Womb News and Research RSS Feed - Womb News and Research

The womb is the small, hollow, pear-shaped organ in a woman's pelvis. This is the organ in which a baby grows. Also called uterus.
Inadequate weight gain during pregnancy puts male fetuses at risk

Inadequate weight gain during pregnancy puts male fetuses at risk

The amount of weight a woman gains during pregnancy can be vitally important--especially if she's carrying a boy--according to a study by researchers at the University of Georgia released today in PLOS ONE, an open access peer-reviewed journal published by the Public Library of Science. [More]
Growth genes seem different in Hunger Winter children

Growth genes seem different in Hunger Winter children

Individuals conceived in the severe Dutch Famine, also called the Hunger Winter, may have adjusted to this horrendous period of World War II by making adaptations to how active their DNA is. Genes involved in growth and development were differentially regulated, according to researchers at the Leiden University Medical Center, Harvard University, and Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
Study: Heavier newborns do better in school

Study: Heavier newborns do better in school

Birth weight makes a difference to a child's future academic performance, according to new Northwestern University research that found heavier newborns do better in elementary and middle school than infants with lower birth weights. [More]
Quarter of all obesity-related cancers in 2012 attributed to increasing BMI, say researchers

Quarter of all obesity-related cancers in 2012 attributed to increasing BMI, say researchers

Based on the results, the researchers led by Dr Melina Arnold from the International Agency for Research on Cancer, estimate that a quarter of all obesity-related cancers in 2012 (118 000 cases) were attributable to the rising average body mass index (BMI) in the population since 1982, and were therefore "realistically avoidable". [More]
New hope for premature babies with breathing troubles

New hope for premature babies with breathing troubles

Babies start breathing in the womb, inhaling and exhaling irregularly at first, and then gradually more and more, until the day when they're born and have to do it all the time. But premature babies sometimes have trouble. They stop breathing periodically, sometimes for 20 or 30 seconds at a time. [More]
Snus consumption in Norway is highest among young people

Snus consumption in Norway is highest among young people

The increase in Scandinavian snus consumption in Norway is highest among young people, according to a new report from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. [More]

New portable device detects electrical activity emitted by mother and unborn baby’s heart

The new portable device is able to detect both the electrical activity emitted by the heart of the mom as from the unborn baby's. [More]
UTHealth professor wins 2014 APGAR Award for contributions to perinatal medicine and education

UTHealth professor wins 2014 APGAR Award for contributions to perinatal medicine and education

Jon Tyson, M.D., M.P.H., the Michelle Bain Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Public Health at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School, has won the 2014 APGAR Award for his lifelong contributions to perinatal medicine and education. [More]
New handheld probe can produce detailed images of blood vessels, other internal body parts

New handheld probe can produce detailed images of blood vessels, other internal body parts

A new handheld probe developed by a team of university and industry researchers in the Netherlands and France could give doctors powerful new imaging capabilities right in the palms of their hands. The imaging system, which is described in a paper published in The Optical Society's open-access journal Optics Express, shrinks a technology that once filled a whole lab bench down to a computer screen and a small probe about the size of a stapler. [More]
LA BioMed to receive Phase II funding through Grand Challenges Explorations

LA BioMed to receive Phase II funding through Grand Challenges Explorations

Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute announced today that it will receive Phase II funding through Grand Challenges Explorations, an initiative created by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation that enables individuals worldwide to test bold ideas to address persistent health and development challenges. [More]
Epileptic mothers in the dark about pregnancy risk?

Epileptic mothers in the dark about pregnancy risk?

A new study has highlighted the need for more research into the safety of using anti-epileptic drugs during pregnancy. [More]
Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon explains how scoliosis affects Baby Boomers

Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon explains how scoliosis affects Baby Boomers

For many adults, the word scoliosis conjures up childhood memories of lining up in gym class for an examination by the school nurse. But scoliosis isn't just a pediatric condition. Curvature of the spine can develop in adults too, and the osteoporosis that can accompany menopause is a risk factor. [More]
Researchers discover new kind of stem cell that may hold clues to origins of liver cancer

Researchers discover new kind of stem cell that may hold clues to origins of liver cancer

A Mount Sinai-led research team has discovered a new kind of stem cell that can become either a liver cell or a cell that lines liver blood vessels, according to a study published today in the journal Stem Cell Reports. The existence of such a cell type contradicts current theory on how organs arise from cell layers in the embryo, and may hold clues to origins of, and future treatment for, liver cancer. [More]
Researchers identify potential cause of PPROM that accounts for 40% of pre-term births

Researchers identify potential cause of PPROM that accounts for 40% of pre-term births

Scientists from Queen Mary University of London and UCL (University College London) have identified what they believe could be a cause of pre-term premature rupture of the fetal membrane (PPROM), which accounts for 40 per cent of pre-term births, and is the main reason for infant death world-wide. [More]
Web-based system could help improve detection of disease outbreaks, say researchers

Web-based system could help improve detection of disease outbreaks, say researchers

A web-based system that allows preschools and child care centers to report illnesses to local public health departments could improve the detection of disease outbreaks and allow resources to be mobilized more quickly, according to University of Michigan research to be presented Saturday, Oct. 11 at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference & Exhibition in San Diego. [More]
Researchers identify potential cause of PPROM which accounts for 40% of pre-term births

Researchers identify potential cause of PPROM which accounts for 40% of pre-term births

Scientists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and UCL (University College London) have identified what they believe could be a cause of pre-term premature rupture of the fetal membrane (PPROM), which accounts for 40 per cent of pre-term births, and is the main reason for infant death world-wide. [More]
Cancer Network presents exclusive coverage of ESMO 2014 Congress

Cancer Network presents exclusive coverage of ESMO 2014 Congress

UBM Medica US announces that Cancer Network, a leading online community for oncologists and others who treat cancer and the online home of the journal ONCOLOGY, presents exclusive coverage of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2014 Congress, held September 26–30 in Madrid, Spain. [More]
Swedish woman gives birth to world's first womb-transplant baby

Swedish woman gives birth to world's first womb-transplant baby

In a ground-breaking research project at the University of Gothenburg, seven Swedish women have had embryos reintroduced after receiving wombs from living donors. Now the first transplanted woman has delivered a baby – a healthy and normally developed boy. The world-unique birth was acknowledged in The Lancet on 5 October. [More]
Survey: Many U.S. adults support equal healthcare coverage for undocumented immigrant children

Survey: Many U.S. adults support equal healthcare coverage for undocumented immigrant children

Access to health insurance is very limited for immigrants living in the U.S. - both undocumented immigrants and permanent residents. But a new survey has found that many U.S. adults who work on behalf of children think undocumented immigrant children should have access to healthcare equal to that of U.S.-born children. [More]
Study assesses effectiveness of UK-wide screening programme for Lynch Syndrome

Study assesses effectiveness of UK-wide screening programme for Lynch Syndrome

Screening families of patients with bowel cancer for a genetic condition would cut their risk of developing bowel, womb, and ovarian cancers, new research has found. [More]