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The womb is the small, hollow, pear-shaped organ in a woman's pelvis. This is the organ in which a baby grows. Also called uterus.
Surprising suggestion for why divorce is more common among families with girls

Surprising suggestion for why divorce is more common among families with girls

In the U.S., couples with daughters are somewhat more likely to divorce than couples with sons. Many scholars have read those numbers as evidence that daughters cause divorce. [More]
Poor nutrition, health cause disparities in fetal growth and newborn size worldwide

Poor nutrition, health cause disparities in fetal growth and newborn size worldwide

Babies' growth in the womb and their size at birth, especially their length, are strikingly similar the world over - when babies are born to healthy, well-educated and well-nourished mothers. [More]
Viewpoints: Expanding Hobby Lobby decision; the faux war on women; dispute over pelvic exams

Viewpoints: Expanding Hobby Lobby decision; the faux war on women; dispute over pelvic exams

The Supreme Court wasted no time in delivering a message to anyone who thought its Hobby Lobby ruling was limited to religious objections to coverage of purported abortion methods: You're wrong. [More]
Research findings provide promising news for couples considering in-vitro fertilization

Research findings provide promising news for couples considering in-vitro fertilization

Using computer-automated, timeā€lapse photography of embryos in the laboratory during in-vitro fertilization may improve embryo selection, potentially increasing the chances of pregnancy among women undergoing the procedure, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and five other fertility centers. [More]
Computer analysis of family photos could help diagnose rare genetic disorders

Computer analysis of family photos could help diagnose rare genetic disorders

Computer analysis of photographs could help doctors diagnose which condition a child with a rare genetic disorder has, say Oxford University researchers. [More]
State highlights: Ohio managed care plans launch; Bluecross Blueshield plan faces Ore. lawsuit; N.Y. policy on unvaccinated children upheld

State highlights: Ohio managed care plans launch; Bluecross Blueshield plan faces Ore. lawsuit; N.Y. policy on unvaccinated children upheld

A selection of health policy stories from Ohio, Oregon, New York, Colorado, Iowa, New Jersey, North Carolina, Georgia, California and Minnesota. [More]
Viewpoints: Concerns about ACOs; problems in Va. gov.'s strategy; Medicaid 'black hole'

Viewpoints: Concerns about ACOs; problems in Va. gov.'s strategy; Medicaid 'black hole'

Although Obamacare's health insurance expansion has directly provided coverage to only about 4 percent of Americans, changes embedded in the Affordable Care Act could affect many more people, and not always in good ways. [More]
Parents opt for emergency room visits to help children attend child care

Parents opt for emergency room visits to help children attend child care

Substantial proportions of parents chose urgent care or emergency department visits when their sick children were excluded from attending child care, according to a new study by University of Michigan researchers. [More]
First Edition: June 23, 2014

First Edition: June 23, 2014

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations, including news stories about healthcare.gov management changes. [More]
State highlights: New Fla. abortion restrictions; docs move to affluent areas; farmworkers' mental health in Calif.

State highlights: New Fla. abortion restrictions; docs move to affluent areas; farmworkers' mental health in Calif.

A selection of health policy stories from Florida, Wisconsin, California, Michigan, Georgia, North Carolina and Maryland. [More]
Researchers create three-dimensional complement of human retinal tissue in a dish

Researchers create three-dimensional complement of human retinal tissue in a dish

Using a type of human stem cell, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have created a three-dimensional complement of human retinal tissue in the laboratory, which notably includes functioning photoreceptor cells capable of responding to light, the first step in the process of converting it into visual images. [More]
Exposure to elevated levels of steroid hormones in the womb linked to later development of autism

Exposure to elevated levels of steroid hormones in the womb linked to later development of autism

Scientists from the University of Cambridge and the Statens Serum Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark have discovered that children who later develop autism are exposed to elevated levels of steroid hormones (for example testosterone, progesterone and cortisol) in the womb. The finding may help explain why autism is more common in males than females, but should not be used to screen for the condition. [More]
Marmoset monkey may offer clues to reducing stillbirths in human mothers

Marmoset monkey may offer clues to reducing stillbirths in human mothers

The marmoset monkey may offer clues to reducing stillbirths in human mothers, according to new research at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing. [More]

Researchers study why male babies generally have worse outcomes than females

Sexual inequality between boys and girls starts as early as in the mother's womb - but how and why this occurs could be a key to preventing higher rates of preterm birth, stillbirth and neonatal death among boys. [More]
Despite worsening economic conditions, infant health improves among poor Americans

Despite worsening economic conditions, infant health improves among poor Americans

Despite worsening economic conditions for those at the bottom, infant health has steadily improved among the most disadvantaged Americans, according to a review published in Science by Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs [More]
Salk scientists explore earliest detectable changes in the brain that lead to schizophrenia

Salk scientists explore earliest detectable changes in the brain that lead to schizophrenia

Using new stem cell technology, scientists at the Salk Institute have shown that neurons generated from the skin cells of people with schizophrenia behave strangely in early developmental stages, providing a hint as to ways to detect and potentially treat the disease early. [More]
Study: Genetics as well as environment in womb play important roles in development of baby

Study: Genetics as well as environment in womb play important roles in development of baby

A recent study led by A*STAR's Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (SICS) found that genetics as well as the environment in the womb play important roles in the development of the baby. [More]
Scientists use analysis of epigenetic marks on DNA to measure baby's development in womb

Scientists use analysis of epigenetic marks on DNA to measure baby's development in womb

An international study, involving scientists at the University of Southampton, has used an analysis of epigenetic marks on DNA to measure how much a baby's development in the womb is determined by the genes inherited from the parents, as compared with the mother's nutrition, mental health and lifestyle. [More]
Researchers use RNA sequencing to look at early- and late-stage development of the heart

Researchers use RNA sequencing to look at early- and late-stage development of the heart

Most people think the development of the heart only happens in the womb, however the days and weeks following birth are full of cellular changes that play a role in the structure and function of the heart. Using mouse models, researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have now been able to categorize the alternative splicing (the process in which genes code proteins, determining their role) that takes place during these changes and what mechanisms they affect. [More]
Men's health conditions may be influenced by exposure to testosterone in womb, says study

Men's health conditions may be influenced by exposure to testosterone in womb, says study

Men's susceptibility to serious health conditions may be influenced by low exposure to testosterone in the womb, new research suggests. [More]