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The womb is the small, hollow, pear-shaped organ in a woman's pelvis. This is the organ in which a baby grows. Also called uterus.
Queen's University expert to lead new €4m initiative for assessing impact of chemicals on health

Queen's University expert to lead new €4m initiative for assessing impact of chemicals on health

A Queen's University Belfast expert is leading a €4m international initiative to investigate whether natural toxins and manmade chemicals are creating potentially dangerous mixtures that affect our natural hormones and cause major illnesses such as cancer, obesity, diabetes or infertility. [More]
Brains of people with autism share similar pattern of abnormal gene activity, UCLA study shows

Brains of people with autism share similar pattern of abnormal gene activity, UCLA study shows

Autism spectrum disorder is caused by a variety of factors, both genetic and environmental. [More]
Study finds link between birth defects and antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy

Study finds link between birth defects and antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy

A joint study conducted by researchers from the universities of Liverpool and Manchester has found a link between birth defects and certain types of epilepsy medication. [More]
Editing preferences of enzymes may play role in infertility and cancer

Editing preferences of enzymes may play role in infertility and cancer

To "turn off" particular regions of genes or protect them from damage, DNA strands can wrap around small proteins, called histones, keeping out all but the most specialized molecular machinery. [More]
Testing for Lynch syndrome: an interview with Kevin Monahan

Testing for Lynch syndrome: an interview with Kevin Monahan

Lynch syndrome is an inherited condition which causes about 1,100 cases of bowel cancer and 1,000 other cancers annually in the UK. It is caused by a fault in the mismatch repair gene (MMR) which usually works to prevent cancer. [More]
Scientists create 3-D virtual reality models that may help better visualize unborn babies

Scientists create 3-D virtual reality models that may help better visualize unborn babies

Parents may soon be able to watch their unborn babies grow in realistic 3-D immersive visualizations, thanks to new technology that transforms MRI and ultrasound data into a 3-D virtual reality model of a fetus, according to research being presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. [More]
Researchers create temporal and spatial atlas that plots development of mouse heart

Researchers create temporal and spatial atlas that plots development of mouse heart

It's not simple, making a heart. In the womb, the organ begins as a tube, sprouts bead-like lumps, folds in on itself and eventually morphs into the more familiar-looking four-chambered structure. [More]
Prenatal cigarette smoke exposure and high temperatures linked to increased SIDS risk

Prenatal cigarette smoke exposure and high temperatures linked to increased SIDS risk

Researchers are a step closer to understanding why cigarette smoke exposure during pregnancy may increase the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). [More]
Researchers to explore how in-womb exposure to environmental chemicals may affect childhood obesity

Researchers to explore how in-womb exposure to environmental chemicals may affect childhood obesity

Kaiser Permanente researchers have received a major new grant from the National Institutes of Health to study how exposures to environmental chemicals during pregnancy may influence the risk of obesity and neurodevelopmental disorders in children. [More]
Long-term weight gain may increase risk of obesity-related cancers

Long-term weight gain may increase risk of obesity-related cancers

Substantial weight gain over many years increases the risk of obesity-related cancers in men by 50 per cent and in women by almost 20 per cent, according to new research presented at the National Cancer Research Institute's Cancer Conference in Liverpool, today (Monday). [More]
Study shows promise for successful ovarian transplantation in future

Study shows promise for successful ovarian transplantation in future

Approximately 11% of women worldwide suffer from premature ovarian failure. This can have many different causes: chemotherapy administered for a malignant disease might irreversibly damage the ovaries and, because of the advances in modern cancer therapy, the number of young women surviving cancer is on the increase. [More]
Research highlights need to improve post mortem techniques to better detect cause of stillbirth

Research highlights need to improve post mortem techniques to better detect cause of stillbirth

Analysis by a Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) led team looking at the effectiveness of different elements of the post mortem process shows that, despite full standard investigation, in the majority of cases of stillbirth the cause remains unknown. The papers highlight the need for further research to improve post mortem techniques to better detect a cause of death. [More]
Breastfed infants born to obese women gain less weight than babies fed with formula milk

Breastfed infants born to obese women gain less weight than babies fed with formula milk

An international study coordinated by professor Cristina Campoy from the department of Paediatrics at the University of Granada has showed that breastfed infants born to obese women keep a lower weight over the first 6 months of life in comparison with those who weren't fed with breast milk. [More]
Iron fortification can reduce blood lead levels, study shows

Iron fortification can reduce blood lead levels, study shows

Lead is a toxic heavy metal that was added to petrol for use in cars until as recently as 25 years ago. It is particularly harmful to the developing brains of infants, children and teenagers, and the damage it does is irreversible. [More]
Does music improve child brain development?

Does music improve child brain development?

We are a research group at the Brain and Creativity Institute at University of Southern California. In 2012, we began a five-year longitudinal study in collaboration with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and their Youth Orchestra program at the Heart of Los Angeles (YOLA at HOLA). [More]
Study identifies mechanistic link between maternal obesity and childhood hypertension

Study identifies mechanistic link between maternal obesity and childhood hypertension

Exposure of babies to high levels of the 'fullness' hormone, leptin, in the womb irreversibly activates receptors in the brain that regulate blood pressure, according to a new study by researchers from King's College London, part-funded by the British Heart Foundation. [More]
Maternal serum levels of nicotinamide linked to child’s risk of atopic eczema

Maternal serum levels of nicotinamide linked to child’s risk of atopic eczema

Infants whose mothers had a higher level of a particular type of vitamin B during pregnancy have a lower risk of eczema at age 12 months, new Southampton research has shown. [More]
Second-generation survivors whose parents were babies during Holocaust at high risk of severe schizophrenia

Second-generation survivors whose parents were babies during Holocaust at high risk of severe schizophrenia

Results of a new study at the University of Haifa have found that no difference in the risk of developing schizophrenia between second-generations Holocaust survivors and those whose parents were not exposed to the Holocaust. [More]
Extreme preemies more likey to develop abnormal blood glucose and high body fat in adulthood

Extreme preemies more likey to develop abnormal blood glucose and high body fat in adulthood

By the time they are in their early 30s, extremely low birth weight (ELBW) babies are four times more likely to develop dysglycemia, or abnormal blood glucose, than their normal birth weight (NBW) peers. [More]
New research discovers how opposite-sex hormonal therapy influences the brain

New research discovers how opposite-sex hormonal therapy influences the brain

Women and men often show marked differences as regards mental illnesses. In order to learn more about this phenomenon, a project supported by the Austrian Science Fund FWF explored how opposite-sex hormonal therapy applied to transgender individuals influences the brain. [More]
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