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The womb is the small, hollow, pear-shaped organ in a woman's pelvis. This is the organ in which a baby grows. Also called uterus.
Environmental conditions play significant role in determining growth, height

Environmental conditions play significant role in determining growth, height

If you've ever wondered why you aren't a little taller, it turns out it's not all about genetics. In findings published in the Journal of Pediatrics (January 2015), an Israeli research team shows that the environment in which one lives from the womb to about age one largely determines an adult's height. [More]
Majority of women support idea of more frequent breast screening for individuals at higher risk of cancer

Majority of women support idea of more frequent breast screening for individuals at higher risk of cancer

Most women (85 per cent) would back the idea of more frequent breast screening if they are at higher genetic risk of developing breast cancer, according to research published today by The Breast. [More]
Neuroscientist to discuss teenage brain development at AAAS meeting in California

Neuroscientist to discuss teenage brain development at AAAS meeting in California

Teenage exploration and risk taking could be explained by dramatic changes in the brain that allow elaborate planning and are driven by the need for immediate reward, according to a University of Pittsburgh neuroscientist who will be talking about her research in a panel discussion and press briefing at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting, Feb. 13 to 16, in San Jose, Calif. [More]
Bayer materials withstand demanding conditions and meet requirements for innovative medical devices MD&M West

Bayer materials withstand demanding conditions and meet requirements for innovative medical devices MD&M West

Increasingly, innovative medical applications place further importance on the success of the materials they use. When patients’ health, mobility and comfort are involved, reliability and durability are crucial. Bayer MaterialScience LLC steps up to the challenge offering original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) a wide range of material solutions for their medical application needs. [More]
Bayer offers wide range of material solutions for OEMs' medical application needs

Bayer offers wide range of material solutions for OEMs' medical application needs

Increasingly, innovative medical applications place further importance on the success of the materials they use. When patients' health, mobility and comfort are involved, reliability and durability are crucial. Bayer MaterialScience LLC steps up to the challenge offering original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) a wide range of material solutions for their medical application needs. [More]
Study recommends normalizing blood pressure in pregnant women

Study recommends normalizing blood pressure in pregnant women

Throughout her career in Canada and the UK, Dr. Laura Magee has taken a restrained approach to use of blood pressure-lowering medication in her pregnant patients, fearing that lowering pressure could reduce the flow of blood and vital nutrients to their babies. [More]
Penn scientists explore potential therapeutic target for cerebral cavernous malformations

Penn scientists explore potential therapeutic target for cerebral cavernous malformations

Tens of millions of people around the world have abnormal, leak-prone sproutings of blood vessels in the brain called cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormal growths can lead to seizures, strokes, hemorrhages, and other serious conditions, yet their precise molecular cause has never been determined. [More]
Researchers identify promising new target for developing better therapies for neuroblastoma kids

Researchers identify promising new target for developing better therapies for neuroblastoma kids

Researchers at the University of Michigan's C.S. Mott Children's Hospital have identified a promising new target for developing new therapies for kids with high-risk neuroblastoma, according to a new study published in Molecular Cancer Research. [More]
EMA recommends orphan designation to Magnus Growth's novel therapy for placental insufficiency

EMA recommends orphan designation to Magnus Growth's novel therapy for placental insufficiency

Magnus Life Science today announces that the European Medicines Agency's Committee for Orphan Medicinal Products has reached a positive decision on recommending orphan designation to Magnus Growth's novel therapy to treat placental insufficiency. [More]
Nearly one-quarter of parents report making change from rear-facing to forward-facing car seats

Nearly one-quarter of parents report making change from rear-facing to forward-facing car seats

Using a rear-facing car seat until a child is age two reduces risk of serious injury, but close to one-quarter of parents report they turned the seat around before their child was even one year old, according to a new University of Michigan study. [More]
Multiple micronutrient supplement during pregnancy reduces pre-term births, increases infant birth weight

Multiple micronutrient supplement during pregnancy reduces pre-term births, increases infant birth weight

A multivitamin given daily to pregnant women in rural Bangladesh reduced pre-term births, increased infant birth weight and resulted in healthier babies overall, according to the large randomized trial conducted by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers. [More]
Inadequate weight gain during pregnancy puts male fetuses at risk

Inadequate weight gain during pregnancy puts male fetuses at risk

The amount of weight a woman gains during pregnancy can be vitally important--especially if she's carrying a boy--according to a study by researchers at the University of Georgia released today in PLOS ONE, an open access peer-reviewed journal published by the Public Library of Science. [More]
Growth genes seem different in Hunger Winter children

Growth genes seem different in Hunger Winter children

Individuals conceived in the severe Dutch Famine, also called the Hunger Winter, may have adjusted to this horrendous period of World War II by making adaptations to how active their DNA is. Genes involved in growth and development were differentially regulated, according to researchers at the Leiden University Medical Center, Harvard University, and Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
Study: Heavier newborns do better in school

Study: Heavier newborns do better in school

Birth weight makes a difference to a child's future academic performance, according to new Northwestern University research that found heavier newborns do better in elementary and middle school than infants with lower birth weights. [More]
Quarter of all obesity-related cancers in 2012 attributed to increasing BMI, say researchers

Quarter of all obesity-related cancers in 2012 attributed to increasing BMI, say researchers

Based on the results, the researchers led by Dr Melina Arnold from the International Agency for Research on Cancer, estimate that a quarter of all obesity-related cancers in 2012 (118 000 cases) were attributable to the rising average body mass index (BMI) in the population since 1982, and were therefore "realistically avoidable". [More]
New hope for premature babies with breathing troubles

New hope for premature babies with breathing troubles

Babies start breathing in the womb, inhaling and exhaling irregularly at first, and then gradually more and more, until the day when they're born and have to do it all the time. But premature babies sometimes have trouble. They stop breathing periodically, sometimes for 20 or 30 seconds at a time. [More]
Snus consumption in Norway is highest among young people

Snus consumption in Norway is highest among young people

The increase in Scandinavian snus consumption in Norway is highest among young people, according to a new report from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. [More]

New portable device detects electrical activity emitted by mother and unborn baby’s heart

The new portable device is able to detect both the electrical activity emitted by the heart of the mom as from the unborn baby's. [More]
UTHealth professor wins 2014 APGAR Award for contributions to perinatal medicine and education

UTHealth professor wins 2014 APGAR Award for contributions to perinatal medicine and education

Jon Tyson, M.D., M.P.H., the Michelle Bain Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Public Health at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School, has won the 2014 APGAR Award for his lifelong contributions to perinatal medicine and education. [More]
New handheld probe can produce detailed images of blood vessels, other internal body parts

New handheld probe can produce detailed images of blood vessels, other internal body parts

A new handheld probe developed by a team of university and industry researchers in the Netherlands and France could give doctors powerful new imaging capabilities right in the palms of their hands. The imaging system, which is described in a paper published in The Optical Society's open-access journal Optics Express, shrinks a technology that once filled a whole lab bench down to a computer screen and a small probe about the size of a stapler. [More]