Veterinary News and Research RSS Feed - Veterinary News and Research

FDA approves new injection to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes

FDA approves new injection to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Adlyxin (lixisenatide), a once-daily injection to improve glycemic control (blood sugar levels), along with diet and exercise, in adults with type 2 diabetes. [More]
FDA approves safety labeling changes for fluoroquinolone antibiotics

FDA approves safety labeling changes for fluoroquinolone antibiotics

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved safety labeling changes for a class of antibiotics, called fluoroquinolones, to enhance warnings about their association with disabling and potentially permanent side effects and to limit their use in patients with less serious bacterial infections. [More]
Promising new therapeutic target could lead to better prognosis of spinal muscular atrophy

Promising new therapeutic target could lead to better prognosis of spinal muscular atrophy

According to studies, approximately one out of every 40 individuals in the United States is a carrier of the gene responsible for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a neurodegenerative disease that causes muscles to weaken over time. [More]
Pet dogs can reduce stress in families of children with ASD

Pet dogs can reduce stress in families of children with ASD

Owning a pet dog reduces stress and significantly improves functioning in families who have a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), new research has shown. [More]
Tecnis Symfony Extended Range of Vision IOL approved for cataract patients

Tecnis Symfony Extended Range of Vision IOL approved for cataract patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first intraocular lens (IOL) that provides cataract patients with an extended depth-of-focus, which helps improve their sharpness of vision (visual acuity) at near, intermediate and far distances. [More]
Rare antibiotic compound detected in fungi for first time

Rare antibiotic compound detected in fungi for first time

Besides mushrooms such as truffles or morels, also many yeast and mould fungi, as well as other filamentous fungi belong to the Ascomycota phylum. They produce metabolic products which can act as natural antibiotics to combat bacteria and other pathogens. Penicillin, one of the oldest antibiotic agents, is probably the best known example. [More]
OVC research may help improve cancer treatment

OVC research may help improve cancer treatment

Cancer treatment in people could be transformed thanks to a study on treating cancer in animals led by researchers from the Ontario Veterinary College at the University of Guelph. [More]
Preventing zoonotic diseases from pets to people: an interview with Dr Monique Éloit, OIE Director General

Preventing zoonotic diseases from pets to people: an interview with Dr Monique Éloit, OIE Director General

Zoonotic diseases are diseases or infections which are naturally transmissible from animals to humans, as defined in the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code. [More]
FDA approves new ExAblate Neuro to treat patients with essential tremor

FDA approves new ExAblate Neuro to treat patients with essential tremor

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first focused ultrasound device to treat essential tremor in patients who have not responded to medication. ExAblate Neuro uses magnetic resonance (MR) images taken during the procedure to deliver focused ultrasound to destroy brain tissue in a tiny area thought to be responsible for causing tremors. [More]
FDA approves new topical retinoid gel for OTC treatment of acne

FDA approves new topical retinoid gel for OTC treatment of acne

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Differin Gel 0.1% (adapalene), a once-daily topical gel for the over-the-counter (OTC) treatment of acne. Differin Gel 0.1% is approved for use in people 12 years of age and older. [More]
FDA approves Roche cobas HPV Test to be used with SurePath Preservative Fluid

FDA approves Roche cobas HPV Test to be used with SurePath Preservative Fluid

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the Roche cobas HPV Test as the first test for Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) that can be used with cervical cells obtained for a Pap test and collected in SurePath Preservative Fluid. [More]
Researchers aim to explore impact of gender and aging on CapZ levels in the heart

Researchers aim to explore impact of gender and aging on CapZ levels in the heart

Why do women have lower rates of heart failure than men for most of their lives? University of Guelph researchers have uncovered a possible clue - an actin binding protein called "CapZ" that also protects against heart attacks. [More]
Mitochondrial stress can trigger tumor-related metabolic shifts, study finds

Mitochondrial stress can trigger tumor-related metabolic shifts, study finds

Cancerous tumors must be fed. Their unregulated growth requires a steady stream of blood flow and nutrients. Thus, one way that researchers have tried to wipe out cancer is to target cells undergoing the metabolic shifts that enable a tumor's rapid growth. [More]
FDA approves Absorb GT1 BVS to treat coronary artery disease

FDA approves Absorb GT1 BVS to treat coronary artery disease

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first fully absorbable stent to treat coronary artery disease. [More]
Key differences in immune response may explain young children’s proneness to infecion

Key differences in immune response may explain young children’s proneness to infecion

Schools are commonly known as breeding grounds for viruses and bacteria, but this may not necessarily be linked to hygiene. [More]
Study finds link between copper exposure and prion protein neurotoxicity

Study finds link between copper exposure and prion protein neurotoxicity

Iowa State University researchers have described with single-molecule precision how copper ions cause prion proteins to misfold and seed the misfolding and clumping of nearby prion proteins. [More]
New strategy treats fatal autoimmune disease without outward off-target effects

New strategy treats fatal autoimmune disease without outward off-target effects

In a study with potentially major implications for the future treatment of autoimmunity and related conditions, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found a way to remove the subset of antibody-making cells that cause an autoimmune disease, without harming the rest of the immune system. [More]
New report reveals commonly available chemicals endanger brain development in fetuses, children

New report reveals commonly available chemicals endanger brain development in fetuses, children

In a new report, dozens of scientists, health practitioners and children's health advocates are calling for renewed attention to the growing evidence that many common and widely available chemicals endanger neurodevelopment in fetuses and children of all ages. [More]
Wolbachia bacterium can prevent mosquitoes from transmitting Zika virus

Wolbachia bacterium can prevent mosquitoes from transmitting Zika virus

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have confirmed that a benign bacterium called Wolbachia pipientis can completely block transmission of Zika virus in Aedes aegypti, the mosquito species responsible for passing the virus to humans. [More]
FDA approves Raindrop Near Vision Inlay device for patients with presbyopia

FDA approves Raindrop Near Vision Inlay device for patients with presbyopia

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the Raindrop Near Vision Inlay, a device implanted in the cornea (the clear, front surface) of one eye to improve near vision in certain patients with presbyopia. [More]
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