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Pivotal enters into sales, distribution agreement for BeneFishial family of products

Pivotal enters into sales, distribution agreement for BeneFishial family of products

Pivotal Therapeutics Inc., a specialty pharmaceutical company with a focus on Omega-3 therapies for cardiovascular disease and overall health, announced today that it has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with Korea Animal Medical Science Institute and its newly created affiliate for the exclusive sales and distribution of the BeneFishial family of products. [More]
Protein-degrading enzyme can trigger strong allergic reactions through skin

Protein-degrading enzyme can trigger strong allergic reactions through skin

Papain is an important industrial protein-degrading enzyme that is used, for example, in the food and cosmetic industries. [More]
Novel biosensing platform could remotely determine treatment options for HIV, E-coli

Novel biosensing platform could remotely determine treatment options for HIV, E-coli

In much the same way that glucometers and pregnancy tests have revolutionized in-home diagnostic testing, researchers from Florida Atlantic University and collaborators have identified a new biosensing platform that could be used to remotely detect and determine treatment options for HIV, E-coli, Staphylococcus aureas and other bacteria. [More]
MRSA bacteria exposed to cigarette smoke become more resistant to antimicrobial peptides

MRSA bacteria exposed to cigarette smoke become more resistant to antimicrobial peptides

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), an antibiotic-resistant superbug, can cause life-threatening skin, bloodstream and surgical site infections or pneumonia. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine now report that cigarette smoke may make matters worse. [More]
Old leukemia drug may help in fight against cancer

Old leukemia drug may help in fight against cancer

A drug used for decades to treat leukemia may have other uses in the fight against cancer, researchers at the University of Missouri have found. Previously, doctors used 6-Thioguanine, or 6-TG, as a chemotherapy treatment to kill cancer cells in patients with leukemia. [More]
Glyxambi for Type 2 diabetes treatment now available by prescription across the U.S.

Glyxambi for Type 2 diabetes treatment now available by prescription across the U.S.

Glyxambi® (empagliflozin/linagliptin) tablets are now available by prescription in many leading chain and independent pharmacies across the U.S., including Walgreens and Rite Aid. [More]
Antech Diagnostics agrees to acquire assets of AVRL for $21 million from Abaxis

Antech Diagnostics agrees to acquire assets of AVRL for $21 million from Abaxis

Abaxis, Inc., a medical products company manufacturing point-of-care blood analysis systems, and VCA Inc., a leading animal healthcare company in the United States and Canada, today jointly announced Antech Diagnostics, Inc., VCA's laboratory division, has agreed to acquire the assets of AVRL (Abaxis Veterinary Reference Laboratory) from Abaxis for $21 million in cash. [More]
Penn researchers find evidence of new culprit in colon cancer

Penn researchers find evidence of new culprit in colon cancer

Colon cancer is a heavily studied disease -- and for good reason. It is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and its numbers are on the rise, from 500,00 deaths in 1990 to 700,000 in 2010. [More]
Trained scent dog identifies thyroid cancer in patients’ urine samples

Trained scent dog identifies thyroid cancer in patients’ urine samples

A trained scent dog accurately identified whether patients' urine samples had thyroid cancer or were benign (noncancerous) 88.2 percent of the time, according to a new study, to- be presented Friday at the Endocrine Society's 97th annual meeting in San Diego. [More]
Researchers one step closer to unraveling complex processes crucial to sperm development

Researchers one step closer to unraveling complex processes crucial to sperm development

Researchers are one step closer to unraveling the extraordinarily complex series of processes that leads to an event crucial to human reproduction: the creation of sperm. [More]
Researchers carry out Listeria screening in Vienna’s public lavatories

Researchers carry out Listeria screening in Vienna’s public lavatories

Listeria monocytogenes is a so-called environmental bacterium. It is highly adaptable and resistant. Previous studies carried out at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna have shown that L. monocytogenes is more prevalent in rural areas than in cities. But the situation in urban lavatories had so far not been investigated. [More]
Novel drug mechanism shows promise against glioma cells

Novel drug mechanism shows promise against glioma cells

Researchers at UC Davis have developed and characterized a molecule that interferes with the internal regulation of cancer cells, causing them to self-destruct. This novel mechanism was found to be effective against glioma cells - responsible for a usually fatal type of brain cancer - and could be applicable to other highly aggressive cancers. [More]
Kansas State researchers preparing for next potential influenza strain

Kansas State researchers preparing for next potential influenza strain

As seasonal influenza cases decrease across the United States, Kansas State University researchers are preparing for the next potential virulent strain of flu. [More]
Easy-to-obtain oral swab could be a game changer for TB control

Easy-to-obtain oral swab could be a game changer for TB control

Drawing inspiration from veterinary medicine, researchers at the University of Washington have helped developed a new prospective approach to diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) - easy-to-obtain oral swab samples, greatly improving on standard diagnostics. [More]
Study details a new pathway for tumor formation

Study details a new pathway for tumor formation

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine (SVM) have identified the biological mechanism that may give some cancer cells the ability to form tumors in dogs. [More]
Genetic decanalization can lead to complex genetic diseases in humans

Genetic decanalization can lead to complex genetic diseases in humans

The information encoded in the DNA of an organism is not sufficient to determine the expression pattern of genes. This fact has been known even before the discovery of epigenetics, which refers to external modifications to the DNA that turn genes "on" or "off". [More]
New cancer drug enters phase I clinical trials in humans

New cancer drug enters phase I clinical trials in humans

A new drug that prompts cancer cells to self-destruct while sparing healthy cells is now entering phase I clinical trials in humans. The drug, called PAC-1, first showed promise in the treatment of pet dogs with spontaneously occurring cancers, and is still in clinical trials in dogs with osteosarcoma. [More]
Study: Plant compounds can help prevent liver damage during menopause

Study: Plant compounds can help prevent liver damage during menopause

Women going through menopause often struggle with weight gain that results when their estrogen levels drop, and many turn to weight-loss supplements to help them shed those extra pounds. But those supplements may cause an accumulation of fat in the liver and a potentially life-threatening condition called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. [More]
Researchers warn doctors, parents not to give melatonin drug to control sleep problems in children

Researchers warn doctors, parents not to give melatonin drug to control sleep problems in children

Sleep researchers at the University of Adelaide are warning doctors and parents not to provide the drug melatonin to children to help control their sleep problems. [More]
Researchers explore influence of host organisms on bacterial metabolism

Researchers explore influence of host organisms on bacterial metabolism

Monika Ehling-Schulz's group from the Institute of Microbiology, together with Mathias Müller's group at the Institute of Animal Breeding and Genetics studied the influence of host organisms on bacterial metabolism. The researchers infected three different lineages of mice with the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. The mouse strains showed significant differences in their response to the infection and in the severity of the clinical symptoms. [More]
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