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The womb is the small, hollow, pear-shaped organ in a woman's pelvis. This is the organ in which a baby grows. Also called uterus.
Adults born very premature display socially withdrawn personality

Adults born very premature display socially withdrawn personality

New research indicates that adults born very premature are more likely to be socially withdrawn and display signs of autism. [More]
Duke study finds that gut worms can protect babies' brains from chronic inflammation

Duke study finds that gut worms can protect babies' brains from chronic inflammation

A Duke University study in rats finds that gut worms can protect babies' brains from long-term learning and memory problems caused by newborn infections. [More]
UMass Amherst scientist to study how estrogen-mimicking chemicals in the womb can increase breast cancer risk

UMass Amherst scientist to study how estrogen-mimicking chemicals in the womb can increase breast cancer risk

Much attention has been paid to genetics in breast cancer as disease rates rise, but most women have no family history of the disease, suggesting that there is an environmental risk we don't yet understand, says environmental health scientist Laura Vandenberg in the School of Public Health and Health Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. [More]
Diabetes drug metformin does not stop babies from being born overweight

Diabetes drug metformin does not stop babies from being born overweight

Treating obese pregnant women with a diabetes drug does not stop their babies from being born overweight, a study has found. [More]
Histones steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life, find Mount Sinai researchers

Histones steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life, find Mount Sinai researchers

For decades, researchers in the genetics field have theorized that the protein spools around which DNA is wound, histones, remain constant in the brain, never changing after development in the womb. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify two proteins within fetal lungs that initiate labor process

UT Southwestern researchers identify two proteins within fetal lungs that initiate labor process

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified two proteins in a fetus' lungs responsible for initiating the labor process, providing potential new targets for preventing preterm birth. [More]
New research suggests pedophiles more likely to have facial anomalies

New research suggests pedophiles more likely to have facial anomalies

New research suggests pedophiles are more likely to have superficial facial flaws, known as Minor Physical Anomalies (MPAs). They are also more likely to be left-handed, says Fiona Dyshniku of the University of Windsor in Canada. She led an investigation into the prevalence and distribution of physical anomalies among men who are sent for sexological assessment. [More]
Ultrasound becoming the most widely used imaging tool in medicine today

Ultrasound becoming the most widely used imaging tool in medicine today

Mention "ultrasound" and most people likely will think of an image of a fetus in a mother's womb. But while providing peeks at the not-yet-born is one of ultrasound's most common applications, that's only a small part of the picture. [More]
Use of antidepressants in late pregnancy may be associated with increased risk of PPHN

Use of antidepressants in late pregnancy may be associated with increased risk of PPHN

An analysis of approximately 3.8 million pregnancies finds that use of antidepressants late in pregnancy may be associated with an increased risk of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), according to a study in the June 2 issue of JAMA. However, the absolute risk was small and the risk increase appears more modest than suggested in previous studies. [More]
Mediterranean-style diet can reduce womb cancer risk by half

Mediterranean-style diet can reduce womb cancer risk by half

Women who eat a Mediterranean diet could cut their risk of womb cancer by more than half (57 per cent), according to a study published today (Wednesday) in the British Journal of Cancer. [More]
Women born preterm have higher risk of preterm delivery, study finds

Women born preterm have higher risk of preterm delivery, study finds

Women who were born preterm have a higher risk of giving birth to preterm children, according to a study, published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology, from researchers of the CHU Sainte-Justine and the University of Montreal. [More]
Research finds link between oestrogen levels and male breast cancer

Research finds link between oestrogen levels and male breast cancer

Men with naturally high levels of the female hormone oestrogen may have a greater risk of developing breast cancer, according to research by an international collaboration including Cancer Research UK published today in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. [More]
Scientists reveal mechanism by which embryos receive nutrition in early stages of pregnancy

Scientists reveal mechanism by which embryos receive nutrition in early stages of pregnancy

The mechanism by which embryos receive nutrition during the first 11 weeks of pregnancy has been revealed by University of Manchester scientists. [More]
Research findings may help identify genes that trigger BWS in humans

Research findings may help identify genes that trigger BWS in humans

Humans and cattle share a similar epigenetic fetal overgrowth disorder that occurs more commonly following assisted reproduction procedures. In humans, this disorder is called Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), and in cattle it is called large offspring syndrome (LOS) and can result in the overgrowth of fetuses and enlarged babies. [More]
Study: BPA exposure during pregnancy affects fertility, reproductive function

Study: BPA exposure during pregnancy affects fertility, reproductive function

When scientists exposed pregnant mice to levels of bisphenol A equivalent to those considered safe in humans, three generations of female mouse offspring experienced significant reproductive problems, including declines in fertility, sexual maturity and pregnancy success, the scientists report in the journal Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology. [More]
Vanderbilt researcher awarded $950,000 grant to explore inheritable bacterial infections

Vanderbilt researcher awarded $950,000 grant to explore inheritable bacterial infections

Seth Bordenstein, associate professor of biological sciences and pathology, microbiology and immunology, has been awarded a $950,000 grant from the National Science Foundation for research into the regulation of bacterial infections that are passed from mother to offspring. [More]
Study pinpoints how body clock genes could lead to recurrent miscarriages

Study pinpoints how body clock genes could lead to recurrent miscarriages

Researchers at the University of Warwick and UHCW have discovered how body clock genes could affect women's ability to have children. [More]
Non-invasive autopsy service nominated for national award

Non-invasive autopsy service nominated for national award

Sheffield’s radiology team are in the running for a top national medical award after establishing the world’s first minimally invasive autopsy service for babies and children who tragically die in the womb or 28 days after birth. [More]
Researchers and medical bodies explore ways to secure funds for womb cancer research

Researchers and medical bodies explore ways to secure funds for womb cancer research

A national group of researchers, medical bodies and charities, led by The University of Manchester is looking for help in setting the top priorities for fighting womb cancer, with a survey launched today (23 March 2015). [More]
Harmful effects of smoking may be reflected in the facial movements of unborn babies

Harmful effects of smoking may be reflected in the facial movements of unborn babies

The harmful effects of smoking during pregnancy may be reflected in the facial movements of mothers' unborn babies, new research has suggested. [More]
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