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Vomiting is the process the body uses to eject some or all of the contents of the stomach through the mouth.
Study opens door for new opportunities in finding antidotes to nerve agent sarin

Study opens door for new opportunities in finding antidotes to nerve agent sarin

The nerve agent sarin causes a deadly overstimulation of the nervous system that can be stopped if treated with an antidote within minutes of poisoning. Today, a ground-breaking study has been published in PNAS, which in detail describes how such a drug works. Researchers at the Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umea University and in Germany are behind the study. [More]
Half-strength apple juice followed by preferred fluid choice better for treating kids with mild gastroenteritis

Half-strength apple juice followed by preferred fluid choice better for treating kids with mild gastroenteritis

Children with mild gastroenteritis and minimal dehydration experienced fewer treatment failures such as IV rehydration or hospitalization when offered half-strength apple juice followed by their preferred fluid choice compared with children who received electrolyte maintenance solution to replace fluid losses, according to a study published online by JAMA. The study is being released to coincide with its presentation at the Pediatric Academic Societies meeting. [More]
Outbreak of tropical parasitic infection observed for first time in the Arctic

Outbreak of tropical parasitic infection observed for first time in the Arctic

An outbreak of an intestinal parasite common in the tropics, known as Cryptosporidium, has been identified for the first time in the Arctic. The discovery was made in Nunavik, Quebec, by a team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, in collaboration with the Nunavik Department of Public Health, Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec and Health Canada. The discovery, which was documented in the journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, could have long-term implications for the health of children in Nunavik and Nunavut's communities. [More]
Research highlights global economic burden of norovirus

Research highlights global economic burden of norovirus

While norovirus is often linked in the news to outbreaks on cruise ships, the highly contagious stomach bug sickens nearly 700 million around the world every year and results in roughly $4.2 billion in health care costs and $60.3 billion in societal costs annually, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Non-invasive test to diagnose EoE could replace need for repeated endoscopy

Non-invasive test to diagnose EoE could replace need for repeated endoscopy

A non-invasive test to diagnose and monitor an inflammatory disease that injures the esophagus - called eosinophilic esophagitis or EoE - would replace the need for repeated endoscopy for a growing number of children and adults with this relatively new condition. [More]
Imatinib-related symptom burden linked to adherence in Indian CML patients

Imatinib-related symptom burden linked to adherence in Indian CML patients

Research shows low adherence to imatinib in Indian patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia, with an association between nonadherence and worse symptom burden related to treatment. [More]
New KidsMD Alexa skill device allows parents to get easier to access medical information

New KidsMD Alexa skill device allows parents to get easier to access medical information

"My child has a fever of 101. Should I be concerned?" Through a new skill created for Amazon Alexa-enabled devices, parents will now be able to ask Alexa a variety of questions around fever and other common symptoms. The KidsMD Alexa skill was developed by the Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator team at Boston Children's Hospital and launched today. [More]
Hospitals could reduce burden of alcohol-related liver disease through universal screening procedure

Hospitals could reduce burden of alcohol-related liver disease through universal screening procedure

The growing burden of alcohol-related liver disease (ARLD) could be reduced if hospitals introduced a simple universal screening procedure for those attending acute and emergency hospital settings, according to a new study shared today at The International Liver Congress in Barcelona, Spain. [More]
RedHill Biopharma initiates phase II study of BEKINDA for irritable bowel syndrome

RedHill Biopharma initiates phase II study of BEKINDA for irritable bowel syndrome

RedHill Biopharma Ltd. (NASDAQ; RDHL) (TASE: RDHL) (“RedHill” or the “Company”), a biopharmaceutical company primarily focused on development and commercialization of late clinical-stage, proprietary, orally-administered, small molecule drugs for inflammatory and gastrointestinal diseases, including cancer, today announced that it has initiated a randomized, double-blind, 2-arm parallel group Phase II clinical study in the U.S. evaluating the safety and efficacy of BEKINDA™ 12 mg in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). [More]
Weekend effect in hospitals affect kidney stone treatment, outcomes

Weekend effect in hospitals affect kidney stone treatment, outcomes

Patients with severe cases of kidney stones are 26 percent less likely to receive timely treatment when they're admitted to the hospital on the weekend, according to a study by researchers at Loyola Medicine and Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. [More]
Vanderbilt's A.S.A.P sees increase in number of patients treated for alpha-gal syndrome

Vanderbilt's A.S.A.P sees increase in number of patients treated for alpha-gal syndrome

Vanderbilt's Asthma, Sinus and Allergy Program (A.S.A.P) has seen an increase in the number of patients being treated for alpha-gal syndrome, commonly known as the red meat allergy linked to tick bites. [More]
Radiation therapy plus PCV chemotherapy improves survival of low-grade glioma patients

Radiation therapy plus PCV chemotherapy improves survival of low-grade glioma patients

Patients with a low-grade type of brain tumor called glioma who received radiation therapy plus a chemotherapy regimen, including procarbazine, lomustine and vincristine (PCV), experienced a longer progression-free survival and overall survival than patients who received radiation therapy alone, according to the results of the clinical trial, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9802 published in the April 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Investigators predict that new pneumonia epidemic in Beijing will likely to continue for longer time

Investigators predict that new pneumonia epidemic in Beijing will likely to continue for longer time

Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections began rising in Beijing last spring, and by December, this pathogen was found in more than half of hospitalized children suffering from pneumonia in that city, according to investigators from the Capital Institute of Pediatrics, Beijing, China. [More]
FDA approves Defitelio to treat hepatic veno-occlusive disease in adults, children

FDA approves Defitelio to treat hepatic veno-occlusive disease in adults, children

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Defitelio (defibrotide sodium) to treat adults and children who develop hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) with additional kidney or lung abnormalities after they receive a stem cell transplant from blood or bone marrow called hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). [More]
Four commonly used medications to treat pregnant women with migraines may not be safe

Four commonly used medications to treat pregnant women with migraines may not be safe

According to doctors at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, medications and treatments long considered safe to treat pregnant women with migraines may not be. [More]
Simple blood test can help detect evidence of concussions up to 7 days after injury

Simple blood test can help detect evidence of concussions up to 7 days after injury

Researchers at Orlando Health detected evidence of concussions in patients up to 7 days after their injury using a simple blood test, according to a new study published in JAMA Neurology. The discovery could greatly expand the window for diagnosing concussions, especially in patients who experience a delayed onset of symptoms. [More]
Yellow fever outbreak in Angola kills 178 people

Yellow fever outbreak in Angola kills 178 people

Angola is grappling with a yellow fever outbreak, which has infected more than 450 people and killed 178 – the first epidemic of the disease to hit the country in 30 years. [More]
Couple's caffeinated beverage consumption can increase risk of miscarriage

Couple's caffeinated beverage consumption can increase risk of miscarriage

A woman is more likely to miscarry if she and her partner drink more than two caffeinated beverages a day during the weeks leading up to conception, according to a new study from researchers at the National Institutes of Health and Ohio State University, Columbus. [More]
Kids with minor head injuries may not require hospitalization, study suggests

Kids with minor head injuries may not require hospitalization, study suggests

Challenging the longstanding practice of keeping all children with head injuries in the hospital overnight, new research from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital suggests that patients with simple skull fractures can be sent home safely if they have no evidence of brain injury and no neurological symptoms. [More]
Anticonvulsant medication gabapentin effectively reduces common complication of PONV

Anticonvulsant medication gabapentin effectively reduces common complication of PONV

The anticonvulsant medication gabapentin—already a useful part of strategies to control pain after surgery—also effectively reduces the common complication of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), reports a study in Anesthesia & Analgesia. [More]
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