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Antivirals that block influenza can also inhibit Zika virus infection, study shows

Antivirals that block influenza can also inhibit Zika virus infection, study shows

Researchers from the University of Helsinki have shown that three anti-influenza compounds effectively inhibit Zika virus infection in human cells. [More]
Mass livestock production could lead to human pandemics, expert says

Mass livestock production could lead to human pandemics, expert says

Mass livestock production is driving molecular changes in diseases that could lead to human pandemics, according to an expert from the University of Exeter. [More]
Penn Vet researchers identify potential target to fight against Ebola

Penn Vet researchers identify potential target to fight against Ebola

Viruses and their hosts are in a eternal game of one-upmanship. If a host cell evolves a way to stop a virus from spreading, the virus will look for a new path. And so on and so forth. [More]
VTCRI scientist receives $2.1 million grant for research to combat heart disease

VTCRI scientist receives $2.1 million grant for research to combat heart disease

Steven Poelzing, an associate professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, has received a $2.1 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health for research to combat the nation's No. 1 killer — heart disease. [More]
Appendix may serve as reservoir for beneficial gut bacteria, new research suggests

Appendix may serve as reservoir for beneficial gut bacteria, new research suggests

The human appendix, a narrow pouch that projects off the cecum in the digestive system, has a notorious reputation for its tendency to become inflamed (appendicitis), often resulting in surgical removal. [More]
Researchers provide clues to how mcr-1 gene protects bacteria from 'last resort' antibiotic

Researchers provide clues to how mcr-1 gene protects bacteria from 'last resort' antibiotic

An international research team, led by the University of Bristol, has provided the first clues to understand how the mcr-1 gene protects bacteria from colistin - a 'last resort' antibiotic used to treat life-threatening bacterial infections that do not respond to other treatment options. [More]
Study confirms presence of ticks carrying Lyme disease in eastern national parks

Study confirms presence of ticks carrying Lyme disease in eastern national parks

Lyme disease has been spreading across the United States over the past several decades, and a new study has confirmed that ticks carrying the disease are present in eastern national parks. [More]
Socioeconomic factors in the U.S. make large-scale Zika outbreaks unlikely, new analysis suggests

Socioeconomic factors in the U.S. make large-scale Zika outbreaks unlikely, new analysis suggests

Is the United States at risk for a large-scale outbreak of Zika or other mosquito-borne disease? While climate conditions in the U.S. are increasingly favorable to mosquitos, socioeconomic factors such as access to clean water and air conditioning make large-scale outbreaks unlikely, according to new analysis of existing research--but small-scale, localized outbreaks are an ongoing concern. [More]
FDA approves first drug to treat children and adults with spinal muscular atrophy

FDA approves first drug to treat children and adults with spinal muscular atrophy

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Spinraza (nusinersen), the first drug approved to treat children and adults with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a rare and often fatal genetic disease affecting muscle strength and movement. [More]
FDA expands approved use of G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System

FDA expands approved use of G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today expanded the approved use of Dexcom's G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System to allow for replacement of fingerstick blood glucose (sugar) testing for diabetes treatment decisions in people 2 years of age and older with diabetes. [More]
FDA awards accelerated approval to new ovarian cancer drug

FDA awards accelerated approval to new ovarian cancer drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Rubraca (rucaparib) to treat women with a certain type of ovarian cancer. [More]
Ancient Chinese medicine for malaria could potentially aid in treatment of tuberculosis

Ancient Chinese medicine for malaria could potentially aid in treatment of tuberculosis

A centuries-old herbal medicine, discovered by Chinese scientists and used to effectively treat malaria, has been found to potentially aid in the treatment of tuberculosis and may slow the evolution of drug resistance. [More]
FDA approves new treatment option for patients dealing with mild to moderate eczema

FDA approves new treatment option for patients dealing with mild to moderate eczema

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Eucrisa (crisaborole) ointment to treat mild to moderate eczema (atopic dermatitis) in patients two years of age and older. [More]
Researchers show how common bacterium in improperly cooked chicken triggers GBS

Researchers show how common bacterium in improperly cooked chicken triggers GBS

A Michigan State University research team is the first to show how a common bacterium found in improperly cooked chicken causes Guillain-Barre Syndrome, or GBS. [More]
FDA announces important steps to improve consumer access to hearing aids

FDA announces important steps to improve consumer access to hearing aids

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced important steps to better support consumer access to hearing aids. [More]
Queen's University expert to lead new €4m initiative for assessing impact of chemicals on health

Queen's University expert to lead new €4m initiative for assessing impact of chemicals on health

A Queen's University Belfast expert is leading a €4m international initiative to investigate whether natural toxins and manmade chemicals are creating potentially dangerous mixtures that affect our natural hormones and cause major illnesses such as cancer, obesity, diabetes or infertility. [More]
Gut microbes may play important role in exacerbated post-dieting weight gain

Gut microbes may play important role in exacerbated post-dieting weight gain

Following a successful diet, many people are dismayed to find their weight rebounding - an all-too-common phenomenon termed "recurrent" or "yo-yo" obesity. [More]
Researchers assess scientific rigor in animal experimentation

Researchers assess scientific rigor in animal experimentation

The "reproducibility crisis" in biomedical research has led to questions about the scientific rigor in animal research, and thus the ethical justification of animal experiments. [More]
New drug receives FDA approval to reduce risk of cardiovascular death in adults with diabetes

New drug receives FDA approval to reduce risk of cardiovascular death in adults with diabetes

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new indication for Jardiance (empagliflozin) to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death in adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. [More]
New UGA research finds pathogen's motility activates immune response

New UGA research finds pathogen's motility activates immune response

Until now, a pathogen's ability to move through the body has been overlooked as a possible trigger of immune response, but new research from the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine found that motility will indeed alarm the host and activate an immune response. [More]
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