk for colon cancer in people under 50

While the incidence of colon cancer has been declining in individuals 50 years old and older in the United States, it is steadily rising in those under age 50. With funding from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Thomas F. Imperiale, M.D., a VA and Regenstrief Institute clinician-researcher, is developing and validating a model to predict risk for colon cancer in those under 50 with no family history of the disease. [More]
Study finds significant increase in age-adjusted prevalence of sleep disorders among U.S. veterans

Study finds significant increase in age-adjusted prevalence of sleep disorders among U.S. veterans

A new study found a six-fold increase in the age-adjusted prevalence of any sleep disorder diagnosis over an 11-year period among U.S. veterans. [More]
Researchers identify new mechanism by which bacteria outsmarts immune system

Researchers identify new mechanism by which bacteria outsmarts immune system

Bacteria are rapidly developing resistance mechanisms to combat even the most effective antibiotics. [More]
Metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular events linked to decreased sexual activity in postmenopausal women

Metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular events linked to decreased sexual activity in postmenopausal women

Understanding the effects of age and disease on sexual wellbeing is crucial as sexual health is increasingly associated with vitality. In a new study published in The American Journal of Medicine, researchers looked at the role metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease play in postmenopausal women's sexual health. [More]
Study identifies new blood markers to accurately diagnose Gulf War Illness

Study identifies new blood markers to accurately diagnose Gulf War Illness

Based on a study of 85 Gulf War veterans, Veterans Affairs researchers in Minneapolis have developed a tentative panel of blood markers they say can verify a diagnosis of Gulf War Illness with 90 percent accuracy. [More]
New study finds no significant harm in melanoma screenings by primary care providers

New study finds no significant harm in melanoma screenings by primary care providers

A new study of more than 1,000 primary care melanoma screenings in the western Pennsylvania area in 2014 suggests that overall the practice complies with the old medical maxim to "first do no harm." [More]
NIH selects VUMC to play foundational role in PMI Cohort Program

NIH selects VUMC to play foundational role in PMI Cohort Program

Vanderbilt University Medical Center has been chosen by the National Institutes of Health to be the Data and Research Support Center for the Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort Program, a landmark study of genetic, environmental and lifestyle factors affecting the health of a million or more people, federal officials have announced. [More]
Testosterone therapy improves sexual activity in older men

Testosterone therapy improves sexual activity in older men

Older men with low libido and low testosterone levels showed more interest in sex and engaged in more sexual activity when they underwent testosterone therapy, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Study shows one in five individuals from U.S. military sample have obesity

Study shows one in five individuals from U.S. military sample have obesity

Despite being held to stringent weight and body fat standards, newly published research shows that one in five individuals from a sample of U.S. military personnel from 2001 - 2008 have obesity. [More]
Research finds significant increase in use of chiropractic services among veterans

Research finds significant increase in use of chiropractic services among veterans

The use of chiropractic services in the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system has seen a steep rise over more than a decade, according to research published in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, the official scientific journal of the American Chiropractic Association. [More]
Scientists provide new insights into role of star-shaped brain cells in memory, learning

Scientists provide new insights into role of star-shaped brain cells in memory, learning

A molecule that enables strong communication between our brain and muscles appears to also aid essential communication between our neurons, scientists report. [More]
Patients more likely to develop increased trust when surgeons disclose specialty bias

Patients more likely to develop increased trust when surgeons disclose specialty bias

A doctor's guidance may reassure us more than we realize -especially if she says she is likely to recommend treatment in her field of expertise, known as "specialty bias." [More]
New report offers PCPs implementable strategies to encourage patients' physical activity

New report offers PCPs implementable strategies to encourage patients' physical activity

Exercise plays a crucial role in being healthy and preventing disease. Because of their close relationship to patients, primary care physicians (PCPs) can act as a catalyst to help people be more active through physical activity counseling; however, doctors often encounter barriers to being able to properly address inactivity. [More]
Clinical trial finds pioglitazone drug safe and effective for NASH patients

Clinical trial finds pioglitazone drug safe and effective for NASH patients

Researchers have found that an existing diabetes drug can be used to halt progression of another disease that is a leading cause of liver transplants. [More]
In-hospital program improves community mobility, posthospitalization function in older adults

In-hospital program improves community mobility, posthospitalization function in older adults

Decreased mobility during hospitalization for older adults is associated with increased risk of death, nursing home admission and functional decline. University of Alabama at Birmingham investigators found that patients who participated in a mobility program were less likely to experience a decline in mobility when compared to the usual care provided during hospilization. [More]
Unsafe antiplatelet use persists in PCI patients

Unsafe antiplatelet use persists in PCI patients

Contraindicated antiplatelet use is rare but persists in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, show US study data. [More]
Duke scientists discover new small-molecule drugs to treat chronic pain

Duke scientists discover new small-molecule drugs to treat chronic pain

A research team at Duke University has discovered a potential new class of small-molecule drugs that simultaneously block two sought-after targets in the treatment of pain. [More]
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