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Vomiting is the process the body uses to eject some or all of the contents of the stomach through the mouth.
NIAID begins early-stage trial of experimental vaccine for preventing yellow fever virus

NIAID begins early-stage trial of experimental vaccine for preventing yellow fever virus

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, has begun an early-stage clinical trial of an investigational vaccine designed to protect against yellow fever virus. [More]
Antipsychotic drug could help reduce nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy

Antipsychotic drug could help reduce nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy

A drug that blocks neurotransmitters could reduce nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy, research co-authored by a Sanford Health physician and published in the New England Journal of Medicine finds. [More]
Soligenix announces encouraging preliminary results of heat stable Ebola vaccine

Soligenix announces encouraging preliminary results of heat stable Ebola vaccine

A biopharmaceutical company collaborating with Hawai'i scientists on an Ebola vaccine announced encouraging news about its vaccine today. [More]
SLU researchers study investigational vaccine for yellow fever

SLU researchers study investigational vaccine for yellow fever

Saint Louis University's Center for Vaccine Development is studying an investigational vaccine for yellow fever, a potentially deadly disease that is spread by the same mosquito that transmits Zika virus. [More]
NPS MedicineWise urges child care centres to increase awareness around misuse of antibiotics in young children

NPS MedicineWise urges child care centres to increase awareness around misuse of antibiotics in young children

NPS MedicineWise has written to child care centres across Australia to enlist their support in responding to the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. Child care staff are well placed to help with education and increase awareness around the misuse of antibiotics in young children. [More]
European Commission approves extended indication for Amgen's Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for the treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma patients

European Commission approves extended indication for Amgen's Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for the treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma patients

Amgen has announced that the European Commission (EC) has approved a variation to the marketing authorization for Kyprolis® (carfilzomib) to include use in combination with dexamethasone alone for adult patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. The extended indication marks the second approval for Kyprolis by the EC in less than a year. [More]
Health care resource use and costs of H.P. Acthar® gel for multiple sclerosis relapse

Health care resource use and costs of H.P. Acthar® gel for multiple sclerosis relapse

Mallinckrodt plc, a leading global specialty biopharmaceutical company, today announced new retrospective health economic data on H.P. Acthar® Gel (repository corticotropin injection; RCI), which may be an option for the management of multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses. [More]
Fecal contamination in water can sicken swimmers

Fecal contamination in water can sicken swimmers

Recreational water illness is the overall term for sickness caused by bacteria or viruses in pools, lakes, rivers and other places people like to swim or play in hot weather. [More]
Study sheds more light on how bacteria rapidly causes infectious diseases

Study sheds more light on how bacteria rapidly causes infectious diseases

Researchers at Umea University are first to discover that bacteria can multiply disease-inducing genes which are needed to rapidly cause infection. [More]
Structures on surface of pneumococci determine bacteria’s ability to cause meningitis

Structures on surface of pneumococci determine bacteria’s ability to cause meningitis

Structures on the surface of pneumococci determine the ability of these bacteria to enter the brain and cause severe infections, according to a paper published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation by researchers at Karolinska Institutet. [More]
Health strategies for families when traveling abroad with kids

Health strategies for families when traveling abroad with kids

Before your family heads to Mexico, Asia or beyond this summer, do a little planning to keep everyone healthy during their journey. Dr. Nava Yeganeh, an assistant professor of pediatric infectious diseases and director of the Pediatric International Travel and Adoption Clinic at Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA, explains three important strategies. [More]
Researchers play crucial role in crafting diagnostic criteria for functional GI disorders

Researchers play crucial role in crafting diagnostic criteria for functional GI disorders

With no laboratory test available to diagnose functional gastrointestinal disorders, proper diagnostic criteria are critical for clinicians to make an accurate determination of what ails their patients. [More]
FDA approves novel stomach-draining device to treat obesity

FDA approves novel stomach-draining device to treat obesity

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new obesity treatment device that uses a surgically-placed tube to drain a portion of the stomach contents after every meal. [More]
Clinical trial to test efficacy of new drug for chronic cough

Clinical trial to test efficacy of new drug for chronic cough

The National Institute for Health Research has today announced its participation in a clinical trial to test a promising new treatment for chronic cough. If approved, this would be the first new cough drug in 50 years and offer hope to the millions of people living with chronic cough for whom few, if any, effective treatments exist. [More]
FDA approves Vaxchora for prevention of cholera

FDA approves Vaxchora for prevention of cholera

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Vaxchora, a vaccine for the prevention of cholera caused by serogroup O1 in adults 18 through 64 years of age traveling to cholera-affected areas. Vaxchora is the only FDA-approved vaccine for the prevention of cholera. [More]
Advanced imaging technique helps predict recovery in concussion patients

Advanced imaging technique helps predict recovery in concussion patients

Using an advanced imaging technique, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System were able to predict which patients who'd recently suffered concussions were likely to fully recover. [More]
Pre-procedure medication regimen could lower incidence of hospital readmission in lung caner patients

Pre-procedure medication regimen could lower incidence of hospital readmission in lung caner patients

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have found that putting liver cancer patients on a medication regimen prior to undergoing a certain treatment could lead to shorter hospital stays and less chance for readmission due to complications. [More]
PD surgery improves quality of life in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

PD surgery improves quality of life in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

Although surgery can prolong the lives of patients with an aggressive type of cancer called malignant pleural mesothelioma, many patients avoid the operation for fear it will degrade their quality of life. [More]
Scientists explore effects of physiological fluid shear on dangerous type of Salmonella

Scientists explore effects of physiological fluid shear on dangerous type of Salmonella

Once inside the human body, infectious microbes like Salmonella face a fluid situation. They live in a watery world, surrounded by liquid continually flowing over and abrading their cell surfaces--a property known as fluid shear. [More]
Metabolite of oral DMF drug for multiple sclerosis appears to slow onset of Parkinson's disease

Metabolite of oral DMF drug for multiple sclerosis appears to slow onset of Parkinson's disease

The metabolite of a drug that is helping patients battle multiple sclerosis appears to significantly slow the onset of Parkinson's disease, researchers say. [More]
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