Womb News and Research RSS Feed - Womb News and Research

The womb is the small, hollow, pear-shaped organ in a woman's pelvis. This is the organ in which a baby grows. Also called uterus.
New research discovers how opposite-sex hormonal therapy influences the brain

New research discovers how opposite-sex hormonal therapy influences the brain

Women and men often show marked differences as regards mental illnesses. In order to learn more about this phenomenon, a project supported by the Austrian Science Fund FWF explored how opposite-sex hormonal therapy applied to transgender individuals influences the brain. [More]
Maternal language influences first cry of newborn babies

Maternal language influences first cry of newborn babies

The very first cry of neonates is marked by their maternal language. This seems to be especially apparent in tonal languages, where pitch and pitch fluctuation determine the meaning of words. [More]
Molecular alarm clock awakens ovules from resting period

Molecular alarm clock awakens ovules from resting period

At the start of reproductive life an ovary contains, on average, several thousands of immature ovules in a resting state that can last for several decades. [More]
Maternal GDM linked to increased risk of childhood obesity among children aged 9-11 years

Maternal GDM linked to increased risk of childhood obesity among children aged 9-11 years

New research published in Diabetologia shows an increased risk of childhood obesity at age 9-11 years when the mother has had gestational diabetes during pregnancy. [More]
Experts propose new clinical guidelines for diagnosing FASD

Experts propose new clinical guidelines for diagnosing FASD

A group of experts on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, organized by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, has produced proposed clinical guidelines for diagnosing FASD, which can result when a mother drinks during pregnancy. [More]
NYU Lutheran offers comprehensive cardiac care for unborn babies

NYU Lutheran offers comprehensive cardiac care for unborn babies

Caring for an infant begins long before birth. Expectant moms are advised to avoid smoking and drinking, watch what they eat, and follow a host of other recommendations that are in the best interest of themselves and their little one on the way. [More]
Lancaster researchers develop new blood-testing technology to improve healthcare treatments

Lancaster researchers develop new blood-testing technology to improve healthcare treatments

New blood-testing technology that promises to improve healthcare treatments for cancer patients, post-operative care and monitor the health of babies in the womb is being developed by Lancaster academics. [More]
People diagnosed with bowel cancer under 50 not tested for Lynch syndrome, research finds

People diagnosed with bowel cancer under 50 not tested for Lynch syndrome, research finds

The UK’s leading bowel cancer research charity, Bowel Cancer UK, and the Royal College of Pathologists have today published findings which show that people under 50 diagnosed with bowel cancer are not being tested for Lynch syndrome – a genetic condition that increases the risk of bowel cancer by 80 per cent. [More]
Clinics with comprehensive care for premature infants alleviate concerns for parents

Clinics with comprehensive care for premature infants alleviate concerns for parents

On January 24, 2013, Iris Vega-Figueroa's life changed completely. That's the day she gave birth to her twin girls, Iris and Geraldine. The twins were monoamniotic-monochorionic, meaning they shared one amniotic sack and one placenta in the womb. These rare pregnancies are considered high risk because of the uneven blood flow that occurs between the infants through the placenta. [More]
New findings on microcephaly may offer clues to explore how Zika virus disrupts brain development

New findings on microcephaly may offer clues to explore how Zika virus disrupts brain development

Long before Zika virus made it a household word, the birth defect called microcephaly puzzled scientists and doctors -- even as it changed the lives of the babies born with it during the pre-Zika era. [More]
Review provides new insights into diagnosis, treatment for PCOS

Review provides new insights into diagnosis, treatment for PCOS

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) afflicts over 14 million women in the United States. The disorder increases the risk of endometrial cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, asthma, obesity, depression and anxiety, as well as infertility and a variety of reproductive disorders. [More]
Scientists test endometrial scratching technique in first-time IVF attempters

Scientists test endometrial scratching technique in first-time IVF attempters

A NEW simple procedure which involves gently scratching the lining of the womb in the month before IVF treatment, potentially improving treatment success, is being tested on first-time IVF attempters in a groundbreaking study. [More]
Key gene controls ability of adult stem cells to regenerate muscle after injury, study finds

Key gene controls ability of adult stem cells to regenerate muscle after injury, study finds

A key gene enables the repair of injured muscle throughout life. This is the finding of a study in mice led by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and the University of Colorado at Boulder, and published online July 21 in Cell Reports. [More]
Researchers shed light on involvement of immune system in schizophrenia

Researchers shed light on involvement of immune system in schizophrenia

Using data from the largest ever genetic study of schizophrenia, researchers have shed light on the role of the immune system. [More]
Scientists identify timing of major metabolic shift in developing neurons

Scientists identify timing of major metabolic shift in developing neurons

Our brains can survive only for a few minutes without oxygen. Salk Institute researchers have now identified the timing of a dramatic metabolic shift in developing neurons, which makes them become dependent on oxygen as a source of energy. [More]
Immobilisation after intrauterine insemination has no beneficial effect on pregnancy rates in women

Immobilisation after intrauterine insemination has no beneficial effect on pregnancy rates in women

Despite the positive results of small studies and a widely held belief in its benefit, the practice of keeping female patients immobilised after intrauterine insemination has no beneficial effect on pregnancy rates, according to results of a large randomised study presented here at the Annual Meeting of ESHRE in Helsinki. [More]
Endometrial scratching in women appears to increase chance of clinical pregnancy, live birth

Endometrial scratching in women appears to increase chance of clinical pregnancy, live birth

There is a much disputed claim that "injury" to the lining of the uterus - whether inadvertent or deliberate - increases the chance of embryo implantation and thus the chance of pregnancy in certain groups of women having IVF. [More]
Omega-3 rich diet during pregnancy has no effect on weight of babies

Omega-3 rich diet during pregnancy has no effect on weight of babies

In Europe, almost one in three schoolchildren under the age of ten is overweight, if not obese. In the search for the cause of this phenomenon, fetal programming inside a mother's womb was put under scrutiny as a potential culprit for this "heavy issue". [More]
Major review highlights lack of genetic understanding of Zika virus

Major review highlights lack of genetic understanding of Zika virus

A major review of the Zika virus has concluded that further research to understand the nature of the virus is critical to developing antiviral treatments and vaccines.The paper, published in the journal Veterinary Quarterly, considers the breadth of current research and highlights a lack of understanding of the nature of the virus. [More]
Scientists aim to explore how gestational diabetes can put babies at lifelong risk for cardiovascular disease

Scientists aim to explore how gestational diabetes can put babies at lifelong risk for cardiovascular disease

Gestational diabetes can put babies at a lifelong risk for cardiovascular disease, and scientists want to better understand how. [More]
Advertisement