Veterinary News and Research RSS Feed - Veterinary News and Research

AMBER unveils new bone repair technology

AMBER unveils new bone repair technology

AMBER, the Science Foundation Ireland funded materials science centre, hosted in Trinity College Dublin, has today unveiled a new bone repair technology, which has led to an injured racehorse returning to winning ways after successful jaw reconstruction. [More]
Increase in Lassa fever cases could be due to human-to-human transmission, research reveals

Increase in Lassa fever cases could be due to human-to-human transmission, research reveals

One in five cases of Lassa fever - a disease that kills around 5,000 people a year in West Africa - could be due to human-to-human transmission, with a large proportion of these cases caused by 'super-spreaders', according to research published today in the journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. [More]
Major investment boosts Scotland's gene research

Major investment boosts Scotland's gene research

A major investment in gene sequencing technology will secure Scotland's place as a world leader in a genomics revolution that is set to transform healthcare. [More]
Cold atmospheric pressure plasma treatment may reduce risk of transmitting norovirus

Cold atmospheric pressure plasma treatment may reduce risk of transmitting norovirus

Treating surfaces with cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) may reduce the risk of transmitting norovirus, a contagious virus leading to stomach pain, nausea and diarrhea, according to a new study. [More]
QIAGEN's circulating tumor DNA test CE-IVD marked to assess genomic mutation NSCLC patients

QIAGEN's circulating tumor DNA test CE-IVD marked to assess genomic mutation NSCLC patients

QIAGEN announced today the CE-IVD marking of its novel liquid biopsy-based companion diagnostic that analyzes circulating nucleic acids obtained from blood samples to assess an important genomic mutation in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most common form of this cancer. [More]
Virginia Tech scientists plan to design virus to switch wound-healing drug into cancer fighter

Virginia Tech scientists plan to design virus to switch wound-healing drug into cancer fighter

At the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, three scientists are planning to create a virus capable of destroying brain cancer. [More]
Researchers use whole genome sequencing to track evolution of chicken flu virus

Researchers use whole genome sequencing to track evolution of chicken flu virus

An international research team has shown how changes in a flu virus that has plagued Chinese poultry farms for decades helped create the novel avian H7N9 influenza A virus that has sickened more than 375 people since 2013. The research appears in the current online early edition of the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Scientists validate oral vaccine delivery system to combat global health threats

Scientists validate oral vaccine delivery system to combat global health threats

Scientists at The Forsyth Institute and Tufts University have succeeded in describing and validating a unique system of oral vaccine delivery using a common bacteria found in the mouth. [More]
UC Davis researchers uncover complex relationship between p53 and Rbm38 proteins

UC Davis researchers uncover complex relationship between p53 and Rbm38 proteins

Scientists have long known the p53 protein suppresses tumors. However, a recent animal study by UC Davis researchers has uncovered a complicated relationship between p53 and another protein, Rbm38, highlighting how the body calibrates protein levels. Too much Rbm38 reduces p53 levels, increasing the risk of cancer. [More]
WSU researchers working on better bone-like materials used in hip and knee replacements

WSU researchers working on better bone-like materials used in hip and knee replacements

Washington State University researchers are working to improve materials used in hip and knee replacements so that they last longer and allow patients to quickly get back on their feet after surgery. [More]
Male hormone testosterone may increase risk of colon cancer

Male hormone testosterone may increase risk of colon cancer

Previous cancer research has revealed that women are less likely than men to suffer from non-sex specific cancers such as cancer of the colon, pancreas and stomach. Scientists theorized that perhaps this trend was due to a protecting effect created by female hormones, such as estrogen, that help prevent tumors from forming. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found evidence suggesting that the male hormone testosterone may actually be a contributing factor in the formation of colon cancer tumors. [More]
CUMC researchers devise way to replace torn knee meniscus

CUMC researchers devise way to replace torn knee meniscus

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have devised a way to replace the knee's protective lining, called the meniscus, using a personalized 3D-printed implant, or scaffold, infused with human growth factors that prompt the body to regenerate the lining on its own. [More]
Silvia Jurisson recognized as AAAS Fellow for contributions to cancer research

Silvia Jurisson recognized as AAAS Fellow for contributions to cancer research

Nuclear medicine is the branch of medicine that uses radioactive materials to provide diagnostics and treatments for cancer. Often, standard protocols involve using radioactive isotopes developed to image as well as weaken cancer cells in the body. With more than 30 years of research in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, Silvia Jurisson, a researcher at the University of Missouri, is a world-renowned scientist who continues to develop breakthrough materials used in the detection and treatment of cancer. [More]
Bayer, DNDi sign first agreement to develop new oral treatment for onchocerciasis

Bayer, DNDi sign first agreement to develop new oral treatment for onchocerciasis

Bayer HealthCare and the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) have signed an agreement under which Bayer will provide the active ingredient emodepside to support DNDi in its effort to develop a new oral drug to treat river blindness (or onchocerciasis). The world's second leading infectious cause of blindness, river blindness is a neglected tropical disease caused by a filarial worm. [More]
MD Anderson study sheds light on miR569 gene

MD Anderson study sheds light on miR569 gene

A genetic misfire called the 3q26.2 amplicon can cause real havoc. In fact, it is among the most frequent chromosomal aberrations seen in many cancers, including ovarian and breast cancers. [More]
New fluorescence-imaging agent could improve diagnosis, guide surgeons during tumor removal

New fluorescence-imaging agent could improve diagnosis, guide surgeons during tumor removal

CEA-Leti and CLARA today announced the development of a new fluorescence-imaging agent that could significantly increase surgeons’ accuracy when removing cancerous tumors. [More]
World-renowned experts to discuss challenges of antibiotic resistance at Murdoch University symposium

World-renowned experts to discuss challenges of antibiotic resistance at Murdoch University symposium

World-renowned experts in the fields of antibiotic resistance will come together at a symposium at Murdoch University to talk about an issue which has the potential to become one of the world’s biggest public health challenges. [More]
Tobacco smoke toxin could increase pain in people with spinal cord injury

Tobacco smoke toxin could increase pain in people with spinal cord injury

A neurotoxin called acrolein found in tobacco smoke that is thought to increase pain in people with spinal cord injury has now been shown to accumulate in mice exposed to the equivalent of 12 cigarettes daily over a short time period. [More]
Study: Selenium compounds appear to have beneficial effect on cancer

Study: Selenium compounds appear to have beneficial effect on cancer

The immune system is designed to remove things not normally found in the body. Cells undergoing change, e.g. precursors of cancer cells, are therefore normally recognised and removed by the immune system. Unfortunately, the different cancer cells contain mechanisms that block the immune system's ability to recognise them, allowing them to freely continue cancer development. [More]
Authors review current progress in developing transgenic pig models for human diseases

Authors review current progress in developing transgenic pig models for human diseases

Genetically engineered pigs, minipigs, and microminipigs are valuable tools for biomedical research, as their lifespan, anatomy, physiology, genetic make-up, and disease mechanisms are more similar to humans than the rodent models typically used in drug discovery research. [More]