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Surgical skills laboratory and dissection curriculum for training neurosurgical residents

Surgical skills laboratory and dissection curriculum for training neurosurgical residents

A surgical skills laboratory and corresponding dissection curricula were established in the Department of Neurosurgery at the Cleveland Clinic in the 2011-2012 academic year. The authors describe how this came about and what it has meant for neurosurgical resident training and assessment of residents' surgical skills in the following paper: "Establishing a surgical skills laboratory and dissection curriculum for neurosurgical residency training" by James K. C. Liu, MD, and colleagues, published today online, ahead of print in the Journal of Neurosurgery. [More]
Researchers create new vaccine development method for H5N1, H7N9 strains of avian influenza

Researchers create new vaccine development method for H5N1, H7N9 strains of avian influenza

A recent study with Kansas State University researchers details vaccine development for two new strains of avian influenza that can be transmitted from poultry to humans. The strains have led to the culling of millions of commercial chickens and turkeys as well as the death of hundreds of people. [More]
Phages in chicken meat can transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria

Phages in chicken meat can transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria

Bacteria resistant to antibiotics are on the rise. There are different explanations for how resistances are transferred. Researchers from the Vetmeduni Vienna found phages in chicken meat that are able to transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria. Phages are viruses that exclusively infect bacteria. They can contribute to the spread of antimicrobial resistance. [More]
Grass plants can bind, uptake and transport infectious prions

Grass plants can bind, uptake and transport infectious prions

Grass plants can bind, uptake and transport infectious prions, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). [More]
HHMI selects two Boston University medical students to conduct full-time biomedical research

HHMI selects two Boston University medical students to conduct full-time biomedical research

Two medical students from Boston University have been selected by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute to conduct full-time biomedical research in its Medical Research Fellows Program. Joseph Park and Jacqueline Estevez are two of the selected 68 top medical and veterinary students from 37 different schools in the United States to receive this honor. [More]
Boehringer Ingelheim, Sutter Health announce health care innovation collaboration

Boehringer Ingelheim, Sutter Health announce health care innovation collaboration

Boehringer Ingelheim, a family-owned biopharmaceutical company, and Sutter Health, a not-for-profit health system in Northern California, today announced the start of a five-year research and health care innovation collaboration, which will explore and test the value of digital health solutions, mobile technologies, and insights from advanced data analytics in the delivery of health care. [More]
Penn researchers find molecular bond between DNA damage, cellular senescence and premature aging

Penn researchers find molecular bond between DNA damage, cellular senescence and premature aging

Like a beloved pair of jeans, human DNA accumulates damage over time, and older people's bodies can't repair it as well. Many scientists believe a build up of damage can cause cells to enter an irreversible dormant state known as senescence. Cellular senescence is believed to be responsible for some of the telltale signs of aging, such as weakened bones, less resilient skin and slow-downs in organ function. [More]
Common tapeworm drug effectively treats MRSA superbugs in lab

Common tapeworm drug effectively treats MRSA superbugs in lab

A new study provides evidence from lab experiments that a drug already used in people to fight tapeworms might also prove effective against strains of the superbug MRSA, which kills thousands of people a year in the United States. [More]
First evidence-based guideline released to ensure patient safety

First evidence-based guideline released to ensure patient safety

Today, the College of American Pathologists and the National Society for Histotechnology released the first evidence-based guideline to ensure patient safety through the uniform labeling of paraffin blocks and slides. [More]
Sugar-sweetened beverages increase risk factors for cardiovascular disease

Sugar-sweetened beverages increase risk factors for cardiovascular disease

Beverages sweetened with low, medium and high amounts of high-fructose corn syrup significantly increase risk factors for cardiovascular disease, even when consumed for just two weeks by young, healthy men and women, reports a team of researchers at the University of California, Davis. [More]
Pivotal enters into sales, distribution agreement for BeneFishial family of products

Pivotal enters into sales, distribution agreement for BeneFishial family of products

Pivotal Therapeutics Inc., a specialty pharmaceutical company with a focus on Omega-3 therapies for cardiovascular disease and overall health, announced today that it has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with Korea Animal Medical Science Institute and its newly created affiliate for the exclusive sales and distribution of the BeneFishial family of products. [More]
Protein-degrading enzyme can trigger strong allergic reactions through skin

Protein-degrading enzyme can trigger strong allergic reactions through skin

Papain is an important industrial protein-degrading enzyme that is used, for example, in the food and cosmetic industries. [More]
Novel biosensing platform could remotely determine treatment options for HIV, E-coli

Novel biosensing platform could remotely determine treatment options for HIV, E-coli

In much the same way that glucometers and pregnancy tests have revolutionized in-home diagnostic testing, researchers from Florida Atlantic University and collaborators have identified a new biosensing platform that could be used to remotely detect and determine treatment options for HIV, E-coli, Staphylococcus aureas and other bacteria. [More]
MRSA bacteria exposed to cigarette smoke become more resistant to antimicrobial peptides

MRSA bacteria exposed to cigarette smoke become more resistant to antimicrobial peptides

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), an antibiotic-resistant superbug, can cause life-threatening skin, bloodstream and surgical site infections or pneumonia. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine now report that cigarette smoke may make matters worse. [More]
Old leukemia drug may help in fight against cancer

Old leukemia drug may help in fight against cancer

A drug used for decades to treat leukemia may have other uses in the fight against cancer, researchers at the University of Missouri have found. Previously, doctors used 6-Thioguanine, or 6-TG, as a chemotherapy treatment to kill cancer cells in patients with leukemia. [More]
Glyxambi for Type 2 diabetes treatment now available by prescription across the U.S.

Glyxambi for Type 2 diabetes treatment now available by prescription across the U.S.

Glyxambi® (empagliflozin/linagliptin) tablets are now available by prescription in many leading chain and independent pharmacies across the U.S., including Walgreens and Rite Aid. [More]
Antech Diagnostics agrees to acquire assets of AVRL for $21 million from Abaxis

Antech Diagnostics agrees to acquire assets of AVRL for $21 million from Abaxis

Abaxis, Inc., a medical products company manufacturing point-of-care blood analysis systems, and VCA Inc., a leading animal healthcare company in the United States and Canada, today jointly announced Antech Diagnostics, Inc., VCA's laboratory division, has agreed to acquire the assets of AVRL (Abaxis Veterinary Reference Laboratory) from Abaxis for $21 million in cash. [More]
Penn researchers find evidence of new culprit in colon cancer

Penn researchers find evidence of new culprit in colon cancer

Colon cancer is a heavily studied disease -- and for good reason. It is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and its numbers are on the rise, from 500,00 deaths in 1990 to 700,000 in 2010. [More]
Trained scent dog identifies thyroid cancer in patients’ urine samples

Trained scent dog identifies thyroid cancer in patients’ urine samples

A trained scent dog accurately identified whether patients' urine samples had thyroid cancer or were benign (noncancerous) 88.2 percent of the time, according to a new study, to- be presented Friday at the Endocrine Society's 97th annual meeting in San Diego. [More]
Researchers one step closer to unraveling complex processes crucial to sperm development

Researchers one step closer to unraveling complex processes crucial to sperm development

Researchers are one step closer to unraveling the extraordinarily complex series of processes that leads to an event crucial to human reproduction: the creation of sperm. [More]
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